Court of Appeal: Television

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many minutes in total of Court of Appeal hearings have been televised since cameras were first allowed in court; [204267]

(2) how many Court of Appeal hearings have been televised since cameras were first allowed in court. [204262]

Mr Vara: As of 8 July 2014, the relevant media organisations inform us that 117 hearings have been recorded since legislation was passed on the 31 October 2013 to enable live television broadcasting from the Court of Appeal.

The BBC, ITN, Sky and the Press Association determine which cases should be filmed and it is for those individual media organisations to decide what should be broadcast, and when. No information about how many cases are broadcast, or how many minutes of coverage, is held by the Ministry of Justice.

Court broadcasting gives the public the opportunity to see and hear the decisions of judges in their own words and is a step towards achieving our aim of having an open and transparent justice system.

Courts: Children

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will introduce mandatory training for lawyers dealing with children. [204364]

Mr Vara: The legal profession is independent of Government. The Legal Services Board and approved regulators are responsible for determining the qualification requirements, ongoing training, quality assurance and other regulatory requirements for legal services providers, such as solicitors, barristers and legal executives.

In criminal cases, there is a range of training and materials available to all advocates in relation to cases involving vulnerable witnesses, including children, much of it available through the Advocate's Gateway. The Bar Council and Law Society have announced a new initiative to train defence lawyers on cases involving vulnerable witnesses, which I welcome.

Criminal Injuries Compensation

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many applications for compensation were rejected by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority in (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013 and (e) 2014 to date; and if he will list in each case the injuries sustained by the applicant and the reason for the application being refused. [204261]

10 July 2014 : Column 378W

Damian Green: The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) publishes data about the reasons applications are ineligible in its annual reports at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications? departments%5B%5D=criminal-injuries-compensation-authority&publication_type=corporate-reports

The published figures show the number of times each refusal reason was used. That does not reflect an accurate total of ineligible cases because some cases are ineligible for multiple reasons. The accurate total of ineligible cases for the calendar years specified is as follows:

YearIneligible cases

2010

27,302

2011

23,316

2012

25,385

2013

23,783

2014 (up to 8 July)

11,309

I have placed records showing why each of these cases was ineligible in the House of Commons Library. CICA uses injuries as the basis for a payment so very few ineligible cases have injuries recorded for them. Where an injury has been assessed and entered on the case file, it is included in the records provided.

Drugs: Nottinghamshire

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people in (a) Ashfield constituency and (b) Nottinghamshire have been arrested for possession of (i) Class A drugs, (ii) Class B drugs and (iii) Class C drugs in the last year; and what steps his Department is taking to rehabilitate people convicted of drug-related crimes. [203962]

Jeremy Wright: The information requested on arrests is not available centrally. Data held by the Home Office on arrests for drug offences cannot be broken down to identify the drug class type.

Offenders are able to access the same help for substance misuse problems as those in the wider community. Prison, probation and youth justice staff work closely with health commissioners and providers to support offenders to access these services. Where appropriate, for those sentenced to a community sentence, the court can impose, as part of that sentence, a Drug Rehabilitation Requirement.

Under Transforming Rehabilitation, community rehabilitation companies will begin to work with offenders while still in custody, enabling them to provide “through the gate” support before managing them in the community. This will support greater continuity of drug treatment, and new processes are being developed and tested in nine resettlement prisons in conjunction with health partners. In addition, the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 will bring new powers to require offenders on licence, where appropriate, to attend drug appointments, as well as expanding powers for testing for Class A and Class B drugs.

Fixed Penalties

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what statistics his Department holds on the use of fixed penalty notices in each local authority area and in each category. [203997]

10 July 2014 : Column 379W

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database holds information on penalty notices for disorder which are a form of fixed penalty notice and are available by police force area only at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/282985/2-out-of-court-disposals-tables.xls

Legal Profession: Regulation

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will review existing trade descriptions legislation and its effect on regulating companies that describe themselves or hold themselves to be acting as legal firms. [204154]

Mr Vara: Most of the trade descriptions legislation has been replaced by the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008. These regulations prohibit traders from engaging in unfair commercial practices against consumers. The regulations apply across all business sectors and set out a framework for how businesses must deal with consumers.

It is also an offence under section 21 of the Solicitors Act 1974 for an unqualified person wilfully to pretend to be a solicitor and section 24 of that Act makes equivalent provision in relation to a body corporate. Section 17 of the Legal Services Act 2007 makes it an offence wilfully to pretend to be entitled to carry on a reserved legal activity. The reserved legal activities are: (a) the exercise of a right of audience, (b) the conduct of litigation, (c) reserved instrument activities, (d) probate activities, (e) notarial activities and (f) the administration of oaths.

Prisoners: Repatriation

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign nationals of each nationality were deported from jails in London to complete their sentences in their home countries in (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012, (d) 2013 and (e) 2014 to date. [204039]

Jeremy Wright: All prisoners who are transferred to a prison in their country in order to serve their remaining sentence leave from Wandsworth Prison (in London) if they are male and Holloway Prison (in London) if they are female. They may, however, only be transferred there shortly before transfer.

The numbers of transfers are provided in the following table.

 Number of prisoner transfers (out of England and Wales)

2010

47

2011

43

2012

41

2013

43

2014 (to date)

116

1 Total at 3 July 2014.

The Prisoner Transfer process is just one mechanism for removing Foreign National Offenders. The number of FNOs deported under the Early Removal Scheme (ERS) has increased under this Government. In 2013, we removed nearly 2,000 FNOs under ERS and under

10 July 2014 : Column 380W

the Tariff Expired Removal Scheme (TERS), which we introduced in May 2012, we have removed over 240 FNOs to date.

Whereas this Government have begun to reduce the foreign national population in prison since 2010, between 1997 and 2010 the number of foreign nationals in our prisons more than doubled.

Prisoners: Suicide

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners committed suicide in each of the last 10 years. [204365]

Jeremy Wright: The number of self-inflicted deaths in prison custody for the last 10 years is published in the Safety in Custody statistical bulletin which is available at:

http://www.gov.uk/government/collections/safety-in-custody-statistics

We are working hard to manage the levels of self-harm in prison and are carefully investigating the rise in self-inflicted deaths.

We are applying strenuous efforts to learn from each one and providing further resources and support to prisons to help support their safer custody work.

Probation: Ashfield

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people in Ashfield constituency have been on probation in each of the last five years. [203963]

Jeremy Wright: Since 2010, crime has continued to fall and fewer individuals are entering the criminal justice system for the first time. The Government are committed to transforming the way that offenders are dealt with in the community. Transforming Rehabilitation is a reform programme that is changing the way offenders are managed in the community to bring down reoffending rates while continuing to protect the public.

Information available centrally on offenders on probation does not allow a breakdown of cases by parliamentary constituency.

Sentencing

Graham Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people who (a) were given a non-custodial sentence and (b) were given their first custodial sentence in each year from 2004 had previously had (i) no criminal convictions, (ii) one criminal conviction, (iii) two criminal convictions, (iv) three criminal convictions, (v) four criminal convictions, (vi) five to 10 criminal convictions, (vii) 11 to 20 criminal convictions, (viii) 21 to 30 criminal convictions, (ix) 31 to 40 criminal convictions, (x) 41 to 50 criminal convictions, (xi) 51 to 75, (xii) 76 to 100 criminal convictions and (xiii) more than 100 criminal convictions. [199092]

Jeremy Wright: Since 2010, crime has continued to fall and fewer individuals are entering the criminal justice system for the first time, but we have a persistent hardcore of offenders being recycled round and round the criminal justice system, as these figures bear out.

10 July 2014 : Column 381W

This Government are committed to tackling reoffending rates. We have reformed sentences so that they combine both punishment and requirements that are effective at preventing further offending. We have legislated so that all community orders must now have a punitive element and that, from 2015, every offender leaving prison spends at least 12 months under supervision, whereas currently around 50,000 are released each year with no statutory support. We are transforming rehabilitation by bringing together the best of the public, private and voluntary sectors, and rewarding them only when they actually reduce reoffending.

Sentencing in individual cases is a matter for our independent judiciary, taking account of the circumstances of the case and the maximum penalty for the offence. A court may only impose a community order or a custodial sentence where the offence is imprisonable. The overwhelming majority of repeat offenders have previously received a number of custodial sentences, but the large majority of previous convictions identified in the following table resulted in a fine as they were for summary non-motoring offences.

The number of offenders who were given a non-custodial sentence in each year since 2004, broken down by their number of previous convictions, is given in Table 1. It is important to note that these figures are based only on those offences recorded on the Police National Computer (PNC) by an English or Welsh police force, including

10 July 2014 : Column 382W

the British Transport Police, and include a number of offences for which the maximum sentence available to the court is a fine. It should also be noted that these figures are based on counting the number of separate occasions on which offenders were sentenced in each year and some offenders will therefore be represented several times in the figures.

Table 2 provides a similar breakdown for those offenders who received their first custodial sentence in each year. Again, the figures are drawn from the PNC and will include a number of offences for which the maximum sentence available to the court is a fine. A large proportion of each offender’s criminal history is therefore likely to include some offences for which it is not possible to receive a custodial sentence. Of those offenders who had between 76 and 100 previous convictions between the 12 months ending September 2004 and the 12 months ending September 2013, 84% of the disposals for their previous convictions were fines. This increases to 96% for offenders who had over 100 previous convictions. It should also be noted that these figures are based on counting the number of separate occasions on which offenders were sentenced in each year and some offenders could therefore be represented several times in the figures.

The number of offenders who have received at least one previous conviction, or indeed multiple previous convictions, before receiving their first custodial sentence has decreased under this Government.

Table 1: Number of offenders1 given a non-custodial sentence for an offence in England and Wales, in each year since 2004 for the 12 months ending September, by number of previous2 convictions
12-month period to the end of September
Number of previous convictions22004200520062007200820092010201120122013

No previous convictions

146,093

144,729

146,786

148,920

143,898

137,457

132,475

125,065

112,687

102,415

1 previous conviction

67,494

63,872

65,466

67,382

66,167

63,938

62,224

57,593

51,264

46,165

2 previous convictions

44,410

41,227

41,983

42,959

42,155

41,081

40,091

37,597

33,700

30,853

3 previous convictions

33,263

30,884

30,978

31,620

31,241

29,902

29,565

28,155

25,414

23,527

4 previous convictions

26,138

24,027

24,188

25,180

24,575

23,734

23,509

22,237

20,411

18,882

5 - 10 previous convictions

91,792

83,783

83,800

85,008

87,250

85,341

83,522

81,150

74,429

69,401

11 - 20 previous convictions

62,601

57,736

57,139

58,189

61,352

62,285

61,922

62,216

58,187

55,533

21 - 30 previous convictions

22,518

22,074

22,674

23,460

26,020

27,135

27,156

28,367

28,023

27,633

31 - 40 previous convictions

7,383

7,761

8,291

9,114

10,793

11,857

12,182

13,187

13,436

13,992

41 - 50 previous convictions

2,648

2,665

3,037

3,493

4,487

4,941

5,551

6,243

6,382

7,033

51 - 75 previous convictions

1,853

1,941

1,980

2,308

2,960

3,637

4,068

4,776

5,328

5,918

76 - 100 previous convictions

603

462

486

640

793

849

957

1,023

1,279

1,513

Over 100 previous convictions

654

680

628

621

817

828

831

987

960

1,079

All offenders

507,450

481,841

487,436

498,894

502,508

492,985

484,053

468,596

431,500

403,944

1 Figures are based on counting the number of non-custodial sentencing occasions for offences committed by offenders which were prosecuted by police forces in England and Wales, including the British Transport Police. Offenders may appear more than once in the year, where they have been sentenced on multiple occasions within the year. 2 Figures are based on counting the number of occasions on which offenders have previously received a conviction for any offence recorded on the Police National Computer, including some offences committed outside of England and Wales. Where there were multiple offences on the same occasion, only the primary offence as recorded on the Police National Computer would be counted. Note: All data have been taken from the MOJ extract of the Police National Computer. This includes details of all convictions, cautions, reprimands or warnings given for recordable offences (see www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/1139/schedule/made for definition). It is therefore possible that some offenders presented in the table above have previously also received convictions for offences not recorded on the PNC. Some less serious offences that do not attract a custodial sentence are also included on the PNC, usually when accompanied by a recordable offence in the same case. Source: Ministry of Justice, Police National Computer (PNC).

10 July 2014 : Column 383W

10 July 2014 : Column 384W

Table 2: Number of offenders1 given their first custodial sentence for an offence in England and Wales, in each year since 2004 for the 12 months ending September, by number of previous2 convictions
12-month period to the end of September
Number of previous convictions22004200520062007200820092010201120122013

No previous convictions

11,408

11,588

11,883

12,039

13,573

13,014

12,713

11,869

11,579

10,117

1 previous conviction

4,865

4,855

4,665

4,660

4,934

5,114

5,017

4,852

4,903

4,037

2 previous convictions

3,851

3,757

3,664

3,607

3,619

3,700

3,566

3,590

3,350

2,651

3 previous convictions

3,156

3,072

2,985

2,790

2,975

2,954

2,769

2,653

2,560

2,071

4 previous convictions

2,589

2,444

2,315

2,290

2,376

2,284

2,200

2,185

2,078

1,649

5 - 10 previous convictions

7,216

6,861

6,559

6,695

7,088

6,811

6,555

6,508

6,144

4,777

11 - 20 previous convictions

1,524

1,440

1,491

1,552

1,717

1,770

1,837

1,926

1,834

1,527

21 - 30 previous convictions

51

91

84

84

83

125

125

171

183

147

31 - 40 previous convictions

11

10

7

5

8

12

9

12

21

22

41 - 50 previous convictions

6

4

5

4

1

1

1

1

2

3

51 - 75 previous convictions

4

4

4

1

1

3

0

5

3

0

76 - 100 previous convictions

0

0

1

2

0

1

1

1

0

0

Over 100 previous convictions

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

All offenders

34,681

34,126

33,663

33,730

36,376

35,789

34,793

33,773

32,658

27,001

1 Figures are based on counting the first sentencing occasion, in each year, an offender was sentenced to immediate custody for offence(s) which were prosecuted by police forces in England and Wales, including the British Transport Police. 2 Figures are based on counting the number of occasions on which offenders have previously received a conviction for any offence recorded on the Police National Computer, including some offences committed outside of England and Wales. Where there were multiple offences on the same occasion, only the primary offence as recorded on the Police National Computer would be counted Note: All data have been taken from the MOJ extract of the Police National Computer. This includes details of all convictions, cautions, reprimands or warnings given for recordable offences (see www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/1139/schedule/made for definition). It is therefore possible that some offenders presented in the table above have previously also received convictions for offences not recorded on the PNC. Some less serious offences that do not attract a custodial sentence are also included on the PNC, usually when accompanied by a recordable offence in the same case. Source: Ministry of Justice, Police National Computer (PNC).

Sexual Offences

Mrs Lewell-Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent discussions he has had with the Bar Standards Board on requiring advocates who handle sexual abuse cases to undertake appropriate specialist training. [203978]

Mr Vara: We have begun discussions with the Bar Council, and officials have met with the Bar Standards Board, on the recommendations in the Jeffrey Review of criminal defence advocacy, which include consideration by the profession of a ticketing system for defence advocates who appear in rape and sexual abuse cases to ensure they have undergone relevant training.

Young Offenders

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders aged 18 to 21 years were held in each prison establishment in England and Wales on the latest date for which data are available. [204105]

Jeremy Wright: There has been a fall in the numbers of young adult offenders over the last five years and it is believed this is explained by a general fall in the numbers of young people being sentenced, in particular of those being sentenced to immediate custody. We will always have enough prison capacity for those committed by the courts.

The following table presents the number of young adults aged between 18 and 21 (inclusive) held in each custodial establishment in England and Wales on 31 March 2014. It includes:

young offenders who have turned 18 in custody and are in the youth secure estate;

those aged 18 to 20 who are sentenced to detention in a young offender institution (DYOI) or custody for life who are generally held in a (18-20) YOI;

21-year-olds who are sentenced to imprisonment and are held in adult prisons;

18 to 21-year-olds who are remanded in custody and may be held in (18-20) YOIs or prisons;

18 to 21-year-olds who are held under immigration powers and may be in (18-20) YOIs, prisons or immigration removal centres.

Number of individuals in custody aged 18 to 21 by establishment, at 31 March 2014, England and Wales
EstablishmentNumber

Altcourse

223

Ashfield

1

Askham Grange

1

Aylesbury

380

Bedford

36

Belmarsh

87

Birmingham

49

Brinsford

531

Bristol

57

Brixton

8

Bronzefield

45

Buckley Hall

13

Bullingdon

78

Bure

1

Cardiff

80

Channings Wood

13

Chelmsford

67

Coldingley

11

Cookham Wood

20

Dartmoor

8

Deerbolt

495

Doncaster

242

Dovegate

23

Drake Hall

22

10 July 2014 : Column 385W

Durham

98

East Sutton Park

1

Eastwood Park

30

Elmley (Sheppey cluster)

128

Erlestoke

1

Exeter

61

Featherstone

20

Feltham

418

Ford

10

Forest Bank

164

Foston Hall

19

Frankland

1

Full Sutton

1

Garth

12

Gartree

5

Glen Parva

650

Grendon/Spring Hill

7

Guys Marsh

8

Haverigg

22

Hewell

32

High Down

126

Highpoint (North and South)

32

Hindley

129

Hollesley Bay

18

Holloway

33

Holme House

79

Hull

84

Humber

28

Huntercombe

1

Isis

312

Isle of Wight

1

Kennet

1

Kirkham

1

Lancaster Farms

405

Leeds

27

Leicester

15

Lewes

65

Lincoln

35

Lindholme

37

Littlehey

399

Liverpool

49

Long Lartin

8

Low Newton

19

Lowdham Grange

16

Maidstone

15

Manchester

35

Moorland / Hatfield

139

Mount

13

New Hall

31

North Sea Camp

1

Northumberland

28

Norwich

96

Nottingham

94

Oakwood

25

Onley

19

Parc

188

Pentonville

152

Peterborough

70

Portland

223

Preston

76

Ranby

38

Risley

29

Rochester

121

Rye Hill

11

10 July 2014 : Column 386W

Send

1

Stafford

15

Standford Hill (Sheppey cluster)

1

Stocken

22

Stoke Heath

32

Styal

36

Sudbury

8

Swaleside (Sheppey cluster)

14

Swansea

50

Swinfen Hall

348

Thameside

114

Thorn Cross

34

Usk / Prescoed

10

Verne

1

Wakefield

1

Wandsworth

106

Wayland

29

Wealstun

34

Werrington

13

Wetherby

27

Whatton

5

Whitemoor

1

Winchester

72

Woodhill

80

Wormwood Scrubs

114

Wymott

22

Dover Immigration Removal Centre

44

Haslar Immigration Removal Centre

10

Morton Hall Immigration Removal Centre

38

All

8,812

1 Establishments with less than five individuals. Data sources and quality: These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Air Travel

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on what occasions each Minister within his Department has taken domestic flights on official business since May 2010. [204294]

Dan Rogerson: This information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Details of all ministerial overseas travel are published on a quarterly basis.

Fixed Penalties

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what statistics his Department holds on the use of fixed penalty notices in each local authority area. [203998]

Dan Rogerson: DEFRA has not collected statistics on the use of fixed penalties by local authorities since 2008-09. Data from previous years can be viewed at:

www.data.gov.uk

10 July 2014 : Column 387W

Since 2009, the Environment Agency has issued 71 fixed penalty notices for offences under the waste duty of care and the hazardous waste regulations.

Nature Conservation

Sir Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will introduce legislative proposals to enshrine the concept of a listed landscape. [204222]

George Eustice: National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty are well-established national landscape designations that define areas with particular landscape qualities that merit protection. They are the jewels in the crown of our country’s landscape and are given the strongest protection from damaging development.

While DEFRA has no plans to introduce legislation to identify listed landscapes, English Heritage maintains a ‘Register of Historic Parks and Gardens’ which identifies over 1,600 sites assessed to be of national importance.

Shipping: Exhaust Emissions

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with his French counterpart on the effects of the EU Sulphur Directive on (a) the shipping industry, (b) jobs and (c) the environment; and what the outcomes of those discussions were. [203938]

Dan Rogerson: There have not been any discussions with our French counterparts on these matters. The shipping aspects of the EU Sulphur Directive do not fall within DEFRA’s area of responsibility.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Under-Secretary of State for Transport, my hon. Friend the Member for Wimbledon (Stephen Hammond), on 9 July 2014, Official Report, column 334W.

Treasury

Civil Servants: Codes of Practice

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many (a) internal and (b) external complaints have been received by his Department about alleged breaches of the Civil Service Code of Conduct since 2010; and what actions his Department has taken in response to each such complaint. [203958]

Mr Gauke: The Civil Service Code sets out the clear procedure that civil servants should follow if they believe they are being required to act in a way which conflicts with the code, or they become aware of action by others which they believe conflicts with the code. Complaints are normally dealt with by the line management chain in the first instance, with the most serious cases escalated to senior managers, HR or the Permanent Secretary. Because most issues are dealt with locally or within the line management chain, there is no formal or systematic register of all complaints within the Department.

Where a civil servant is not satisfied with how the matter has been handled by a Department, he or she can raise the matter with the Civil Service Commission. The Commission publishes details of the number of complaints received annually.

10 July 2014 : Column 388W

Corporation Tax: Dover

Charlie Elphicke: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much was paid in corporation tax by businesses registered in Dover and Deal in each of the last five years; and what proportion of such taxation was paid by small and medium-sized enterprises. [203948]

Mr Gauke: Since 2010, the Government have cut the main rate of corporation tax from 28% to 21%. It will fall further to 20% in April 2015. The small profits rate was cut to 20% in April 2011. These corporation tax cuts will be worth around £9.5 billion per year to businesses by 2016-17.

The table sets out the amount of corporation tax liable for payment by businesses with a registered address in the Dover parliamentary constituency for accounting periods ending in the past five years. The latest year for which figures are available is 2011-12.

 2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

Corporation tax liability (£ million)

14

14

12

13

16

Figures on the amount of tax paid, broken down by company size, are not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Credit: Interest Rates

David T. C. Davies: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what discussions he has had with banks about the consequences for a mortgage application of taking out a payday loan. [204209]

Mr Gauke: Treasury Ministers and officials meet a range of stakeholders to discuss relevant policy issues.

In making mortgage lending decisions, lenders must follow the appropriate regulatory and legislative requirements. Beyond this, decisions about who they lend to and on what terms are a commercial matter, including how they use information about existing or previous credit commitments.

Credit risk models and approaches vary between lenders, so while a history of payday loans may prevent a borrower from taking out a loan with one lender, others may take a different approach.

Derelict Land: Taxation

Sir Nicholas Soames: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make it his policy to introduce a derelict land tax. [204221]

Mr Gauke: The Government have no intention of introducing a tax on derelict land. The Government do not believe that increasing the cost of holding derelict land would be an effective way to incentivise development. The Government are instead focusing on other more effective measures to address stalled sites such as introducing a right of appeal against economically unviable affordable housing (section 106) obligations, and incentivising the development of derelict land through Land Remediation Relief.

10 July 2014 : Column 389W

Mapeley

Charlie Elphicke: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what assessment he has made of the (a) compliance and (b) performance of Mapeley STEPS Contractor Limited following HM Revenue and Custom's last audit of such compliance and performance of Mapeley STEPS Contractor Limited in respect of the Annual PM Schedule under 17.1(a) of the Private Finance Initiative contract between HM Revenue and Customs and Mapeley STEPS Contractor Limited; [204244]

(2) when HM Revenue and Customs last audited the (a) compliance and (b) performance of Mapeley STEPS Contractor Limited in respect of the Annual PM Schedule, under 17.1(a) of the Private Finance Initiative contract between HM Revenue and Customs and Mapeley STEPS Contractor Limited. [204245]

Mr Gauke: HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) monitors the performance of its contractor regularly under a range of provisions. Commercial discussions between HMRC and its suppliers are confidential.

Minimum Wage: Scotland

Pamela Nash: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to the answer of 10 April 2013, Official Report, column 1177W, on minimum wage: Scotland, how many staff were in the national minimum wage team monitoring Scotland at the most recent date in 2014 for which records are available. [203022]

Mr Gauke: The Government take the enforcement of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) very seriously. HMRC reviews every complaint that is referred to it by the Pay and Work Rights Helpline. In addition, by collating and analysing data received from various sources, HMRC ensures targeted enforcement through robust risk assessment processes to identify employers across the United Kingdom who are more likely to be not paying NMW.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 6 May 2014, Official Report, column 111W, that HMRC deploys resources to risk, so work relating to a specific geographical area is not always undertaken by the NMW team based in that area.

Revenue and Customs

John Healey: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he is taking to ensure that the sharing of customer information collected by HM Revenue and Customs is subject to appropriate safeguards. [203961]

Mr Gauke: HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is bound by a strict duty of confidentiality with respect to all the information it holds in connection with its functions. This is underpinned by a criminal sanction to protect against the unlawful disclosure of information that identifies a person or through which their identity can be deduced. HMRC officials may share information only in the limited circumstances set out in legislation, which include disclosures for the purposes of HMRC’s functions, through specific legislative gateways or with the consent of the subject of the information.

10 July 2014 : Column 390W

After establishing that there is a valid legal basis to disclose, any disclosures must also be compliant with the Data Protection Act 1998 and the Human Rights Act 1998. HMRC also operates rigorous and robust security processes and safeguards which are in line with industry best practice. Legislative gateways include restrictions and safeguards to control how information may be used.

Home Department

ICT

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many mobile telephones, BlackBerrys and laptops were lost by her Department in (a) 2013 and (b) 2014 to date. [204474]

Karen Bradley: The Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), can confirm that the information relating to lost and stolen mobile phones, BlackBerrys and laptops can be found on the following link to the Home Office webpage on the Gov.UK website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/306918/2013_Annual_ICT_Losses.csv/preview

January to December 2013
Device/IncidentTotal

Lost BlackBerrys/Mobile Phones

62

Stolen BlackBerrys/Mobile Phones

12

Lost Laptops

3

Stolen Laptops

5

Lost Removable Media

1

Stolen Removable Media

0

Recovered BlackBerrys/Mobiles

2

Recovered Laptops

0

Information is recorded and published under calendar year; information on items lost and stolen for 2014 will be published in early 2015.

Terrorism

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps the Government have taken to prevent UK citizens from joining terrorist movements in Egypt and Syria. [202276]

Karen Bradley: The Government take the issues of radicalisation, extremism and the threat posed by UK citizens who join terrorist movements abroad extremely seriously.

We are particularly concerned about those who travel to Syria to fight. Our first priority is to dissuade people from going through public messaging, community events and bespoke interventions. The police and intelligence services are also undertaking a great deal of work to disrupt terrorist activity.

While the main effort is dissuading people from travel, the intelligence agencies and police are working to identify and disrupt potential threats. This includes interviewing individuals at the UK border suspected of being involved in the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism, and cancelling or withdrawing passports of some UK nationals of concern seeking to travel to Syria. People who become involved with fighting

10 July 2014 : Column 391W

in Syria could potentially be prosecuted under UK law on their return. But each case is considered individually. If the police refer a case to the Crown Prosecution Service, they consider whether there is sufficient evidence of any offence, and if so, whether it is in the public interest to prosecute.

Education

Academies

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when the sponsor capacity funds awarded by his Department to the Third Millennium Education Trust were returned to his Department. [203554]

Mr Timpson: The sponsor capacity funds awarded to the Third Millennium Education Trust was returned to the Department for Education on 29 January 2013.

Basic Skills: South East

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of levels of literacy and numeracy in (a) primary school leavers and (b) secondary school leavers in (i) Brighton, Kemptown constituency, (ii) East Sussex and (iii) South East England in each of the last five years. [203872]

10 July 2014 : Column 392W

Mr Laws: Key stage 2 national curriculum assessment statistics are published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-key-stage-2

GCSE attainment statistics are published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-gcses-key-stage-4

Attainment statistics by parliamentary constituency are published online at:

www.education.gov.uk/inyourarea/

Information that is not already in the public domain has been placed in the House Library.

Education: Warrington

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much (a) revenue and (b) capital funding was provided to each pupil in state (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools in Warrington in (A) cash terms and (B) at 2014 prices in each year since 1995-96. [203329]

Mr Laws: As Warrington only became a local authority in 1998 as a result of local government reorganisation, comparable funding data are only available from this date.

Average per pupil revenue funding figures, from the Department to local authorities, for pupils aged 3 to 10 (primary) and 11 to 15 (secondary) for Warrington specifically for years 1997-98 to 2005-06 are as follows. These figures are in cash terms:

Average Per Pupil Revenue Funding (cash)1997-981998-991999-20002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-052005-06

Warrington LA (primary)

1,856

1,973

2,123

2,337

2,540

2,670

2,896

3,046

3,321

Warrington LA (secondary)

2,579

2,711

2,841

3,075

3,287

3,472

3,633

3,886

4,124

These figures are in real terms using June 2014 GDP deflators in 2013-14 prices:

Average Per Pupil Revenue Funding (real)1997-981998-991999-20002000-012001-022002-032003-042004-052005-06

Warrington LA (primary)

2,618

2,730

2,881

3,149

3,333

3,424

3,642

3,728

3,992

Warrington LA (secondary)

3,637

3,752

3,856

4,145

4,313

4,452

4,570

4,757

4,957

Per pupil figures are using standard spending assessment (SSA)/education formula share (EFS) allocations and pupils aged 3 to 15.

With the introduction of the dedicated schools grant (DSG) in 2006-07, the changes to the funding mechanism meant figures were no longer comparable with previous years.

The 1997-98 to 2005-06 figures are based on EFS, which formed the education part of the local government finance settlement, plus various grants. This was an assessment of what local authorities needed to fund education rather than what they spent. The DSG is based largely on an authority’s previous spending. In addition, the DSG has a different coverage to EFS. EFS comprised a schools block and a local education authority (LEA) block (to cover LEA central functions), whereas DSG only covers the EFS school block. LEA block items are still funded through DCLG’s local government finance settlement but education items cannot be separately identified. Consequently, there is a break in the Department’s time series as the two sets of data are not comparable.

To provide a comparison for 2006-07 DSG, the Department has isolated the EFS school block equivalent funding in 2005-06; as described above this does not represent the totality of ‘education’ funding in that year.

Figures for financial years 2005 to 2013 are shown as follows. These are in cash terms:

10 July 2014 : Column 393W

10 July 2014 : Column 394W

Average revenue per pupil funding (cash)2005-06(baseline)2006-072007-082008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Warrington LA

3,630

3,840

4,100

4,300

4,490

4,730

4,670

4,670

These figures are in real terms using June 2014 GDP deflators in 2013-14 prices:

Average revenue per pupil funding (cash)2005-06(baseline)2006-072007-082008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Warrington LA

4,370

4,490

4,670

4,760

4,850

4,970

4,800

4,750

Per pupil figures are using DSG allocations plus other schools related grants, e.g. school standards grant, school standards grant (personalisation), standards fund etc. and pupils aged 3 to 15 rounded to the nearest £10. Most of the additional grants were mainstreamed into DSG in 2011-12.

With the changes to DSG funding in financial year 2013 to 2014, i.e. funding allocated through three blocks, namely schools, early years and high needs, there is no longer a comparable overall figure with previous years. The following table shows the DSG schools block unit funding figures in cash and real terms for Warrington LA.

DSG schools block per pupil funding2013-142014-15

Warrington LA (cash)

4,219

4,219

Warrington LA (real)*

4,219

4,128

* Real terms figures shown in 2013-14 prices using GDP deflators at 27 June 2014.

Since 2011-12 schools have received the pupil premium which targets funding at pupils from the most deprived backgrounds to help them achieve their full potential. In 2011-12, the premium was allocated for each pupil known to be eligible for Free School Meals, looked-after children and children of parents in the armed services. In 2012-13 coverage was expanded to include pupils known to have been eligible for Free School Meals at any point in the last six years. The per pupil amounts for each type of pupil are shown in following table in cash terms:

Pupil Premium per pupil (£)2011-122012-132013-142014-15

Free School Meal Pupil Primary

488

623

953

1,300

Free School Meal Pupil Secondary

488

623

900

935

Service Children

200

250

300

300

Looked-After Children

488

623

900

*1,900

*Also includes children adopted from care.

Total pupil premium allocations for Warrington local authority for each year are shown in the following table in cash terms:

Pupil Premium Allocations (£ million)2011-122012-132013-142014-15

Warrington

1.720

3.389

5.281

6.899

These figures in real terms:

Pupil Premium Allocations (£ million)2011-122012-132013-142014-15

Warrington

1.769

3.447

5.281

6.750

Price Base: Real terms at 2013-14 prices, based on GDP deflators as at 27 June 2014

The following table shows capital funding for the financial years that are available. The data are in cash terms as allocations are phased across more than one year making real terms calculations meaningless. Complete information on the split of capital between phases of education is not held centrally.

WarringtonCapital funding

1998-99

3.70

1999-2000

4.70

2000-01

8.70

2001-02

10.00

2002-03

11.70

2003-04

10.60

2004-05

10.30

2005-06

12.20

2006-07

12.70

2007-08

10.40

2008-09

10.60

2009-10

19.40

2010-11

18.40

2011-12

5.60

2012-13

7.10

2013-14

8.60

Notes:

1. Capital allocations include capital grant and supported borrowing allocations.

2. Figures are rounded to the nearest £100,000.

Sources:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-2014-to-2015

www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2013-to-2014-final-allocation-tables

www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2014-to-2015-illustrative-allocation-tables

webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20131216163513/http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/financialmanagement/schoolsrevenuefunding

Warrington also received £1.3 million in 2007-8, £3.4 million in 2008-9, £18.2 million in 2009-10, and £0.9 million in 2010-11 under the BSF programme.

10 July 2014 : Column 395W

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of secondary school students in Gloucestershire qualify for the pupil premium. [204206]

Mr Laws: Tables detailing the number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in the financial year 2014-15 at school and local authority level are available online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2014-to-2015-illustrative-allocation-tables/

The tables show that 18.2% of secondary school pupils in Gloucestershire are eligible for the deprivation pupil premium in 2014-15.

Schools: Finance

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment the Government have made of the impact on school budgets in 2016-17 of planned changes in pension and national insurance contributions. [203204]

Mr Laws: The Government’s position on the change in employer contribution rate for the Teachers’ Pension Scheme was published in the Teachers’ Pension Scheme Valuation Report (Actuarial Valuation as at 31 March 2012), which is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/324305/TPS_2012_valuation_report_FINAL_9_June_2014.pdf

The position for non-teaching staff is less clear-cut as they are covered by the Local Government Pension Scheme, which consists of around 90 different funds, and thus the change in employer costs as a result of recent reforms will vary from fund to fund.

The expected changes in national insurance for employers as a result of moves to a single tier state pension were set out in the impact assessments for the Pensions Act 2014, which are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/311316/pensions-act-ia-annex-a-single-tier-state-pension.pdf

Schools: Uniforms

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education under what circumstances schools are permitted to require religious headcoverings or other religious items as part of compulsory uniform; and if he will issue revised guidance on this matter to Ofsted. [202910]

Mr Laws: Our guidance to schools on school uniform is clear that schools must have full regard to their obligations under equalities law, and act reasonably, fairly and flexibly in the interests of all their students.

A school that required compulsory religious items as part of its policy may be at risk of breaching the Equality Act 2010; we would expect all schools to act flexibly in response to reasonable requests to vary their uniform policy.

The Department’s guidance on school uniform is available online:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-uniform

10 July 2014 : Column 396W

Sixth-Form Education

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate his Department has made of the level of funding for each pupil aged 16 to 18-years- old in each academic year until 2020. [204202]

Mr Laws: We confirm final funding rates for 16 to 19-year-olds in the spring before the start of each academic year. We confirmed rates for academic year 2014/15 in March 2014. We will confirm rates for 2015/16 in March 2015. Budgets beyond 2015/16 will not be agreed until after the Government’s next spending review.

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of the effect of an increase in the numbers of young people at school age on funding for provision for 16 to 18-year-olds in each year of the next Parliament. [204208]

Matthew Hancock: Funding for provision for 16 to 19-year-olds in the next Parliament will be subject to the next spending round.

Deputy Prime Minister

Local Enterprise Partnerships

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what guidance the Minister of State for Cities and Constitution has given to local enterprise partnerships on informing (a) district councils and (b) hon. Members about Growth Deal schemes before briefing the media; and if he will make a statement. [204251]

Greg Clark: Growth Deals are negotiated between the Government and local enterprise partnerships. It was for every local enterprise partnership to determine who to contact in advance of the announcement of their deal.

I wrote to all hon. Members with constituencies in England on the morning of 7 July, the day of the Growth Deals announcement, setting out full details of the Growth Deal in their area.

Scotland

Civil Servants: Codes of Practice

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many (a) internal and (b) external complaints have been received by his Department about alleged breaches of the Civil Service Code of Conduct since 2010; and what actions his Department has taken in response to each such complaint. [203957]

David Mundell: The Office has not received any (a) internal and (b) external complaints about alleged breaches of the Civil Service Code of Conduct by individual officials since 2010.

10 July 2014 : Column 397W

Commonwealth Games 2014

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what contribution his Department is making to the preparations for the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. [203915]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office is committed to the success of the Commonwealth Games and has played a co-ordinating role in UK Government Departments’ vital work on the preparations for the Games in a wide range of areas. Scotland Office Ministers and officials have been in extensive, regular and proactive contact with ministerial colleagues and officials in other UK Government Departments, with Shona Robison MSP (Scottish Government Cabinet Secretary for the Commonwealth Games) and her officials, with Councillor Gordon Matheson and others in Glasgow City Council, with the Glasgow 2014 Organising Committee, and with Police Scotland, and other stakeholders, to ensure that UK Government Departments, fulfilling their reserved responsibilities, work as closely as possible with the devolved Administration and the Organising Committee.

Domestic Visits

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland which official welfare-related engagements in Scotland (a) he and (b) other Ministers in his Department have attended together with Ministers in the Department for Work and Pensions since May 2010. [202814]

David Mundell: The Secretary of State for Scotland, the right hon. Member for Orkney and Shetland (Mr Carmichael) and I have carried out a series of welfare- related visits from which we have fed back to DWP Ministers. DWP have also carried out a series of welfare related meetings. Specific accompanied visits are:

In 2011 the then Secretary of State for Scotland undertook in April a visit to High Riggs Jobcentre Plus with Chris Grayling, and in May attended a youth employment event in Irvine with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, my right hon. Friend the Member for Chingford and Woodford Green (Mr Duncan Smith).

In November 2012, Lord Freud and I undertook a series of welfare-related engagements including meeting the Scottish Federation of Housing Associations, Edinburgh council and Dunedin Canmore Housing Association; discussions with locally elected members from Dumfries and Galloway, West Dunbartonshire and North Lanarkshire; and meeting with the Scottish Parliament Welfare Reform Committee.

In July 2013, Lord Freud and I met both the Scottish Minister for Housing and Welfare, Margaret Burgess MSP and the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA), at Lord Freud’s office in London.

Lord Freud and I also attended the 2013 Annual COSLA Conference where Lord Freud gave a key note speech on welfare reform.

I recently completed a second round of meetings with all 32 local authorities in Scotland to seek their feedback on how the welfare reform changes are working in practice. I was also pleased to give evidence to the Scottish Parliament’s Welfare Reform Committee on the 26 June 2014.

10 July 2014 : Column 398W

Leader of the House

Ministers: Disclosure of Information

Pat Glass: To ask the Leader of the House what recent guidance he has given to his ministerial colleagues on making statements to the House before they are made to the media. [904796]

Mr Lansley: The Ministerial Code is clear: when Parliament is in session the most important announcements of Government policy should be made in the first instance to Parliament.

I regularly remind my colleagues of this.

Private Members' Bills

Mr Bain: To ask the Leader of the House what recent discussions he has had with his ministerial colleagues about Private Members' Bills. [904789]

Mr Lansley: I have regular discussions with ministerial colleagues about legislation before the House, including Private Members' Bills.

Electoral Commission Committee

Elections: Fraud

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, if the Electoral Commission will produce a list of significant cases of electoral fraud resulting in custodial sentences since 1998; and what political party was involved in each case. [203973]

Mr Streeter: The Electoral Commission informs me that the requested data for the period 1998-2012 are contained in Appendix 3 of its evidence and issues paper on electoral fraud published in May 2013. This may be found on the Commission’s website here:

http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/find-information-by-subject/electoral-fraud/electoral-fraud-vulnerabilities-review#

In addition, since the publication of its paper in May 2013 a case of personation, misconduct in public office and intention to pervert the course of justice at the Derby Council elections in 2012 resulted in one defendant being jailed for 14 months and three other defendants each being given suspended jail sentences of eight months. The Commission understands that none of those convicted in this case were shown to be linked to a political party.

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how many successful prosecutions for (a) postal, not proxy, vote fraud and (b) electoral registration fraud there have been in each of the last 15 years. [203974]

Mr Streeter: The Electoral Commission informs me that data for offences under the various Representation of the People Acts which specifically refer to offences relating to electoral registration fraud, or postal vote fraud cannot be separately identified on the Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database as they form part of a miscellaneous group which cannot be separately analysed. However, since 2008, the Electoral Commission

10 July 2014 : Column 399W

has collated and published data reported by UK police forces on cases of alleged electoral fraud annually on its website here:

http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/find-information-by-subject/electoral-fraud/electoral-fraud-responsibilities

Electoral Register

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, how many electors have registered online since the introduction of online registration; and what steps the Electoral Commission is taking to encourage online registration. [203675]

Mr Streeter: The Electoral Commission informs me that the numbers of people who have registered online falls within the remit of the Cabinet Office, which is leading on online registration.

The Electoral Commission is taking a range of steps to encourage online registration, including providing template letters for electoral registration officers (EROs) to send to residents highlighting the fact that people can register online and directing them to the registration site (gov.uk/register-to-vote). The Commission has also made a range of publicity resources available for EROs to use in their local public engagement activity which direct people to the gov.uk site. These will work in conjunction with the Commission’s mass media public awareness campaign to coincide with the ‘write out’ EROs are doing in their areas and which takes place in England and Wales in July/August and in October in Scotland. The Commission is also working with partners and stakeholders, including political parties, businesses, voluntary organisations and the media, to ensure the message about online registration and the gov.uk/register-to-vote address is spread as widely as possible.

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, (1) what assessment the Electoral Commission has made of public awareness of the change from household to individual electoral registration; [203677]

(2) how much the Electoral Commission has spent on public awareness campaigns on the change from household to individual electoral registration; and what assessment the Commission has made of the effectiveness of those campaigns. [203676]

Mr Streeter: The Electoral Commission informs me that the budget for the first phase of its individual electoral registration (IER) public awareness campaign, which is timed to coincide with the 'write out' from electoral registration officers to everyone in their area, is approximately £3 million.

The campaign is running in England and Wales from 3 July to 10 August and a separate campaign will run in Scotland when IER is introduced there in the autumn. The Commission will use a range of measures to assess the effectiveness of the campaigns, including undertaking campaign tracking research studies at the start and conclusion of each campaign.

10 July 2014 : Column 400W

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, for what reason the Electoral Commission first decided to undertake research into the completeness of the electoral register; and why further work on this issue has now been commissioned. [203678]

Mr Streeter: The Commission’s first research on the completeness and accuracy of the registers was published in 2005, using 2001 census data. The research was undertaken to gain estimates of the quality of the electoral registers and to continue a series of published reports following each census, which had previously been funded/overseen by the Office of Public Censuses and Surveys and the Home Office.

The 2005 report and subsequent research have informed the advice, guidance and resources the Commission produces to help get people registered, as well as the public awareness campaigns the Commission runs itself.

All of its current planned research is focused on monitoring the transition to individual electoral registration.

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what assessment the Electoral Commission has made of the effect of the removal of electors who failed to register under individual electoral registration before 1 December 2015 on the next boundary review. [203679]

Mr Streeter: The Electoral Commission will report on the number of individuals on the registers before the next UK parliamentary general election that will be removed if the transition to individual electoral registration will end in December 2015.

As usual, the Commission will ensure the information is publicly available and it will be for the Boundary Commissions and those responsible for boundaries to assess their impact.

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, pursuant to the answer of 1 July 2014, Official Report, column 613W, on electoral register: young people, what the EC's policy is on publishing data which it holds but has not commissioned. [203831]

Mr Streeter: The Commission informs me that it does not have a policy on publishing data which it holds but has not commissioned.

The data referred to in the original question are publicly available on the Office for National Statistics website and can be accessed by every member of the public.

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, pursuant to the answer of 1 July 2014, Official Report, column 613W, on electoral register, what assessment the Electoral Commission has made of the accuracy of two separate pilot schemes which data mined Student Loans Company data. [203837]

10 July 2014 : Column 401W

Mr Streeter: The Commission has published an evaluation report on each of the two data-matching pilots conducted using data from the Student Loans Company.

http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/our-work/our-research/electoral-registration-research

In 2012, the Commission found that there were very few registrations from data matching with the Student Loans Company (SLC) database. This and responses to the follow-up activity support the view expressed by the SLC that the data used for these pilots (at the end of the academic year) were sometimes out of date.

In 2013, the Commission concluded that there were some issues with the addresses on this data being incomplete. Only one pilot area reported usable results for this database and this pilot area reported a low number of new registrations.

Voting Behaviour

Chris Ruane: To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what role the Electoral Commission has in promoting political engagement; and what assessment the Commission has made of the contribution of ward level data or voter turnout at general elections to monitoring political engagement. [203630]

Mr Streeter: Until 2007 the Commission delivered both its own programmes to increase voter turnout and engagement and funded a range of voluntary and other providers to deliver such work, with a particular focus on encouraging under-engaged groups to vote.

Since 2007 the Commission’s work has focused on increasing voter registration, providing information to help people vote and improving the regulation necessary to foster public confidence in political parties and their funding. Partly for this reason, the Commission has not considered the contribution of ward level data to monitoring political engagement at general elections.

The shift in focus in 2007 was in line with the conclusions of the Committee on Standards in Public Life (CSPL) report into the Electoral Commission that year, which said that pursuing the aims of increasing voter turnout and democratic participation was not the most effective use of its limited resources. The Speaker’s Committee supported this change, and both the Government and the Opposition at the time agreed with this shift. The Commission welcomes opportunities, such as those provided by the current review of the Political and Constitutional Reform Committee (PCRC) into voter engagement in the UK, to ensure that it continues to reflect Parliament’s view about its most appropriate role and focus for the future.

Communities and Local Government

Accommodation Agencies

Mr Prisk: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government in which month the redress arrangements concerning letting and managing agents will commence. [R] [204060]

10 July 2014 : Column 402W

Kris Hopkins: The draft Redress Schemes for Lettings Agency Work and Property Management Work (Requirement to Belong to a Scheme etc) (England) Order 2014 was laid in Parliament on 23 June. Subject to approval of that Order by both Houses of Parliament, the requirement for letting agents and property managers in England to belong to an approved redress scheme will come into force on 1 October 2014.