19 Nov 2013 : Column 851W

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 19 November 2013

Health

Clinical Commissioning Groups

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what factors were given a greater weighting than previously when calculating the allocation of funds to commissioning groups; and what factors were given a lesser weighting. [175695]

Dr Poulter: Responsibility for resource allocation is a matter for NHS England as set out in The Mandate. For 2013-14, NHS England opted for a uniform increase

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in funding to all clinical commissioning groups to give these new organisations stability in their first year, and agreed to undertake a fundamental review into its approach to allocations.

The review is progressing, and the aim is for initial conclusions to be ready in time to inform 2014-15 allocations. It is anticipated that NHS England will be in a position to announce these in late December 2013.

Doctors: Hampshire

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital and community health service doctors were employed by the NHS in Hampshire in (a) the latest period for which figures are available and (b) 2010. [175732]

Dr Poulter: The information is not available in the format requested. Information on the number of medical and dental staff in national health service organisations in Hampshire is shown in the following table:

Hospital and community health services: Medical and dental staff in NHS organisations in Hampshire, provisional statistics
Full-time equivalent
 July 2010July 2013

Isle of Wight Clinical Commissioning Groups

*

0

Hampshire Primary Care Trust

58

Isle of Wight NHS Trust

*

237

University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust

995

1,082

Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust

726

779

Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

277

585

Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust

184

228

‘0’ denotes more than zero, less than one. ‘*’denotes not applicable. ‘—’ denotes zero. Notes: 1. As from 21 July 2010 the HSCIC has published experimental, provisional monthly NHS work force data (experimental tag has been removed from 24 April 2012). As expected with provisional data, some figures may be revised from month to month as issues are uncovered and resolved. The monthly work force data is not directly comparable with the annual work force census; it only includes those staff on the Electronic Staff Record (ESR) (i.e. it does not include primary care staff or bank staff). There are also new methods of presenting data (headcount methodology is different and there is now a role count). 2. HSCIC seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality. Where changes impact on figures already published, this is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) Medical and Dental Workforce Census.

Hospital Beds: North East

Mr Alan Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital beds there were in the North East in each of the last three years. [175232]

Jane Ellison: The average daily number of available beds in the former North East Strategic Health Authority area in 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 is shown in the following table:

North East Strategic Health Authority area
 Average daily number of beds open overnightAverage daily number of beds open daytime only

2010-11

9,621

836

2011-12

9,740

796

2012-13

9,579

805

Notes: 1. The NHS England KH03 is a quarterly collection of data from all national health service organisations that operate beds, open overnight or day only, both providers and commissioners. It collects the total number of available bed days and the total number of occupied bed days by consultant main specialty, for general and acute, learning disabilities, maternity and mental illness. The data are published as the average daily number of available and occupied beds which is calculated by dividing the number of bed days in the quarter by the number of days in the quarter. 2. Prior to 2010-11 the KH03 was an annual return collecting beds by ward classification. It also included data on residential care beds. Source: NHS England KH03 return

Hospitals: Waiting Lists

Mr Alan Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many operations were cancelled in the North East in each of the last three years. [175229]

Jane Ellison: The number of last minute cancelled elective operations for non-clinical reasons in the former North East Strategic Health Authority area in 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 is shown in the following table:

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North East Strategic Health Authority area
 Number of last minute elective operations cancelled for non-clinical reasonsNumber of patients not treated within 28 days of last minute elective cancellation

2010-11

2,283

54

2011-12

2,149

38

2012-13

2,268

51

Note: NHS England collects the number of operations cancelled at the ‘last minute’ for non-clinical reasons on a quarterly basis. It does not collect the total number of cancelled operations or a breakdown of the type of operations that have been cancelled. Operations cancelled for clinical reasons are not collected as the patient is not available for the operation. A last minute cancellation is defined as when a patient's operation is cancelled by the hospital on or after the day of admission (including the day of surgery) for non-clinical reasons. Source: NHS England Quarterly Monitoring Cancelled Operations

Learning Disability: Drugs and Alcohol

Mr Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many people had a recorded diagnosis of both a learning disability and drug or alcohol dependency in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13; [175771]

(2) how many people had a recorded diagnosis of a learning disability and were statutorily homeless in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13; [175772]

(3) how many people had a recorded diagnosis of both a mental health condition and a learning disability in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13; [175773]

(4) how many people had a recorded diagnosis of a mental health condition and were statutorily homeless in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13. [175775]

Norman Lamb: Information is not held centrally on the number of people with a recorded diagnosis of both

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a learning disability and drug or alcohol dependency, or for those with a recorded diagnosis of a learning disability and statutorily homeless in 2011-12 and 2012-13.

However, the Health and Social Care Information Centre has information on the number of adult patients, aged 18 or over, on the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) Learning Disabilities register for both years.

Number of adult patients, aged 18 or over, on the QOF Learning Disabilities register in the specified years
 Number

2011-12

198,877

2012-13

206,132

Information for the numbers of people with a recorded diagnosis of both a mental health condition and learning disability is not held centrally. There are, however, plans for the Mental Health Minimum Data Set (MHMDS) to be expanded to include information on learning disabilities.

Information in respect of the numbers of people with a recorded mental health diagnosis and who were statutorily homeless in 2011-12 and 2012-13 is not available in the format requested. However, some information is available from the MHMDS for 2011-12.

The information contained in the following table makes the assumption that every person recorded in the MHMDS is receiving secondary mental health care for a diagnosable mental health condition in order to provide as complete a dataset as possible.

Data for 2012-13 have not yet been published.

People with a recorded diagnosis of a mental health condition and were statutorily homeless.

2011
AccommodationNumber

Total number of adult and older adult mental health care spells

770,3121

With accommodation status recorded

649,420

With accommodation status of homeless recorded

17,118

Of which:

 

Homeless

3,204

Rough sleeper

608

Squatting

123

Night shelter/emergency hostel/direct access hostel (temporary accommodation accepting self referrals, no waiting list and relatively frequent vacancies)

1,413

Sofa surfing (sleeps on a different friend's floor each night)

982

Placed in temporary accommodation by local authority (including homelessness resettlement service) eg bed and breakfast accommodation

1,929

Staying with friends/family as a short-term guest

7,732

Other homeless

1,127

Notes: 1. Please see the Data Quality Measures that accompany each annual release to see which provider's data contributed to these figures. This can lead to changes over time. 2. The number of mental health care spells is not the same as the number of service users, as a service user may have a mental health care spell with more than one provider in the reporting period. Source: Mental Health Minimum Dataset Annual data, 2011-12

Maternity Services: Cumbria

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many unfilled vacancies in maternity units in Cumbria there were by (a) unit and (b) type of vacant post on the most recent date for which figures are available. [175625]

Dr Poulter: This information is not collected centrally.

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many maternity consultants were employed by each NHS trust covering Cumbria in each of the last five years. [175626]

Dr Poulter: The information is not available in the format requested.

Numbers of medical consultants in the obstetrics and gynaecology speciality at University Hospitals of

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Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust and North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust from 2008-12

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by full-time equivalent (FTE) are shown in the following table:

Numbers of obstetrics and gynaecology consultants employed in Cumbria trusts (FTE)
 20082009201020112012

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

10

10

11

11

12

North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust

8

9

9

8

10

Notes: 1. Data are not held on the number of consultants that work solely in maternity services, therefore data are provided for consultants in the obstetrics and gynaecology speciality, 2. The Health and-Social Care Information Centre seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Source: Medical and Dental Workforce Census, the NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many maternity nurses were employed by each NHS trust covering Cumbria in each of the last five years. [175627]

Dr Poulter: Numbers of qualified nursing and midwifery staff employed in maternity services at North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust and University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust from 2008-2012 by full time equivalent (FTE) are shown in the following table:

 Numbers of maternity staff employed in Cumbria trusts (FTE)
 20082009201020112012

North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust:

     

Modern matron

4

4

4

4

3

Children's nurse

6

7

5

11

8

Registered midwife

113

113

113

116

118

Other 1st level

15

17

17

11

13

Other 2nd level

0

0

0

1

1

Total

137

140

139

143

144

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust:

     

Modern matron

5

5

5

4

2

Children's nurse

12

14

13

14

10

Registered midwife

114

117

117

115

121

Other 1st level

3

2

2

2

4

Total

134

138

136

135

137

Notes: 1. The organisations listed in the table are the only ones which employ maternity services staff in the Cumbria area. 2. Full-time equivalent figures are rounded to the nearest whole number. 3. Maternity services figures also include a small number of staff working in neonatal nursing (including special care baby units). 4. The Health and Social Care Information Centre seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Source: Non-Medical Workforce Census, the NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care

Maternity Services: North West

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether any maternity units in Cumbria or Lancashire have been temporarily closed due to staff shortages during the last three years. [175624]

Dr Poulter: These data are not collected centrally.

NHS Walk-in Centres: North East

Mr Alan Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many walk-in-centres there were in the North East in each of the last three years. [175228]

Jane Ellison: The information requested is not held centrally.

NHS England decides what data to collect on national health service walk-in centres.

Clinical commissioning groups are responsible for commissioning walk-in centres, based on an assessment of local need.

There has never been an agreed definition of a ‘walk-in-centre’. This term is sometimes used interchangeably with terms such as ‘minor injuries unit’ and ‘urgent care centre’.

Information on walk-in-centres which are a classified as a type of accident and emergency (A and E) department is already collected as part of the existing A and E returns, although others are commissioned locally and do not currently submit central returns.

Nurses: North East

Mr Alan Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many nurses were employed by the NHS in the North East in May (a) 2010 and (b) 2013. [175230]

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Dr Poulter: The information is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is shown in the following table.

North East strategic health authority (SHA) areaNursing, midwifery, and health visiting staff numbers (full-time equivalent)

May 2010

19,692

May 2013

19,843

Notes: 1. Data shows number of full-time equivalent nursing, midwifery, and health visiting staff as at 31 May each specified year. 2. North East SHA organisations have been mapped as at May 2013 to the old SHA boundary that ceased to exist in April 2013, to ensure a consistent timeseries. 3. Figures are rounded, to the nearest whole number. Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre

Tuberculosis: Drugs

Pauline Latham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department spends on (a) an adult's and (b) a child's dose of (i) Rifater, (ii) Ethambutol, (iii) Rifinah, (iv) Isoniazid, (v) Rifampicin and (vi) Pyrazinamide. [175337]

Norman Lamb: The estimated cost of the listed anti-tuberculosis (TB) medicines, in both primary and secondary care in 2012-13 was £6.7 million. It is not possible to determine usage between adult and child, as this information is not collected.

Cost of anti-TB medicines in primary and secondary care for the period 2012-131
£000
 Primary care 2,3Secondary care 4, 5, 6

Ethambutol hydrochloride

348.1

Isoniazid

430.4

Pyrazinamide

59.5

Rifampicin

543.0

Rifampicin combined preparations

110.2

Total

1,491.2

5,222.4

1 Rifater and Rifinah are brand names of rifampicin combined preparations and so all rifampicin combined preparations have been included,. Medicines have not been separated by brand. 2 The net ingredient cost of prescription items written in the United Kingdom and dispensed in the community in England. 3 Some supplies through homecare providers may not be included. 4 Cost is estimated from on volume used. 5 Cost of medicines at national health service list price and not necessarily the price paid. 6 Only overall figures for the medicines listed are available, due to licensing restrictions. Sources: 1. Prescription Cost Analysis (PCA) system. The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Prescribing and Primary Care Services. 2. IMS data. Copyright IMS HEALTH: Prescribing Audit Index (HPAI).

Home Department

Borders: Personal Records

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the answer of 2 November 2012, Official Report, column 412W, on e-Borders, when a copy of the original business case for the e-Borders programme will be placed in the Library. [159981]

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Mr Harper: I have today placed a copy of the e-Borders Full Business Case, dated 12 November 2007, in the House Library. Please note however that elements of this document are restricted and will therefore be redacted.

Conditions of Employment

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many direct employees and contracted workers of her Department and its arm's lengths bodies are paid less than the rate defined by the Living Wage Foundation as a living wage; and how many direct employees are on zero hours contracts. [174980]

James Brokenshire: The core Home Office has 21 staff paid below the living wage. Following the 2013 pay settlement, no staff will be paid less than the living wage.

None of the Home Office's Executive agencies have staff paid below the living wage.

None of the Home Office's arm’s length bodies have staff paid less than the living wage.

No staff within the Home Office and its arm’s length bodies are employed on zero-hours contracts.

The following table sets out the data in more detail.

The Home Office does not keep information on the level of pay of staff employed by organisations contracted to provide services within the Home Office. The Home Office's facilities management contracts are next due for review in 2014.

This will provide an opportunity to consider the contractors' proposed wage rates and their proposals for service delivery.

Number
OrganisationStaff below the national living wageStaff below the London living wageDirectly employed staff on zero-hours contracts

Core Home Office

19

2

0

HM Passport Office

0

0

0

National Fraud Authority

0

0

0

Disclosure and Barring Service

0

0

0

Independent Police Complaints Commission

0

0

0

Office of the Immigration Service Commissioner

0

0

0

Security Industry Authority

0

0

0

National Crime Agency

0

0

0

College of Policing

0

0

0

    

Total

19

2

0

EU Justice and Home Affairs

Jacob Rees-Mogg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which EU member states the Council has decided, under Article 25(2) of Council Decision 2008/615/JHA, meet the requirements of Chapter 6 of that Decision; and when other EU member states will be the subject of such a decision. [172089]

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James Brokenshire: The following countries meet the requirements of Chapter 6 of Council Decision 2008/615/JHA:

Belgium; Bulgaria; Czech Republic; Estonia; France; Cyprus; Latvia; Lithuania; Hungary; Malta; The Netherlands; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Slovenia; Slovakia; Finland; Sweden.

As stated in Article 25(3) of 2008/615/JHA, paragraph 2 shall not apply to those member states where the supply of personal data as provided for in this Decision has already started pursuant to the treaty of 27 May 2005 between the Kingdom of Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Kingdom of Spain, the French Republic, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Republic of Austria on the stepping up of cross-border cooperation, particularly in “combating terrorism, cross-border crime and illegal migration (Prüm Treaty).

Jacob Rees-Mogg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many joint investigation teams including the UK have been set up in each of the last five years as a result of Article 3 of Council Decision 2005/671/JHA; and what the aims, activities and achievements of each of these teams were; [172098]

(2) what measures the UK has taken to implement Article 4 of Council Decision 2005/61/JHA; how many requests in each of the last five years the UK has (a) received and (b) sent that have been dealt with under this Article; what the decision was on each such request; how much quicker she estimates each such request was dealt with compared to if this Decision had not applied; and what assessment she has made of the effect in these matters if the UK ceases to be bound by this Decision pursuant to Article 10 of the Protocol on Transitional Provisions annexed to the EU treaties; [172099]

(3) how many times information has been provided (a) by and (b) to the UK as a result of Article 2(6) of Council Decision 2005/671/JHA in each of the last five years; and what assessment she has made of how useful this exchange has been to the UK and the other EU member states concerned; [172100]

(4) how many times information has been provided to Europol by UK authorities as a result of Article 2 of Council Decision 2005/671/JHA in each of the last five years; and what use this information has been put to in each case; [172101]

(5) how many times information has been provided to Eurojust by UK authorities as a result of Article 2 of Council Decision 2005/671/JHA in each of the last five years; and what use this information has been put to in each case; [172102]

(6) whether the Government intend to maintain unchanged the co-operation and information exchange with other EU member states established by Council Decision 2005/671/JHA if the UK ceases to be bound by that Decision pursuant to Article 10 of the Protocol on Transitional Provisions annexed to the EU treaties; how any such co-operation and information exchange would be maintained; and what assessment she has made of whether this would be at least as efficacious as UK participation in the Decision; [172103]

(7) what the cost to the public purse has been in each of the last five years of UK participation in Council Decision 2005/671/JHA; [172104]

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(8) what requirements of Council Decision 2005/671/JHA the UK (a) has and (b) has not implemented; [172105]

(9) whether the Government intend to retain unchanged existing provisions of UK law and practice required by Council Decision 2005/671/JHA, if the UK ceases to be bound by that Decision pursuant to Article 10 of the Protocol on Transitional Provisions annexed to the EU treaties; [172106]

(10) in which instances information which is currently exchanged as a result of Council Decision 2005/671/JHA would no longer be exchanged if the UK ceases to be bound by that Decision pursuant to Article 10 of the Protocol on Transitional Provisions annexed to the EU treaties. [172107]

James Brokenshire: The UK has fully implemented this Decision. No legislation was required to do so.

The UK has neither established nor been part of any joint investigation teams established under Article 3 of this Decision. The UK conducts Joint Investigation Teams (JITs) pursuant to Council Framework Decision 2002/465/JHA.

That measure is included in the set of measures that the Government have indicated they will seek to rejoin in the UK's national interest as part of our decision to opt out of pre-Lisbon EU police and criminal justice measures.

Information on the number of requests received and sent in each of the last five years pursuant to Article 4 is not held centrally. Nor is information on the number of times information has been provided by and for the UK as a result of Article 2(6) in each of the last five years.

Information on the number of times information has been provided to Europol by UK authorities as a result of Article 2 in each of the last five years is not available centrally. Nor is information provided to Eurojust by UK authorities as a result of this Article held centrally.

Information on the cost to the public purse for participation in this Council Decision in each of the last five years is not held centrally.

The UK co-operates bilaterally with other member states on counter terrorism and will continue to do so irrespective of participation in this measure. The Government believe that alternatives will be at least as efficacious as participation in this Decision. The Government have assessed that there are no impediments to exchanging information bilaterally, if required.

As the UK has opted out of the all pre-Lisbon police and criminal justice measure and Council Decision 2005/671/JHA is not one of the measures which we will seek to rejoin in the national interest, it is important to note that on 1 December 2014 that the UK will be free to change domestic law and practice if required. In the meantime, the Government will retain unchanged existing UK law and practice.

EU Law

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department to which EU Directives within her Department's areas of responsibility the Government have formally opted into in each financial year since May 2010; on what dates each such directive was signed; and if she will make a statement. [175496]

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James Brokenshire: Details of all EU directives that the UK has opted into pursuant to protocol 21 to the treaties on the functioning of the European Union since May 2010 are listed on the JHA opt-in webpage. The webpage can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/206297/2_JHA_opt-in_webpage_update_-_data_v0_1.pdf

In the written ministerial statement from the Minister for Europe, the right hon. Member for Aylesbury (Mr Lidington) of 20 January 2011, Official Report, columns 51-52WS, the Government committed to a number of measures to strengthen parliamentary scrutiny of JHA measures, in particular to make written statements to Parliament on each opt-in decision and to set aside Government time for debates in both Houses in circumstances where there is particularly strong parliamentary interest in an opt-in decision.

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what EU Directives within her Department's areas of responsibility have come into force without the need for an opt-in decision in each financial year since May 2010; on what dates each such directive came into force; and if she will make a statement. [175517]

James Brokenshire: Details of all EU legislation, including full details of all EU directives that have come into force since May 2010, can be found on the Commission's website:

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/RECH_legislation.do

The Government's position is that the UK's Justice and Home Affairs opt-in applies to all measures adopted pursuant to Title V of part 3 of the treaty on the functioning of the European Union, as set out in protocol 21 to the treaty on the functioning of the European Union. It follows that the opt-in does not apply to measures adopted that are not pursuant to Title V of part 3 of the treaty on the functioning of the European Union.

Police: South West

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the annual budget is of each police constabulary in the South West. [174712]

Damian Green: The Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) receive funding from central Government and locally through the police precept component of council tax. In 2013-14 total central Government funding to the police is £8.8 billion. Total precept funding (including local council tax support) is £3.4 billion.

The aggregate amount of grant funding the Home Office provides to PCCs in England and Wales is published in the Police Grant Report 2013/14. Although the Home Office provides funding to PCCs, it does not hold details of the full budgets for police forces as this includes funding from other sources such as the use of reserves and from charging for additional services. We do not collect or hold this information centrally.

PCCs have the responsibility for allocating the force budget, in consultation with their respective chief constables.

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Secondment

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many private sector employees have been seconded by the private sector to her Department; what the name was of the company from which they were seconded; and whether any of those employees have worked on drafting legislation. [175654]

James Brokenshire: This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Terrorism: Northern Ireland

Mr Dodds: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions she has had with the Scottish Government on tackling terrorism in Northern Ireland. [174616]

James Brokenshire: The Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), had a recent discussion with the Scottish Government in relation to a range of security-related issues, including the threat from Northern Ireland-related terrorism, on 29 October.

Terrorism: Surveillance

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much additional funding her Department has provided to the Metropolitan Police to meet the costs of surveillance arising from terrorism prevention and investigative measures. [175812]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 18 November 2013]: To complement the introduction of terrorism prevention and investigative measures (TPIMs), additional funding of tens of millions of pounds was given to the police and Security Service to enhance their investigative and evidence-gathering capabilities. For operational reasons, we cannot reveal the exact amount.

Northern Ireland

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland with reference to recent meetings between the Northern Ireland Department of the Environment Minister, hon. Members and trades union representatives from Northern Ireland and the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport regarding Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency jobs and services in Northern Ireland, when she expects to hold further discussions to reach a final resolution on this matter. [175685]

Mr Robathan: The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, my right hon. Friend the Member for Chipping Barnet (Mrs Villiers), has discussed this matter with my hon. Friend the Under-Secretary of State for Transport on a number of occasions. She has made clear to him the concerns there are about this matter in Northern Ireland and has emphasised that it is very important to look at the wider economic impacts of any possible decision that would involve removing work from the

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DVA. However, my hon. Friend will also need to consider efficiency issues and the need to deal with the deficit and reduce costs in the Department for Transport. He will also want to consider the best way for drivers in Northern Ireland to access electronic and web-based services to licence vehicles which, unlike their counterparts in the rest of the UK, they are currently unable to do.

EU Law

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland to which EU Directives within her Department's areas of responsibility the Government has formally opted into in each financial year since May 2010; on what dates each such directive was signed; and if she will make a statement. [175499]

Mrs Villiers: Details of all EU directives that the UK has opted into pursuant to protocol 21 to the treaties on the functioning of the European Union since May 2010 are listed on the Government's JHA opt-in web page. The website can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/206297/2_JHA_opt-in webpage_update_-_data_v0_1.pdf

In the written ministerial statement from the Minister for Europe, the right hon. Member for Aylesbury (Mr Lidington) of 20 January 2011, Official Report, columns 51-52WS, the Government committed to a number of measures to strengthen parliamentary scrutiny of JHA measures, in particular to make written statements to Parliament on each opt-in decision and to set aside Government time for debates in both Houses in circumstances where there is particularly strong parliamentary interest in an opt-in decision.

19 Nov 2013 : Column 864W

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what EU directives within her Department's areas of responsibility have come into force without the need for an opt-in decision in each financial year since May 2010; on what dates each such directive came into force; and if she will make a statement. [175520]

Mrs Villiers: Details of all EU legislation, including full details of all EU directives that have come into force since May 2010, can be found on the Commission's website:

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/RECH_legislation.do

The Government's position is that the UK's Justice and Home Affairs opt-in applies to all measures adopted pursuant to title V of part three of the treaty on the functioning of the European Union, as set out in protocol 21 to the treaty on the functioning of the European Union. It follows that the opt-in does not apply to measures adopted that are not pursuant to title V of part three of the treaty on the functioning of the European Union.

Visits Abroad

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many overseas trips, and at what total cost, her Department has made in each year since 2010; and what the costs of (a) flights, (b) internal travel, (c) hotel accommodation and (d) subsistence were of each trip. [175473]

Mr Robathan: The details requested for overseas trips are shown in the following table:

 Number of tripsCost of flights (£)Number of Eurostar tripsCost of Eurostar trips (£)Travel and subsistence costs (including hotels and internal travel expenses) (£)Total costs (£)

2010-11

6

61,909

2

2,853

1,407

66,169

2011-12

6

67,424

3

3,226

2,898

73,548

2012-13

6

42,947

2

3,900

5,667

52,514

Further detail could be provided only at disproportionate cost due to the way that these records are stored in the Department's financial systems.

I should add that since May 2010 the Northern Ireland Office has discontinued the practice of the previous Administration of using private jets for routine travel to and from Northern Ireland by the Secretary of State. This has resulted in considerable savings for the taxpayer and is part of this Government's efforts to control the spiralling costs of government we inherited from Labour.

Transport

High Speed 2

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the total cost to HS2 Ltd of running all phase one community forum meetings and all phase one bilateral meetings has been; and how much of this cost is (a) staff time, (b) travel expenses, (c) materials, (d) administration and (e) preparation time. [175139]

Mr Goodwill: Information is not available in the form requested and can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

The HS2 Phase One community forums are an important part of the engagement process and have provided an opportunity for members of the community to put their issues, ideas and priorities to the engineers and environment teams developing the design. The forum process has been valuable in the development of the scheme and its mitigation.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Fisheries: Isle of Man

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with the (a) Northern Ireland Assembly and (b) Northern Ireland fishing organisations on the decision by the Isle of Man to extend the fishing limits to 12 miles. [175760]

19 Nov 2013 : Column 865W

George Eustice: The fishing limits were officially extended to the 12 mile limit in 1991 through The Territorial Sea Act 1987 (Isle of Man) Order. A copy of the Order can be found here:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1991/1722/made

Consultation between the Isle of Man and the UK took place prior to this order being made. The Isle of Man can provide more information on the exact process followed to put the Order in place.

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many herring were caught in the sea around the Isle of Man in the last year. [175761]

George Eustice: Data on landings are collected for International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) statistical rectangles. In 2012 4,265 tonnes of herring were landed from the ICES rectangle (37E5) for the area of sea around the Isle of Man.

Marine Conservation Zones

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what progress has been made on establishing marine conservation zones around England. [175704]

George Eustice: We expect to announce the designation of MCZs shortly and at the same time we hope to indicate our plans for future work on MCZs.

Nature Conservation

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he is taking to control the intrusion of alien species to the UK. [175781]

George Eustice: Action to tackle the threat from invasive non-native species is delivered through the Invasive Non-Native Species Framework Strategy for Great Britain, which was published in 2008. It sets out seven objectives and over 50 key actions to deliver these, including nine key actions to minimise the risk of invasive non-native species entering and becoming established in Great Britain. The strategy is currently being reviewed in consultation with stakeholders to examine the continuing relevance of its objectives, actions and mechanisms and whether any modifications or additions are merited. We anticipate a revised strategy being published in summer 2014.

A similar approach has been taken in Northern Ireland, working with the Republic of Ireland on an all-Ireland basis through the Invasive Species Ireland Project since 2006. To further co-ordinate work, the Department of the Environment in Northern Ireland published an Invasive Alien Species Strategy in May 2013 that reflects the main challenges for Northern Ireland. The strategy seeks to maximise the effectiveness of existing approaches while putting in place new actions to address gaps that have been identified. A similar harmonised strategy is in development in the Republic of Ireland. The first review of the strategy will be carried out in 2016 and thereafter on a five-yearly basis.

19 Nov 2013 : Column 866W

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with the British Association for Shooting and Conservation and the Countryside Alliance on the help they might provide in tackling the problem of alien species in the UK. [175785]

George Eustice: Stakeholder engagement is key to the successful delivery of our strategy for tackling invasive non-native species. DEFRA officials have had a number of discussions with the British Association for Shooting and Conservation on a range of non-native species issues and its representatives attend the annual non-native species stakeholder forum regularly. Both the British Association for Shooting and Conservation and the Countryside Alliance have been consulted on the draft EU regulation on invasive non-native species.

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he had with (a) institutions and (b) member states of the EU on the help they might provide in tackling the problem of alien species in the UK. [175786]

George Eustice: The UK has long been calling for the development of an EU strategy to tackle the problems that invasive species across the EU pose to the UK. During 2010-11 the UK actively participated, with other member states and non-governmental organisations, in working groups convened by the European Commission to consider and develop ideas for such a strategy, taking a leading role on five of the nine tasks.

Since the European Commission published its proposals on 9 September 2013, officials have met several UK MEPs, as well as the Environment Committee Rapporteur and the European Commission, to discuss the proposals. Discussions with other member states have taken place within European Council working party meetings.

Squirrels

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he is taking to reduce the number of grey squirrels across the UK. [175782]

George Eustice: Control of grey squirrels is a devolved matter. England's national strategy for grey squirrel management is set out in the document published in January 2006 entitled ‘Grey Squirrels and England's Woodlands: Policy and Action’:

www.forestry.gov.uk/greysquirrel

In accordance with the strategy, the Forestry Commission focuses grey squirrel control (and grant aid) effort in woodlands, primarily where the delivery of public benefits is critically threatened by grey squirrels. This addresses the threats that grey squirrels pose to woodlands, and to red squirrels where they are present or nearby. In addition, the Forestry Commission, DEFRA, the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency and the National Wildlife Research Centre have been collaborating on research into fertility control as a method for population control of grey squirrels.

19 Nov 2013 : Column 867W

Wild Ducks

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether the ruddy duck has been eradicated in the UK. [175783]

George Eustice: At the start of the UK Ruddy Duck Eradication Programme in 2005, 4,400 ruddy ducks were estimated to be in the wild within the UK. During the summer of 2013 approximately 50 ruddy ducks were estimated to be in the wild within the UK. The UK is working within the framework of the Bern convention to eradicate the ruddy duck from the wild in the Western Palaearctic by 2015.

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the total cost to the public purse to date is of the programme to eradicate the ruddy duck. [175784]

George Eustice: The UK Ruddy Duck Eradication Programme was targeted at protecting European white headed ducks. Their conservation is threatened as a result of hybridisation with the ruddy duck which is not native to Europe. The programme began in 2005 and ran until March 2011 at a cost of £3.3 million. Approximately half of this was provided by EU LIFE-Nature funding, with the remainder funded by DEFRA.

DEFRA has continued to fund ongoing work on eradication with funding amounting to £200,000 in the 2011-12 financial year, £150,000 in the 2012-13 financial year and £120,000 allocated for this financial year.

Attorney-General

Sentencing

6. Oliver Colvile: To ask the Attorney-General on how many occasions he has referred a criminal sentence to the Court of Appeal for review on the ground that it was unduly lenient in the last 12 months. [901115]

The Solicitor-General: For the period 1 November 2012 to 30 October 2013, the sentences of 81 offenders were referred as unduly lenient and have either been heard or are due to be heard by the Court of Appeal.

Rape and Domestic Violence Referrals

7. Andy Sawford: To ask the Attorney-General what resources he plans to make available to police forces and the Crown Prosecution Service to implement his action plan for referrals of cases of rape and domestic violence. [901116]

The Solicitor-General: The Government take the effective prosecution of rape and domestic violence cases very seriously.

The former Director of Public Prosecutions, Keir Starmer QC, met with the Home Office, national policing leads and other interested parties in September 2013 to consider the reduction in the number of cases referred by the police to the Crown Prosecution Service for a charging decision.

The six actions following this meeting are being taken forward by the Inspectorate, CPS, Home Office and police within existing resources.

19 Nov 2013 : Column 868W

Central and Eastern Europe

8. Jesse Norman: To ask the Attorney-General what steps the Law Officers' Departments are taking to promote the rule of law in central and eastern Europe. [901117]

The Attorney-General: The CPS International Division has been involved in a range of activities intended to strengthen the capacity of criminal justice practitioners in Albania, Montenegro and Bulgaria. The Serious Fraud Office has provided assistance to countries within central and eastern Europe investigating frauds committed in the region. I also have bilateral relationships with prosecutors. For example, I recently attended the International Association of Prosecutors in Moscow where 1 held a bilateral with the Prosecutor General of Albania.

In addition, the Ministry of Justice and Home Office have also been involved in rule of law projects in the area. Such projects, along with liaison and engagement, promote the rule of law.

EU Law

Mr Thomas: To ask the Attorney-General (1) to which EU Directives within the Law Officers' Departments' areas of responsibility the Government has formally opted into in each financial year since May 2010; on what dates each such directive was signed; and if he will make a statement; [175485]

(2) what EU Directives within the Law Officers' Departments' areas of responsibility have come into force without the need for an opt-in decision in each financial year since May 2010; on what dates each such directive came into force; and if he will make a statement. [175506]

The Solicitor-General: None.

Defence

Armed Forces: Dogs

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what requirement is placed on those bidding for military working dogs withdrawn from service as to their competence with animal welfare; and if he will make a statement. [175674]

Anna Soubry: Applicants wishing to re-home military working dogs are vetted by interview to determine suitability and a judgment is made by the Ministry of Defence's Procurement and Re-homing Section as to the appropriateness of the individual.

When a suitable dog is identified, all interested parties are invited to come and meet the dog with family and other pets, if applicable.

Each new owner is required to complete a ‘contract sale of dog’ which states that they must abide by the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and are not to compromise the Five Freedoms which are fully stated in the contract.

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many military working dogs have been sold following the decision to withdraw them from service (a) in 2012 and (b) so far in the current calendar year; and how many such dogs were purchased by their handler. [175676]

19 Nov 2013 : Column 869W

Anna Soubry: Information on the number of military working dogs that have been sold in 2012 and in 2013 to date, and how many have been sold to their handlers, is shown in the following table:

 Number of dogs soldNumber sold to handlers

2012

142

87

2013 (to date)

84

59

Patrol Craft

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) when work began on the Navy's new offshore patrol vessels; [175470]

(2) when the decision to build three new offshore patrol vessels was taken; [175471]

(3) whether Portsmouth was considered as the preferred location for the construction of all or any of the offshore patrol vessels; [175559]

(4) when preliminary work began on the three new offshore patrol vessels; and when the contract negotiations with BAE for those vessels commenced. [175560]

Mr Dunne: The Ministry of Defence entered into discussions with BAE Systems (BAES) in summer 2012 about the future of the UK warship building programme. This covered a number of issues, including how best to manage the workload gap and maintain key shipbuilding skills between the Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carrier and Type 26 Global Combat Ship build programmes.

Building Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) in Portsmouth was among the options considered initially. As discussions with BAES progressed, it became evident that there would be clear business benefits in the company's decision to consolidate its shipbuilding capabilities on the Clyde. The key issue, therefore, became the maintenance of shipbuilding skills on the Clyde after completion of work on the Carrier blocks. Following analysis, the build of three OPVs was determined to be the optimum method to maintain these skills, while delivering useful capability for the Royal Navy.

Detailed commercial negotiations around the shipbuilding programme began in mid 2013, with agreement reached on an overall deal in late October. A Commercial Principles Agreement was signed on 6 November 2013.

Subject to the Main Investment decision in the coming months and contract placement in 2014, construction work on the OPVs is expected to begin in autumn 2014.

Qualifications

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many people employed by his Department hold a (a) bachelor's, (b) master's and (c) PhD-level degree in computer science; and if he will make a statement. [175364]

Anna Soubry: There is no mandatory requirement for personnel, either service or civilian, to record their qualifications on Ministry of Defence management systems. The following table is therefore likely to under-represent the number of employees holding computer science degrees. Where personnel hold more than one level of qualification only the highest is shown:

19 Nov 2013 : Column 870W

Highest Qualification Level Achieved in Computer ScienceTotal (Service and Civilian Personnel

Bachelors Degree

280

Masters Degree

50

PhD

10

Total

340

Note: Rounding has been applied to all figures. When rounding to the nearest 10, numbers ending in '5' have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent systematic bias.

Sunningdale Park

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how often his Department has used Sunningdale Park for Civil Service events since May 2010; what the nature of each such event was; and what the cost of each such event was. [174396]

Anna Soubry: This information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. Following a review of learning and development across Government, the National School of Government (which delivered training on the Sunningdale Park site) closed in March 2012.

Cabinet Office

Employment

Frank Dobson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people are in full-time equivalent employment. [175427]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated November 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking the number of people in full-time equivalent employment. 175427

Total full-time equivalent employment in the UK, for the reference period July to September 2013, is estimated to be 28.754 million

This is derived from ONS's Labour Force Survey, using usual weekly hours worked by people aged 16 and over in their main job, including paid and unpaid overtime. A full-time working week is assumed to be 37 hours.

Politics and Government: Public Participation

Paul Blomfield: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps his Department is taking to promote the engagement of civil society in the political process. [901053]

Mr Hurd: The Civil Society Compact lays the foundation for effective partnership working between Government and civil society organisations.

Deputy Prime Minister

Devolution: English Regions

8. John Pugh: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what his policy is on devolution of powers to the regions of England; and if he will make a statement. [901061]

19 Nov 2013 : Column 871W

Greg Clark: The Government are committed to devolving power to the most appropriate level.

In England, we are achieving this in many ways, including the City Deals Programme. So far, we have eight City Deals with the biggest cities outside London, four City Deals with smaller cities, and 16 more deals still being negotiated.

We have also created 39 Local Enterprise Partnerships, 24 Enterprise Zones, a £2.4 billion Regional Growth Fund and Local Growth Deals in response to the Heseltine Review; implemented local government finance reforms; and given local authorities a general power of competence.

Devolution: Cornwall

9. Andrew George: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what recent assessment he has made of the case for devolving powers to Cornwall as a pilot rural city deal. [901063]

Greg Clark: Cornwall is currently developing proposals for their forthcoming Local Growth Deal. This deal will enable Cornwall to access funding from the £2 billion per year Local Growth Fund and agree freedoms and flexibilities that will support work to drive local economic growth.

In addition Cornwall is also playing an active role in the development of the Plymouth City Deal, ensuring that the deal's proposals to grow the marine sector; tackle youth unemployment; and grow SMEs, benefit the residents of Cornwall.

Devolution: Wales

11. Jesse Norman: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what assessment he has made of the economic and social effects of further devolution in Wales on areas close to the border between England and Wales. [901065]

Greg Clark: I support devolution of power to the most appropriate level. Yesterday we announced the devolution of a range of financial powers to the Welsh Government.

I am aware that this can have an impact on people who live or work in border areas. That is why we included consideration of cross border issues in the Silk Commission's terms of reference. The Government have taken account of this in responding to Part I of the Commission's Report and will do so for Part II as well.

Legislative Priorities

12. Mr MacNeil: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what his legislative priorities are for the remainder of this Parliament. [901066]

13. Robert Flello: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what the Government's political and constitutional reform priorities are for the remainder of this Parliament. [901067]

Greg Clark: The Government are focused on devolving more powers from Whitehall to our cities and regions. As part of our legislative programme the Government are currently taking forward the Transparency Bill and also intend to bring forward legislation to provide for a power of recall before the end of this Parliament.

19 Nov 2013 : Column 872W

Natural Capital Committee

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister on how many occasions he has met Dieter Helm in his capacity as Chair of the Natural Capital Committee since May 2010. [175724]

The Deputy Prime Minister: I have not met with Dieter Helm in this capacity.

Education

Free Schools

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his Department's policy is on taking over under-performing free schools. [174447]

Mr Timpson: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), is responsible for ensuring that underperforming free schools take steps to raise standards, and he will not tolerate failure.

In extreme cases of failure, the Secretary of State can intervene to enforce a change in leadership or force the academy to close. Before intervening in an underperforming free school, the Secretary of State will assess whether the trust is taking, or has the necessary capacity to take, the appropriate action to improve standards. The Secretary of State's powers to intervene are specified in the funding agreement between the Secretary of State and the academy trust running the school.

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department takes to address serious financial mismanagement in free schools. [174448]

Mr Timpson: The Department for Education has a number of measures in place both to address financial mismanagement in free schools should it occur, and to prevent it from happening in the first place.

The financial viability and resilience of free school proposals, and the financial capacity and capability of those responsible for them, is tested during the application process and before schools open.

The Department for Education has established an accountability system for academy trusts, including those operating free schools, which reflects their status as companies, charities and public bodies. Within this system, which is more robust than that in place for maintained schools, academy trusts are required to take full control of their financial affairs and must ensure regularity, propriety and value for money in their management of public funds. Trusts must ensure trustees and managers have the skills, knowledge and experience to run the academy trust; prepare financial plans so as to secure the academy trust's short-term and long-term financial health; have in place sound internal control and risk management processes; ensure trustees and managers monitor the academy trust's current and forecast financial position; be able to show that public funds have been used as intended by Parliament; and prepare annual financial statements which are audited by a registered auditor.

Where the Education Funding Agency (EFA) has concerns about financial management or governance in an academy trust, the EFA may issue a Financial Notice

19 Nov 2013 : Column 873W

to Improve (FNtI), which sets out the actions the EFA requires the trust to take in order to address the underlying causes of the concerns. Those academy trusts subject to financial notices to improve have restrictions placed on the authorities and freedoms delegated to them until the conditions of the FNtI have been satisfied.

Should financial mismanagement arise as a result of fraud or irregularity, academy accounting officers and trusts have primary responsibility for ensuring that appropriate action is taken. The Secretary of State will not tolerate fraud and reserves the right to conduct or commission his own investigation into actual or potential fraud, theft or irregularity in any academy trust, either as the result of a formal notification from the trust itself or as the result of other information received, for example from a whistleblower. Other authorities, including the police, may be involved as appropriate.

Kings Science Academy

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) if he will publish the financial notice to improve letter sent by his Department to Kings Science Academy in May 2013; [174586]

(2) when his Department was first informed that an administrative error had taken place in Action Fraud's handling of allegations of fraud at the Kings Science Academy, Bradford; [174587]

(3) for what reasons Action Fraud informed his Department that it was not taking any further action into allegations of fraud at the Kings Science Academy, Bradford. [174588]

Mr Timpson: A financial notice to improve was not issued to Kings Science academy. The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member

19 Nov 2013 : Column 874W

for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), issued a warning notice in May 2013 and the academy was asked to put in place actions to address the weaknesses identified in the investigation report.

Action Fraud notified the Department on 1 November that they made a mistake in classifying the information provided. The error has been rectified by Action Fraud and West Yorkshire police have confirmed they are investigating. Action Fraud has apologised to the Department for this error.

Special Educational Needs: Greater London

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many children had a statement of special educational needs in each London local authority area in each of the last five years; [175631]

(2) what the change in proportion was of children with a statement of special educational needs in each London local authority area between 2009-10 and the latest date for which figures are available. [175632]

Mr Timpson: Information on the number and percentage of pupils with statements of special educational needs1 in each London local authority from 2009 to 2013 is provided in the following table.

The available information only reflects a snapshot of data as at January each year and, therefore, the change in proportion of pupils with statements of special educational needs in all London local authorities has been provided for both 2009 to 2013 and 2010 to 2013, as shown in the appended table.

1 Full information on pupils with SEN can be found in the ‘Special Educational Needs in England, January 2013’ Statistical First Release at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2013

All schools1: Pupils with statements of special educational needs (SEN), based on where the pupil attends school2 as at January each year: 2009-2013 by region and local authority area in England
   20092010
LA Code  Total pupilsPupils with statements of SEN%3Total pupilsPupils with statements of SEN%3
  

England3

8,092,280

225,400

2.8

8,098,360

223,945

2.8

  

London4

1,236,350

33,765

2.7

1,254,720

33,755

2.7

  

Inner London4

442,775

12,425

2.8

451,605

12,670

2.8

E09000007

202

Camden

29,449

930

3.2

29,503

918

3.1

E09000001

201

City of London

2,235

5

0.2

2,260

4

0.2

E09000012

204

Hackney

32,936

973

3.0

34,066

1,069

3.1

E09000013

205

Hammersmith and Fulham

23,505

721

3.1

23,968

762

3.2

E09000014

309

Haringey

38,153

1,147

3.0

38,695

1,208

3.1

E09000019

206

Islington

23,329

726

3.1

23,340

727

3.1

E09000020

207

Kensington and Chelsea

22,674

373

1.6

23,202

368

1.6

E09000022

208

Lambeth

32,956

1,213

3.7

33,681

1,269

3.8

E09000023

209

Lewisham

38,076

1,134

3.0

38,891

1,120

2.9

E09000025

316

Newham

51,199

506

1.0

52,696

456

0.9

E09000028

210

Southwark

41,550

1,312

3.2

42,103

1,265

3.0

E09000030

211

Tower Hamlets

39,767

1,355

3.4

40,865

1,363

3.3

E09000032

212

Wandsworth

39,332

1,340

3.4

39,825

1,419

3.6

E09000033

213

Westminster

27,615

688

2.5

28,510

720

2.5

  

Outer London4

793,570

21,340

2.7

803,115

21,085

2.6

E09000002

301

Barking and Dagenham

33,062

783

2.4

33,869

803

2.4

E09000003

302

Barnet

55,647

1,458

2.6

56,302

1,420

2.5

E09000004

303

Bexley

41,437

1,183

2.9

41,350

1,135

2.7

E09000005

304

Brent

44,551

1,259

2.8

45,201

1,325

2.9

19 Nov 2013 : Column 875W

19 Nov 2013 : Column 876W

E09000006

305

Bromley

51,135

1,645

3.2

51,302

1,704

3.3

E09000008

306

Croydon

58,617

1,319

2.3

59,060

1,325

2.2

E09000009

307

Ealing

50,585

1,312

2.6

51,869

1,384

2.7

E09000010

308

Enfield

52,290

1,188

2.3

52,996

1,144

2.2

E09000011

203

Greenwich

40,252

1,347

3.3

40,555

1,248

3.1

E09000015

310

Harrow

35,103

930

2.6

35,398

913

2.6

E09000016

311

Havering

37,036

704

1.9

37,097

616

1.7

E09000017

312

Hillingdon

47,996

1,293

2.7

48,472

1,347

2.8

E09000018

313

Hounslow

37,590

977

2.6

38,059

903

2.4

E09000021

314

Kingston upon Thames

25,748

593

2.3

26,295

624

2.4

E09000024

315

Merton

28,220

928

3.3

28,768

891

3.1

E09000026

317

Redbridge

51,531

1,313

2.5

52,442

1,259

2.4

E09000027

318

Richmond upon Thames

29,630

682

2.3

30,140

689

2.3

E09000029

319

Sutton

33,827

1,057

3.1

33,990

1,046

3.1

E09000031

320

Waltham Forest

39,315

1,370

3.5

39,948

1,311

3.3

   20112012
LA Code  Total pupilsPupils with statements of SEN%3Total pupilsPupils with statements of SEN%3
  

England3

8,123,865

224,210

2.8

8,178,200

226,125

2.8

  

London4

1,276,410

34,415

2.7

1,304,100

35,165

2.7

  

Inner London4

460,135

12,950

2.8

470,760

13,175

2.8

E09000007

202

Camden

29,496

896

3.0

30,537

851

2.8

E09000001

201

City of London

2,295

4

0.2

2,307

4

0.2

E09000012

204

Hackney

34,996

1,093

3.1

36,725

1,169

3.2

E09000013

205

Hammersmith and Fulham

24,364

775

3.2

25,291

789

3.1

E09000014

309

Haringey

39,378

1,251

3.2

39,827

1,255

3.2

E09000019

206

Islington

23,884

783

3.3

24,215

798

3.3

E09000020

207

Kensington and Chelsea

24,131

445

1.8

24,616

412

1.7

E09000022

208

Lambeth

34,523

1,329

3.8

35,250

1,272

3.6

E09000023

209

Lewisham

39,700

1,106

2.8

40,595

1,107

2.7

E09000025

316

Newham

53,523

444

0.8

55,228

468

0.8

E09000028

210

Southwark

42,536

1,246

2.9

43,359

1,251

2.9

E09000030

211

Tower Hamlets

41,742

1,401

3.4

42,188

1,477

3.5

E09000032

212

Wandsworth

40,303

1,470

3.6

40,743

1,553

3.8

E09000033

213

Westminster

29,265

709

2.4

29,879

770

2.6

  

Outer London4

816,275

21,465

2.6

833,340

21,990

2.6

E09000002

301

Barking and Dagenham

35,075

807

2.3

36,490

817

2.2

E09000003

302

Barnet

57,101

1,498

2.6

58,861

1,561

2.7

E09000004

303

Bexley

41,731

1,087

2.6

42,364

1,063

2.5

E09000005

304

Brent

46,434

1,418

3.1

47,395

1,397

2.9

E09000006

305

Bromley

51,584

1,786

3.5

51,789

1,779

3.4

E09000008

306

Croydon

59,743

1,386

2.3

61,348

1,488

2.4

E09000009

307

Ealing

52,928

1,340

2.5

54,318

1,505

2.8

E09000010

308

Enfield

53,816

1,153

2.1

54,986

1,154

2.1

E09000011

203

Greenwich

41,150

1,248

3.0

41,703

1,214

2.9

E09000015

310

Harrow

35,985

939

2.6

36,260

955

2.6

E09000016

311

Havering

37,223

588

1.6

37,252

599

1.6

E09000017

312

Hillingdon

49,184

1,362

2.8

50,017

1,423

2.8

E09000018

313

Hounslow

38,565

923

2.4

39,571

981

2.5

E09000021

314

Kingston upon Thames

26,645

642

2.4

27,087

673

2.5

E09000024

315

Merton

29,667

922

3.1

30,825

962

3.1

E09000026

317

Redbridge

53,684

1,271

2.4

54,793

1,273

2.3

E09000027

318

Richmond upon Thames

30,393

703

2.3

31,143

737

2.4

E09000029

319

Sutton

34,448

1,115

3.2

34,996

1,108

3.2

E09000031

320

Waltham Forest

40,917

1,275

3.1

42,140

1,299

3.1