Repossession Orders

Mr Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many court orders have been issued for the repossession of homes in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the north-east and (d) the UK in each of the last five years. [152963]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to him in due course.

Scotland

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what (a) external organisations and (b) individuals his Department engaged with as part of the Scotland Analysis programme; and what was discussed at such consultations; [153352]

(2) how many members of his Department's staff have been allocated to work on the Scotland Analysis programme; and if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of this work; [153353]

(3) what meetings (a) he and (b) officials in his Department have had with the right hon. Member for Edinburgh South West (Mr Darling) as part of the Scotland Analysis programme; and what was discussed at each such meeting; [153354]

(4) what work his Department has commissioned by external consultants in relation to work on the Scotland Analysis programme; which consultants were used; and how much such consultancy has cost. [153355]

Mrs Grant: Work on the Scotland Analysis programme is being carried out across Government by policy experts in relevant areas. As the programme largely relates to reserved areas of policy, the Ministry of Justice is not actively involved in the analysis. Therefore, the Ministry

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1340W

of Justice has not undertaken engagement, allocated staff, met with the right hon. Member for Edinburgh South West (Mr Darling) or commissioned external consultants on this matter.

Sexual Offences Act 2003

Sarah Champion: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many convictions there have been for offences under section (a) 57, (b) 58 and (c) 59 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, by types of offence, in each year since 1 May 2004; [151949]

(2) how many (a) prosecutions of offences and (b) convictions for offences under section (i) 57, (ii) 58 and (iii) 59 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 there have been in circumstances where the victim was aged under 18, by (A) type of offence and (B) age of victim in each year since 1 May 2004. [151950]

Jeremy Wright: The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates' courts and offenders found guilty at all courts of offences under sections 57 to 59 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, in England and Wales, from 2004 to 2011 (latest available), can be viewed in the table.

Information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on the Court Proceedings Database does not include the circumstances behind each case beyond the description provided in the statute. The age of the victim cannot be separately identified unless specified within the statute.

Human trafficking is abhorrent and the UK Government are committed to combating this crime in all its forms. We have already made significant progress in the fight against trafficking but the Government are not complacent and we will continue to work to improve and strengthen our approach to keep pace with emerging threats. The National Crime Agency will build on existing work to combat trafficking by using its enhanced crime-fighting and intelligence capabilities to target criminal gangs. During the past two years, thousands of front-line professionals, including border staff, police and healthcare staff, have been trained to better identify, support and protect vulnerable individuals who may be suffering abuse at the hands of traffickers.

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and offenders found guilty at all courts of offences under sections 57 to 59 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, England and Wales, 2004-11(1,2,3)
Offence descriptionOutcome20042005200620072008+200920102011

Trafficking into the UK for sexual exploitation(5)

Proceeded against

5

10

19

7

20

20

8

6

 

Found guilty

9

6

9

11

15

3

3

          

Trafficking within the UK for sexual exploitation(6)

Proceeded against

16

21

18

33

13

16

3

 

Found guilty

3

9

5

13

8

7

5

          

Trafficking out of the UK for sexual exploitation(7)

Proceeded against

 

Found guilty

1

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1341W

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1342W

‘—’ = Nil (1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The number of defendants found guilty in a particular year may exceed the number proceeded against as the proceedings in the magistrates court took place in an earlier year and the defendants were found guilty at the Crown court in the following year; or the defendants were found guilty of a different offence to that for which they were originally proceeded against. (4) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates' court for April, July and August 2008. (5) An offence under s.57 Sexual Offence Act 2003. (6) An offence under s.58 Sexual Offence Act 2003. (7) An offence under s.59 Sexual Offence Act 2003. Source: Ministry of Justice—Justice Statistics Analytical Services

Sexual Offences: Rehabilitation

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 25 March 2013, Official Report, columns 952-4W, on probation, how many sex offender treatment programmes were undertaken by participants in each probation trust area in each of the last five years; how many such programmes offenders (a) completed and (b) failed to complete; what the costs were of those programmes; and how many offenders returned to custody for failing to complete those programmes. [152728]

Jeremy Wright: It has not been possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many sex offenders (a) completed and (b) failed to complete accredited treatment programmes; and how many such offenders have subsequently been convicted of (i) a further sex offence and (ii) another serious offence in each of the last five years. [152729]

Jeremy Wright: It has not been possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to her in due course.

Telephone Services

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 22 March 2013, Official Report, column 840, on telephone services, what his timetable is for greater use of 0300 numbers by his Department. [152461]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to him in due course.

Victim Support Schemes

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what funding his Department has allocated to victims' services, excluding compensation and legal aid, in 2013-14. [153232]

Jeremy Wright: It has not been possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of (a) victims of fraud, homicide and sexual violence and (b) other people offered referral to victims' services decline to use those services. [153236]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to her in due course.

Witnesses: Protection

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of people who have requested witness protection and anonymity have been provided that service by the Crown Prosecution Service in the last five years. [153234]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice is responsible for the overall policy on witnesses.

Local police forces are currently responsible for the protection of protected persons, including witnesses. Applications for protected persons status usually come from police investigators, who have an overview of all the facts including the circumstances of the case and the threat involved, rather than from individuals seeking protection. The police do not centrally collate information on the number of requests for protection.

Similarly, the Crown Prosecution Service, which is responsible for applications for witness anonymity, does not keep central records on the number of requests or success rates.

Young Offender Institutions: Training

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many young offenders institutions offer mixed martial arts training or similar activities as part of the training curriculum; [151200]

(2) whether mixed martial arts training or similar is part of the training curriculum for offenders at HM Young Offenders Institution Brinsford; [151201]

(3) what the average period of time per week is that mixed martial arts or similar training is available to inmates at young offenders' institutions; [151457]

(4) what the estimated cost to the public purse was of providing mixed martial arts or similar training in young offenders institutions in the latest period for which figures are available. [151458]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1343W

Jeremy Wright: The National Offender Management Service (NOMS), which is responsible for prison and probation services, is aware of the importance that PE can make on the overall health and welfare of all prisoners especially young offenders and the role sport can play in supporting self-discipline programmes.

Prison Service Instruction (PSI) 58/2011 Physical Education for Prisoners sets out the policy for physical education (PE) in prisons and young offender institutions in England and Wales. The PSI states that establishments must not deliver any supervision, training or instruction to prisoners in combat sports such as boxing, boxercise, martial arts or any similar activity. In line with this instruction, Brinsford young offender institution does not offer training in martial arts to its prisoners as part of its delivery of PE.

Young Offenders

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to ensure that young offenders on release have suitable accommodation made available. [153015]

Jeremy Wright: Youth offending teams advise and assist young offenders to find suitable accommodation on release, where necessary securing the involvement of the local Children's Services and/or the housing authority that has statutory responsibilities in respect of young people with accommodation needs. The Youth Justice Board has established and supported regional resettlement consortiums to promote closer working between youth offending teams, custodial establishments and their partners to improve resettlement outcomes, and evaluations of this consortium model have shown that one of the benefits is improved accommodation outcomes for young people leaving custody. The Youth Justice Board have also been working to develop and disseminate good practice in this area, and will shortly be publishing a set of resources on the Ministry of Justice website to support practitioners in helping young people access appropriate accommodation on release.

Youth Custody

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent discussions he has had with the devolved Administrations on youth custodial sentences. [150261]

Jeremy Wright: We regularly have a range of conversations with the devolved Governments on youth justice matters.

Youth justice is a devolved matter in Northern Ireland. However, the Secretary of State for Justice had an introductory meeting with David Ford, the Northern Ireland Justice Minister on 6 February 2013 in Belfast, at which they discussed a range of matters in relation to justice policy.

My officials are presently having discussions with officials from the Welsh Government on our plans to reform youth custody across England and Wales, as set out in our consultation paper, “Transforming Youth Custody: Putting education at the heart of detention”.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1344W

Youth Custody: Standards

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what grade was received by each (a) secure children's home, (b) secure training centre and (c) young offenders institution following their latest Ofsted inspection of the establishment. [152884]

Jeremy Wright: The information is as follows:

(a) The “overall effectiveness rating” provided by Ofsted for each Secure Children's Home is as follows:

Aldine—Good

Aycliffe—Good

Barton Moss—Outstanding

Clayfields—Good

East Moor—Good

Hillside—N/a (Ofsted does not apply to Wales)

Lincolnshire—Good

Red Bank—Good

Swanwick Lodge—Adequate

Vinney Green—Good

(b) The “overall effectiveness rating” provided by Ofsted for each Secure Training Centre is as follows:

Hassockfield—Good

Medway—Good

Oakhill—Outstanding

Rainsbrook—Good

(c) Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP) has the statutory responsibility for inspecting young people's young offenders institutions (YOIs). Ofsted is invited to inspect the education provision in each YOI, as part of these inspections. Until recently no formal rating was provided against the Ofsted grading system; instead Ofsted's views contributed to the overall HMIP judgments on the young people's YOI and outcomes for young people.

HMIP reports now include Ofsted ratings against three key education factors. The latest published report for HMYOI Werrington includes ratings against these factors as follows:

Achievement of young people in learning, skills and work (satisfactory),

Quality of learning, skills and work provision (inadequate); and

Leadership and management of learning, skills and work (inadequate).

This format will be utilised for all forthcoming full reports. The latest published HMIP reports for each YOI are available on the Ministry of Justice website.

Youth Custody: Transport

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department has spent on secure and custodial transport for young people in each year since May 2005. [152772]

Jeremy Wright: Secure escorting of young people is managed via two separate contractual arrangements. The Youth Justice Board contracts with providers to transport young people to and from secure training centres and secure children's homes. Cost figures for this contract are available from 2008-09 onwards and are shown in the following table:

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1345W

Cost of transporting young people under 17 to secure training centres and secure children's homes
 Total cost (£ million)

2008-09

3.2

2009-10

2.9

2010-11

3.1

2011-12

3.4

2012-13

2.7

Transport of young people who are sent to young offender institutions is the responsibility of the Prisoner Escort Custody Service (PECS), which is part of the National Offender Management Service. PECS manages the secure escort contracts covering all those sent to custody in the prison estate, apart from Category A prisoners: this includes young people sent to young offender institutions.

Total expenditure under the PECS contracts for the years 2005-06 to 2012-13 is shown in the following table. This covers transport costs for prisoners of all ages. Because of the way in which the data are collected and collated, it is not possible at present to separate out the costs of transporting young people. For future years, the Youth Justice Board is putting systems in place which will enable these costs to be identified separately.

Cost of transporting prisoners of all ages accommodated in the prison estate
 Total cost (£ million)

2005-06

146.5

2006-07

155.8

2007-08

164.2

2008-09

157.3

2009-10

161.4

2010-11

163.6

2011-12

146.1

2002-13

134.3

Youth Justice

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department has spent on service development programmes in each year since May 2005. [152773]

Mrs Grant: It has not been possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation. I will write to him in due course.

Youth Justice Board

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much VAT has been paid by the Youth Justice Board on applicable services in each year since May 2005. [152794]

Jeremy Wright: The following table provides a summary of VAT incurred by the Youth Justice Board for spend in relation to the following contracts: privately operated young offender institutions where the YJB commissions places for young people sentenced to custody; secure escorts to transport young people to/from the youth custodial establishments and to/from court; privately run secure training centres where the YJB commissions places for young people; and youth justice IT programmes.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1346W

 £000

2005-06

10,450

2006-07

14,615

2007-08

17,573

2008-09

17,246

2009-10

19,170

2010-11

18,796

2011-12

21,129

2012-13

12,093

There was a reduction in VAT paid in 2012-13 due to invoices for Rainsbrook, Hassockfield and Medway Secure Training Centre being paid for by the Ministry of Justice because these contracts are with the Secretary of State for Justice. In addition, the YJB agreed a substantial reduction in the National Offender Management Service's charge for prisoner escort custody costs, resulting in a proportionate reduction in VAT costs.

It would be at a disproportionate cost to the Department to examine each receipt to calculate the amount of VAT on smaller items.

Home Department

Air Travel

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many officials in her (a) Department and (b) non-departmental public bodies travelled on (i) domestic and (ii) international flights in each of the last five years; in which class categories; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest airfare charges in each such year. [152535]

James Brokenshire: The information requested for the Home Office and its agencies and non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Alcoholic Drinks: Prices

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the net present value of the Government's proposals for a minimum unit price for alcohol would be after the first five years of implementation; [R] [147560]

(2) whether she has undertaken an analysis of the likely impact on bootleg alcohol sales if her plans to introduce a minimum unit price for alcohol; and if she will place the information in the Library; [R] [147561]

(3) whether she has conducted an analysis of the effect of consumer spending in the on-trade from an increase in the cost of alcohol in the off-trade; and if she will place the information in the Library; [R] [147562]

(4) what assessment she has made of the proportion of the £1,049 million annual cost to consumers from the Government's proposals for a minimum unit price for alcohol that will be met by households below median income. [R] [147563]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Government have recently consulted on a proposed minimum unit price and published a consultation stage impact assessment alongside this.

A response will be published in due course.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1347W

Animal Experiments

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many Home Office inspection visits have been made to Imperial College London in the last 12 months; and if she will place a copy of any inspection reports in the Library. [152413]

Mr Harper: From January 2012 to March 2013 inclusive, Home Office Inspectors made 48 visits to Imperial College.

We currently have no plans to place a copy of any inspection reports in the Library.

Animal Experiments: Imperial College London

Henry Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many animals were used in regulated procedures at Imperial College London in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012. [152179]

James Brokenshire: The Government are unable to provide the information requested. Information provided by individual project licence holders and licensed establishments on the use of animals under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 is provided in confidence and is covered by section 24 of the 1986 Act.

Section 24 prohibits the disclosure by Home Office Ministers and officials of confidential information relating to the use of animals in scientific procedures other than in the discharge of their functions under the 1986 Act. It creates a criminal offence and provides a maximum punishment of two years imprisonment and a fine for unauthorised disclosure of information. The Government have undertaken to review section 24 in the context of our commitment to transparency and we plan to present proposals for consultation during 2013.

Henry Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many projects licences granted under the provisions of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 have been granted for procedures being carried out at Imperial College London; and what the severity band for each project is. [152180]

James Brokenshire: To protect the health and safety of individuals and places licensed under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 it is not our policy to publish details of the licences held at specific institutions.

Arrest Warrants

Eric Ollerenshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many European arrest warrants were issued in the UK in the last three years. [147510]

Mr Harper: I refer my hon. Friend to the written ministerial statement made by the Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), of 16 April 2013, Official Report, column 28WS, which informed the House of an error SOCA has identified in the capture and reporting of information on the numbers of EAWs since 2009-10. HM chief inspector of constabulary (HMCIC) has been asked to work with us to review SOCA data and will report back in mid May.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1348W

Assets

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what (a) assets and (b) liabilities are held by (i) her Department and (ii) its non-departmental public bodies with a value of (A) between £100,000 and £1 million, (B) between £1 million and £10 million, (C) between £10 million and £100 million and (D) over £100 million; what the value is of each item; and what assets are scheduled for disposal. [153633]

James Brokenshire: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Asylum: Children

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many children seeking asylum in the UK have been stripped searched in the last six months. [153340]

Mr Harper: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the protocol is for children seeking asylum in the UK where their age is disputed. [153356]

Mr Harper: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many children seeking asylum in the UK have been subject to the use of physical force in the last six months. [153357]

Mr Harper: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Communications Data Bill (Draft)

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the provisions of the Communications Data Bill envisage that communication service providers will be able to recover the cost of subject access requests. [151902]

James Brokenshire: The Government have accepted the substance of all the recommendations of the Joint Committee on the draft Communications Data Bill including in relation to cost recovery by communication service providers.

Cost Effectiveness

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will place in the Library (a) her Department's response to HM Treasury's requests for information on the value of departmental spending in terms of cost-effectiveness per unit cost in advance of the 2010 comprehensive spending review and (b) the data disclosed to HM Treasury on net present value per pound for resource spending. [153614]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1349W

James Brokenshire: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Counter-terrorism

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much funding her Department has given to the police forces of England and Wales in connection with the Prevent strategy in the last five financial years; and how much such funding will be provided in (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2013-14. [152310]

James Brokenshire: The Prevent strategy was revised in 2011. The subsequent allocation of funding to the police in England and Wales in connection with Prevent is as follows:

 £ million

2010-11

24

2011-12

19.8

2012-13

20.6

2013-14

18.7

The figure available for 2009-10 is £47 million and was published in the strategy. This is for overall Prevent funding which includes the contribution to Prevent policing. The figure for 2008-09 could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Crime: Victims

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what proportion of people referred to victims' services by the police had been in previous contact with (a) police forces, (b) social services and (c) victims' services in each year since 2005; [153212]

(2) how many calls citing complaints of victimisation of (a) domestic violence and (b) anti-social behaviour police forces received in the last year; and how many people who had made such calls subsequently received visits from the police; [153231]

(3) how many (a) arrests were made for charges relating to domestic violence and (b) emergency telephone calls concerning allegations of domestic violence were logged in the last 12 months. [153230]

Mr Jeremy Browne: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Lady in the time available before Prorogation.

Databases: Telecommunications

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the salary bands are of those employed in the Relationships and Communications team of the Communications Capabilities Development programme; what the total salary cost is; and how many people the team employs. [127415]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 8 November 2012]:Staff across the CCD programme and within the associated policy team have as part of their core duties a requirement to work closely with industry and law enforcement. These staff may also be required to produce relevant communications material.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1350W

Deportation

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many foreign nationals have been deported in each of the last five years. [150921]

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency seeks to deport from the UK foreign national offenders who meet the following criteria:

A court recommendation.

For non-EEA nationals—a custodial sentence of 12 months or more either in one sentence or as an aggregate of two or three sentences over a period of five years, or a custodial sentence of any length for a drug offence (other than possession).

For EEA nationals—a custodial sentence of 12 months or more for an offence involving drugs, violent or sexual crimes or a custodial sentence of 24 months or more for other offences.

The following table sets out the number of foreign national offenders removed or deported from the United Kingdom in each year of the last five years:

 Total number of FNOs removed by UKBA

2008

5,395

2009

5,530

2010

5,342

2011

4,649

2012

4,589

The table above includes foreign national offenders who do not meet the criteria set out above and are removed from the UK under section 10(1) of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. Section 10(1) relates to the removal of individuals unlawfully in the UK. The table can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/data-tables-immigration-statistics-october-to-december-2012

Drugs

Stephen Phillips: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking with international partners to prevent the diversion of legitimately-traded drug precursors into illicit drug production. [153259]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Home Office runs a licensing regime that enables the legitimate trade in high-risk precursor chemicals, while reducing the risk of their diversion to the illicit market. The European Union has competence for the control of drug precursor chemicals. The Home Office works closely with EU partners to develop, implement and enforce EU-wide regulations to apply proportionate controls to the trade in drug precursor chemicals. This work includes recognising emerging trends, developing a proportionate response and engaging in a dialogue with source countries for many of the chemicals. The control system is overseen by the International Narcotics Control Board, on behalf of the United Nations.

Entry Clearances

Mr Lilley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been allowed entry to the UK subject to guarantees from relatives that they

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1351W

would not be a burden on public finances in each year since 2000; and in how many such cases there has been recourse to that guarantee. [151167]

Mr Harper: Information is not held centrally on the number of guarantees (also known as sponsorship undertakings) that have been made arising from the settlement in the UK of a dependent relative or on the number of people who have made a claim for public funds following entry to the UK. To obtain this information would incur disproportionate cost.

On 9 July 2012 the Government introduced new rules governing the entry of adult dependent relatives. The new rules allow an adult dependent relative of non-European economic area nationality to settle in the UK if they can demonstrate that, as a result of age, illness or disability, they require a level of long-term personal care that can only be provided in the UK by their relative here and without recourse to welfare benefits. The UK resident will continue to be required to ensure that their adult dependent relative will be adequately maintained, accommodated and cared for without recourse to welfare benefits and sign an enforceable five-year undertaking to that effect.

Entry Clearances: Married People

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 16 April 2013, Official Report, columns 305-6W, on entry clearances: married people, what the average time between receipt of the initial application and the request for biometric information was for those applications made within the UK in each quarter of 2012. [152493]

Mr Harper [holding answer 22 April 2013]:The information requested is shown in the following table:

Table 1: Average time between applications received date and biometric letter despatch date for marriage applications, January to December 2012
Calendar days
  Enrolment period
  January to March 2012April to June 2012July to September 2012October to December 2012

Postal

FLR(M)

33

27

72

65

 

SET(M)

32

51

57

42

      

Premium (PEO)

FLR(M)

0

0

0

0

 

SET(M)

0

0

0

0

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. Figures relate to main applicants only. 3. Figures relate to postal applications as well as premium applications submitted at UKBA Public Enquiry Offices (PEO). 4. FLR(M) applications relate to leave to remain. SET(M) applications relate to settlement. 5. Processing time is based on the average number of calendar days from application raised (ie received) date to case creation date (ie date biometric letter issued). 6. Data generated on 24 April 2013. 7. Our procedure is to despatch invitation letters on the date cases are created on our system and so we have used the case creation date to calculate the average times (there may be some exceptions where invitation letters are not sent immediately).

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1352W

The waiting times have reduced substantially since the end of 2012. For in-country applications we are currently requesting biometric information around 11 days after an application for leave to remain on the basis of marriage has been made.

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 16 April 2013, Official Report, columns 305-6W, on entry clearances: married people, what the average processing time for initial decisions on marriage visas for non-EU spouses was in each despatch period between January 2011 and December 2012 where the application was made (a) within and (b) outside the UK. [152494]

Mr Harper: The information requested is shown in the following table.

For overseas visa applications, the visa section may despatch completed applications to the applicant or hold them for collection, dependent on the service chosen by the applicant. Consequently, the figures in Table 1 relate to the date the application was completed.

Overseas figures relate to non-El) spouse marriage applications only. However, in-country data cannot be disaggregated within cost, consequently these data relate to all in-country marriage applications. For in-country applications we have put additional resource into the processing of applications from spouses and partners of non-EU nationals, and waiting times have reduced. The average waiting time for applications processed last week was around nine weeks, and we are currently considering applications where the applicant enrolled their biometric information on 16 April 2013.

Table 1: Non-EU spouse marriage visa application processing times, January 2011 to December 2012
Days
 Processing times
  In-country
  PostalPremium
PeriodOverseasFLR(M)SET(M)FLR(M)SET(M)

January to March 2011

37

185

66

8

9

April to June 2011

32

123

78

4

6

July to September 2011

34

71

79

5

5

October to December 2011

26

72

80

5

7

January to March 2012

28

204

90

6

6

April to June 2012

35

141

127

8

11

July to September 2012

53

254

128

21

8

October to December 2012

66

246

143

15

9

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1353W

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. Overseas figures relate to main applicants and dependents. 3. Overseas figures relate to non-EU spouse marriage visa applications completed between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. 4. Overseas processing time is based on the average External Customer Service working days. 5. Overseas data generated on 3 April 2013. 6. In-country figures relate to main applicants only. 7. In-country figures relate to in-country marriage applications despatched between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. 8. FLR(M) applications relate to leave to remain. SET(M) applications relate to settlement. 9. Processing time is based on the average number of calendar days between application raised date and decision despatch date. Figures relate to completed applications only. 10. In-country figures relate to postal applications as well as premium applications submitted at UKBA Public Enquiry Offices (PEO). 11. In-country data generated on 18 April 2013. 12. Overseas figures relate to non-EU spouse marriage applications only. However, in-country-data cannot be disaggregated within cost, consequently these data relate to all in-country marriage applications.

EU Justice and Home Affairs

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many officials of her Department are working on the proposed EU police and criminal justice opt-out. [153271]

James Brokenshire: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

G4S

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions she has had with G4S on its suitability and performance as a Government contractor. [153265]

James Brokenshire: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Hotels

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many officials in her (a) Department and (b) non-departmental public bodies stayed in hotels in (i) the UK and (ii) every other country during the last five years; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest such hotel expenses in each such year. [152559]

James Brokenshire: The information requested for the Home Office and its agencies and non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Illegal Immigrants: Employment

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many foreign nationals found to be working illegally in (a) the UK, (b) the east of England and (c) Essex in each year since 2008 have been deported. [136051]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1354W

Mr Harper: The Home Office does not collate information centrally on the number of arrests as a result of illegal working enforcement visits specifically by the east of England or at county level. However, information relating to activity at a national level and regional level for the midlands and east of England is available. These data are shown in the following table:

Number of arrests as a result of illegal working enforcement visits(1)
 National totalMidlands and east of England

2008

5,785

838

2009

4,475

702

2010

4,299

727

2011

3,905

850

2012

(2)

(2)

(1) Information displayed relates to a count of arrests and not individuals. (2) Calendar year information not currently available.

The number of arrests made as a result of illegal working enforcement visits has reduced due to a tactical decision concerning where to target suspected immigration offenders and due to an expansion of the types of activity conducted by enforcement teams, increasing numbers of illegal immigrants have left the UK over the same period. In recent years, as well as illegal working operations, the Home Office has also targeted areas such as abuse of the marriage system and the asylum system, organised crime groups and individuals who facilitated significant breaches in the immigration rules for suspected immigration offenders.

Information relating to the number of arrests as a result of illegal working enforcement visits also does not include activity where a tactical decision has been made to target a suspected immigration offender at a residential address rather than an employer's address. The volume of arrests made year on year does not take into consideration complex operational activity against individuals of significance who have committed high harm activity in the United Kingdom.

All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols.

Immigration

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her most recent estimate is of the number of Romanian and Bulgarian nationals expected to immigrate to the UK between December 2013 and December 2014. [152312]

Mr Harper: I refer my hon. Friend to my answer of 13 February 2013, Official Report, column 759W.

The report of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research on the potential impact on the UK of future migration from Bulgaria and Romania confirms that

“it is not possible to predict the scale of future migration from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK numerically”.

This report was commissioned by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 2012 to draw together existing research on the potential impacts on the UK of future migration from Bulgaria and Romania after the lifting of transitional controls on 31 December 2013.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1355W

Immigration Controls: Manchester Airport

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 26 March 2013, Official Report, column 1021W, on Manchester Airport: immigration controls, for what reasons no queuing data was collected at Terminal 3 in (a) November and (b) December 2012. [153273]

Mr Harper: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Immigration: Applications

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cases at the UK Border Agency for (a) Tier 1 applications, (b) Tier 2 applications, (c) Tier 3 applications and (d) Tier 4 applications are outstanding. [141048]

Mr Harper: The following table shows the numbers of Points Based System applications awaiting decisions by case type as of 14 April 2013. The table shows applications made in the UK only.

Case typeTotal

PBS Tier 1

11,795

PBS Tier 2

6,246

PBS Tier 4

12,208

Total

30,249

Note: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. Figures relate to main applicants only. 3. Figures relate to postal and premium applications.

The Home Office received a significant increase in Tier 1 applications in December 2012 and high levels of applications have continued in 2013. The Home Office have deployed considerable extra resource to reduce the volume of Tier 1 applications awaiting a decision.

The Home Office is currently working on cases received in March for Tiers 2 and 4. Tier 3 is not, and has never been, open for applications.

Immigration: EU Nationals

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 12 March 2013, Official Report, column 147W, on immigration: EU nationals, whether she plans to amend the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 to require mandatory registration of EU nationals exercising their free movement rights. [153667]

Mr Harper: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Investigatory Powers Tribunal

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many complaints have been submitted to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal concerning the surveillance of communications data under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 in each year since implementation of that Act; and what proportion of such complaints have been upheld. [153033]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1356W

James Brokenshire [holding answer 23 April 2013]: Complaints submitted to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal are in respect of misuses of investigatory powers under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 by those bodies approved to use such powers. No breakdown exists of complaint by type of investigative power.

Although the tribunal is not obliged by statute to report on its activities, it has generally published statistics on the number of complaints submitted. The most recent information regarding the number of complaints made to the tribunal is set out in its Statistical Report for 2011, which contains the number of complaints made annually since 2001. This states that, in 2011, the tribunal received a total of 180 complaints. I will place a copy of this report in the Library of the House. It is also available at:

http://www.ipt-uk.com/docs/20120710-2011StatReportFinal.pdf

Licensing Laws

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many licensing authorities have imposed the (a) late night levy and (b) early morning restriction orders to date; and how many of those authorities are in the largest 100 licensing authorities as used for calculating expected revenue from those measures in her Department's impact assessment. [148719]

Mr Jeremy Browne [holding answer 18 March 2013]:No licensing authorities have yet introduced either the late night levy or an early morning alcohol restriction order. Both measures were commenced on 31 October 2012. Many licensing authorities have conducted preliminary studies on how the measures would affect their area and some have begun formal consultations.

Members: Correspondence

Mr Hain: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department for what reason she has not replied to the letter of 14 February 2013 from the right hon. Member for Neath (Mr Hain) concerning the case of his constituent; and when she intends to do so. [153331]

Mr Harper: It has not proved possible to respond to the right hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Offences Against Children

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many investigations have led to prosecutions relating to localised grooming in each police force area in (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012 and (d) 2013 to date. [152419]

Mr Jeremy Browne [holding answer 22 April 2013]: Child sexual exploitation is an abhorrent form of child abuse and the Government are committed to combating this crime in all its forms.

The information requested is not held centrally by the Department. However, evidence does confirm that police forces are tackling this issue locally. There are an increasing number of cases being brought before the courts, with significant sentences being handed down to perpetrators.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1357W

Already in 2013 we have seen a number of significant cases brought before the courts including prosecutions being brought by Thames Valley Police, Greater Manchester Police, Derbyshire, and Lancashire.

Official Hospitality

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many officials in (a) her Department and (b) the non-departmental public bodies for which she is responsible claimed reimbursements for working lunches and official entertainment in each of the last five years; and what the total cost was in each such year. [152671]

James Brokenshire: The information requested for Home Office and its agencies and non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Passports

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of the population (a) in total and (b) who are (i) English, (ii) Welsh, (iii) Scottish and (iv) Northern Irish own a passport; and what assessment she has made of the reasons for differences in the ownership of passports between the constituent parts of the UK. [153580]

Mr Harper: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how much was paid to officials in (a) her Department and (b) its non-departmental public bodies in bonuses and other payments in addition to salary in each of the last five years; how many officials received such payments; and what the monetary value was of the 20 largest payments made in each year; [148028]

(2) what allowances and subsidies in addition to salary were available to officials in (a) her Department and (b) its non-departmental public bodies in each of the last five years; and what the monetary value was of such payments and allowances in each such year. [148047]

James Brokenshire: The information requested is set out in the tables:

Table 1: Non-consolidated performance payments

Table 2: Largest 20 non-consolidated performance payments

Table 3: Allowances in addition to salary.

There are two separate sets of these three tables: one set covers Home Office HQ, the UK Border Agency (UKBA), the Identity and Passport Service (IPS) and the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB); the other set covers the Home Office's non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs).

Non-consolidated performance payments are one-off payments which are non-pensionable, are paid only to the top achievers and are used to help drive performance.

Allowances comprise skills and recruitment and retention allowances. The figures exclude locational allowances and temporary payments, such as those paid to staff for fulfilling temporary duties. They also exclude expenses,

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1358W

for example the reimbursement of costs actually and necessarily incurred in the course of official business.

Pay arrangements for the senior civil service (SCS) are based on a framework set by the Cabinet Office. For staff below the SCS, Departments, agencies and NDPBs have delegated authority to tailor reward packages to meet their own business needs, and performance pay and pay-related allowances are a matter for each organisation.

This response does not include data for 2011-12 for the National Policing Improvement Agency, as to do so would be at a disproportionate cost.

Although the Equality and Human Rights Commission was sponsored by the Home Office during 2011-12, its data will be included in the Department of Culture, Media and Sport's response.

Home Office NDPBs

Table 1: In-year and end of year non-consolidated performance payments
Financial yearTotal value of payments (£)Number of staff receivingTotal number of staff eligible to receive paymentTotal value of largest 20 payments (£)

2011-12(1)

914,722

800

4,653

66,607

2010- 11

531,054

721

5,655

105,824

2009-10

915,993

924

5,818

213,893

2008-09

559,731

361

5,651

210,558

2007-08

405,243

422

5,010

178,162

Table 2: Largest 20 non-consolidated payments
£
Payment2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12(1)

1

25,000

20,000

16,793

10,000

10,000

2

15,000

17,000

16,350

8,460

5,000

3

15,000

17,000

12,500

8,250

5,000

4

13,978

17,000

10,000

5,000

5,000

5

12,000

17,000

10,000

5,000

5,000

6

12,000

11,000

10,000

5,000

5,000

7

8,706

10,000

10,000

5,000

5,000

8

8,000

9,026

10,000

5,000

5,000

9

8,000

9,026

10,000

5,000

4,500

10

8,000

9,026

10,000

5,000

2,400

11

7,156

8,500

10,000

5,000

1,687

12

5,322

8,495

10,000

5,000

1,633

13

5,000

8,495

10,000

5,000

1,500

14

5,000

8,495

10,000

5,000

1,500

15

5,000

8,495

10,000

5,000

1,500

16

5,000

8,000

10,000

5,000

1,411

17

5,000

6,000

10,000

5,000

1,369

18

5,000

6,000

10,000

4,232

1,369

19

5,000

6,000

10,000

2,482

1,369

20

5,000

6,000

8,250

2,400

1,369

(1 )This figure does not include the National Policing Improvement Agency.
Table 3: Allowances in addition to salary
Financial yearAllowances in addition to salary (£)

2011-12

600,646

2010-11

1,004,093

2009-10

1,018,864

2008-09

1,278,547

2007-08

1,716,457

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1359W

Home Office HQ, UKBA, IPS and CRB

Table 1: Performance-related pay awards for the performance year 2011-12
Total value of payments (£)Number of awards(1)Number of staff eligible for awardTotal value of largest 20 payments (£)

4,502,280

7,936

30,724

181,000.00

(1 )Data included cover the number of awards made, not the number of individuals awarded a payment. Staff in grades AA to G6 are eligible to receive both an end of year non-consolidated performance payment and a special performance payment in the same year. Therefore the number of payments may include individuals who have been awarded both types of payment within the 2011-12 performance year. Notes: Extract date: 1 April 2012 for Data View, 30 September 2012 for payroll information. Source: Data on non-consolidated performance-related pay taken from P60 information from payroll and reconciled with Data View—the Home Office's single source of Office for National Statistics compliant monthly snapshot Corporate Human Resources data. Period covered: Data relate to the performance year 2011-12 in which these payments were awarded; 2011-12 end of year performance-related payments were paid in July 2012; and special performance payments were made during the 2011-12 year in which they were awarded. Employee coverage: All civil servants, paid and unpaid, who were either current staff or leavers as at 31 March 2012 have been included as eligible for a performance-related payment. Organisational coverage: Figures include Home Office headquarters (including Border Force) and the Department's executive agencies (UK Border Agency, Identity and Passport Service and the Criminal Records Bureau—data for the National Fraud Agency were not available). Transparency agenda considerations: Figures provided are in line with Cabinet Office guidelines on non-consolidated performance payment reporting. Additional notes: Includes end of year performance payments made to grades AA to SCS, and special performance awards made to grades AA to G6. SCS bonuses are also reported in the Department's Annual Report and Accounts for the end of each financial year. Performance-based contractual bonus payments made to members of the SCS have also been included.
Table 2: Largest 20 non-consolidated payments 2011-12
Payment£

1

(1)56,000

2

10,000

3

8,000

4

7,000

5

7,000

6

7,000

7

7,000

8

7,000

9

7,000

10

7,000

11

7,000

12

7,000

13

7,000

14

7,000

15

5,000

16

5,000

17

5,000

18

5,000

19

5,000

20

5,000

(1 )The Home Office runs some of the biggest, most important programmes across Government. This payment was made to a member of staff who was employed for a short (fixed) term specialist programme which required specialist expertise. The fixed-term appointment has now ended.
Table 3: Allowances in addition to salary
Financial year£

2011-12

3,601,213

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1360W

Police

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (a) how many and (b) what proportion of police officers were in each National Readership Grade social grade in each of the last 30 years. [153433]

Damian Green: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Police Cautions

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many cautions were issued for indictable only offences (a) nationally and (b) by police authority area in each year from 2002 to 2012 by type of offence; [140265]

(2) how many cautions were issued for (a) triable either way offences and (b) indictable only offences in each year from 2002 to 2012 (i) nationally and (ii) by police authority area; [140266]

(3) what the caution rate was by type of offence in each year from 2002 to 2012 (a) in England and Wales and (b) by police authority area. [140268]

Jeremy Wright: The use of cautions is at its lowest level for more than five years, as is the number of cautions issued to those who have a previous criminal record. However, the public and victims have a right to expect that people who commit serious crimes should be brought before a court. On 3 April 2013 we launched a review of the use of cautions which will focus on the use of cautions for serious offences and persistent offenders. Among other things, the review will examine whether there are some offences for which the use of simple cautions is generally inappropriate, the reasons why multiple cautions are given to some criminals and the difference in the use of cautions by police force areas. The review is a significant step to ensuring that cautions are used correctly, in the interests of justice, and command the confidence of the public.

The number of cautions issued for indictable only and triable either way offences, and the caution rate by type of offence in each police force area in England and Wales in each year from 2002 to 2011 (latest data available), can be viewed in the tables. Statistics on out-of-court disposals in 2012 are planned for publication in May 2013.

Police ICT Company

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the current status is of the Police IT Company; and what the value is of the savings it has made to date. [151268]

Damian Green: In June 2012 the Police ICT Company was established as a company limited by guarantee. It is currently jointly owned by the Home Office and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners (APCC), as an interim measure until Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) take ownership. The company is not yet operational. The company board is currently overseeing the development of the long-term business plan and structure of the company including ownership and will take the commercial decision as to when the company becomes operational.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1361W

The Police ICT Company Directorate (PCD) was created in the Home Office to build a business ready to transfer into the company in due course. This includes commercial management functions that were transferred from the National Policing Improvement Agency in October 2012. In 2012-13, PCD secured cost avoidance and cashable savings worth £36 million through challenge and commercial management of existing contracts.

Police: G8

Mr Dodds: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers from Great Britain are expected to be on duty in Northern Ireland over the period of the hosting of the G8 Summit in Northern Ireland. [153674]

Damian Green: This is a matter for the Police Service of Northern Ireland and chief officers of police from Scottish, Welsh and English police forces, under mutual aid arrangements.

Police: Recruitment

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent changes have been introduced in relation to the recruitment of police officers; and what assessment she plans to make of recruitment levels of officers from (a) black and ethnic minority communities and (b) deprived communities. [153581]

Damian Green: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Gentleman in the time available before Prorogation.

Procurement

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will publish details of all (a) her Department's and (b) its non-departmental public bodies' existing contractual commitments with a value of (i) between £100,000 and £1 million, (ii) between £1 million and £10 million, (iii) between £10 million and £100 million and (iv) over £100 million; what the (A) duration, (B) value including annual costs to the public purse, (C) expiry date and (D) purpose of each such contract is; and whether each such contract contains (1) renewal clauses and (2) early release clauses. [153652]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1362W

James Brokenshire: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012

Chris White: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department has taken to implement the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012. [153503]

James Brokenshire: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Redundancy Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many officials in (a) her Department and (b) each of the non-departmental public bodies for which she is responsible received payments under a voluntary exit scheme in each of the last five years; and at what total cost in each such year. [152652]

James Brokenshire: Information about the number of officials in the Home Department and its non-departmental public bodies who have received payments under an exit scheme in 2010-11 and 2011-12 and the total costs of those exits has been published in the Home Department's annual report and accounts for those years. This is shown in the following table. Information for 2012-13 will be published as part of the 2012-13 annual report and accounts. There were no voluntary exits from the Home Department and its non-departmental public bodies in 2009-10. Information on years prior to 2009-10 is not captured centrally and could be calculated only at disproportionate cost.

The Civil Service Compensation Scheme was reformed in December 2010. Under the previous terms, there could be costs extending for up to 10 years from a departure while under the reformed scheme all of the costs fall within the year of departure. The National Audit Office has estimated that under the reformed scheme, the cost of exits is around 40-50% less than the previous compensation scheme. The reformed scheme allows for greater distinction between voluntary and compulsory exits and is designed to encourage voluntary rather than compulsory departures.

Table as shown in Annual Report and Accounts 2011-12, page 129. Accounts Section, Note 7.1: Reporting of civil service and other compensation schemes—exit packages
Civil Service Compensation Scheme
 2011-122010-11
Exit package cost bandNumber of compulsory redundanciesNumber of other departures agreedTotal number of exit packages by cost bandNumber of compulsory redundanciesNumber of other departures agreedTotal number of exit packages by cost band

Less than £10,000

25

91

116

2

265

267

£10,000 to £25,000

10

717

727

3

711

714

£25,000 to £50,000

2

582

584

9

563

572

£50,000 to £100,000

279

279

5

463

468

£100,000 to £150,000

60

60

2

162

164

£150,000 to £200,000

1

12

13

59

59

£200,000 to £250,000

6

6

15

15

£250,000 to £300,000

1

1

4

4

£300,000 to £350,000

1

1

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1363W

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1364W

       

Total number of exit packages by type

38

1,748

1,786

21

2,243

2,264

Total resource cost (£000)

536

63,297

63,833

1,066

100,287

101,353

Note: Redundancy and other departure costs have been paid in accordance with the provisions of the Civil Service Compensation Scheme, a statutory scheme made under the Superannuation Act 1972. Exit costs are accounted for in full in the year of departure. Where the Department has agreed early retirements, the additional costs are met by the Department and not by the civil service pension scheme. Ill-health retirement costs are met by the pension scheme and are not included in the table: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/143619/annual-report-2011-12.pdf

Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the five largest employers in Bassetlaw constituency were in terms of recruitment through the 2012 seasonal agricultural workers scheme. [151275]

Mr Harper: There were only three employers in the Bassetlaw constituency that used the seasonal agricultural workers scheme in 2012:

Wheatley Wood Produce

Tasker, E A and M

CM & GW Goacher Ltd.

They are ranked on the most number of workers recruited.

Notes:

1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols.

2. Figures based on information provided by the operators responsible for administering the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme (SAWS) on behalf of the Home Office.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the 20 largest employers were in terms of recruitment through the 2012 seasonal agricultural workers scheme. [151277]

Mr Harper: The following table lists the top 20 employers who recruited workers through the 2012 seasonal agricultural workers scheme. They are ranked on the most number of workers recruited.

RankingFarm

1

Barway Services Ltd

2

Staples Vegetables

3

Haygrove

4

Oakdene Farm

5

International Farm Camp

6

Rowe Farming Limited

7

Brook Farm

8

Cobrey Farms

9

Hugh Lowe Farms Ltd

10

Edward Vinson

11

Hernhill Nursery

12

Sandfields Farms Limited

13

E C Drummond & Son

14

George Busby & Sons

15

M T Mitchell

16

Pencoyd Court Farm

17

Stewarts Of Tayside Ltd

18

Rumwood Green Farm

19

Oakchurch Farm

20

Groves Farm

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. Figures based on information provided by the operators responsible for administering the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme (SAWS) on behalf of the Home Office.

Sexual Offences: Victim Support Schemes

Ann Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department for which services provided by sexual assault referral centres funding will be transferred from her Department to the NHS National Commissioning Board in 2015; and if she will make a statement. [152836]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The funding and commissioning arrangements for sexual assault referral centres are now a matter for NHS England, who will work collaboratively with Police and Crime Commissioners and local authority commissioners to determine the needs for their local areas.

Sexual Offences: Young People

Yvette Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much funding the Government have allocated since 2010-11 on improving services for people under the age of 18 who are victims of sexual violence. [152632]

Mrs May [holding answer 22 April 2013]: The Government are committed to ensuring that victims of sexual violence have access to the support they need. The Home Office and Ministry of Justice have collectively ring-fenced nearly £40 million of stable funding until

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1365W

2015 for specialist domestic and sexual violence local support services and national helplines, which will include assisting those under the age of 18.

This funding includes the Home Office provision of £1.72 million per year for 87 independent sexual violence advisors, some of which specialise in dealing with victims under the age of 18. This level of funding will continue to 2015.

The Home Office is also providing £1.2 million over three years (from April 2012 until March 2015) for 13 Young People's Advocates working in areas most affected by gangs. They provide direct and dedicated support to young people under 18 who have been victims, or are at risk of, sexual and domestic violence and/or sexual exploitation.

UK Border Agency

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she expects performance in each area of permanent migration within the UK Border Agency to be within the agency's service standard by March 2013. [150295]

Mr Harper [holding answer 15 April 2013]: As at the end of March 2013, nationality and settlement casework were within published service standards. European casework was at 97% against a service standard of 100% of cases decided within six months.

The information has been provided from local management information and has not been quality assured to the level of published National Statistics. As such it should be treated as provisional and therefore subject to change.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the cost of transferring the functions of UK Border Agency to her Department. [151211]

Mr Harper [holding answer 18 April 2013]: Any costs incurred in this internal Home Office reorganisation will be met from existing budgets.

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate her Department has made of the cost to the public purse of restructuring the UK Border Agency. [151286]

Mr Harper [holding answer 17 April 2013]: Any costs incurred in this internal Home Office reorganisation will be met from existing budgets.

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on which dates the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration was (a) consulted about and (b) given final confirmation of the abolition of the UK Border Agency and the return of its functions to her Department; [151455]

Mr Harper [holding answer 17 April 2013]:Home Office Ministers have regular meetings and conversations with ministerial colleagues and others as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1366W

UK Border Agency: South West

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many raids on (a) home addresses and (b) workplaces the UK Border Agency has conducted in (i) Swindon and (ii) the South West in the last 12 months. [152808]

Mr Harper [holding answer 23 April 2013]: The Home Office does not collate information centrally on the number of home and workplace enforcement visits by town or at district level.

However, this information is available for the ‘Wales and the South West Region’. Records indicate that between April 2012 and March 2013, the Home Office carried out 575 enforcement visits to residential addresses and 1,019 visits to non-residential addresses.

All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols.