Renewable Energy

Andrew George: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of investor and financial market confidence in the renewable and low-carbon energy sector. [152778]

Sajid Javid: The Government introduced the Energy Bill to Parliament in November 2012, seeking to deliver electricity market reforms to support low-carbon investment. On publication of the Bill, the Government also set a cap on the level of support for low-carbon electricity generation out to 2020 of £7.6 billion (real 2012 prices).

The Bill, on track for Royal Assent by the end of 2013, puts in place measures to attract the investment which is needed to replace current generating capacity and upgrade the grid by 2020, and to cope with rising electricity demand. It will provide long-term certainty for investors in all forms of generation.

Revenue and Customs: Complaints

Toby Perkins: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he is taking to ensure that complaints and queries from businesses to HM Revenue and Customs can be made easily and quickly via email. [153196]

Mr Gauke: HMRC has over 100 electronic contact services available to customers that offer a structured and secure means of communicating with HMRC through its website, and we are looking at doing even more.

In the autumn statement HMRC announced it will allow small business customers to access their tax accounts, transact and interact with HMRC using secure digital channels. HMRC is designing the service in such a way that the majority of customers’ needs can be met easily, quickly and simply without recourse to costly communication channels. As such, HMRC has completed a ‘use of email’ pilot with large and complex customers (ie those with £30 million+ turnover or 250+ staff) using existing HMRC technology and capability, which proved very successful. Email is now being used in our day to day processes with these types of customers and the fully redesigned service will go live in April 14.

HMRC is also developing an email strategy and it is anticipated that this will be delivered during 2013-14 with a supporting implementation plan to integrate email use into HMRC for its customers.

Scotland

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what (a) external organisations and (b) individuals his Department engaged with as part of the Scotland Analysis programme; and what was discussed at each such meeting; [153303]

(2) how many members of his Department's staff have been allocated to work on the Scotland Analysis programme; and at what cost to the public purse; [153304]


(3) what meetings he or his officials have had with the right hon. Member for Edinburgh South West as part of the Scotland Analysis programme; and what was discussed at each such meeting; [153305]


(4) what work his Department has commissioned by external consultants in relation to work on the Scotland Analysis programme; which consultants were used; and at what cost to the public purse. [153306]

Danny Alexander: Work on the Scotland Analysis programme is being carried out across Government by policy experts in relevant areas. There is a small team in the Treasury co-ordinating the programme. The cost of carrying out the work is being funded from existing departmental budgets in the normal way. To date, no consultants have been sought or employed by the Treasury as part of this programme.

Treasury Ministers and officials engage with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Meetings held or attended by Ministers and senior officials are routinely published as part of the Department's quarterly transparency returns and can be found on the Treasury's website.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1153W

Sterling: Scotland

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on the use of sterling as currency in an independent Scotland. [153449]

Danny Alexander: The Chancellor of the Exchequer has had no discussions with the Scottish Government on the use of sterling as a currency in an independent Scotland.

Tax Evasion and Avoidance

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he plans to take to reduce the amount of revenue lost to the Exchequer through tax evasion and tax avoidance. [153432]

Mr Gauke: In the 2013 Budget the Government announced a wide-ranging package of measures to tackle tax avoidance and offshore evasion that are forecast to raise over £4 billion over the next five years. These measures include the UK's first General Anti-Abuse Rule (GAAR), closure of 10 loopholes, and agreements with the Isle of Man, Guernsey and Jersey to increase tax transparency and encourage offshore tax evaders to put their affairs on the right footing.

At the 2010 Spending Review, the Government reinvested £917 million in HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) to tackle tax avoidance, evasion, criminal attack and debt; and invested a further £77 million in the Autumn Statement 2012. HMRC’s spending this money on increasing the number of specialists working on compliance, improving their skills and investing in the data and technology that they use to identify and tackle tax avoidance and evasion. By the end of 2014-15, this investment will have contributed to delivering £22 billion a year in extra tax revenues.

Taxation: Environment Protection

Mr Yeo: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what representations he has received on the effect of the Carbon Price Floor on the competitiveness of UK business. [152901]

Sajid Javid [holding answer 23 April 2013]:Treasury Ministers and officials engage with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors, both meeting and receiving correspondence from stakeholders, as well as their ministerial colleagues, as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

The Treasury publishes a list of ministerial meetings with external organisations. This is available online at

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/minister_hospitality.htm

Valuation Office Agency

Mr Raab: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will place in the Library a copy of the Valuation Office Agency's training video entitled, Breaking the code - an aid to understanding dwellinghouse coding. [144818]

Mr Gauke: This historic training video was produced in 1995 and is no longer available to Valuation Office Agency (VOA) staff. It was superseded by the Dwelling

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1154W

House Coding Guide, which was first published on the VOA's website in 2007 and placed in the Library in 2009, and the latest coding guidance is available on the Agency's corporate website:

http://www.voa.gov.uk/corporate/publications/DwellingHouseCodingGuide/index.html

A transcript of the training video will be placed in the Library and I will write to my hon. Friend on the matter of releasing the video.

Welfare Tax Credits

Priti Patel: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what estimate he has made of the number of (a) individuals and (b) households with an annual income from employment of (i) zero, (ii) zero to £1,000, (iii) £1,000 to £2,000, (iv) £2,000 to £3,000, (v) £3,000 to £4,000, (vi) £4,000 to £5,000, (vii) £5,000 to £6,000, (viii) £6,000 to £7,000, (ix) £7,000 to £8,000, (x) £8,000 to £9,000, (xi) £9,000 to £10,000, (xii) £10,000 to £11,000, (xiii) £11,000 to £12,000, (xiv) £12,000 to £13,000, (xv) £13,000 to £14,000, (xvi) £14,000 to £15,000, (xvii) £15,000 to £16,000, (xviii) £16,000 to £17,000, (xix) £17,000 to £18,000, (xx) £18,000 to £19,000, (xxi) £19,000 to £20,000, (xxii) £20,000 to £21,000, (xxiii) £21,000 to £22,000, (xxiv) £22,000 to £23,000, (xxv) £23,000 to £24,000, (xxvi) £24,000 to £25,000, (xxvii) £25,000 to £26,000, (xxviii) £26,000 to £27,000, (xxix) £27,000 to £28,000, (xxx) £28,000 to £29,000, (xxxi) £29,000 to £30,000, (xxxii) £30,000 to £31,000, (xxxiii) £31,000 to £32,000, (xxxiv) £32,000 to £33,000, (xxxv) £33,000 to £34,000, (xxxvi) £34,000 to £35,000 and (xxxvii) over £35,000, who receive (A) any type of tax credit, (B) working family tax credits and (C) child tax credits; [153451]

(2) what estimate he has made of the average amount paid in (a) any type of tax credit, (b) working family tax credits and (c) child tax credits to (i) individuals and (ii) households with an annual income from employment of (A) zero, (B) zero to £1,000, (C) £1,000 to £2,000, (D) £2,000 to £3,000, (E) £3,000 to £4,000, (F) £4,000 to £5,000, (G) £5,000 to £6,000, (H) £6,000 to £7,000, (I) £7,000 to £8,000, (J) £8,000 to £9,000 (K) £9,000 to £10,000, (L) £10,000 to £11,000, (M) £11,000 to £12,000, (N) £12,000 to £13,000, (O) £13,000 to £14,000, (P) £14,000 to £15,000, (Q) £15,000 to £16,000, (R) £16,000 to £17,000, (S) £17,000 to £18,000, (T) £18,000 to £19,000, (U) £19,000 to £20,000, (V) £20,000 to £21,000, (W) £21,000 to £22,000, (X) £22,000 to £23,000, (Y) £23,000 to £24,000, (Z) £24,000 to £25,000, (AA) £25,000 to £26,000, (BB) £26,000 to £27,000, (CC) £27,000 to £28,000, (DD) £28,000 to £29,000, (EE) £29,000 to £30,000, (FF) £30,000 to £31,000, (GG) £31,000 to £32,000, (HH) £32,000 to £33,000, (II) £33,000 to £34,000, (JJ) £34,000 to £35,000 and (KK) over £35,000 in the latest year for which figures are available. [153453]

Sajid Javid: This information could be made available only at disproportionate cost.

National Statistics are available for tax credits awards in the 2010-11 tax year on the HMRC website. These figures relate to the finalised awards, and are located here:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/statistics/fin-main-stats.htm

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1155W

Priti Patel: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many (a) individuals and (b) households were eligible to receive (i) any type of tax credit, (ii) working family tax credits and (c) child tax credits in each of the last five years; and if he will estimate the number of such (A) individuals and (B) households in each of the next five years. [153452]

Sajid Javid: Information on the number of families claiming tax credits is available in HMRC's published National Statistics, “Child and Working Tax Credits Finalised annual awards”, available at:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/statistics/fin-main-stats.htm

Information on the number of families entitled to, but not claiming, tax credits is available in HMRC's published statistics on take-up rates for tax credits, “Child Benefit, Child Tax Credit and Working Tax Credit Take-up rates”, available here:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/statistics/fin-takeup-stats.htm

A breakdown of adults in families who are eligible for WTC could be made available only at disproportionate cost. A forecast of the number of families eligible to receive tax credits, child tax credit and working tax credit could be made available only at disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the annual cost to the public purse is of administering (a) all tax credits, (b) working family tax credits and (c) child tax credits. [153454]

Sajid Javid: The costs of the administration of payments can be found in the HMRC Annual Report at:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/about/annual-report-accounts-1112.pdf

Priti Patel: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much has been paid in (a) all tax credits, (b) working family tax credits and (c) child tax credits in each of the last five years; and what estimate he has made of such amounts in each of the next five years. [153455]

Sajid Javid: The information requested is given in the following table.

Annual tax credits expenditure (£ billion)
 Total tax creditsChild tax creditWorking tax credit

Outturn

   

2008-09

24.1

16.5

7.6

2009-10

27.6

19.6

8.0

2010-11

28.9

20.9

8.0

2011-12

29.8

22.7

7.1

2012-13(1)

29.9

23.3

6.6

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1156W

Forecast

   

2013-14

30.0

2014-15

30.1

2015-16

30.7

2016-17

31.7

2017-18

32.5

(1) Provisional.

Total tax credits outturn expenditure is taken from published HMRC figures on tax receipts and expenditure, available here:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/statistics/receipts/receipts-stats.xls

Total tax credits figures for 2013-14 onwards are forecasts consistent with OBR's Economic and Fiscal Outlook for March 2013:

http://budgetresponsibility.independent.gov.uk/economic-and-fiscal-outlook-march-2013/

The split between child tax credit (CTC) and working tax credit (WTC) for 2008-09 to 2012-13 has been estimated using HMRC administrative data. Estimates for 2008-09 to 2011-12 are consistent with the split between CTC and WTC in published HMRC accounts. The estimate for 2012-13 is based on April 2013 data. Total expenditure forecasts are provided for 2013-14 to 2017-18. Separate estimates of CTC and WTC expenditure are not available.

Priti Patel: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the average amount awarded to households in (a) all tax credits combined, (b) working family tax credits and (c) child tax credits was in each of the last five years; and what estimate he has made of such sums in each of the next five years. [153456]

Sajid Javid: The information is as follows:

£
 Average CTC awardAverage WTC awardAverage combined award

2006-07

2,642

2,809

3,412

2007-08

2,777

2,946

3,611

2008-09

3,153

3,203

4,104

2009-10

3,415

3,233

4,380

2010-11

3,552

3,217

4,525

The average combined award is higher than the average individual awards since claimants may be in receipt of both types of credit.

Information on tax credit awards is available in HMRC's published National Statistics, available at

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/statistics/fin-main-stats.htm

Forecasts of average amounts are not available.

Written Answers to Questions

Thursday 25 April 2013

Education

Academies

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the answer of 27 November 2012, Official Report, column 325W, on academies, what proportion of the converter academies supporting other schools are supporting (a) another academy and (b) a local maintained school. [133484]

Elizabeth Truss: All converter academies supporting another school through formal arrangements to raise performance are supporting other academies. Academies also provide support to other academies and maintained schools through other arrangements. The Department does not hold information on these other arrangements.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many complaints have been made to his Department about breaches of the civil service code by academy brokers. [149523]

Elizabeth Truss: There have been six formal written complaints made to the Department about named academy brokers in the last 12 months.

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the groups into which school academies are organised are allowed to make a profit on either the services they provide or the running of the schools. [149793]

Elizabeth Truss: As charitable trusts, individual academy trusts and multi academy trusts are not permitted to make a profit on goods and/or services supplied to their academies. When selecting a company to provide services, the academy trust must follow a fair and open procurement process. Where an academy has a sponsor, the sponsor company may tender for the provision of services ‘at cost'. This means that, if successful, the sponsor must provide services ‘at cost' and must not charge any element of profit.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much was spent by academies on contracts with for-profit organisations for school management services or other services in each year since 2010. [151158]

Elizabeth Truss: Academy trusts are required to prepare and submit audited financial statements in accordance with company and charity law. As with local authority schools, there is no requirement to analyse expenditure to the detailed level which would enable the identification of spend through contract arrangements.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1158W

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure transparency and value for money when an academy opts to contract a for-profit organisation owned by the respective academy group. [151159]

Elizabeth Truss: As public sector bodies, academy trusts are expected to comply with public sector procurement rules and to seek best value in purchasing goods and services. The Education Funding Agency ensures there is an appropriate framework on these matters. The academies financial handbook sets out the duties and obligations on academy trusts and these include:

Personal responsibilities on the academy trust's accounting officer for high standards of probity in the management of public funds;

Ensuring a competitive tendering process is in place and applied.

The preparation and publication of audited financial statements provides transparency on the use of public funds and academy trusts are required to disclose details of related party transactions in their financial statements.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what for-profit companies are wholly owned by each academy chain or group. [151160]

Elizabeth Truss: Academy trusts can establish subsidiary companies to carry on any trade or business for the sole purpose of raising additional funds for the academy trust. This can provide additional revenue for academies to spend on improving educational outcomes. Academy Trusts and subsidiary companies cannot profit from academies; they are free to raise funds but any surplus must be re-invested according to the charitable object of the trust. Academy trusts, as charitable organisations, cannot make a profit.

Sponsors of academies must not profit from their relationship with their trusts. Some academy sponsors have, or chose to set up, companies to bid for contracts to provide services to their trusts. However, sponsors or sponsor related bodies who win contracts to deliver services to their trusts must do so only ‘at cost' (no profit must be made). Academy trusts have been able to set up subsidiary companies in this way since the first academy trusts were set up in 2003.

From the 2011/12 audited financial statements the list of academy trusts reported owning subsidiary companies will be placed in the Library of the House. The list is based on the position as reported at 31 August 2012.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which academies, from which academy groups, have breached their funding agreements since May 2010; when each such breach occurred; and what the reasons for each such breach were. [151161]

Michael Gove: Since being established on 1 April 2012, the Education Funding Agency (EFA) has recorded funding agreement breaches by 411 academies or academy trusts. An accurate list of the reasons for each individual breach—which can range from non-compliant complaints processes to late return of audited financial statements—could be collated only at disproportionate cost.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1159W

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which academy groups operate in England; and what the (a) number, (b) name and (c) location is of the academies within any such group. [151189]

Elizabeth Truss: We have taken academy groups to mean chains of two or more academies. A list of academy chains containing the number, name, and location of their academies has been placed in the House Libraries.

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what action his Department is able to take against an academy chain that fails to address financial weaknesses. [153189]

Elizabeth Truss: Where a chain or multi-academy trust has failed to address financial weaknesses in its operation, a financial notice to improve can be issued, requiring the trust to take action to address the underlying cause(s) of its financial weaknesses.

The financial notice to improve is a set of conditions that the Education Funding Agency (EFA) would require the trust to meet. It would be customised to the specific trust and its circumstances. The trust would be expected to provide a robust and timely action plan setting out how it will address the issues of concern in response to the financial notice to improve. This would be assessed for adequacy, agreed and monitored by the EFA to ensure compliance. Peer and sector-based support options would be explored, such as negotiating the addition of new sponsors, to assist addressing any underlying concerns.

Ultimately, if a chain or multi-academy trust fails to address the financial weaknesses the Secretary of State for Education has intervention powers which are set out in the individual funding agreements and, in the most serious circumstances, include the ability to terminate the funding agreement.

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many academies have been issued with financial notices to improve since May 2010. [153190]

Elizabeth Truss: The Education Funding Agency has issued two financial notices to improve since May 2010 to academy trusts.

Academies: Finance

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (a) how many and (b) what type of funding agreement violations have been recorded by the Education Funding Agency since May 2010. [146029]

Mr Laws: Since being established on 1 April 2012, the Education Funding Agency (EFA) has recorded 411 breaches of the funding agreement, 339 of which were a failure to submit a financial return by a given date. Between May 2010 and March 2012, the EFA's predecessor, the Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA), recorded 122 funding agreement breaches as a result of failure to submit a financial return by a given date; no other breaches were systematically recorded. The percentage of academy trusts submitting their financial statements on time has improved from 73% in 2009/10 to 80% in 2010/11, and 87% in 2011/12.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1160W

The type of funding agreement breaches recorded by the EFA include failure to submit financial accounts on time, failure to fulfil certain statutory duties and failure to obtain the approval of the Secretary of State for Education to act where required to do so. In all cases, the EFA first contacts the academy to make sure it is aware of its obligations under the funding agreement; it then works with the academy to achieve compliance. Failure to comply with the funding agreement is not acceptable and may lead to sanctions.

Advanced Extension Awards

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on measures to encourage more A-level students to undertake advanced extension awards. [151988]

Elizabeth Truss: Advanced extension awards were introduced in 2002, to challenge the most able advanced level students. Following changes made to A-levels in 2008, including the introduction of the A* and greater stretch and challenge, advanced extension awards in subjects other than mathematics ceased to be offered after 2009. The Government are not taking any specific action to encourage more A level students to undertake the advanced extension award in mathematics.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the merits of the advanced extension award in bridging the gap between school and university. [151989]

Elizabeth Truss: Advanced extension awards were introduced in 2002, to challenge the most able advanced level students. Following changes made to A-levels in 2008, including the introduction of the A* and greater stretch and challenge, advanced extension awards in subjects other than mathematics ceased to be offered after 2009. It is important that students are well prepared for the transition between school and university, which is why the Government are reforming A-levels to ensure greater input from universities in their design and development.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many A-level students undertook the advanced extension award in (a) history and (b) geography in each of the last five years. [151990]

Elizabeth Truss: Advanced extension awards in subjects other than mathematics ceased to be offered after 2009. Awards for pupils completing A-level studies in 2008/09 are shown in the following table.

Numbers of students aged 16-18(1) at the end of advanced level study(2) who were awarded(3) an advanced extension award in selected subjects, Years: 2008/09 (final), Coverage: England (all schools and colleges)
Subject2008/09

History

751

Geography

330

(1) Age in years at the start of the academic year, i.e. 31 August 2008. (2) Students entered for a GCE or Applied GCE A-level or Double Award in the summer examination session of the respective year. (3) Excludes pupils who were recorded as absent/declined (grade X).

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1161W

Air Travel

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many officials in his (a) Department and (b) its non-departmental public bodies travelled on (i) domestic and (ii) international flights in each of the last five years; in which class categories; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest airfare charges in each such year. [152529]

Elizabeth Truss: Based on data held within the Department, the numbers of officials who have travelled on domestic and international flights in the last five years are set out in the following table.

Type2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Domestic

770

339

202

51

57

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1162W

International

367

147

76

237

197

The class of travel breakdown is set out in the following table.

Class2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Business Class

431

64

4

11

16

Economy

703

417

273

276

236

First Class

3

2

1

1

Premium Economy

3

2

Total

1,137

486

278

288

254

The total cost breakdown of the same is set out in the following table.

£
Type2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Domestic

122,373.23

57,713.88

38,196.29

7,783.21

6,156.19

International

239,425.79

59,664.01

26,652.83

74,844.53

68,766.80

Total

361,799.02

117,377.89

64,849.12

82,627.74

74,922.99

The monetary values of the 20 highest airfare charges in each year are set out in the following table.

Financial yearTotal of top 20 airfares (£)

2008-09

80,218.65

2009-10

43,865.78

2010-11

4,789.18

2011-12

30,840.69

2012-13

30,993.15

Data for arm’s length bodies and non-departmental public bodies are not held centrally and therefore has not been used in the analysis given. The data for the financial year 2012-13 includes the recently formed Executive agencies of the Department.

Artworks

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the value is of each work of art on display in his private ministerial office. [153284]

Elizabeth Truss: There are no works of art on display in the office of the Secretary of State for Education. Posters on display in the office are the property of the Secretary of State and are, therefore, not valued by the Department.

Assets

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what (a) assets and (b) liabilities are held by (i) his Department and (ii) its non-departmental public bodies with a value of (A) between £100,000 and £1 million, (B) between £1 million and £10 million, (C) between £10 million and £100 million and (D) over £100 million; what the value is of each item; and what assets are scheduled for disposal. [153628]

Michael Gove: The Department’s tangible and intangible fixed asset net book values together with non-current liabilities are listed below as they stood at 31 March 2012. The same information as at 31 March 2013 will be available later this year in the Department's annual accounts.

The items are grouped in the same way as they are presented in the audited Annual Accounts.

This information does not include assets and liabilities for Academies; it relates only to the Department, its Executive agencies and NDPBs (and does not reflect machinery of Government changes made since 31 March 2012).

Property, Plant and Equipment: net book value at 31 March 2012
£000
CategoryCore departmentNDPBsConsolidated group

Land and Buildings

51,389

22,313

73,702

Information Technology

8,891

683

9,574

Plant and Machinery

44

12

56

Furniture and Fittings

9,320

2,992

12,312

Assets under Construction

4,352

4,352

Total

73,996

26,000

99,996

Intangible Assets: net book value at 31 March 2012
£000
CategoryCore departmentNDPBsConsolidated group

Software Licenses

2,173

528

2,771

Developed Software

30,960

1,068

32,028

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1163W

Teacher's TV Programmes

17,688

17,688

Assets under Construction

6,100

240

6,340

Total

56,921

1,906

58,827

Other Liabilities: carrying value at 31 March 2012
£000
CategoryCore departmentNDPBsConsolidated group

Employee Early Departure Provision

25,050

Retirement Compensation

68,012

Property Provisions

19,638

Other NDPB Provisions

18,142

Total

130,842

Categories of provisions are not listed for each body within the annual accounts; they are disclosed for the consolidated group only.

Group pension liabilities are valued at £148 million. This belongs to CAFCASS, which runs a defined benefit pension scheme; the rest of the Departmental Group's employees are members of PCSPS, the Civil Service Pension Scheme, which is an unfunded, multi-employer defined benefit scheme, which does not break out an individual Department's share of the underlying assets and liabilities.

On 24 April 2013 we announced that we plan to close and dispose of the Runcorn site next year.

Beef: Horsemeat

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has had any recent updates from the Food Standards Agency on the risk

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1164W

that burgers with horsemeat have been distributed into the supply chain of UK schools; and if he will make a statement. [140244]

Elizabeth Truss: The Food Standards Agency has advised that investigations are continuing to find out how a number of meat products became contaminated with traces of pork and horse DNA. If contaminated products are identified, steps will be taken to ensure that these are removed from the food chain. Many retailers and suppliers have already taken action to identify and withdraw products from sale on a precautionary basis.

Schools are responsible for the procurement of the food they provide, in negotiation with their caterers. If schools are concerned about food that they serve, they should contact their caterers or their local authority for further information.

Children in Care: Death

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children under 18 years old who have died while in the care of local authorities in the last 10 years have (a) had those deaths investigated by police and (b) died as a result of overdosing of illegal drugs; and if he will make a statement. [151480]

Mr Timpson: Table 1 shows the number of children, aged under 18, who died while being looked after by local authorities in England for the year 2003 to 2012.

However, the Department does not collect information on either the cause of death or any other factors involved. Information is not therefore available on the number of those deaths investigated by the police or the number which were a result of overdosing of illegal drugs.

Information is also available on the number of child death reviews which were completed for children who were the subject of a statutory order at the time of the death. These figures are shown in table 2 for the year 2011 and 2012; figures are not available for years prior to this.

Table 1: Number of looked-after children who have died while being looked after by a local authority(1, 2, 3), year ending 31 March 2003 to 2012, England
 2003200420052006200720082009201020112012

Number of children who died while being looked after by local authorities

60

60

70

60

70

50

50

50

50

40

(1) Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. (2) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short-term placements. (3) Historical data may differ from older publications. This is mainly due to the implementation of amendments and corrections sent by some local authorities after the publication date of previous materials. Source: SSDA 903.
Table 2: Number of child death(1) reviews completed by child death overview panels on behalf of local safeguarding children boards by statutory order status, England
 Year ending 31 March(2, 3)
 20112012

At the time of death

40

50

Previously, but not at time of death

20

20

Never the subject of a statutory order

3,610

3,610

Unknown(4)

350

290

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1165W

Insufficient information to fully review the death

40

50

All child death reviews completed

4,060

4,010

(1) A child for these purposes is defined as a child aged 0 up to their 18th birthday, excluding stillbirths. (2) Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Figures may not add up due to rounding. (3) Deaths are recorded by the date the child death review was completed, not by the date the death occurred. (4) Where statutory order status was unknown, this may be because this information is not collected by the panel or the information collected is not in the required format.

Children: Internet

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the safety of children online. [149453]

Mr Timpson: I co-chair the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) which brings together the internet industries, charities, academia, law enforcement and regulators to work in partnership to help keep children safe online. The Government have used this forum, which is informed by the reviews of Professor Tanya Byron and Reg Bailey, to identify the risks posed to children using the internet, and put in place a series of preventative and educational work-streams to address these risks.

In addition, between 28 June and 6 September 2012, the Department for Education held a consultation seeking views on the best ways to keep children safe online. The Government’s Response to the Consultation on Parental Internet Controls was published in December and outlines what is expected of the IT and communications industries to develop universally-available, family-friendly internet access.

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent meetings Ministers have had with internet service providers to monitor progress on the use of parental controls for internet usage. [152505]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 22 April 2013]: The Minister for Culture, Communications and the Creative Industries, my hon. Friend the Member for Wantage (Mr Vaizey), and co-chair of the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS), held a roundtable on parental controls with the five largest internet service providers (ISPs) on 31 January. UKCCIS Ministers, my hon. Friend the Member for Wantage, the Minister of State for Crime Prevention, the hon. Member for Taunton Deane (Mr Browne), and I) received an update on the progress of the five ISPs from representatives of TalkTalk and BT at the 11 February UKCCIS Executive Board meeting. A further update is expected at the next UKCCIS Executive Board meeting on 7 May 2013.

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what specific steps the Government are taking following its consultation on internet parental controls. [153250]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1166W

Mr Timpson: The Government published their response to the Parental Internet Controls Consultation in December 2012. This asked Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to actively encourage new and existing customers to switch on parental controls if children are in the household and will be using the internet. It also asks ISPs to put in place appropriate systems to ensure that the person setting up the parental controls is over 18.

In addition, the Government's response also asks the information and communications industries, including retailers and device manufacturers, to work to develop universally-available, family-friendly internet access which is easy to use.

As a co-chair of the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS), and with support from fellow co-chairs the Minister of State for Crime Prevention, the hon. Member for Taunton Deane (Mr Browne), and the Minister for Culture, Communications and the Creative Industries, my hon. Friend the Member for Wantage (Mr Vaizey), I am challenging the internet industries to meet these requests. Through a series of separate project groups, ISPs, public WiFi providers and device manufacturers are regularly reporting to the UKCCIS Executive Board on their commitments to put in place systems to reduce children's access to harmful internet content.

Child Protection

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) on what basis the proposed multi-agency child protection inspections have been deferred; [152046]

(2) whether he will publish the findings of the multi-agency inspections of child protection pilots. [152047]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 18 April 2013]: I have asked Sir Michael Wilshaw, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, to write to my hon. Friend about these matters which fall to Ofsted.

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether he will publish the findings of the multi-agency inspections of child protection pilots. [153311]

(2) on what basis the proposed multi-agency child protection inspections have been deferred. [153484]

Mr Timpson: I have asked Sir Michael Wilshaw, Her Majesty's chief inspector, to write to the hon. Member about these matters which fall to Ofsted.

Classroom Assistants

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many teaching assistants are employed in schools in England; and what the unit cost is of employing a teaching assistant. [153458]

Mr Laws: In November 2011 there were 219,800 full-time equivalent regular teaching assistants in service in publicly funded schools in England. The unit cost of employing a teaching assistant is not currently available due to the lack of quality assured salary data.

Information for November 2012 will be published shortly.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1167W

Classroom Assistants: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many teaching assistants were employed in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last five years. [152266]

Mr Laws [holding answer 22 April 2013]:The following table shows the full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants in service in publicly funded schools in Brigg and Goole constituency and the Yorkshire and the Humber region from January 2007 to November 2011, which is the latest information available.

Full-time equivalent teaching assistants in service in publicly funded schools (thousand). January 2007 to 2010 and November 2010 to 2011. Brigg and Goole
 Brigg and GooleYorkshire and the Humber

January

  

2007

0.3

18.0

2008

0.3

19.4

2009

0.3

20.1

2010

0.3

20.8

   

November

  

2011

n/a

24.3

n/a = Not available Sources: 1. January 2007 to 2010 (School Census) 2. November 2011 (School Workforce Census)

Statistics for the total number of teaching assistants in the Brigg and Goole constituency are not available for November 2011 because not all the schools in the area provided a complete return to the November 2011 School Workforce Census.

Cost Effectiveness

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will place in the Library (a) his Department's response to HM Treasury's requests for information on the value of departmental spending in terms of cost-effectiveness per unit cost in advance of the 2010 comprehensive spending review and (b) the data disclosed to HM Treasury on net present value per pound for resource spending. [153609]

Mr Laws: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Curriculum

Craig Whittaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he expects the final version of the revised National Curriculum to be available. [152127]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 April 2013]: A consultation on the new draft curriculum was published on 7 February and closed on 16 April. Subject to the outcomes of the consultation, we will publish the final version of the new national curriculum in the autumn. A further draft version will be published in the summer for schools to look at. All maintained schools will be required to teach the new programmes of study from September 2014. Further information will be available on the Department's website in due course.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1168W

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he will make a formal response to the UK Youth Parliament's Curriculum for Life campaign. [152710]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 April 2013]: We are awaiting an announcement by the Youth Select Committee, which was established by the British Youth Council through this Department's Youth Voice grant, on the subject of its inquiry this year. The Department for Education will play a full part in the inquiry, as we would for any Parliamentary Select Committee, if the Youth Select Committee chooses Curriculum for Life.

We have already discussed the curriculum with young people through the National Scrutiny Group, which was also established with funding from the Youth Voice grant, and are consulting young people with the support of the British Youth Council.

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent representations he has received on the introduction of a Curriculum for Life; and if he will make a statement. [153312]

Elizabeth Truss: I can confirm that we have already discussed the Curriculum for Life with young people through the National Scrutiny Group, and that we are consulting young people with the support of the British Youth Council. The Department has also received a number of pieces of correspondence relating to the Curriculum for Life.

Our proposals for the new national curriculum were published for consultation on 7 February, and the consultation closed on 16 April. The proposals are based on the principle that the national curriculum should set out a body of essential knowledge that children should be expected to acquire in key subjects during the course of their school career. One of these key subjects is citizenship in secondary schools, and the new programmes of study which we have proposed would cover a number of topics highlighted by the Curriculum for Life campaign including politics and, for the first time, personal finance.

The proposed new national curriculum has been designed to be slimmer than the existing one in order to free up teachers to create lessons that inspire and engage their pupils. Schools are free to teach any topic suggested by the UK Youth Parliament if they wish to do so.

Data Protection

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many confirmed data security breaches there have been in his Department in the last two years for which figures are available; and what action was taken after each occurrence. [148393]

Elizabeth Truss: The following table provides the number of confirmed data security breaches for the Department for Education for 2011 and 2012.

Confirmed data security breaches
 Number

2011

6

2012

14

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1169W

For the purposes of this reply, a confirmed data security breach is assumed to mean any reported and substantiated loss or compromise (actual or potential) of unencrypted data. The Department's Executive agencies are not included in these figures.

All reported security incidents are reviewed by the Department's departmental security unit and managers in the relevant business area. Appropriate action, including disciplinary action, is taken where it is considered appropriate. Any lessons learned from each incident are identified and actioned as required. Any incidents involving personal data are reviewed with regard to the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998. Where appropriate the Information Commissioner’s Office is notified.

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many official ministerial papers were recorded as not returned to his Department or otherwise unaccounted for by him and his private ministerial office in each month since May 2010. [149474]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 March 2013]:We have taken the phrase 'official ministerial papers' to mean Cabinet Committee papers. The Department's Cabinet Documents Officer has robust systems in place to ensure compliance with Cabinet Office guidance on handling papers. No ministerial papers have been recorded as not returned or unaccounted for since May 2010.

Disclosure of Information

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many civil servants in his Department have been subject to non-disclosure agreements in each year since 2010. [150030]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department does not use specific non-disclosure agreements but it uses settlement agreements, compromise agreements and COT3 agreements when resolving and settling issues and disputes with staff.

These agreements may contain a non-disclosure clause preventing the individual from disclosing or discussing the existence, negotiation and terms of the settlement. The Department always considers whether such a clause is appropriate and necessary and always ensures that any non-disclosure clause allows disclosure for business needs and the requirements of law, including accountability to Parliament. Non-disclosure clauses are not aimed at preventing staff from raising or disclosing any concerns regarding their employment, which they continue to have a right to do under whistleblowing legislation and the Department's whistleblowing policy.

The following numbers of civil servants in the Department for Education signed settlement agreements, compromise agreements or COT3 agreements, which contained a non-disclosure clause, in the last five years:

 Number

2008

9

2009

6

2010

2

2011

10

2012

9

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1170W

Domestic Visits

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which constituencies Ministers in his Department have visited in an official capacity in the last 12 months. [149091]

Elizabeth Truss: Information about which constituencies Ministers, have visited is not held centrally. To collate and provide this information for all Ministers for the last 12 months would incur disproportionate cost.

Dominic Cummings

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) pursuant to the answer of 26 March 2013, Official Report, column 1105W, on ministerial policy advisers, what the (a) date, (b) location and (c) nature was of each of the meetings to which he invited Dominic Cummings before his appointment as a special adviser; [151531]

(2) when Dominic Cummings was first given a departmental pass; [151532]

(3) pursuant to the answer of 26 March 2013, Official Report, column 1105W, on ministerial policy advisers, for what reason he is not able to provide a figure for the number of occasions Dominic Cummings visited his Department between May 2010 and 21 February 2011; and what records are kept of those signing in at his Department’s reception desk. [151533]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 17 April 2013]: Dominic Cummings was given a departmental pass on 3 February 2011 prior to his appointment as a special adviser on 21 February 2011. Departmental passes are often granted to non-employees who frequently attend meetings e.g. charity representatives.

As confirmed in the answer to my hon. Friend on 26 March 2013, Official Report, column 1105W, the Department can confirm that Dominic Cummings was invited to 30 meetings between May 2010 and 21 February 2011. It is not possible to confirm how many actual visits Dominic Cummings made to the Department as comprehensive attendance records are not held.

The Department’s reception desk maintains a daily planner recording visitors invited to meetings and holds a log of visitors signed in by the reception desk staff. These records are retained for one month.

Following a search of departmental records, the following table provides information about the meetings held by the Secretary of State for Education, to which Dominic Cummings was invited, between May 2010 and his appointment as a special adviser on 21 February 2011.

All meetings were held in the Department unless otherwise specified.

Date 

10 January 2011

Monday catch-up

17 January 2011

Monday catch-up

24 January 2011

Briefing meeting—Education Bill

24 January 2011

Monday catch-up

26 January 2011

Briefing meeting—Education Bill

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1171W

26 January 2011

Catch-up—Free Schools

27 January 2011

Quick chat

27 January 2011

Policy meeting on career service

27 January 2011

Briefing meeting—Education Bill

27 January 2011

Discussion meeting on funding pressures

27 January 2011

Discussion meeting on funding pressures (continued)

27 January 2011

Delivery Meeting

28 January 2011

Free School Conference Speaker Dinner at Quo Vadis

28 January 2011

Discussion meeting on music

31 January 2011

Monday catch-up

1 February 2011

Discussion meeting on curriculum and exam reform in House of Commons

1 February 2011

Discussion meeting on funding pressures

2 February 2011

Meeting with members of FilmClub

2 February 2011

Discussion meeting on funding pressures

3 February 2011

Delivery Meeting

7 February 2011

Monday catch-up

8 February 2011

Meeting with Stewart Jackson MP

9 February 2011

Quick chat

9 February 2011

Meeting with Professor Alison Wolf

10 February 2011

Comms meeting

10 February 2011

Delivery Meeting

14 February 2011

Comms meeting

14 February 2011

Monday catch-up

16 February 2011

Meeting with Patrick Mercer MP in House of Commons

17 February 2011

Delivery meeting

Drugs: Health Education

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how much his Department has spent on educating young people on the risks associated with Class (a) A, (b) B and (c) C drugs in each of the last five years; [139580]

(2) how much his Department has spent on advertising the risks associated with Class (a) A, (b) B and (c) C drugs via the Frank drug information campaign in each of the last five years. [140528]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education does not explicitly fund drug education. School pupils are currently provided with education on the physiological effects of drugs as part of the statutory National Curriculum Programmes of Study for science. They may also receive wider drugs education as part of non-statutory personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education.

The Frank service provides information and advice to young people about drugs. The Home Office, Department of Health and Department for Education work together to support the service. Funding is not allocated to advertising the risks associated with specific classes of drugs.

Education

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to encourage an inter-disciplinary approach to learning in secondary schools and sixth-form colleges. [151991]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1172W

Elizabeth Truss: Secondary schools and sixth-form colleges have flexibility in the way they teach different subjects and support pupils to make the relevant connections between them. For pupils aged 11-16, it is up to schools to decide how best to teach the prescribed content of the national curriculum and to design their own wider school curricula which best meet the needs of their pupils; this could include inter-disciplinary approaches.

Education Funding Agency

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he expects the Education Funding Agency to respond to the letter dated 11 July 2012 from Harrow council in relation to a Priority School Building Programme alternative financial proposal. [149271]

Mr Laws: Departmental officials are in continuing and regular dialogue with Harrow local authority regarding their Priority School Building Programme applications. A formal response to this proposal was sent to the local authority yesterday and copied to the hon. Member.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) staff and (b) consultants were working in the Education Funding Agency, or its component predecessor organisations, in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11, (iii) 2011-12 and (iv) 2012-13; and what estimate he has made of the number of such staff in (A) 2013-14 and (B) 2014-15. [152931]

Elizabeth Truss: The Education Funding Agency (EFA) was created on 1 April 2012, and was formed from a combination of three predecessor organisations: the Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA), Partnerships for Schools (PfS), and part of the Department for Education (DFE).

The YPLA was created on 1 April 2010, its functions previously being part of the Learning and Skills Council (LSC). It is not possible to isolate the YPLA element of the LSC figures, so precise data are not available for 2009-10, but the reorganisation of functions previously managed by the LSC during 2009-10 led to the transfer of nearly 1,000 posts with responsibilities for young people's learning to local authorities from April 2010.

Taking these factors into account, the following table shows the number of staff employed by the EFA and its component predecessor organisations from 2009-10 to 2012-13, with planned numbers for 2013-14 and 2014-15.

Overall, the number of staff employed by the Department for Education and its agencies, including the EFA, will fall from 5,575 in 2010-11, to 3,000 in 2014-15.

Table 1: Average full-time equivalent staffing numbers
    EFA 
 YPLAPfSDFE staff working on functions later transferred to EFAAdmin costsCapital fundedTotal

2009-10

n/a

189

34

n/a

2010-11

497

185

34

716

2011-12

524

167

34

725

2012-13

648

(1)91

739

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1173W

2013-14 (planned)

766

(1)141

907

2014-15 (planned)

776

(1)141

917

(1) Compared to predecessor organisations, a much larger part of the EFA's capital work is the direct management of capital build contracts. These costs were previously funded by grant borne in external organisations. The EFA accounts for these costs as capital funding.

Where staff were, or are planned to be, employed to conduct EFA core business, either on a temporary agency basis or on secondment from professional firms, these are included in the figures above.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the most recent total budget is of the Education Funding Agency. [152991]

Elizabeth Truss: The total budget for the Education Funding Agency for the financial year 2012-13 was £51,454,795,974.

Education: Young Offender Institutions

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much per head the Education Funding Agency has spent on education in young offender institutions in each year since May 2010. [152883]

Mr Laws: Education Funding Agency spending per head according to the average capacity of Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) was £6,886 in 2009/10, £6,356 in 2010/11 and £7,276 in 2011/12 (academic years).

Educational Institutions: Worcester

Mr Robin Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what capital investments either for maintenance or construction have been granted to (a) academies, (b) maintained schools and (c) colleges in Worcester by his Department in each of the last three years. [151801]

Mr Laws: Capital support provided to Worcestershire and its schools since 2010-11 is set out in the following table:

 Capital Funding (£ million)
Capital support for:2010-112011-122012-13

(a) academies

2.2

10.2

7.7

(b) maintained schools (and the local authority)(1)

29.8

19.2

18.1

(c) colleges

0.0

1.1

1.0

Total

32.0

30.5

26.8

(1) Includes capital support to the local authority for the provision of new school places, in any type of school (including academies).

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1174W

Engineering: Education

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will take steps to ensure that engineering is taught at (a) primary and (b) secondary schools; and if he will make a statement. [150152]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 26 March 2013]: The Government recognise the importance of engineering and is supporting programmes to improve the teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects in schools.

The review of the national curriculum will ensure that pupils are taught the essential knowledge required in science and mathematics. We are working with leading figures in industry and education to ensure that the new design and technology curriculum helps build the engineering skills the country needs.

We are increasing the number and quality of secondary science and mathematics teachers, and supporting more schools to offer GCSE triple science. We are also encouraging more students to study A-level physics and A-level further mathematics, which will enhance their prospects of studying engineering-related subjects at university.

The Department helps to fund STEM Clubs, which provide secondary pupils with opportunities to participate in engineering and technology projects.

The Government are supporting the work of the Royal Academy of Engineering to develop a suite of four new engineering qualifications at Key Stage 4 which meet high standards.

University technical colleges and studio schools are also providing new routes into engineering.

English Baccalaureate

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the omission of creative subjects from the English Baccalaureate on the creative economy. [137577]

Elizabeth Truss: This Government believe that artistic achievement, in all its forms, should be made accessible to every child. The English Baccalaureate measure, which is not compulsory, leaves space for pupils to study creative subjects alongside a strong academic core. We believe good school leaders will continue to make time for artistic and cultural education. We have no reason to believe there will be an impact on the contribution of creative industries to the economy, which amounts to £36 billion. We will continue to monitor take up of creative subjects at Key Stage 4.

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent discussions he has had with (a) representatives of manufacturing and engineering businesses and (b) the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills about the potential comparative benefits to the manufacturing and engineering industries of including (i) Classical Greek, Latin and Biblical Hebrew studies and (ii) Design and Technology studies within the English baccalaureate. [138778]

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1175W

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 January 2013]:The Department for Education has received correspondence from and had a number of discussions with supporters of subjects outside the current English baccalaureate (EBacc) list, and industries which rely on those subjects. Ministers have also had discussions with Ministers in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

To succeed in any area, young people must have a solid foundation in core academic disciplines. Access to an academic core of knowledge—as provided by the EBacc subjects—alongside a broad and balanced curriculum, enables all young people to develop those key skills they need to complement their wider knowledge, understanding and talents. The EBacc subjects were not selected for their particular benefits to any specific industry, rather for their value in providing that strong academic core.

It is widely recognised that the study of any foreign language offers great benefits in terms of cognitive skills and understanding as well as cultural awareness. We do not want to prescribe the languages students should study; all second languages therefore count towards the EBacc.

The EBacc is designed to allow 20-30% of curriculum time for the study of other valuable subjects, including those that might be of particular benefit to specific industries, such as including Design and Technology or Engineering.

Families

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what contributions his Department has made to the family policy commission instigated by the Prime Minister to date. [151027]

Mr Timpson: The Childhood and Families Taskforce was established by the Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister in 2010 and initiated more effective cross-Whitehall work to tackle some of the major obstacles to a happy childhood and a successful family life. The Department for Education has led a number of programmes emanating from the Taskforce, including the Bailey Review of the commercialisation and sexualisation of childhood; and the Graham Allen review of Early Intervention.

At present, Parliament is scrutinising the Children and Families Bill which takes forward the coalition Government's commitments to improve services for vulnerable children and support strong families.

The Bill will reform the systems for adoption, looked after children, family justice and special educational needs. It will encourage growth in the child care sector and introduce a new system of shared parental leave.

Free School Meals

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils in (a) Barnsley Central constituency, (b) South Yorkshire and (c) England are eligible for free school meals but do not currently claim them. [150539]

Mr Laws [holding answer 15 April 2013]:The Department routinely collects information on pupils who are both eligible for and claiming free school

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1176W

meals. Identifying those who are eligible for free school meals but who do not claim is more difficult.

The Department has published the research paper 'Pupils not claiming free school meals' which presents estimates of the numbers and proportions of pupils who are entitled to receive free school meals but are not claiming. The paper compares registration rates for children aged between 4 and 15, and highlights regions and local authorities where under-registration rates are high. The paper includes local authority level analysis but does not contain any figures at constituency level. The paper is published at:

www.education.gov.uk/publications/RSG/AllRsgPublications/Page4/DFE-RR235

The latest published information on those eligible for and claiming free school meals is available in the 'Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2012' Statistical First Release at:

www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/a00209478/

Free School Meals: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber are eligible for free school meals but do not currently claim them. [153476]

Mr Laws: The Department routinely collects information on pupils who are both eligible for and claiming free school meals. Identifying those who are eligible for but do not claim is more difficult.

The Department has published the research paper “Pupils not claiming free school meals” which presents estimates of the number and proportion of pupils who are entitled to receive free school meals but are not claiming. The paper compares registration rates for children aged between four and 15 and highlights regions and local authorities where under-registration rates are high. The paper includes regional and local authority level analysis but does not contain any figures at constituency level. The paper is published at:

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/RSG/AllRsgPublications/Page4/DFE-RR235

and a copy has been placed in the Library of the House.

Free Schools

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will list (a) the names and locations, (b) the accountants, (c) the number of pupils and (d) any educational group membership of each free school established since May 2010. [149696]

Elizabeth Truss: The first free schools opened in September 2011. The list attached contains: (a) names, locations of open free schools and (d) whether they belong to an educational group. (c) The numbers of pupils provided are the number of full time equivalents the schools recorded as being on roll at the autumn census on 4 October 2012. Further information on the school census can be found on the Department's website. In most cases, these numbers reflect recruitment to only one or two year groups, and so do not represent the final capacity of the school.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1177W

This table does not take account of children who will join these schools this September. Figures collected by the Department suggest that 9 in 10 of the free schools that are already open have received more applications from parents than there are places available, with an average of three applications for each place.

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1178W

(b) Free schools are not required to provide us with the names of their accountants. Therefore, we do not hold this information.

Academy namePupil numberTown/cityLAMembership

Al Madinah School

270

Derby

Derby

Alban City Free School

60

St Albans

Hertfordshire

Aldborough E-ACT Free School

180

London

Redbridge

E-Act

All Saints Junior School

35

Reading

Reading

CfBT Schools Trust (CST)

ARK Atwood Primary Academy

120

London

Westminster

ARK

ARK Bolingbroke Academy

120

London

Wandsworth

ARK

ARK Conway Primary Academy

60

London

Hammersmith and Fulham

ARK

Atherton Community School

60

Atherton

Wigan

Chapel Street Trust

Avanti House School

140

Harrow

Harrow

Barnfields Moorlands Free School

378

Luton

Luton

Barrow 1618

45

Broseley

Shropshire

Batley Grammar School

700

Batley

Kirklees

Becket Keys Church School

123

Brentwood

Essex

Bedford Free School

200

Bedford

Bedford

Bilingual Primary School for Brighton and Hove

90

Brighton

Brighton and Hove

Bristol Free School

215

Bristol

Bristol

Canary Wharf College

120

London

Tower Hamlets

CET Primary School (Tower Hamlets)

75

London

Tower Hamlets

CET Primary School (Westminster)

56

London

Westminster

City Gateway (Hybrid Academy)

260

London

Tower Hamlets

City of Peterborough Academy Special School

50

Peterborough

Peterborough

Greenwood Dale Foundation Trust

Cobham Free School

65

Cobham

Surrey

Corby Technical School

75

Corby

Northamptonshire

Cramlington Village Primary School

30

Cramlington

Northumberland

Derby Pride Academy

50

Derby

Derby

Discovery New School

64

Crawley

West Sussex

Dixons Music Primary

30

Bradford

Bradford

Dixons Academy Trust

Dixons Trinity Academy

112

Bradford

Bradford

Dixons Academy Trust

EBN East Birmingham Network Free School

45

Stechford

Birmingham

Eden Primary School

60

London

Haringey

Emmanuel Community School

20

Walthamstow

Waltham Forrest

Enfield Heights Academy

25

Enfield

Enfield

Etz Chaim Jewish Primary School

50

London

Barnet

Europa School UK

168

Abingdon

Oxfordshire

Everton in the Community Free School Trust

72

Liverpool

Liverpool

Grindon Hall Christian School

509

Sunderland

Sunderland

Harpenden Free School

30

Redbourn

Hertfordshire

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1179W

25 Apr 2013 : Column 1180W

Harris Primary Free School Peckham

60

Peckham

Southwark

Harris Federation

Hartsbrook E-ACT Free School

110

Tottenham

Haringey

E-Act

Hatfield Community Free School

60

Hatfield

Hertfordshire

IES Breckland Free School

210

Brendon

Suffolk

Kingfisher Hall Primary Academy

83

Edmonton

Enfield

King's Leadership Academy Warrington

45

Warrington

Warrington

Kings Science Academy

360

Bradford

Bradford

Krishna-Avanti Primary School

90

Leicester

Leicester

Langley Hall Primary Academy

342

Langley

Slough

Lighthouse School

(1)10

Leeds

Leeds

London Academy of Excellence

(2)190

London

Newham

Maharishi School

155

Ormskirk

Lancashire

Nishkam Primary School

340

Birmingham

Birmingham

Nishkam School Trust

175

Birmingham

Birmingham

Oakbank School

60

Reading

Wokingham

CfBT Schools Trust (CST)

Perry Beeches 2 Free School

160

Birmingham

Birmingham

Rainbow Primary

115

Bradford

Bradford

Reach Academy Feltham

120

Feltham

Hounslow

Rimon Jewish Primary School

28

London

Barnet

Rosewood School

58

Southampton

Southampton

Sandbach School

1,272

Sandbach

Cheshire East

Sandymoor School

37

Runcorn

Halton

School 21

150

London

Newham

Southwark Free School

30

Peckham

Southwark

St Luke's Church of England School

31

London

Camden

St Michael's Catholic Secondary School

60

Cambourne

Cornwall

Steiner Academy Frome

130

Corsley

Somerset

Stone Soup Learns

(3)10

Nottingham

Nottingham

Stour Valley Community School

330

Sudbury

Suffolk

Tauheedul

150

Blackburn

Blackburn-with-Darwen

The Beccles Free School

80

Lowestoft

Suffolk

The Free School Norwich

144

Norwich

Norfolk

The Gateway Academy—Free School

75

Tildbury

Thurrock

The Greenwich Free School

100

Greenwich

Greenwich

The Hawthorne's Free School

432

Bootle

Sefton

The Priors School

56

Southam

Warwickshire

The Rural Enterprise Academy

40

Penkridge

Staffordshire

The Saxmundham Free School

115

Woodbridge

Suffolk

The Tiger School

77

Maidstone

Kent

Wapping High School

60

London

Tower Hamlets

West London Free School

241

Hammersmith

Hammersmith and Fulham

Woodpecker Hall Primary Academy

156

Edmonton

Enfield

(1) Special Free School for learners aged 11-19 with learning difficulties or disabilities, mainly autistic, with a capacity of 50 learners which opened in Sept 12 with one year group only.

(2) Self-reported numbers due to problems with Ml.

(3) Alternative provision for young people aged 11-19 unable to attend mainstream or special school, with a capacity of 100 learners which opened in September 2012 with one year group only.