Orphans: Education

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 15 April 2013, Official Report, column 134W on orphans: education, what financial assistance his Department provides to orphans from the age of 16 who are not and have never been in the care of local authorities. [152063]

Mr Timpson: Local authorities have a general duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children within their area who are in need. Children who are orphaned will normally be considered children in need and have their needs assessed by the local authority. Many will come into the care system and receive the full range of support to which all looked after children are entitled. Others may continue to live with members of their wider family where this is assessed as being in their best interests.

Local authorities do not provide income support, but in exceptional cases they can provide financial assistance to families where children are assessed as being in need. This could include for example small payments to cover subsistence in an emergency or for accommodation for families without access to public funds.

Orphans aged 16 and 17-years-old are entitled to the same support as any other young person. This may include financial support through the 16 to 19 bursary for those in education, as well as benefits such as income support. In addition, where these young people remain with family or friends, the carers may be entitled to a range of support including benefits such as child benefit, subject to satisfying the relevant qualifying conditions.

Pay

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many staff in his private ministerial office received a performance-related bonus in the last two financial years. [147861]

24 Apr 2013 : Column 957W

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 14 March 2013]: The following table shows the number of staff in the Secretary of State's office who received a non consolidated performance award in each of the last two financial years. Awards paid in the financial year relate to performance in the previous year.

 Number of staffNumber of staff who received a non consolidated performance award

2011/12

12

6

2012/13

13

7

Physical Education

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what steps he is taking to ensure that children receive adequate instruction at school on how to maintain and improve physical fitness; [151992]

(2) what steps he is taking to ensure that children are given adequate physical fitness tests at school; [151993]

(3) what steps he is taking to ensure that children are informed of the benefits of competitive sport at school. [151995]

Mr Timpson: We recently announced additional ring-fenced funding of £150 million per annum for academic years 2013/14 and 2014/15 to support the provision of Physical Education (PE) and sport in state primary schools in England.

PE is currently compulsory in the National Curriculum at all four Key Stages and will remain so after the current review. A draft programme of study for PE was published for consultation in February 2013. This makes clear that a high-quality physical education curriculum should provide opportunities for pupils to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness. We do not prescribe specific measures to help to achieve this as we believe that individual schools and teachers are best placed to address the particular needs of their pupils.

The draft programme of study also reflects our belief that opportunities to compete in sport and other activities build character and help to embed values such as fairness and respect, and it places far greater emphasis on the importance of competitive sport within and between schools.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education and Her Majesty's chief inspector have agreed that for all primary schools Ofsted inspectors will consider how well the school uses its additional funding to improve the quality and breadth of its PE and sporting provision.

Primary Education: Class Sizes

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils aged five, six or seven have been taught in classes of 30 or more in each local education authority area in each year since 2010; and if he will make a statement. [151558]

Mr Laws: The number of pupils in state-funded mainstream primary schools in England, including information on class sizes, is published as part of the

24 Apr 2013 : Column 958W

Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2012'. This is available on the Department's website

(1)

.

The number and proportion of pupils in school years 1, 2 and 3 taught in class sizes of 31 or more in each local authority area in England have been placed in the House Libraries.

(1) http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/a00209478/

Primary Education: Teachers

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of how many new primary teachers would been needed by 2014-15 to maintain current pupil teacher ratios. [152484]

Mr Laws [holding answer 22 April 2013]:No such estimate has been made.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has given consideration to using parental educational attainment as the basis for the allocation of the pupil premium rather than free school meals. [153096]

Mr Laws: The Pupil Premium is allocated to schools at the rate of £900 for each child who is either known to have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) at any time during the past six years (known as the “Ever6 basis”), or who has been looked after continuously in public care for more than six months during the year. The total annual investment in this priority for the Government will rise to £2.5 billion in 2014-15.

The Government consulted in June 2010 on the appropriate allocation methodology for the Pupil Premium, and we published our conclusions before the 2011-12 financial year. In that year, Pupil Premium was allocated on the basis of current eligibility for FSM; the Ever6 basis was then introduced from 2012-13. Our report, published on 13 December 2010 following the consultation, set out our rationale. We consulted on the merits of different indicators as a basis for the distribution of the Pupil Premium, and FSM was chosen because it is the only pupil-based indicator nationally available.

The link between FSM eligibility, both current and recent, and under-achievement is very strong, and there is overwhelming evidence that pupils eligible for FSM generally have lower educational attainment outcomes than their peers. While there is also a strong link between other characteristics and under-achievement, such as parental educational attainment, a school's ability to identify eligible pupils easily and objectively using a nationally recognised measure is very important in enabling them to claim the necessary funding and to deliver the educational interventions that their pupils require. FSM- based measures fulfil these criteria more closely than other approaches.

Pupils: Per Capita Costs

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the (a) national and (b) regional average spend on pupils is in (i) England and (ii) Barnsley Central constituency. [138929]

24 Apr 2013 : Column 959W

Mr Laws [holding answer 23 January 2013]:Figures are not available for the parliamentary constituency of Barnsley Central as data are collected at a local authority level. The available information for 2010-11 on the national and local revenue expenditure on pupils in England and Barnsley local authority is shown in the following table:

 Primary educationSecondary educationSpecial schoolsTotal (excluding pre-primary)

England

4,040

5,250

21,170

4,760

Barnsley LA

4,150

5,020

19,110

4,620

Schools: Co-operation

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what grants have been allocated via the £35 million school collaboration incentive outlined in the Schools White Paper 2010. [150725]

Mr Laws: The Department has made no allocations using the model originally envisaged in the White Paper. Collaboration is, however, fundamental to the work of Teaching Schools. Teaching Schools are required to establish alliances of schools with which they work directly to provide: school based initial teacher training, school to school support, research and development activity and continuous professional development. Teaching schools also work with others to develop new school leaders and can designate and deploy specialist Leaders of Education.

National Leaders of Education also work collaboratively with other schools. They use the resources of their own schools to support others. Local Leaders of Education provide direct support to the leadership to support school improvement.

Schools: Finance

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the value is of the successful grants given by the Education Endowment Fund to date; and if he will place in the Library a complete list of all bids made and successful recipients. [151250]

Mr Laws: The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) is an independent grant making charity established in 2011. The main aims of the EEF are to raise the attainment of children facing disadvantage by:

identifying promising educational innovations that address the needs of disadvantaged children in primary and secondary schools in England;

evaluating these innovations to extend and secure the evidence on what works and can be made to work at scale;

encouraging schools, government, charities, and others to apply evidence and adopt innovations found to be effective.

The Department entered a Grant Funding Agreement which established the EEF for a minimum of ten years, with a single initial grant of £125 million so far. The charity has funded 56 successful projects, including eight new projects announced in March 2013, at a value of £28.7 million covering both primary and secondary schools. So far over 1,800 schools and 300,000 pupils

24 Apr 2013 : Column 960W

have been involved in projects funded by the EEF. The knowledge gained from these projects will be shared with all schools.

The successful grants and their individual and total value are shown in the following table. The Department does not maintain records of any unsuccessful bids.

 £

Durham University

766,945

ARK

774,000

Future Foundations

930,339

Tutor Trust

263,000

PATHS

90,000

Bristol University

1,600,184

Campaign for Learning

550,154

Challenge Partners

961,778

Hampshire County Council

141,000

The Schools Network

396,750

Anglican School Partnership

110,760

Catch Up

184,900

University College London

736,546

Oxford Trust

270,750

Plymouth Parent Partnership

1,022,471

Portsmouth University

368,460

Sapere

304,000

SHINE Trust

510,175

Achieve Together

1,800,192

The Learning Trust

310,237

Creative futures

415,000

How to Thrive

687,000

Innovation Unit

906,000

Primary Writing Project

121,000

School21

382,000

Success for All

1,410,000

Book Trust

218,414

Calderdale Excellence Partnership

395,850

Catch Up

424,626

Coventry University

397,314

Discover

240,652

Dyslexia Action

390,206

Real Action

457,980

SHINE Trust

455,800

Success for All (Quest)

726,112

North Tyneside Council

520,064

Unitas

480,953

University College London

525,000

University of Exeter

338,752

CUREE

550,347

Bolton Council

393,570

Norfolk Council

148,217

Adamsrill Primary School

78,755

Nottingham Council

70,575

Perry Beeches

306,000

Greenford High School

148,110

Fresh Start Aggregated Trial

353,065

Thornaby Academy

146,880

Chess in Schools and Communities

689,150

The Communications Trust

967,780

The Curriculum Centre

147,848

Edge Hill University

543,425

Oxford University

489,471

Let's Think Forum

639,485

Private Equity Foundation

254,624

Catch 22

596,087

 

28,708,753

24 Apr 2013 : Column 961W

Schools: Inspections

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools have requested an Ofsted inspection since Quarter 3 2011. [151251]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 15 April 2013:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for reply.

Since 1 October 2011, Ofsted has received 24 requests for an inspection from schools.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 962W

The Education Act 2011 provides Her Majesty's Chief Inspector (HMCI) with a power to charge for the cost of a school inspection in response to a request from ‘the appropriate authority’ of a school, and where HMCI is not required to inspect the school routinely. This power took effect from February 2012. No school has yet been charged for the cost of an inspection under these provisions.

Schools: Pendle

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of the level of literacy and numeracy of (a) primary and (b) secondary school leavers in Pendle constituency in each of the last five years. [151230]

Mr Laws: The information requested is provided in the following tables.

Primary school leavers. Achievements at the expected level(1) by pupils at the end of Key Stage 2 in Pendle parliamentary constituency(2). Years: 2008-12(3). Coverage: Pendle constituency(4)
Percentage of KS2 pupils achieving expected level in20082009201020112012(5)

English

78

74

*

76

81

Maths

74

74

*

72

80

* = Figures have been suppressed as they are unrepresentative due to industrial action. (1) Includes pupils who achieved Level 4 or above. Level 4 is the expected level of achievement for pupils at the end of Key Stage 2. (2) Parliamentary constituency figures are based on the postcode of the school. (3) Data are final data for academic years 2008 to 2011, 2012 is based on revised data. (4) Includes state-funded schools including academies. Figures do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas. (5) In 2012, English was calculated from reading test results and writing teacher assessment rather than from reading and writing tests as in previous years. English in 2012 is, therefore, not comparable to previous years. Source: National Pupil Database
Secondary school leavers. Percentage of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 achieving A*-C grades in English and mathematics GCSEs(1) in Pendle constituency(2). Years: 2007/08 to 2011/12(3). Coverage: Pendle constituency(4)
Percentage of KS4 pupils achieving an A*-C grade in2007/082008/092009/102010/112011/12

English

51.1

51.8

57.7

64.1

56.2

Maths

48.9

48.6

55.1

57.2

62.5

(1) Full GCSEs only have been included (full GCSEs, double awards, accredited international certificates and their predecessor iGCSEs and AS-levels). Figures from 2007/08 to 2008/09 exclude iGCSEs, 2009/10 figures onwards include accredited iGCSEs. (2) Parliamentary constituency figures are based on the postcode of the school. (3 )Data are final data for academic years 2007/08 to 2010/11, 2011/12 is based on revised data. (4) Includes state-funded schools including academies. Figures do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas. Source: National Pupil Database (2007/08 to 2010/11) and Key Stage 4 attainment data (2011/12)

Schools: Sports

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools participating in his Department's next recent physical education and school sport survey reported that (i) fewer than 20 per cent and (ii) more than 80 per cent of pupils had participated in (A) any competitive intra-school sport and (B) regular competitive intra-school sport. [151940]

Mr Timpson: The most recent survey of pupils' participation in physical education and sport in school covered the academic year 2009/10 and was published in September 2010. This survey reported the overall proportion of pupils who participated in competitive intra-school sport; including those who participated in any such competitive activities, and those who participated regularly. These figures are not broken down to school level. A copy of the survey has been placed in the House of Commons Library.

Schools: Standards

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils attend schools that have been judged by Ofsted to be inadequate or requiring improvement by local authority. [152602]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Lorraine Langham, dated 22 April 2013:

Your recent Parliamentary Question has been passed to Ofsted for response. I am replying on behalf of Her Majesty's Chief Inspector.

Since 2005, maintained school inspections have been carried out under section 5 of the Education Act 2005 and, more recently, the Education Act 2011. Under section 5, Ofsted inspects maintained schools (nursery, primary, secondary and special schools and pupil referral units), state-funded independent schools such as academies and certain non-maintained special schools in England.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 963W

The number and proportion of pupils attending schools inspected at 31 December 2012 that have been judged as 'satisfactory / requires improvement' or ‘inadequate', by local authority, have been provided in table 1. The ‘requires improvement' judgement was introduced in September 2012, replacing ‘satisfactory'. For completeness, the number and proportion of pupils at schools judged to be ‘outstanding' or ‘good', by local authority, are also provided.

Schools: Transport

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many education providers were consulted before the Guidance on home-to-school travel and transport was published in March 2013. [152935]

Mr Laws: A working group of four local authority home-to-school transport practitioners and two road safety policy officials from the Department of Transport were consulted on the appeals element of the guidance. The local authority practitioners represented the Rural Access to Learning Group, the Association of Transport Co-ordinating Officers, and Road Safety GB.

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what assessment he has made of the effect of his Department's guidance on home-to school-travel and transport published in March 2013 on schools with larger catchment areas; [152936]

(2) what assessment he has made of the effect of his Department's guidance on home-to-school travel and transport published in March 2013 on schools in areas of sparse population density; [152937]

(3) what assessment he has made of the effect of his Department's guidance on home-to-school travel and transport published in March 2013 on schools of a religious character. [152938]

Mr Laws: The revised statutory guidance published in March 2013 is designed to reflect the Government's commitment to reducing bureaucracy, and to allow local authorities to reach their own solutions to local issues, following the usual practice of consulting with schools and interested parties, without the burden of overly prescriptive guidance.

The guidance provides a summary of the statutory obligations placed upon local authorities, none of which have changed since the revisions introduced by the Education and Inspections Act 2006. Given that the regulations have not changed it is not our intention to carry out an impact assessment.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 964W

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils have benefited from subsidised home to school transport in the last three years for which figures are available. [152939]

Mr Laws: The Department for Education does not collect this data. Local authorities will collect this data to inform their budgetary allocations, but they are not under a duty to report pupil numbers to the Department.

Sixth-form Education

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) schools and (b) academies have opened new sixth form provision in each of the last three years; and how many such sixth forms were graded (i) inadequate or (ii) satisfactory by Ofsted at their last inspection. [150140]

Mr Laws [holding answer 26 March 2013]:The Department for Education through the Education Funding Agency (EFA) has funded new sixth forms at schools and academies over the last two years as follows:

 Number

2011/12

 

New school sixth forms

24

New academy sixth forms

33

  

2012/13

 

New school sixth forms

19

New Academy sixth forms

18

The EFA does not have records of new academies' sixth forms prior to 2011.

Of these 94 schools and academies with new sixth forms, Ofsted have recorded 60 inspections since September 2011(1). Inspections taking place after January 2012 do not include a separate grade for school and academy sixth forms but do include commentary in the body of the inspection report.

The Ofsted judgments of the overall effectiveness of these schools and academies, and the separate commentary about their sixth forms (where made) are set out in the following table:

(1) See Ofsted website:

http://www.Ofsted.gov.uk/resources/official-statistics-maintained-school-inspections-and-outcomes

 Overall Ofsted school/academy inspection judgmentSixth form commentary (where made)

Outstanding

11

Outstanding—6

  

Good—1

  

No commentary—4

   

Good

18

Good—9

  

No commentary—9

   

Requires improvement/satisfactory

18

Good—4

  

Requires improvement/satisfactory—6

  

No commentary—8

24 Apr 2013 : Column 965W

24 Apr 2013 : Column 966W

Inadequate

6

Good—1

  

Requires improvement/satisfactory—2

  

No commentary—3

   

Total

(1)53

53

(1) Seven academies received a ‘monitoring inspection' as part of an ‘academy initiative'—this resulted in a letter and no grades were given.

Teachers

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to plan future teacher supply requirements on an (a) local and (b) national basis. [152440]

Mr Laws [holding answer 22 April 2013]: National teacher supply requirements are estimated each year by the Teacher Supply Model (TSM). This model takes into account any future growth (or decline) in pupil numbers, pupil-teacher ratios within schools, and any policy changes that may affect, for example, the number of specialist (secondary) subject teachers needed. In addition, the TSM also forecasts the number of experienced teachers entering or leaving the profession as a result of retirement or career change. Collectively, these factors are used to determine the number of new teachers it is necessary to train in order to supply the workforce needs of our schools. We initially allocated 34,791 initial teacher training (ITT) places for the 2013/14 academic year(1).

Local teacher supply needs are addressed through the allocation of these ITT places among a growing number of ITT providers and schools located across England. There are now more than 240 higher education institution-led and school-centred providers of ITT (including 38 new school-led providers accredited in the last 12 months) and more than 800 schools leading School Direct school partnerships, who are seeking to meet local supply needs. The allocation of ITT places is also informed by a range of market information based on geographic patterns in newly-qualified teacher employment, existing teacher workforce levels and teacher vacancies.

(1) ITT places for HE and school-centred ITT providers for the academic year 2013/14 can be found at the following location:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/careers/traininganddevelopment/initial/b00204256/itt-funding-and-allocations/allocations.

The 2013/14 allocations are subject to changes and final numbers for 2013/14 will be published shortly after the end of the academic year.

Teachers: Industrial Disputes

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the potential number of parents likely to be affected by the teachers' strike expected in June 2013. [151939]

Mr Laws: Any strike action by teachers will disrupt pupils' education and inconvenience a significant number of parents. We will be assessing the likely impact on schools, pupils and parents of any strike action by the NUT and the NASUWT, including the strike they have announced in the North West of England on 27 June. However, at this stage, it is too early to estimate with any accuracy the exact number of parents likely to be affected by this strike, which is over two months away.

Teachers: Qualifications

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many teachers in secondary schools are teaching subjects in which they do not have a (a) degree, (b) A-Level and (c) O-Level/GCSE at C or above. [152316]

Mr Laws: The latest information on the proportion of secondary school teachers teaching subjects in which they do not have a degree or higher is shown in the following table, which is table 13 of the “School Workforce in England: November 2011” statistical first release.(1)

Information on how many secondary school teachers do not have A or O-levels in the subject they teach is not collected centrally.

(1 )Available at the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/recentreleases/a00205723/school-workforce-in-england-provisional-nov-2011

Highest post A-level qualifications(1, 2) held by publicly funded secondary school teachers (head count) in the subjects(3) they taught to year groups 7 to 13 in 2011, November 2011, England
 Highest level of qualification(1) held in a relevant subject(3, 4)
 Degree or higher(5)Bachelor of EducationPostgraduate Certificate of EducationOther qualification(6)Any relevant post A-level qualificationNo relevant post A-level qualificationTotal head count
Subject(3)%±CI(7)%±CI(7)%±CI(7)%±CI(7)%%Thousands

Mathematics

45.4

±

0.8

7.1

±

0.4

18.2

±

0.6

2.2

±

0.2

72.9

27.1

35.2

English

63.1

±

0.7

4.5

±

0.3

9.1

±

0.4

1.7

±

0.2

78.3

21.7

38.8

                

Physics(8)

56.1

±

1.9

3.0

±

0.7

6.3

±

1.0

0.8

±

0.3

66.3

33.7

5.9

Chemistry(8)

65.8

±

1.6

2.4

±

0.5

6.2

±

0.8

0.6

±

0.3

75.0

25.0

6.9

24 Apr 2013 : Column 967W

24 Apr 2013 : Column 968W

Biology(8)

76.0

±

1.2

3.8

±

0.5

5.7

±

0.7

0.8

±

0.3

86.3

13.7

8.5

Combined/General science(8)

80.4

±

0.6

4.8

±

0.3

4.9

±

0.3

1.3

±

0.2

91.4

8.6

34.7

Other Sciences(8)

77.7

±

2.1

3.5

±

0.9

4.4

±

1.0

1.4

±

0.6

87.0

13.0

2.8

                

History

61.7

±

1.1

3.1

±

0.4

6.6

±

0.6

0.9

±

0.2

72.3

27.7

16.6

Geography

57.4

±

1.2

3.3

±

0.4

5.9

±

0.6

1.0

±

0.2

67.5

32.5

14.9

                

French

51.3

±

1.2

4.1

±

0.5

16.7

±

0.9

1.3

±

0.3

73.4

26.6

15.3

German

52.4

±

2.0

2.1

±

0.6

10.7

±

1.3

1.0

±

0.4

66.2

33.8

5.5

Spanish

33.6

±

2.1

1.6

±

0.6

10.6

±

1.4

1.0

±

0.5

46.9

53.1

6.8

Other Modern Languages

25.0

±

3.3

0.4

±

0.5

7.7

±

2.0

1.0

±

0.8

34.0

66.0

3.3

                

Design and technology(9)

51.8

±

1.1

14.8

±

0.8

9.6

±

0.7

5.4

±

0.5

81.6

18.4

14.8

Electronics/Systems and Control(9)

55.5

±

3.6

16.6

±

2.7

7.9

±

2.0

3.3

±

1.3

83.3

16.7

1.3

Food Technology(9)

42.5

±

2.0

16.3

±

1.5

9.6

±

1.2

8.0

±

1.1

76.4

23.6

5.3

Graphics(9)

59.5

±

2.1

14.1

±

1.5

10.5

±

1.3

3.0

±

0.7

87.1

12.9

3.9

Resistant Materials(9)

56.6

±

1.9

16.4

±

1.5

10.0

±

1.2

4.5

±

0.8

87.5

12.5

4.5

Textiles(9)

58.6

±

2.3

10.3

±

1.4

9.0

±

1.4

4.9

±

1.0

82.8

17.2

3.3

Other/Combined Technology(9)

48.7

±

1.1

13.9

±

0.8

9.5

±

0.6

4.6

±

0.5

76.7

23.3

16.8

Engineering

16.4

±

5.2

0.9

±

1.3

0.8

±

1.2

1.0

±

1.4

19.0

81.0

1.6

ICT(10)

26.4

±

1.3

2.0

±

0.4

8.9

±

0.8

0.6

±

0.2

37.9

62.1

18.6

                

Business/Economics

51.8

±

1.5

4.8

±

0.6

4.6

±

0.6

1.1

±

0.3

62.2

37.8

11.1

Religious Education(11)

33.0

±

1.4

3.1

±

0.5

7.6

±

0.8

1.0

±

0.3

44.7

55.3

16.5

                

Music

73.3

±

1.4

4.9

±

0.7

4.6

±

0.6

2.1

±

0.4

84.9

15.1

8.0

Drama

39.2

±

1.6

3.0

±

0.6

6.0

±

0.8

1.5

±

0.4

49.7

50.3

11.6

Art and design

70.1

±

1.1

5.3

±

0.5

7.8

±

0.6

1.3

±

0.3

84.5

15.5

13.9

Media Studies

15.4

±

2.5

0.7

±

0.6

2.4

±

1.1

0.3

±

0.4

18.8

81.2

6.6

                

Physical education

56.0

±

0.8

15.7

±

0.6

6.8

±

0.4

1.5

±

0.2

80.0

20.0

26.0

24 Apr 2013 : Column 969W

24 Apr 2013 : Column 970W

Citizenship

3.9

±

1.9

0.1

±

0.3

2.4

±

1.5

0.2

±

0.4

6.5

93.5

10.0

(1) Where a teacher has more than one post A-level qualification in the same subject, the qualification level is determined by the highest level reading from left (degree or higher) to right (other qualification). For example, teachers shown under PGCE have a PGCE but not a Degree. (2) Not including qualifications in special educational needs provision. (3 )Teachers are counted once against each subject which they are teaching. Head counts are used, so a teacher teaching French and German would be counted once in each. (4 )A full list of what was deemed as a ‘relevant' qualification subject for each curriculum subject taught can be found in the SFR home page, November 2010 at http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000997/index.shtml (5 )Includes Doctorates and other level 8 qualifications, Masters and other level 7 qualifications (e.g. Post Graduate certificates and diplomas), first degrees (excluding BEds) and other level 6 qualifications (e.g. graduate certificates and diplomas). (6 )Includes Certificate of Education, non-UK qualifications where the level was not provided and other qualification at National Qualifications Framework (NQF) level 4 or 5 and above e.g. diplomas or higher education and further education, foundation degrees, higher national diplomas and certificates of higher education. (7) Confidence intervals have been calculated around the proportions as not all schools were able to submit curriculum information, and not all qualifications returns were complete. Qualifications information was either not provided, or the subject field was missing for 12% of the teachers in schools submitting curriculum data. The confidence intervals show the statistical accuracy for the data, and give a range within which we can be reasonably sure (95% certain) that the true value actually lies. (8)Teachers qualified in biology, chemistry, or physics are treated as qualified to teach both combined/general science and other science. (9 )Teachers qualified in each of the specialist design & technology subjects are treated as qualified to teach other/combined design & technology. (10 )Information & Communication Technology is abbreviated as ICT. (11 )Includes philosophy. Notes: 1. Percentages are row percentages, and based on the number of teachers for whom curriculum and qualifications information was provided. 2. Numbers rounded to the nearest 100 and numbers below 50 are shown as nil or negligible. * = Not applicable. — = Nil or negligible. 3. Totals may not appear equal to the sum of the component parts because of rounding. Source: School Workforce Census

Teachers: Recruitment

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what progress he has made toward establishing Teach Next; how many recruits have come into the profession by this route; and how many people he expects to have been recruited by this route by September 2013. [151449]

Mr Laws: Teach First was asked to establish a “Teach Next” programme aimed at attracting high quality career changers with a recruitment target of 200 in total by September 2013. In the 2011 pilot year 68 career changers were recruited. In 2012, the first full year of the programme, 106 career changers were recruited. To date, Teach First has recruited 121 career changers to the 2013 cohort that will commence training this September, so they are on course to recruit 295 career changers compared to the target of 200.

Teachers: Training

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many initial teacher training applications were made in each subject and phase in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2012-13 to date. [149667]

Mr Laws: Information on the number of applications made through the Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR) and School Direct (2012/13 only) for all post graduate Initial Teacher Training (ITT) programmes that awarded qualified teacher status (QTS) in England for academic years 2009/10, 2010/11 and 2012 to 28 February 2013 are in Table A. Other ITT routes are available but records of applications via these routes are not held centrally.

Table A: Applications for post graduate ITT
Subject2009/102010/112012/13

Art

1,740

1,400

900

Biology

1,780

1,710

880

Business Studies

1,510

1,050

350

Chemistry

1,130

1,370

860

Citizenship

570

450

110

Classics

100

100

100

Combined and General Science

1,470

590

50

Design and Technology

1,830

1,050

300

Drama

1,180

1,100

1,050

Economics

20

10

20

English

4,330

4,090

3,160

Env/Rural Science

20

0

0

French

870

640

290

Geography

1,190

1,080

620

Geology

10

10

0

German

210

200

90

History

1,850

1,890

2,090

Home Economics

150

110

20

Information Technology

1,620

1,000

Computer Science

200

Italian

20

10

10

Mathematics

4,040

3,600

1,980

24 Apr 2013 : Column 971W

Music

1,050

740

480

Other

190

280

330

Other Modern Languages

730

820

1,130

Physical Education

3,300

3,390

3,700

Physics

720

850

450

Primary

23,870

24,670

23,340

Religious Education

1,400

1,020

480

Russian

0

10

0

Social Studies

530

450

260

Spanish

370

310

190

Total

57,790

53,970

43,430

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10 and include some applications which were subsequently withdrawn. 2. For 2012/13 ICT has been replaced in England by Computer Science as an ITT course so the figures are not directly comparable. 3. Applications for 2012/13 are correct to 28 February 2013. 4. Some applications for postgraduate ITT courses are made independently of the GTTR and School Direct and are not included in the figures. 5. Membership of the GTTR and engagement with School Direct changes between years, therefore the number of accredited ITT providers covered in this table varies from year to year. 6. The applications are shown against the year in which they were made; applicants would be expected to commence training in the following academic year. 7. Applications are counted for providers in England where at least one application was made to GTTR or School Direct. Individual applicants can place more than one application, and so the number of applicants may be smaller. Duplication of applicants between GTTR and School Direct has been removed and figures for School Direct only applications have been added to 2012/13 figures. Source: GTTR and for 2012/13 School Direct Application Portal.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when his Department plans to publish an evaluation of the School Direct programme; and which organisations he has asked to undertake that review. [152482]

Mr Laws [holding answer 22 April 2013]:We are currently considering whether to commission a formal external evaluation of School Direct.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many applicants there have been for School Direct places starting in September 2013; and how many such applicants have been accepted on to courses. [152683]

Mr Laws [holding answer 22 April 2013]:The National College for Teaching and Learning will be publishing data on how many applicants there have been for School Direct places starting in September 2013 shortly.

Teachers: Veterans

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many members of the armed forces have (a) been recruited to the Troops to Teachers programme and (b) had their PGCEs funded by his Department. [151451]

Mr Laws [holding answer 17 April 2013]: The new Troops to Teachers (TtT) programme has not yet been launched; we expect to make an announcement within the next couple of months. Between May 2011 and 10 April 2013 the rate at which service leavers have been applying to teacher training courses has been increasing. During this period, 322 service leavers have applied to teacher training courses, of which 132 have been accepted so far.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 972W

Through the Troops to Teachers programme, there will be opportunities for both graduates and non-graduates, subject to eligibility criteria, to train and enter the teaching profession via school-based routes. We have further plans to encourage eligible graduate service leavers to use existing teacher training routes. From September 2013, the School Direct programme will allow eligible graduate Service Leavers to retrain to become teachers, and they will be offered additional incentives (either financial or through additional premium training personalised to their needs).

Vetting

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department takes when notified that a legally required referral in relation to a regulated activity has not been made to the Disclosure and Barring Service; and whether there is a length of time after which his Department would not take action. [152332]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 22 April 2013]: If my Department were to be informed of such allegations about named individuals and named employers, my officials would notify the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). It would make no difference when we were informed. If an organisation removes an individual from working closely and regularly with children, because of harm or a risk of harm, it must make a referral to the DBS. If it fails to do so without good reason, it is committing an offence under the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006. If the DBS had evidence that such an offence may have been committed, it would inform the police.

Visits Abroad

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his Department's budget was for overseas travel for officials and Ministers in 2012-13. [151355]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education does not allocate budgets at this level of financial detail. As part of the transparency agenda, the Department publishes a quarterly return on its website which includes details of overseas travel.(1)

(1)http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation/transparency/b0065263/ministers-quarterly-returns

Vocational Guidance

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether Ofsted plans to amend its inspection frameworks in order to issue a specific grade in (a) school, (b) further education college and (c) sixth form college inspections relating to the standard of careers advice secured under section 29 of the Education Act 2011. [151921]

Mr Laws [holding answer 18 April 2013]:This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 16 April 2013:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for reply.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 973W

There are no plans to make a specific graded judgement on the quality of careers guidance in respect of the school inspection framework and the common inspection framework. However, in the common inspection framework, which applies to Further Education colleges, sixth-form colleges and independent learning providers, inspectors are required to consider how well learners develop an understanding of careers and progression opportunities, and their ability to benefit from training and development opportunities in reaching judgements for outcomes for learners.

In the school inspection framework, inspectors must assess how well leaders and managers ensure that the curriculum promotes successful progression to the pupils' next stage of education, training or employment. Ofsted intends to amend its school inspection framework from September so inspectors take greater account of the quality of careers guidance in respect of reaching a judgement on the effectiveness of a school's leadership and management.

Energy and Climate Change

Energy Companies Obligation

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what proportion of energy companies obligation contracts allocated by his Department have been allocated to (a) small businesses, (b) medium businesses and (c) large companies. [152215]

Michael Fallon [holding answer 22 April 2013]:The energy company obligation (ECO) places a carbon reduction obligation on the largest GB energy supply companies.

What contracts energy companies enter into to deliver their ECO obligations is a commercial matter for them. DECC has no responsibility for the allocation of contracts under ECO.

Hotels

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many officials in his (a) Department and (b) non-departmental public bodies stayed in hotels in (i) the UK and (ii) every other country during the last five years; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest such hotel expenses in each such year. [152554]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change's expenditure on hotel costs is as follows:

£000
  2008-09(1)2009-102010-112011-122012-13

Core DECC

UK

123

226

188

238

108

 

Overseas

147

633

432

343

272

 

Total Core DECC

274

859

620

581

380

NDPBs

UK

(2)40

(2)31

847

742

1,133

 

Overseas

45

40

56

 

Total NDPBs

40

31

892

782

1.189

(1 )2008-09 expenditure relates to the period from October 2008, as that is when DECC was established. (2 )The Coal Authority is the only NDPB that were able to provide information for 2008-09 and 2009-10. The majority of expenditure in subsequent years is incurred by the Civil Nuclear Police Authority and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 974W

It is not possible, from the data available on the Department's system, to identify the number of officials who incurred these costs. As it is not possible to disaggregate the individual costs, the 20 highest hotel expenses cannot be established without incurring disproportionate cost.

North Sea Oil

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what local content requirements exist for offshore development at the Rosebank oil field. [152988]

Michael Fallon: The Department is actively engaged with Chevron to ensure that we maximise opportunities for UK content in the Rosebank development. This is part of our work with all licensees operating in the UKCS to ensure that they are aware of the capability of the UK supply chain and afford fair opportunities to bid for contracts under EU procurement laws.

Redundancy Pay

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of the non-departmental public bodies for which he is responsible received payments under a voluntary exit scheme in each of the last five years; and at what total cost in each such year. [152648]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change was created in October 2008 so the following information is from that point onwards.

Core DECC
 2008-09 (£000)2009-10 (£000)2010-11 (£000)2011-12 (No. of officials)2011-12 (£000)

DECC

0

0

0

8

506

Total

0

0

0

8

506

NDPBs
2008-09 2009-102010-11 2011-12 
 No of officials£000£000No of officials£000No of officials£000

NDA

5

104

0

68

4,325

1

82

CNPA

0

0

0

0

CA

0

0

33

1,805

0

CCC

0

0

0

0

Total

5

104

0

101

6,130

1

82

The above information has been published as part of our 2011-12 Annual Resource Accounts. The information can be found in table 7.3 on page 118:

http://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/48452/5718-decc-annual-report-and-accounts-201112.pdf

The figures for 2012-13 will be published as part of the Annual Report and Accounts which is due to be laid before Parliament in July 2013.

All voluntary exits that are included in this answer have been taken to include all non-compulsory departures.

The civil service compensation scheme was reformed in 2010. Under the previous terms there could be costs extending for up to 10 years from a departure while under the reformed scheme all of the costs fall within the year of departure.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 975W

NAO have estimated that under the reformed scheme, exits cost around 40-50% less than the previous compensation scheme in place before the 2010 general election. The reformed scheme allows for greater distinction between voluntary and compulsory departures.

Scotland

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) what (a) external organisations and (b) individuals his Department engaged with as part of the Scotland Analysis programme; and what was discussed at each such meeting; [153295]


(2) how many members of his Department's staff have been allocated to work on the Scotland Analysis programme; and at what cost to the public purse; [153296]


(3) what meetings he or his officials have had with the right hon. Member for Edinburgh South West (Mr Darling) as part of the Scotland Analysis programme; and what was discussed at each such meeting; [153297]

(4) what work his Department has commissioned by external consultants in relation to work on the Scotland Analysis programme; which consultants were used; and at what cost to the public purse. [153298]

Gregory Barker: Department of Energy and Climate Change Ministers and officials engage with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Inevitably devolved issues and the Scottish Independence debate are addressed in many of these meetings. Meetings held or attended by DECC Ministers are routinely published on gov.uk:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-of-energy-climate-change/series/ministers-meeting-with-external-organisations

No meetings have taken place with the right hon. Member for Edinburgh South West (Mr Darling) as part of the Scotland Analysis programme and no external consultants have been commissioned by DECC to work on this programme.

No staff in the DECC are working exclusively on the Scotland Analysis programme which has been taken forward as part of the Department’s broader work on devolved issues (coordinated by a team of 2.5 FTEs). Any costs are being funded from existing departmental budgets in the normal way as part of the Department's ongoing policy programme.

Wind Power

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether his Department keeps records of the (a) number and (b) location of all (i) current and (ii) planned onshore wind turbines in the UK. [153085]

Michael Fallon: Applications for onshore wind developments over 50 MW in England and Wales are considered by the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change the Department retains details of their location and scale.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 976W

Applications for all other onshore wind developments (that require planning permission) are considered by local planning authorities in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, as well as the Scottish Government. DECC gathers and holds records of those onshore wind farms that are operational, consented and in the planning system. Details of all these UK onshore wind farms can be found on the Renewable Energy Planning database at:

https://restats.decc.gov.uk/app/reporting/decc/monthlyextract

DECC and Ofgem also record the numbers and location of schemes accredited under the Great Britain feed-in tariff (FiT) scheme. These will also include any smaller-scale developments that are not in the planning system. For schemes accredited on FiTs, DECC produces a summary table of the number of onshore wind installations by local authority and parliamentary constituency area at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/sub-regional-feed-in-tariffs-confirmed-on-the-cfr-statistics

Similarly, there may be some schemes accredited on the renewables obligation (RO) that are not in the planning system; a list of RO accredited stations can be found at:

https://www.renewablesandchp.ofgem.gov.uk/Public/ReportManager.aspx?ReportVisibility=1&ReportCategory=0

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether his Department has made projections of the proportion of renewable energy made up by onshore wind turbines in the UK. [153086]

Michael Fallon: The 2009 renewable energy directive sets a target for the UK to achieve 15% of its energy consumption for heat, electricity and transport from renewable sources by 2020.

The renewable energy roadmap sets out the amount of onshore wind we anticipate will be deployed, based on operational capacity, and projects in the current pipeline. This is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/68637/7382-uk-renewable-energy-roadmap-update.pdf

Chris Heaton-Harris: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what onshore wind energy generation capacity (a) was installed, (b) had gained planning consent and (c) was seeking planning permission on 1 April 2013. [R] [153219]

Michael Fallon: The Department operates the Renewable Energy Planning Database (REPD) which tracks all renewable developments, including onshore wind, through the planning system

https://restats.decc.gov.uk/app/reporting/decc/monthlyextract

The REPD is updated monthly with the latest version being to the end of March.

The figures from REPD show:

 MW

Operational

5747.28

Under construction

2058.53

Awaiting construction

5007.05

Planning submitted

6148.74

24 Apr 2013 : Column 977W

Wind Power: Seas and Oceans

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what records his Department keeps of the (a) number and (b) location of all (i) current and (ii) planned offshore wind turbines in the UK. [153011]

Michael Fallon: The Department maintains the renewable energy planning database (REPD) that tracks all renewable energy projects, including offshore wind, through the planning system. This database provides, amongst other things, details on the installed capacity of the developments and actual site location:

https://restats.decc.gov.uk/app/reporting/decc/monthlyextract

The Crown Estate has published a number of maps showing the locations of current offshore wind farms and potential future offshore wind farms. These are publicly available and can be found at:

http://www.thecrownestate.co.uk/energy-infrastructure/downloads/maps-and-gis-data/

Cabinet Office

10 Downing Street

Ms Abbott: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how much 10 Downing street spent on (a) cosmetics, (b) maintaining the Downing street gardens and (c) pre-organised events and receptions in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012 and (iv) 2013 to date. [152587]

Mr Maude: There has been no expenditure on cosmetics. Spending on maintaining the Downing street gardens for 2009-10 and 2010-11 was agreed under the previous Administration. The figures are: £56,027 for 2009-10 and £49,060 for 2010-11. The cost of maintaining the gardens for 2011-12 was £47,321.

Figures for 2012-13 will be available once the Cabinet Office accounts for that year have been published.

Information on official and charity receptions held at 10 Downing street is published annually.

The latest information can be found on the Cabinet Office website. A copy has been placed in the Library of the House.

Conditions of Employment

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people were working (a) on full-time contracts, (b) on part-time contracts, (c) on zero-hour contracts and (d) in a self-employed capacity in each parliamentary constituency in each of the last five years. [152385]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated April 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people were working (a) on full-time contracts, (b) on part-time contracts, (c) on zero-hour contracts and (d) in a self-employed capacity in each parliamentary constituency in each of the last five years. (152385)

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) compiles labour market statistics for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS), following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions. Estimates of the number of zero hour contracts are not available from this source.

24 Apr 2013 : Column 978W

Due to small sample sizes estimates of the number of self-employed people in each constituency is also not available. As an alternative table 1 shows the number of people in self-employment for the UK and each region, according to APS survey responses during for the 12 month period ending December 2012, the latest available period, along with estimates for the 12 month periods ending in December for 2008 to 2011.

Tables 2 and 3 show the number of people in full-time or part-time employment, according to APS survey responses, for each parliamentary constituency in Great Britain for the 12 month period ending December 2012, the latest available period, along with estimates for the 12 month periods ending in December for 2008 to 2011. Estimates for parliamentary constituencies in Northern Ireland are not available. As these data are quite extensive a copy has been placed in the House of Commons Library.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty. A guide to the quality of the estimates is given in the tables. Due to the size of the tables, they will be stored in the library of the house.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at http://www.nomisweb.co.uk