In Vitro Fertilisation

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department plans to take to allow progress with the mitochondrial transfer IVF technique following the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority consultation findings. [150638]

Anna Soubry: We will carefully consider the advice that we received on 28 March from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and will respond in due course.

Kidneys: Diseases

Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the mortality rate of hospital patients with acute kidney injury in the most recent period for which figures are available. [150253]

Anna Soubry: This information is not available in the format requested. Information concerning the number of finished admission episodes (FAEs) with a primary or secondary diagnosis of acute renal failure and acute kidney injury according to whether they were alive or dead at the end of the hospital spell for 2011-12 is shown in the following table.

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A count of finished admission episodes(1) with a primary or secondary diagnosis(2) of acute renal failure and acute kidney injury(3) according to whether they were alive or dead(4) at the end of the hospital spell(5) for 2011-12
 Status of patients at end of spell
Primary or secondary diagnosisAliveDeadUnknown.

Acute renal failure

114,495

36,501

456

Acute Kidney Injury

1,116

62

2

(1) An FAE is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2) The number of episodes where this diagnosis was recorded in any of the 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) primary and secondary diagnosis fields in a hospital episode statistics (HES) record. Each episode is only counted once, even if the diagnosis is recorded in more than one diagnosis field of the record. (3) Acute Renal Failure/Acute Kidney Injury ICD10 codes N17.0 Acute renal failure with tubular necrosis N17.1 Acute renal failure with acute cortical necrosis N17.2 Acute renal failure with medullary necrosis N17.8 Other acute renal failure N17.9 Acute renal failure, unspecified O90.4 Postpartum acute renal failure S37.0 Injury of kidney (4) HES data cannot be used to determine the cause of death of a patient while in hospital. Deaths may be analysed by the main diagnosis for which the patient was being treated but this may not be the underlying cause of death. For example, a patient admitted for a hernia operation (with a primary diagnosis of hernia) may die from an unrelated heart attack. The Office for National Statistics collects information on the cause of death, wherever it occurs, based on the death certificate and should be the source of data for analyses on cause of death. (5) This field contains a code which defines the circumstances under which a patient left hospital. For the majority of patients, this is when they are discharged by the consultant. This field is only completed for the last episode in a spell. Alive: Discharged on clinical advice or with clinical consent Self discharged, or discharged by a relative or advocate Discharged by a mental health review tribunal, the Home Secretary or a court Dead: Died Baby was still born Unknown: Not known: a validation error. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre. Activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Yasmin Qureshi: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many of the recommendations made in the report Acute Kidney Injury: Adding Insult to Injury published in 2009 by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death have been addressed. [151060]

Anna Soubry: The report “Acute Kidney Injury: Adding Insult to Injury”, published in 2009 by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCPOD), made a number of recommendations to improve the clinical care of people with acute kidney injury (AKI). In response to the report; the Department asked the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to provide definitive clinical guidance in this area. The NCPOD recommendations have informed

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the development of the guidance, the draft of which is currently out for consultation until 29 April 2013 and can be viewed on the NICE website

www.nice.org.uk

by typing ‘acute kidney injury’ into the search bar. It is anticipated that the final guidance will be published in August 2013.

More generally, since the publication of the NCPOD report, the Department has undertaken a range of actions to support improved care for people with AKI. These have included developing multiprofessional e-learning packages for fluid management and AKI prevention; establishing regional networks for AKI to support integrated care for AKI patients and to share expertise and resources; working with the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges to develop a multiprofessional skills and competency programme for fluid management; and establishing an AKI delivery group with the key stakeholders in acute care.

NHS Kidney Care (NHS KC), the kidney diseases improvement body, launched the Hydration Matters campaign in June 2012 to highlight the importance of good fluid management in order to improve care for acutely unwell patients and reduce the risk of kidney damage.

Between August 2012 and January 2013, NHS KC also piloted an audit of stage 3 AKI (kidney failure) incidence and outcomes at 47 NHS trusts. The publication of comparative information will allow organisations to benchmark their performance against one another and to identify and share good practice. We anticipate the audit findings will be made available in May 2013.

In November 2012, with the support of NHS KC, the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh convened a United Kingdom wide meeting at which a consensus statement on how to improve the diagnosis and management of AKI was agreed. The statement can be read on the Royal College of Physicians website

www.rcpe.ac.uk

by typing 'acute kidney injury consensus statement' into the search bar.

Mental Health Services

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what progress has been made by the National Quality and Outcomes Group in developing a range of quality indicators and outcome measures to assess the performance of services provided by mental health trusts; [150909]

(2) what assessment he has made of the effect of delays in introducing a national tariff for mental health services in 2013-14 on improving choice and the quality of care for patients with mental health conditions; [150911]

(3) what progress he has made on developing a national tariff for mental health services; and if he will make a statement. [150917]

Norman Lamb: The introduction of a national tariff for mental health services has not been delayed. 2013-14 was previously identified as the first possible year that a national tariff could be introduced for mental health services, if the evidence supported it. The Department has concluded that there is still a need to improve the

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quality of the clinical data that is being submitted through the Mental Health Minimum Data Set, as well as the costing of the new currencies before a national tariff can be considered. NHS England and Monitor are responsible for agreeing the scope of the tariff and the pricing of the tariff from 1 April 2013. It will be for these organisations to decide how quickly to move to a national tariff for mental health services.

However, mental health providers and commissioners are moving forward on the implementation of payment by results (PbR) for mental health services. In the PbR guidance for 2013-14 the Department asked providers and commissioners to start to use some of the quality and outcome measures set out in the guidance and to review performance against these on a regular basis. Further work over the next year on these indicators aims to mandate the use of a key set of indicators in the future.

Choice of provider for mental health services for those people referred to a secondary care mental health provider will commence in April 2014. Guidance to support the implementation of this policy is currently being developed.

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what measures will be used by his Department to assess whether the NHS is delivering parity of esteem for mental health with physical health; and if he will make a statement. [150910]

Norman Lamb: The mandate to the NHS Commissioning Board (known as NHS England) sets out the Government's ambitions for the health service for the next two years. It includes an objective for the NHS England to put mental health on a par with physical health, and close the health gap between people with mental health problems and the population as a whole. The objective sets out the progress we expect to see by March 2015.

We have asked NHS England for its proposed response to the mandate, and we will assess whether NHS England is meeting the objective of putting mental health on a par with physical health by its practical actions, by whether its overall programme of work demonstrates that commitment, as well as progress on the relevant outcome measures in the NHS outcomes framework, and the delivery of other mental health commitments in the mandate.

Mental Health Services: Young People

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the potential effects on children and adolescent mental health services of reductions in funding to local authorities for those services by the Department for Communities and Local Government; and if he will make a statement. [150639]

Norman Lamb: Provision for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) is included in both the overall financial allocations made to the national health service and in financial allocations made to local authorities through the Local Government Revenue Support Grant. All current social care grants, including the old CAMHS grant, were rolled into the Local Government Revenue Support Grant (LGRSG) for the

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spending review period 2011-15. The LGRSG is the main route by which local authorities receive the majority of their funding for local public service delivery/and is issued via the Department for Communities and Local Government.

CAMHS funding is included in funding provided for On-going Personal Social Services. The funding for all Department of Health revenue grants has been maintained and will rise in line with inflation over the spending review period (£767.02 million in 2011-12, £784.43 million in 2012-13, £804.98 million in 2013-14 and £826.31 million in 2014-15 for On-going Personal Social Services). Individual elements of funding are not ring-fenced. It is for commissioners to decide how to use the resources available to them to best meet the needs of their local populations.

The Department for Education has also made funding available through the Early Intervention Grant to local authorities and schools for a wide range of services for children, young people and families including targeted mental health support in schools. This grant is due to finish at the end of the financial year. From April 2013, this funding is being moved and the majority will be paid as part of the Dedicated Schools Grant as part of changes to give schools greater flexibility to respond to the individual needs of their pupils.

Neither the Revenue Support Grant or Early Intervention Grant include ring fenced elements for CAMHS or anything else. This provides flexibility to local authorities and enables them to act more strategically and target investment early, where it will have the greatest impact.

NHS: Finance

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many NHS trusts went into administration in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12 and (c) 2012-13; [150326]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of NHS trusts at risk of going into administration in 2013-14; [150327]

(3) what steps he is taking to prevent NHS trusts going into administration. [150328]

Anna Soubry: South London Healthcare is the only national health service trust that has been placed into the Trust Special Administrator's regime. The Secretary of State appointed a Trust Special Administrator in July 2012. On 31 January 2013, the Secretary of State for Health announced his decision regarding the future of the trust in order to secure a sustainable future for its services.

The NHS Trust Development Authority (NHS TDA) is responsible for overseeing the performance management and governance of NHS trusts, including helping trusts to achieve foundation trust status.

The NHS TDA is not formally considering the application of the Trust Special Administrator's regime for any other NHS trusts at present. However, this remains an option where needed to secure the provision of sustainable services.

The NHS TDA will support NHS trusts in improving the quality and sustainability of their services for patients. It may take a range of bespoke steps depending on the

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circumstances, which might include specific support on key areas such as quality, finance, business planning and governance.

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment he has made of whether any NHS trusts are at risk of budget reductions resulting from financial problems of neighbouring trusts in 2012-13; [150399]

(2) which NHS trusts' budgets have been reduced as a result of financial problems of neighbouring NHS trusts. [150400]

Anna Soubry: National health service trusts receive income from commissioners as reimbursement for services provided to their local populations. They may also increase their income through a range of activities including attracting new patients to elective care. They should not be at risk of budget reductions as a result of financial problems in neighbouring trusts.

NHS: Health

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for what reasons staff health and well-being was not included in the NHS Commissioning Board's document, Everyone Counts: Planning for Patients 2013-14. [150499]

Dr Poulter: NHS England has advised that ‘Everyone Counts: Planning for Patients 2013-14’ sets out the planning framework for national health service commissioners. It is focused on improving outcomes and delivering the rights and pledges under the NHS Constitution within available resources. In doing so it sets out the expectations that all staff follow the values set out in the NHS constitution and also within Compassion in Practice, the chief nursing officer's new vision and strategy. This includes six areas of action which include improving staff experience.

NHS organisations, who are responsible for the health and well-being of their staff, continue to be supported by NHS Employers through a programme of work monitored under its contract with the Department. This programme includes:

the identification, production, promotion and mobilisation of good practice;

supporting 60 trusts to develop improvement plans for reducing sickness absence and improving staff health and well-being (now extended to another 45 trusts);

developing performance in parts of the NHS with particular challenges (e.g. ambulance services/mental health trusts); and

supporting the development of occupational health services.

NHS: Innovation

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when the next set of high impact innovations will be identified as part of the Innovation, Health and Wealth implementation programme. [150063]

Dr Poulter: NHS England is currently considering which innovations may constitute the next set of High Impact Innovations that will be a Prequalification Gateway for Commissioning for Quality and Innovation payments in 2014.

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A catalogue of potential innovations aligned to the five domains of the NHS Outcomes Framework was launched at the Innovation EXPO 2013.

This catalogue lists a collection of ideas gathered as part of ongoing horizon scanning, aimed at identifying emerging innovative thinking in healthcare that may have the potential to form future programmes of work.

A copy has been placed in the Library and is available on the following website:

https://innovault.innovation.nhs.uk/pg/dashboard

NHS: Physiotherapy

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what representations his Department has received on access and provision of physiotherapy services for NHS staff. [150494]

Dr Poulter: The Department has received representations on access and provision of physiotherapy services for NHS staff from the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. “Fit enough for Patients? An audit of workplace health and wellbeing services for NHS staff” (published 13 March 2013) is their review of how much progress has been made in implementing the Boorman recommendations from his report on NHS Health and Wellbeing published in 2009.

NHS: Sickness Absence

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what plans his Department has to reduce staff sickness absence rates in the NHS; [150495]

(2) what plans his Department has to review the implementation of the recommendations of the NHS Health and Well-being Final Report, published in November 2009. [150498]

Dr Poulter: The Department commissioned NHS Employers to support the national health service in improving staff health and well-being to help reduce sickness absence by encouraging trusts to implement five high impact changes (HICs) developed following the NHS Health and Well-being final report. The five HICs are: developing local evidence-based improvement plans; with strong visible leadership; supported by improved management capability; with access to better, local, high-quality accredited occupational health services; where staff are, encouraged and enabled to take more responsibility for their health.

The current workplan includes: the identification, production, promotion and mobilisation of good practice; supporting the 60 most challenged NHS organisations that could release the biggest cash savings, with a further 45 being added; developing performance in parts of the NHS with particular challenges (e.g. ambulance services, mental health trusts) and supporting the development of occupational health services.

Implementing the five HICs is a matter for individual NHS organisations. The Department has been monitoring progress through regular contractual reviews of the support being provided to the NHS by NHS Employers.

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Nurses: Training

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the effect of his planned NHS funding reforms on the number of applications for nursing degrees in the (a) short and (b) long term. [150964]

Dr Poulter: Reform of the funding of education and training is designed to provide commissioners of education programmes with the levers to improve the quality of national health service funded education and training, including nursing degrees. We would expect this to result in higher quality education and training which will make the programmes more attractive to applicants.

Obesity

Nick Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the recommendation of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges' report Measuring in: the medical profession's prescription for the nation's obesity crisis, published in 2013, to increase funding for weight management services; and if he will implement that report's recommendation that the Quality and Outcomes Framework be adjusted to provide incentives to GPs to refer patients to weight management services. [151012]

Anna Soubry: We have noted this report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges. ‘Healthy Lives, Healthy People: A call to action on obesity in England’, published in October 2011, sets out the Government's approach to tackling obesity in the new public health and NHS systems and the role of key partners, which includes the medical profession, business and other Government Departments.

Local authorities are responsible for commissioning weight management services. We have set up a new body for public health, Public Health England, to support local authorities in their public health responsibilities, including the identification and spread of good practice.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence is responsible for reviewing the evidence and making recommendations on new indicators for the Quality and Outcomes Framework to the negotiating parties to the General Medical Services Contract.

A copy of ‘A call to action’ has already been placed in the Library.

Ophthalmic Services

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital outpatient appointments were recorded for people with a primary or secondary diagnosis of (a) an ophthalmological condition, (b) age-related macular degeneration and (c) wet age-related macular degeneration, by primary care trust, in each of the last five years for which data are available. [150111]

Dr Poulter: Tables which record the number of out-patient attendances for ophthalmic conditions and a count of out-patient attendances where the patient had

16 Apr 2013 : Column 347W

a primary or secondary diagnosis of macular degeneration by primary care trust (PCT) for the years specified have been placed in the Library.

It is not possible to differentiate between wet and dry age-related macular degeneration due to the coding used.

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospital admissions were recorded for patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis of (a) an ophthalmological condition, (b) age-related macular degeneration and (c) wet age-related macular degeneration by primary care trust in each of the last five years for which data are available. [150112]

Dr Poulter: Tables which record the number of finished admission episodes where the patient was seen under an ophthalmology treatment speciality and a count of finished admission episodes where the patient had a primary or secondary diagnosis of macular degeneration by primary care trust (PCT) for the years specified have been placed in the Library.

It is not possible to differentiate between wet and dry age-related macular degeneration due to the coding used.

Organs: Donors

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his Department's policy is on the use of organs donated to the NHS being given to fee-paying patients from overseas. [151013]

Anna Soubry: The offering process for organs donated in the United Kingdom is specified in NHS Directions given to NHS Blood and Transplant by the Secretary of State, specifically in paragraph four of the NHS Blood and Transplant (2005) Directions and associated guidance.

All organs donated in the UK are first offered to national health service-entitled patients based on clinical need. This means people who are ordinarily resident in the UK; that is people who are lawfully living in the UK voluntarily and for settled purpose as part of their regular order of their life. It may also include certain persons who are entitled under European Union law and residents of non-European Union countries with whom the UK has bilateral health agreements.

Only if the organs are rejected by all designated transplant units for NHS-entitled patients are organs then offered to non-NHS entitled patients.

Once entitlement is established and the organ allocated, arrangements may be made for the actual surgery to be undertaken on a private basis. The Buggins review ‘Allocation of Organs to Non-UK EU Residents’, published in July 2009, found no evidence that people having their transplant as a private patient were allocated an organ more quickly.

Donated organs save lives and, while priority is given to NHS entitled patients, when there is no such patient for an organ the use of it for a non-NHS entitled patient is allowed in order to save a life and avoid the organ being wasted.

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Radiotherapy

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) pursuant to the answer of 13 March 2013, Official Report, column 248W, on Radiotherapy, which UK cancer centres delivering Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) are working with the UK SABR Consortium to create the national dataset; [150703]

(2) if he will request the UK Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Consortium to make its new guidelines on cancers of the lung, liver and prostate publicly available; [150705]

(3) who chairs the UK Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) Consortium; and what experience that person has in delivering SABR to cancers of the prostate, head and neck, kidney, pancreas, liver and spine; [150706]

(4) which officials from his Department sit on the UK Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Consortium; and for what reasons the Consortium only meets twice yearly. [150707]

Anna Soubry: The United Kingdom Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Consortium is a national health service group allied to the Royal College of Radiologists, and has no formal link to the Department. Queries about the group, its membership and the frequency with which it meets should be addressed to its Chair, Dr Matthew Hatton, at the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.

As set out the previous answer on 13 March 2013, Official Report, column 249W, the consortium has advised the Department that it will make the guidance that it has developed more widely available in due course.

Sepsis

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) which Minister in his Department is responsible for the performance of the NHS in the (a) diagnosis and (b) treatment of sepsis; [150608]

(2) what his Department's policy is on measures to ensure that (a) diagnosis of and (b) death from sepsis is accurately recorded by NHS trusts; and if he will make a statement. [150609]

Dr Poulter: I am the Minister responsible for the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in terms of patient safety. My right hon. and noble Friend Earl Howe is the Minister responsible for national health service performance matters.

The recording of data related to sepsis by national health service trusts has to comply with World Health Organisation (WHO) coding. The WHO changed the terminology used in January 2010, to refer to sepsis rather than septicaemia and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reports will, in future, show sepsis under their categories, rather than septicaemia. This should enable a more accurate reflection of the position.

In relation to the collection of data, although ONS use mandatory death certification to develop data on mortality, the description of the cause of death is a matter for local clinical judgment. As part of the Death Certification Reforms, the Department will be consulting shortly on new guidance to doctors for completing Medical Certificates of Cause of Death.

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Officials are exploring with the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and Health Education England how best to strengthen arrangements for sepsis training and give greater prominence to the importance of early detection and treatment of sepsis.

Suicide

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has held with the devolved Administrations on suicide prevention. [150949]

Norman Lamb: The Government are working with the devolved Administrations to share evidence on suicide prevention and effective interventions. A five nations official level joint working forum facilitates the sharing of best practice between the nations and enhances co-operation on mutually beneficial areas of work.

Tamoxifen

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether tamoxifen is available UK-wide for the treatment of cancer. [150894]

Norman Lamb: Tamoxifen is licensed for the treatment of breast cancer in the United Kingdom.

In England, clinicians can prescribe any product, including any unlicensed product, subject to their primary care organisation agreeing funding, if they feel it is clinically appropriate for an individual patient after discussing the potential risks and taking into account the patient's medical history. In these circumstances, the clinician is expected to retain clinical responsibility for the patient while prescribing the medicine.

Telephone Services

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) his Department in each of the last three years. [149996]

Dr Poulter: As of 27 March 2013 the principal access numbers operated by the Communication Division of the Department of Health and the Department's Executive agency, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, do not retain revenue either for the telephone provider, the Department or the agency. This has been the case for at least the last three years.

The Department's new Executive agency, Public Health England, took over responsibility for a number of these phone services on 1 April 2013.

The Department has a number of arm's length bodies and national programmes eg NHS Employers. Information about telephone services for these bodies is not held centrally and cannot be provided except at disproportionate cost.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which telephone lines are operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible for public enquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone

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service provider is for each number; and which such lines (A) are free to the caller and (B) may incur a charge to the caller. [150019]

Dr Poulter: The following table shows the principal access numbers and service providers for the phone services managed or promoted on behalf of the Department of Health's Communication Division as of 27 March 2013.

Campaign or serviceNumberService provider

Carers Direct

0808 802 0202

SERCO

Change4Life

0300 123 4567

SERCO

Drinkline

0800 917 8282

SERCO

European Health Insurance Card

0300 330 1350

NHS Business Services Authority

Frank

0800 776600

SERCO

Healthy Start

0845 607 6823

SERCO

Health Visitor Recruitment

0300 123 1023

SERCO

NHS Careers

0345 60 60 655

SERCO

Sexual health Line

0800 567123

SERCO

Smokefree

0800 169 0169

SERCO

Worth Thinking About

0800 28 29 30

SERCO

We are unable to say what a caller may or may not be charged as it depends on their own phone service supplier. The Department uses 080, 03 and 0845 numbers which can often be called free depending on the supplier.

The Department's new Executive agency, Public Health England, took over responsibility for a number of these phone services on 1 April 2013.

The principal access number for the Department's executive Agency, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, is a standard issued telephone number, 0203 0806000. As such the caller will receive standard call charges dependant on how the caller has placed the call, ie via standard telephone or mobile. The agency does not operate Freephone numbers; thus the caller will always incur a charge.

The Department has a number of arm’s length bodies and national programmes eg NHS Employers. Information about telephone services for these bodies is not held centrally and cannot be provided except at disproportionate cost.

Transverse Myelitis

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what consideration his Department has given to providing funding for research into transverse myelitis; and what estimate he has made of how many people are affected by that condition. [150838]

Norman Lamb: We have made no estimation of the number of people affected by transverse myelitis.

The Department's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including transverse myelitis. These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the scientific quality of the proposals made. An application has been made to the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme for a trial of intravenous immunoglobulin versus standard therapy

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for the treatment of transverse myelitis in adults and children, and this has been recommended for funding subject to contract.

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he expects his Department to begin engagement with stakeholders on the terms of inquiry into the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust. [150999]

Dr Poulter: The inquiry into previous failings in maternity and neonatal services at the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust is independent of the Government. The Department is supportive of efforts by the local NHS to ensure the investigation is fully transparent, independent and impartial. This includes the recent appointment of an independent chairmen, Dr Bill Kirkup CBE, to chair the inquiry. Terms of reference for the inquiry are a matter for the chair.

Energy and Climate Change

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices his Department has purchased in the last two years. [151334]

Gregory Barker: In the last two years, DECC have purchased the following:

 Number

(a) Desktop computers

207

(b) Laptop computers

280

(c) Tablet devices

13

Recruitment

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what amount his Department spent on advertising job vacancies in each year from 2005 to 2009. [150686]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change was created in October 2008, therefore expenditure details can only be provided relating to the period October 2008 to March 2009.

The expenditure for this period was £17,000.

Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme

Dr Whitehead: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the effect on investor confidence in the domestic renewable heating sector of the Government’s decision to delay introduction of the renewable heat incentive; and if he will make a statement. [151617]

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Gregory Barker: We recognise that there are a number of investors keen to see the immediate full implementation of the RHI. However, we are equally aware of the importance of ensuring that we get the design of the domestic RHI right—if we do not, the effect on investor confidence could be far more damaging. We must design and deliver a scheme that offers sustainable support and delivers renewable heat in the most cost-effective way, learning from our experience of other schemes and from the evidence stakeholders provided through the consultation process.

The extension of the renewable heat premium payment (RHPP) scheme and the continuing dialogue we are having with stakeholders in the sector are intended to mitigate some of the risk of reduced investor confidence.

We remain committed to providing a long-term incentive for deployment of renewable heat installations in the domestic sector. We are continuing to make progress towards finalising the details of the domestic RHI as quickly as possible, and we intend to announce those details this summer, and open the scheme for payments from spring 2014.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many days of work were carried out by officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies on average in each of the last five years; and what the total salary cost was of officials in each year. [151105]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) was created in October 2008. Therefore there is no data available prior to that date.

All civil servants employed by (a) DECC and (b) its non-departmental bodies for which it is responsible, are expected, on average, to attend for 220 working days per year. This figure excludes weekends, public and privilege leave and annual leave.

The total salary costs for civil servants employed by DECC are shown in the following table.

 Total salary cost (£000)

2008-09

55,664

2009-10

62,746

2010-11

70,695

2011-12

76,665

The annual resource accounts for each of the non-departmental bodies for which DECC is responsible are shown in the following table.

OrganisationHyperlink to annual resource accounts

Civil Nuclear Police Authority

http://www.cnpa.police.uk/publications

Coal Authority

http://coal.decc.gov.uk/en/coal/cms/publications/annual_report/annual_report.aspx

Committee on Climate Change

http://www.theccc.org.uk/?s=annual+accounts

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Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

http://www.nda.gov.uk/documents/search-results.cfm?renderforprint= 0&renderelements=&fieldnames= &rendercontrolidlist=&c7153t1f6= 0&c7153t1f4=0&c7153t1f5=0& c7153t1f3=0.91&c7153t1f2=0& c7153t1fl=0

The total salary costs shown in the resource accounts for DECC and the non-departmental bodies for which it is responsible, in the tables above, include additional work carried out through overtime costs.

Wind Power: Lyme Bay

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what consideration he has given to the use of any part of Lyme Bay as an offshore wind farm; and if he will make a statement. [151156]

Gregory Barker: The Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change has given no consideration to the use of Lyme Bay as a possible location for an offshore wind farm. If such a development proposal is submitted to the Planning Inspectorate it will fall to the Department in due course to consider the Planning Inspectorate’s recommendation alongside all other representations received.

Culture, Media and Sport

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices her Department has purchased in the last two years. [151330]

Hugh Robertson: The following table sets out how many desktop computers, laptop computers and tablet devices the Department for Culture, Media and Sport has purchased in the last two years.

Type of computerNumber bought in last two years

Desktop computer

1

Laptop computer

0

Tablets (Ipads)

16

International Development

Asylum: Education

Jim Sheridan: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent discussions she has had with the UN Relief and Works Agency on the education of young refugees in its care. [150310]

16 Apr 2013 : Column 354W

Mr Duncan: I regularly discuss with the Commissioner General of the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) a range of issues including the education of young refugees in its care.

Between 2011 and 2015, the UK's contribution to UNRWA's general fund will provide, among other things, education for over 36,000 refugees a year. The UK has also provided support for construction of 12 new schools in Gaza, supporting at least 24,000 children to attend school one of which I opened on the 9 April. We provide funding in a way that supports better long term planning by UNRWA and drives improvements in services and value for money.

Computers

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many (a) desktop computers, (b) laptop computers and (c) tablet devices her Department has purchased in the last two years. [151341]

Mr Duncan: The numbers of desktop computers, laptop computers and tablet devices purchased by DFID in the last two years are shown in the following table.

Type of computerNumber purchased

Desktop

1215

Laptop

2811

Tablet

1

The majority of the computers were purchased in the last six months as part of an upgrade of the Department's technology to replace existing laptops and desktops that were four and eight years old respectively.

Developing Countries: Police

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many police training projects were funded by her Department in 2012-13; how much funding was given to each project; and if she will make a statement [151222]

Mr Duncan: DFID's support to police training tends to be part of wider, multi-annual security and justice programmes. DFID does not currently fund any projects purely dedicated to police training and disaggregated data on funding for police training is therefore not available.

DFID spent £27 million on security sector management and reform in 2011-12, which includes support for policing. Funding data for 2012-13 is not yet available.

Developing Countries: Politics and Government

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many governance projects were funded by her Department as ODA spending in 2012-13; and how much each such project cost. [151635]

16 Apr 2013 : Column 355W

Lynne Featherstone: The project database within the Department's website at:

http://projects.dfid.gov.uk/

provides full information including total planned project budget and spend to date by sector of all of the projects currently operational, completed and planned. This shows that 424 projects currently operational currently contribute towards governance-related activities.

Public Expenditure

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development with reference to the estimated Resource DEL underspend in financial year 2012-13 of £500 million as set out in Table 2.5 of the Budget 2013 Red Book which service areas in her Department received reduced resources; what the amounts of resource reduction were; and if she will make a statement. [150196]

Justine Greening: Table 2.5 of the Budget 2013 Red Book shows the difference between Budget 2012 plans and Department's latest estimates of their full-year position.

The Department will set out its spending for the year in detail in its annual accounts in the usual way.

Rwanda

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which post-genocide reconciliation projects her Department supported in Rwanda in 2012; and which such projects her Department plans to support in 2014-15. [151272]

Lynne Featherstone: In 2012, the UK supported the Public Policy Information Monitoring and Advocacy (PPIMA) project which encourages community dialogue and advocacy. The project aims to deliver improved services and to strengthen social cohesion and reconciliation.

In the coming period, in addition to supporting a second phase of PPIMA, we will support the Aegis Trust to deliver a Genocide research and reconciliation programme, and a Kigali based think tank, the Institute of Research and Dialogue for Peace, to deliver a project focusing on building peace through research, dialogue and strategic advocacy. Through an Innovation for Education fund, we will also fund ‘I-Witness in Rwanda', an innovative peace-building project that uses technology to encourage empathy for disadvantaged and vulnerable groups.

Syria

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what further assistance she plans to provide to aid Syrian civilians. [150276]

Justine Greening: The UK is a leading donor to the humanitarian response in Syria and the region. Following our announcement at the pledging conference in Kuwait, the UK's total funding for Syria and the region to date is £139.5 million. UK funding is assisting people in

16 Apr 2013 : Column 356W

need in Syria in addition to refugees and host communities in Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey and Iraq. The UK is calling on all parties to the conflict to reach an agreement that allows humanitarian workers full, unfettered humanitarian access without interference or threat of violence.

DFID continues to support the UN-led response in Syria and the region and is encouraging the UN to plan for a sustainable long-term humanitarian response. DFID continues to develop its strategy for meeting humanitarian needs.

Telephone Services

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) her Department and (b) the non-departmental public body for which she is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) her Department in each of the last three years. [149998]

Mr Duncan: No revenue has been retained by DFID for the principal access numbers operated by the Department and its non-departmental public bodies. The revenue retained by the telephone provider is a matter for the provider and not for the Department. DFID pays an annual fee to Level 3 Communications for provision of the 0845 number used for the Public Enquiry Point and are not charged for the number of calls received by that number.

Visits Abroad

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what her Department's budget was for overseas travel for officials and Ministers in 2012-13. [151361]

Mr Duncan: In 2012-13 DFID spent £11.25 million on travel. This total includes both domestic and overseas travel and includes travel expenditure by Ministers and officials.

The Department's chart of accounts does not distinguish between overseas and domestic travel.

Education

Academies

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will publish the rates of pay for academy brokers. [149520]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 18 March 2013]: In May 2012, the Department published information on contractors whose contracts were worth over £58,200 per annum and this information can be found on the Department's website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation/transparency/a00209502/tax-arrangements

Academy brokers are listed as Education Advisers.

Information to cover the remainder of the year 2012/13 for academy brokers is in the following table.

16 Apr 2013 : Column 357W

16 Apr 2013 : Column 358W

ABCDEFGHIJ(a)J(b)KLM

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

700

799

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

700

799

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

600

699

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

500

599

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

500

599

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

<1yr

0

700

799

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

400

499

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

600

699

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

500

599

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

600

699

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

500

599

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

500

599

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

1yr <2yrs

0

600

699

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

16 Apr 2013 : Column 359W

16 Apr 2013 : Column 360W

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

<1 yr

0

600

699

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Personal service company

<1 yr

0

500

599

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Employment business

Veredus

(1)

2yrs <3yrs

2

700

799

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Employment business

Veredus

(1)

9yrs <10yrs

2

800

899

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Employment business

Veredus

(1)

6yrs <7yrs

2

800

899

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Employment business

Veredus

(1)

<1yr

0

600

699

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Employment Business

Veredus

(1)

4yrs <5yrs

2

700

799

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Employment business

Veredus

(1)

2yrs <3yrs

2

700

799

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Employment Business

Veredus

(1)

2yrs <3yrs

2

700

799

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

DFE

DFE

Education adviser

Other

Employment business

Veredus

(1)

4yrs <5yrs

2

700

799

per day

N

Supply of education advice for the Dept’s Academies programme.

(1) 18 King William Street, London, EC4N 7HE Key: A = Sponsor Department. B = Organisation. C = Job title. D = Specialism. E = Contractual chain, i.e. type of organisation that payments are being made to. F = Name of company, business or other entity to which payments are made. G = Address of company, business or other entity to which payments are made. H = Engagement length category. Shows the current continuous engagement period, including any contract renewals. I = Number of contract renewals. J(a) = Total cost of engaging the individual with a range: Lower bound (excludes VAT). J(b) = Total cost of engaging the individual with a range: Upper bound (excludes VAT). K = Payment methods. L = Has the contract been ended and/or the individual brought onto payroll since 31January? Y/N. M = Additional comments.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many complaints have been made to his Department about the conduct of academy brokers. [149522]

Elizabeth Truss: There have been six formal written complaints made to the Department on the conduct of named academy brokers in the last 12 months.

16 Apr 2013 : Column 361W

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education into which groups school academies are organised; and who the designated accountancy officer is for each such group. [149791]

Elizabeth Truss: Academies can operate alone as a single academy trust or as part of a group of academies in a multi-academy trust (one academy trust with responsibility for more than one academy). Single academies can also be part of an over-arching umbrella trust or collaborative agreement.

The funding agreement requires each academy trust to appoint an Accounting Officer. The Academies Financial Handbook requires each academy trust to designate a named individual as its Accounting Officer. The Accounting Officer should usually be the senior executive of the academy trust and in most cases this will be the Principal or for multi-trusts, the Chief Executive.

Adoption

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which local authorities have signed up to the Adopters Charter to date. [149820]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 25 March 2013]: The Department does not routinely collect information about the Adopters Charter but in July 2012 the British Association for Adoption and Fostering, at the Department's request, conducted an online survey into use of the Charter. Of the 52 agencies that responded 23 had implemented the Charter and another 24 planned to do so within the following year.

Cabinet Committees

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of meetings of the Home Affairs Cabinet Committee he has attended in the last 12 months. [146723]

Elizabeth Truss: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education prioritises attendance at Cabinet Committees. Information about the proceedings of Cabinet Committees is not routinely disclosed.

Care Homes

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which local authorities have signed up to the Care Homes Charter to date. [149821]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 25 March 2013]: The draft charter for children and young people living in children's homes developed last year was not in the event issued. This was in the light of the decision to launch an urgent programme of work to review the quality of provision being delivered in children's homes. I announced on 5 February the key actions being taken in response to the report of the Expert Group on Quality, and as our plans are developed further I will be

16 Apr 2013 : Column 362W

considering if the charter could now play a useful role in helping to raise expectations and drive improvements.

Childminding

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the number of childminders active in (a) England and Wales, (b) Suffolk and (c) Bury St Edmunds constituency in each quarter of each of the last three years. [148087]

Elizabeth Truss: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries. The response covers the information requested for England only, as this is where the responsibility of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education lies.

Education

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he plans to require all schools to publish their policies for building the character of their pupils. [148449]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department has no plans to require all schools to publish their policies for building the character of their pupils.

Section 78 of the Education Act 2002 requires the school curriculum to be balanced and broadly based and: to prepare pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of life; and to promote pupils' spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development.

It is for schools to determine how they do this through the teaching of their curriculum and in other ways.

Free School Meals

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of children in (a) Suffolk, (b) Bury St Edmunds constituency and (c) England were eligible for free school meals in (i) primary schools and (ii) secondary schools in each of the last three years. [148090]

Mr Laws: Information on the number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals is shown in the following tables.

Information on the number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals as at January 2012 is published in the Statistical First Release 'Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics: January 2012' available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/datasets/a00209478/schl-pupil-charac-jan-2012

Copies of this report will be placed in the House Libraries.

16 Apr 2013 : Column 363W

16 Apr 2013 : Column 364W

State-funded primary and state-funded secondary schools(1,2,3): Number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals—January each year: 2010 to 2012—England, Suffolk local authority and Bury St Edmunds parliamentary constituency
 2010
 State-funded primary schools(1,2)State-funded secondary schools(1,3)
 No. on roll(4,5)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(4,5)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school mealsNo. on roll(4,5)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(4,5)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals
       

England

3,831,475

709,370

18.5

2,864,345

441,145

15.4

       

Suffolk

40,121

5,040

12.6

46,024

4,665

10.1

       

Bury St Edmunds constituency

5,546

481

8.7

9,615

632

6.6

 2011
 State-funded primary schools(1,2)State-funded secondary schools(1,3)
 No. on roll(4,5)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(4,5)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school mealsNo. on roll(4,5)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(4,5)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals
       

England

3,866,885

741,315

19.2

2,837,825

450,275

15.9

       

Suffolk

41,952

5,612

13.4

44,207

4,423

10.0

       

Bury St Edmunds constituency

5,629

547

9.7

9,449

687

7.3

 2012
 State-funded primary schools(1,2)State-funded secondary schools(1,3)
 No. on roll(4,5)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(4,5)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school mealsNo. on roll(4,5)No. of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(4,5)% of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals
       

England

3,941,625

759,040

19.3

2,809,815

449,485

16.0

       

Suffolk

46,464

6,335

13.6

41,474

4,057

9.8

       

Bury St Edmunds constituency

6,020

569

9.5

9,303

699

7.5

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes all primary academies, including free schools. (3) Includes city technology colleges and all secondary academies, including free schools. (4) Includes pupils who are sole or dual main registrations. Includes boarders. (5) Pupils who have full-time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils who have part time attendance and are aged between five and 15. Note: National numbers have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: School Census

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he plans to automatically enrol eligible students for free school meals. [148748]

Mr Laws: The Department has no plans to enrol eligible students automatically for free school meals.

We are, however, considering options to promote wider use of the eligibility checking service by local authorities so that they can improve their application processes, encouraging more parents to apply online.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he plans to take to ensure that money awarded to universal credit recipients for free school meals is spent on school meals. [150941]

Mr Laws: The Government's intention is that free school meals will continue to be provided by schools as a meal in kind under universal credit.

GCSE

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils without statements of special educational needs who were (a) eligible and (b) not eligible for free school

16 Apr 2013 : Column 365W

meals and who attended mainstream schools that were not academies, achieved 5 A* to C grades including English and mathematics but excluding equivalents is each year since 2003. [148523]

Mr Laws [holding answer 18 March 2013]: The requested information for the academic year 2007/08 to 2011/12 is

16 Apr 2013 : Column 366W

given in the following table. Information for earlier years could be provided only at disproportionate cost. The drop in the number of pupils in 2011/12 is the result of the larger proportion of pupils attending academies, who are excluded from this table.

Achievements at GCSE for pupils(1) without a statement of SEN at the end of key stage 4 by free school meal eligibility, 2007/08 to 2011/12 (revised)(2), England, state-funded mainstream schools excluding academies
 Pupils known to be eligible for free school mealsAll other pupils(3)All pupils(4)
  Achieving 5+ A*-C grades excluding equivalents including English and mathematics GCSEs Achieving 5+ A*-C grades excluding equivalents including English and mathematics GCSEs Achieving 5+ A*-C grades excluding equivalents including English and mathematics GCSEs
Pupils without a statement of SEN(5)Number of eligible pupilsNumberPercentageNumber of eligible pupilsNumberPercentageNumber of eligible pupilsNumberPercentage

2007/08

65,693

15,258

23.2

497,738

255,863

51.4

563,431

271,121

48.1

2008/09

63,813

16,133

25.3

473,195

252.990

53.5

537,008

269,123

50.1

2009/10

63,780

17,884

28.0

461i450

261.333

56.6

525,230

279,217

53.2

2010/11

62,862

19,095

30.4

438,077

258.765

59.1

500,939

277,860

55.5

2011/12

51,645

15,555

30.1

312,827

174,504

55.8

364,472

190,059

52.1

(1) Pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each academic year. (2) Figures for 2007/08 to 2010/11 are based on final data, 2011/12 figures are based on revised data. (3) Includes pupils not eligible for free school meals and for whom free school meal eligibility was unclassified or could not be determined. (4) Includes pupils for whom free school meal eligibility or SEN provision could not be determined. (5) Includes pupils with no identified SEN, SEN pupils without a statement (classified as School Action or School Action plus) and unclassified pupils. Source: National pupil database (2007/08 to 2010/11) and key stage 4 attainment data (2011/12).

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils in each school achieved an A* to C grade in both English and mathematics GCSE excluding equivalents in each year since 1997. [150138]

Mr Laws [holding answer 26 March 2013]:The information requested for 2005/06 to 2011/12 academic years has been placed in the House Libraries. Information for other years could be provided only at disproportionate cost as this measure was only routinely produced from the 2009/10 academic year onwards.

Home Education

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of children in (a) Barnsley Central constituency, (b) South Yorkshire and (c) England were home-educated in the academic year (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12 in (A) Foundation Stage, (B) Key Stage 1, (C) Key Stage 2, (D) Key Stage 3 and (E) Key Stage 4. [149904]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 March 2013]:Information on the numbers and ages of home educated children is not collected by the Department for Education.

Official Engagements

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his official engagements were on 12 February 2013. [150497]

Elizabeth Truss: Details of the Department's Ministers' meetings with external organisations from May 2010 to September 2012 have been published on our website and data.gov.uk. Details of meetings for February 2013 will be collated as part of the information for the first quarter of this year and published as soon as possible.

Overtime

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average cost in overtime payments was per member of staff in his ministerial private office in the most recent year for which figures are available. [150496]

Elizabeth Truss: Average expenditure on overtime for the private ministerial office of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education in the last financial year (from 1 March 2012 to 28 February 2013) was £4,956 per official.

Priority School Building Programme: Sandwell

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he expects school improvement works to commence on (a) Phoenix Collegiate Academy, (b) Hall Green Primary School and (c) Harvills Hawthorn Primary School under his Department's Priority School Building programme in Sandwell; if he will inform those schools of his Department's timetable for works under the programme; and if he will make a statement. [150168]

16 Apr 2013 : Column 367W

Mr Laws [holding answer 26 March 2013]:Engagement work will start with Phoenix Collegiate Academy, Hall Green Primary School and Harvills Hawthorn Primary School between July and September 2013. The Education Funding Agency (EFA) sent a letter to the schools on 20 July 2012 to inform them of this schedule and to confirm that an EFA project director will contact each of the schools to organise an initial meeting during that time period.

Public Expenditure

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the estimated Resource DEL underspend in financial year 2012-13 of £1 billion as set out in Table 2.5 of the Budget 2013 Red Book which service areas in his Department received reduced resources; what the amounts of resource reduction were; and if he will make a statement. [150194]

Elizabeth Truss: Table 2.5 of the Budget 2013 Red Book shows the difference between Budget 2012 plans and the Department's latest estimates of its full-year position.

In addition to forecast underspend against final plans, since Budget 2012 the Department has surrendered £612 million of RDEL at the supplementary estimate, of which £612 million is available for future years through the Budget Exchange mechanism.

16 Apr 2013 : Column 368W

The Department will set out its spending for the year in detail in its annual accounts in the usual way.

Pupils: Bullying

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many incidents of (a) bullying between pupils and (b) verbal and physical abuse of school staff by pupils were recorded in schools in (i) Suffolk, (ii) Bury St Edmunds constituency and (iii) England in each of the last three years. [148099]

Elizabeth Truss: Information is not available in the form requested.

The Department collects information on the reasons pupils are excluded from school. This includes exclusions relating to bullying, to physical assault against an adult and to verbal abuse or threatening behaviour against an adult.

Information on the number of permanent and fixed period exclusions by reason for the years 2008/09 to 2010/11 is given in the tables.

The latest published information on permanent and fixed period exclusions is available in the 'Permanent and Fixed Period Exclusions from Schools in England 2010/11' Statistical First Release at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/a00211337/

A copy of the release will be placed in the House Library.

State-funded primary, state-funded secondary and special schools(1,2,3,4): number of permanent exclusions and fixed period exclusions by reason 2008/09 to 2010/11, England
 Permanent exclusions
 BullyingVerbal abuse/threatening behaviour against an adultPhysical assault against an adult
 2008/09(5)2009/10(5)2010/112008/09(5)2009/10(5)2010/112008/09(5)2009/10(5)2010/11

England

50

50

60

710

630

510

730

580

570

Suffolk local authority

0

0

x

17

9

7

6

7

8

Bury St Edmunds constituency

0

0

0

x

x

0

0

0

x

 Fixed period exclusions (pupils can be excluded more than once)
 BullyingVerbal abuse/ threatening behaviour against an adultPhysical assault against an adult
 2008/092009/102010/112008/092009/102010/112008/092009/102010/11

England

5,140

5,100

4,800

78,350

69,190

65,170

17,200

16,370

16,790

Suffolk local authority

74

51

49

1,460

1,154

770

216

221

206

Bury St Edmunds constituency

10

11

19

257

153

162

31

37

32

x = less than 5 exclusions. (1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes primary academies. (3) Includes city technology colleges and secondary academies (including all-through academies). (4) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools. (5) Figures relating to permanent exclusions at national and local authority level are based on incomplete pupil-level data and include some estimation for missing data. Constituency level figures are as reported without estimation. Note: National figures have been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: School Census

16 Apr 2013 : Column 369W

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in Kingston upon Hull North constituency qualify for the Pupil Premium; and how much has been transferred to each school in Kingston upon Hull North under the pupil premium in each of the last two financial years. [147487]

Mr Laws [holding answer 12 March 2013]: The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011. Pupil Premium funding is provided to schools which have on roll pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (the Deprivation Premium); children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months (the Looked After Child Premium); and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces (the Service Child Premium).

In the financial year 2011-12, 3,340 pupils attending schools in Kingston upon Hull North constituency area were eligible for the Deprivation Premium or Service Child Premium, attracting £1.623 million. It is not possible to identify, at constituency level, the number of pupils eligible for the Looked After Child Premium or the number of pupils eligible for the Deprivation Premium in Alternative Provision settings.

16 Apr 2013 : Column 370W

In the financial year 2012-13, eligibility for the Pupil Premium was extended to include those eligible for FSM at any point in the last six years. This had the effect of increasing the number of pupils in Kingston upon Hull North constituency eligible for the Deprivation Premium or Service Child Premium to 4,680, attracting £2.906 million.

In 2013-14, total Pupil Premium funding will rise from £1.25 billion to £1.875 billion per year. This will enable the level of funding for the Deprivation and Looked After Child Premium to increase to £900 per pupil and the Service Child Premium to increase to £300 per pupil. Final allocations for 2013-14 are not yet available. Illustrative Pupil Premium allocations using January 2012 pupil numbers show that Kingston upon Hull North constituency will receive approximately £4.196 million of Pupil Premium funding in 2013-14 for 4,680 eligible pupils. Final allocations for 2013-14 based on 2013 pupil numbers will be published in the autumn.

A breakdown of Kingston upon Hull North constituency school allocations for the financial years 2011-12, 2012-13 and illustrative allocations for 2013-14 are provided in Annex A.

Annex A: State-funded primary, secondary and special schools, and pupil referral units(1, 2, 3, 4: )Number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in 2011/12(8, 9)
       Deprivation pupil premium(6)
URNParly constLALocal authorityEstabSchool nameNumber on roll(5)Number of pupils eligible for the deprivation pupil premiumPercentage of pupils eligible for the deprivation pupil premiumAllocation for the deprivation pupil premium 2011/12(7)()(£)

132026

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

1103

Ashwell Pupil Referral Unit

*

*

*

*

117713

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2002

Appleton Primary School

256

50

19.5

24,400

133597

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2003

The Parks Primary School

247

155

62.8

75,640

117716

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2040

Stepney Primary School

204

80

39.2

39,040

117717

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2045

Bricknell Primary School

625

66

10.6

32,208

117773

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2162

Endike Primary School

250

127

50.8

61,976

117792

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2200

The Green Way Primary School

433

284

65.6

138,592

117795

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2279

Parkstone Primary School

331

56

16.9

27,328

117796

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2280

Hall Road Primary School

211

111

52.6

54,168

117808

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2493

Thorpepark Primary School

314

206

65.6

100,528

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117816

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2647

Sidmouth Primary School

190

63

33.2

30,744

117822

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2684

Thoresby Primary School

354

80

22.6

39,040

117898

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2822

Cleeve Primary School

327

179

54.7

87,352

117901

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2861

Biggin Hill Primary School

432

189

43.8

92,232

117904

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2868

Highlands Primary School

358

192

53.6

93,696

117913

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2884

Broadacre Primary School

294

74

25.2

36,112

117929

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2902

Bude Park Primary School

214

94

43.9

45,872

118031

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

3302

Newland St John CofE Primary School

208

51

24.5

24,888

118046

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

3400

Endsleigh Holy Child RC Primary School

263

26

9.9

12,688

118047

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

3404

Holy Name RC Primary School

175

86.8

49.6

42,358

118049

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

3460

St Vincent's RC Primary School

206

15

7.3

7,320

118050

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

3500

St Nicholas' Primary School

188

48

25.5

23,424

118051

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

3506

St Andrew's Church of England Voluntary Aided Primary School

538

56

10.4

27,328

118052

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

3508

St Mary Queen of Martyrs RC Primary School

279

63

22.6

30,744

131918

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

4004

Kingswood College of Arts

797

239

30.0

116,632

118070

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

4030

Newland School for Girls

850

249

29.3

121,512

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118103

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

4113

Kelvin Hall School

972

180

18.5

87,840

118117

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

4626

St Mary's College

1258

209

16.6

101,992

118138

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

7000

Northcott School

*

*

*

*

118139

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

7006

Frederick Holmes School

*

*

*

*

118140

Kingston upon Hull North

810

Kingston upon Hull, City of

7007

Oakfield

*

*

*

*

Notes: x = Less than five pupils or a percentage based on less than five pupils or an allocation amount based on less than five pupils. * = Allocations for these schools are not included as they are either a maintained special school or PRU. The premium for these establishments is held with the local authority (please see the conditions of grant). (1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes primary academies. (3) Includes city technology colleges and secondary academies. (4) Includes maintained special schools, excludes general hospital schools and non-maintained special schools. (5) Full-time equivalent (FTE) pupils in year groups R-11 (where national curriculum year groups do not apply pupils aged four to 15). For all those aged five and over includes sole or dual main registrations only. In pupil referral units, FTE pupils aged four (all registration types) and headcount of pupils aged five to 15 (sole or dual main registrations as well as pupils who are registered with other providers and further education colleges). (6) Full-time equivalent (FTE) number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals in year groups R-11, (where national curriculum year groups do not apply pupils aged four to 15). For all those aged five and over includes sole or dual main registrations only. In pupil referral units, FTE pupils aged four (all registration types) and headcount of pupils aged five to 15 (sole or dual main registrations as well as pupils who are registered with other providers and further education colleges) known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals. (7) Each FSM eligible pupil will attract £488 through the pupil premium. For pupils in maintained primary and secondary schools funding will be passed to schools via the local authorities. Academies will receive funding from the YPLA. For pupils in maintained special schools and PRU's funding will be allocated to local authorities to decide whether to pass on funding to the education setting or to hold back funding to manage centrally for the benefit of those pupils it has responsibility for. (8) It is not possible to determine the number of parliamentary constituency pupils recorded on the Alternative Provision census or recorded as looked-after children as they are both local authority returns, and not an establishment level return. Therefore, this figure will be lower then the corresponding figure on the local authority table. (9) The number of service children are not provided at school level due to data protection issues.