Social Security Benefits: Fraud

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in (a) Airdrie and Shotts constituency, (b) Scotland and (c) each local authority area have been (i) investigated and (ii) prosecuted for benefit fraud in each of the last three years; and what the total amount was of benefit assessed as fraudulently claimed in that period. [150466]

Mr Hoban: This information is not available for the Airdrie and Shotts constituency or by each local authority area. The following table shows the number of investigations closed by the Department's Fraud Investigation Service (FIS), the number of prosecutions and the total amount of recoverable overpayments identified following FIS investigations in Scotland for the last three years.

 Investigations closedProsecutionsRecoverable overpayments (£)

2009-10

15,712

434

18,749,104.00

2010-11

15,291

514

29,631,590.00

2011-12

15,769

692

25,985,901.00

Social Security Benefits: Greater London

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 12 March 2013, Official Report, column 205W, on social security benefits: Greater London, how many children he estimates will be affected by the benefit cap in each local authority area. [148770]

Steve Webb: A table showing a breakdown of the number of children in households that will be affected by the benefit cap in each local authority will be placed in the Library.

Please note as the benefit cap will be applied through a phased roll-out from 15 April 2013 and at a national level from 15 July 2013, at present no households have been affected by the cap. The figures are consistent with

15 Apr 2013 : Column 249W

the impact assessment published on 16 July 2012. The figures in the table assume that the situation of these households will go unchanged, and they will not take any steps to either work enough hours to qualify for working tax credit, renegotiate their rent in situ, or find alternative accommodation. The Department is identifying and writing to all the households who are likely to be affected by the cap and we are offering advice and support through Jobcentre Plus, including, where appropriate, early access to the Work programme before the cap is introduced.

Please note that household numbers are rounded to the nearest 100. Areas with fewer than 100 households affected are denoted by "..", as additional disclosure control has been applied to these areas. For this reason, figures will not sum to the total number of households affected in the July 2012 impact assessment for the household benefit cap.

The disregarding of housing costs for those in supported exempt accommodation announced in the autumn statement can not be allocated geographically, so this has not been removed from the estimates presented here.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 250W

Social Security Benefits: Scotland

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of people (a) who are not in employment and do not receive jobseeker's allowance or incapacity benefit and (b) who are not in employment and do not receive any Government support in (i) Scotland, (ii) Airdrie and Shotts constituency and (iii) North Lanarkshire local authority area. [150583]

Mr Hoban: The number of people not in employment in these areas, and the numbers claiming jobseeker's allowance, incapacity benefits or other out of work benefits, are shown in the table. The benefit figures will include small numbers who are doing part-time work but retain some eligibility for benefit. Some people who are not in employment—such as full-time students, those bringing up a family or early retired—may not be eligible for benefits or may choose not to claim. They may receive support in other ways such as child tax credit, child benefit, housing benefit, or state pension.

 Not in employment aged 16 to 64(1)Incapacity benefit (IB) or employment and support allowance (ESA)(2)Jobseeker's allowance (JSA)(3)Other out of work benefits(4)
 October 2011 to September 2012August 2012August 2012August 2012

Scotland

993,700

274,440

146,200

100,810

Airdrie and Shotts

18,500

5,660

3,400

2,330

North Lanarkshire

65,500

21,260

12,500

8,210

(1) People aged 16 to 64 who do not have a job (unemployed or economically inactive) from the Annual Population Survey (APS). APS data are used for consistency across areas so will not match the latest, more timely, data available for Scotland as a whole. (2) Claimants of incapacity benefit, employment and support allowance or severe disablement allowance from the Work and Pensions Longitudinal Survey data (WPLS). (3) Claimant count data published by the Office for National Statistics, not seasonally adjusted (NSA) figures covering August 2012. More recent claimant count figures are available but would not be comparable with the data on other benefits which are currently available only up to August. (4) Lone parents claiming income support, carers and others on income-related benefits from WPLS.

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will estimate the number of people (a) receiving disability living allowance and (b) expected to receive the personal independence payment in (i) Airdrie and Shotts constituency, (ii) Scotland and (iii) North Lanarkshire. [151504]

Esther McVey: The available information on personal independence payment is published in a reassessments and impacts briefing note. This can be found on the Department's website at:

www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/pip-reassessments-and-impacts.pdf

Information on current disability living allowance case loads at a parliamentary constituency, regional and local authority level can also be found on the Department's website at:

http://83.244.183.180/100pc/tabtool.html

Social Security Benefits: Wales

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in (a) Ynys Mon, (b) Gwynedd, (c) Conwy, (d) Denbighshire, (e) Flintshire and (f) Wrexham local authority areas are claiming (i) housing benefit non-dependant deductions, (ii) council tax benefit non-dependant deductions, (iii) contribution-based employment and support allowance (ESA) and (iv) youth provision of ESA. [150606]

Steve Webb: The information requested regarding non-dependent deductions is not currently available, and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Statistics for the number of people receiving contribution- based employment support allowance, including those aged under 25, is published at

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

State Retirement Pensions: Females

Emma Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 28 January 2013, Official Report, column 667, if under his pension proposals the 430,000 women in the UK born between 6 April 1952 and 6 July 1953 delay their retirement in order to retire at the same age as a man, they will be treated in the same way and receive the same entitlements as a man. [151048]

Steve Webb: On 19 March I announced that the single-tier pension will now be introduced in 2016. This

15 Apr 2013 : Column 251W

means that women born on and after 6 April 1953 will reach their state pension age after the introduction of the single-tier pension.

Women (and men) who reach state pension age before 6 April 2016 will receive a state pension in line with the rules of the current system.

Therefore, women born between 6 April 1953 and 5 July 1953 (totalling approximately 85,000) will be covered by the rules of the single-tier system in the same way as a man born the same day. If they decide to defer drawing their state pension until they reach 65, they will be subject to the same deferral rules as a man born the same day and may achieve the same state pension valuation, depending on their national insurance record.

Women born between 6 April 1952 and 5 April 1953 will be covered by the rules of the current system. Around 85% of the women in this cohort would receive more in lifetime state pension and other benefits by drawing their state pension at their legislated state pension age under the current system than they would if they had a state pension age of 65 and received a single-tier pension. If women in this cohort choose to defer until they reach 65, they will be able to increase their state pension entitlement but will still receive a pension based on the rules of the current system.

Unemployment Benefits: Foreign Nationals

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many non-EU nationals are paid unemployment benefits on the basis that the UK is their country of residence. [150653]

Mr Hoban: Information on the number of non-EU nationals who are paid unemployment benefits on the basis that the UK is their country of residence is not available.

We currently check nationality and immigration status of benefit claimants to ensure the benefit is paid properly and to prevent fraud. While this information is used, it is not recorded as part of the payment administrative systems.

Looking forward, the Government are looking at ways to record the nationality and immigration status of migrants who make a claim to universal credit so that we have more robust information about our claimants.

Unemployment Benefits: Greater London

Dame Joan Ruddock: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in Lewisham, Deptford constituency have received out-of-work benefits in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12 to date; and what proportion of such people have been the subject of sanctions leading to benefit cut-offs by (i) gender, (ii) ethnicity and (iii) disability. [150516]

Mr Hoban: Statistics on the number of people in Lewisham, Deptford constituency who were receiving out-of-work benefits in 2010-11 and 2011-12 by gender are available in the following table:

15 Apr 2013 : Column 252W

Number of out-of-work benefit claimants in Lewisham, Deptford parliamentary constituency by statistical group and gender: 2010, 2011 and 2012, as at August each year
Statistical group/gender 201020112012

All

Total

12,250

12,330

11,880

 

Female

6,250

6,320

6,170

 

Male

6,000

6,010

5,710

     

Jobseeker’s allowance

Total

4,080

4,550

4,350

 

Female

1,410

1,790

1,790

 

Male

2,680

2,760

2,560

     

Incapacity benefits

Total

5,200

5,260

5,290

 

Female

2,220

2,310

2,390

 

Male

2,980

2,950

2,900

     

Lone parents

Total

2,420

2,040

1,790

 

Female

2,300

1,940

1,720

 

Male

120

100

70

     

Carers

Total

240

240

260

 

Female

130

130

140

 

Male

110

110

120

     

Other income- related benefits

Total

300

240

200

 

Female

190

160

140

 

Male

110

80

60

Notes: 1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Totals may not sum due to rounding. 2. Statistical group is a hierarchical variable. A person who fits into more than one category will appear only in the top-most one for which they are eligible. 3. Out-of-work benefits which are included in this analysis are: Jobseeker’s allowance Employment and support allowance Incapacity benefit and severe disablement allowance Income support 4. Incapacity benefit was replaced by employment and support allowance (ESA) for new claims from October 2008. 5. Durations shown are the longest claim duration of the benefits of interest. 6. The duration of claim reflects the longest out-of-work benefit claim for each person: For the Jobseekers statistical group this will be the length of the JSA claim. For the Lone Parent, Carer, and Others on income-related benefit statistical groups this will be the length of the IS claim. For the ESA and incapacity benefits claim this will be the length of the IB/SDA or ESA claim if the person is only claiming that benefit, or the oldest of either the IB/SDA/ESA and IS claim if the person is claiming a combination of these benefits. 7. August 2012 data are the latest available. Source: DWP Information, Governance and Security Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study.

Information on how many people in Lewisham, Deptford constituency have received out-of-work benefits in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12 to date by ethnicity and disability is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Information on what proportion of people in Lewisham, Deptford constituency who received out-of-work benefits in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011 -12 have been the subject

15 Apr 2013 : Column 253W

of sanctions leading to benefit cut-offs is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Unemployment Benefits: North Lanarkshire

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in (a) Airdrie and Shotts constituency and (b) North Lanarkshire local authority area have been in receipt of out-of-work benefits for (i) one year, (ii) two years, (iii) three years,

15 Apr 2013 : Column 254W

(v) four years, (v) five years and (vi) 10 years at the most recent date for which figures are available. [150566]

Mr Hoban: The information requested on the number of people in receipt of out-of-work benefits in (a) Airdrie and Shotts constituency and (b) North Lanarkshire local authority by duration can be found in the following tables.

Latest figures available: August 2012.

Airdrie and Shotts parliamentary constituency
 TotalJobseeker’s allowanceIncapacity benefitsLone parentsCarersOther income-related benefits

All

10,300

3,150

5,660

1,030

360

100

Up to 1 year

4,580

2,200

1,930

300

80

60

1 to 2 years

1,450

720

480

190

60

10

2 to 3 years

680

180

310

150

50

(1)

3 to 4 years

410

30

230

110

30

(1)

4 to 5 years

260

10

150

70

20

(1)

5 to 10 years

820

(1)

640

120

60

10

10 years and over

2,110

(1)

1,930

90

70

10

North Lanarkshire local authority
 TotalJobseeker’s allowanceIncapacity benefitsLone parentsCarersOther income-related benefits

All

38,050

11,600

21,260

3,580

1,260

360

Up to 1 year

16,790

8,140

7,060

1,070

300

220

1 to 2 years

5,590

2,630

2,050

680

200

20

2 to 3 years

2,470

670

1,170

470

150

20

3 to 4 years

1,430

110

850

360

100

10

4 to 5 years

970

40

600

250

70

10

5 to 10 years

3,230

10

2,540

450

200

30

10 years and over

7,560

(1)

6,990

290

230

50

(1) Denotes nil or negligible. Notes: 1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest 10 and totals may not sum due to rounding. 2. Statistical group is a hierarchical variable. A person who fits into more than one category will only appear in the top-most one for which they are eligible. 3. Out-of-work benefits which are included in this analysis are: Jobseeker’s allowance; Employment and support allowance; Incapacity benefit and severe disablement allowance; and Income support. 4. Incapacity benefit was replaced by employment and support allowance (ESA) for new claims from October 2008. 5. Durations shown are the longest claim duration of the benefits of interest. 6. The duration of claim reflects the longest out-of-work benefit claim for each person. For the jobseekers statistical group, this will be the length of the JSA claim. For the lone parent, carer and others on income-related benefit statistical groups, this will be the length of the IS claim. For the ESA and incapacity benefits claim, this will be the length of the IB/SDA or ESA claim if the person is only claiming that benefit, or the oldest of either the IB/SDA/ESA and IS claim if the person is claiming a combination of these benefits. Source: DWP Information, Governance and Security Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study.

Universal Credit

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 6 March 2013, Official Report, column 1001W, on universal credit, what assessment he has made of the performance of his Department's work with (a) Digital Unite, (b) UK Online and (c) Go On. [149217]

Mr Hoban: Digital Unite, UK Online and Go On have all got different contributions to make to the challenge of developing digital skills.

(a) DWP has been a supporter of Digital Unite campaigns—such as Spring Online—that have helped encourage older people to get online.

(b) DWP staff often arrange support from UK Online centres for jobseekers who need help in getting digital skills.

(c) Go On has led campaigns such as Race Online that have been successful in encouraging people to see the benefits of the Internet and DWP has been a strong supporter of their campaigns.

With all three organisations—and other organisations involved in supporting digital inclusion—we understand the importance of their support in our delivery of digital services including universal credit. Under the Freedom and Flexibility framework, which gives frontline staff more autonomy to deliver services tailored to the

15 Apr 2013 : Column 255W

needs of their local areas, jobcentre managers can choose which providers to work with based on their performance and suitability for local needs; these partnerships are not centrally managed.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what discussions he has had with individuals and organisations on providing funding to increase public internet access provision prior to the introduction of universal credit. [149812]

Mr Hoban: We are in continuing discussions with a wide range of organisations about online applications for universal credit.

The universal credit local support services framework, produced collaboratively between DWP and local authorities, sets out the principles for providing support through a network of local services, including support for those who need help with making online applications, and invites views from charities and other organisations.

The Department has installed a total of 2,167 new internet access devices (IADs) in jobcentres for those who do not have their own computer, and we will ensure that digital skills are a key part of the support offered to jobseekers to help them back to work.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he has taken to increase investment in publicly accessible computers to ensure that universal credit claimants are able to manage their entitlements. [149813]

Mr Hoban: We are in continuing discussions with a wide range of organisations about online applications for universal credit.

The universal credit local support services framework, produced collaboratively between DWP and local authorities, sets out the principles for providing support through a network of local services, including support for those who need help with making online applications, and invites views from charities and other organisations.

The Department has installed a total of 2,167 new internet access devices (IADs) in jobcentres for those who do not have their own computer, and we will ensure that digital skills are a key part of the support offered to jobseekers to help them back to work.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much his Department spent on IT development and implementation for universal credit in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12 and (c) 2012-13. [150358]

Mr Hoban: I refer the right hon. Gentleman to the reply I gave to his previous question (PQ 147641) on 13 March 2013, Official Report, columns 276-77W.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what representations he has received from charitable organisations on the status of exempt accommodation under universal credit; and if he will make a statement. [150429]

15 Apr 2013 : Column 256W

Steve Webb: Ministers set out their intentions for the future treatment of supported “exempt accommodation” in their announcement to the Work and Pensions Committee on 17 September 2012.

A wide range of providers of supported accommodation, including charitable organisations, have expressed their views about the proposals for reform since then and Ministers and officials have had discussions with a number of them.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether the telephony and face-to-face services available for claimants of universal credit will assist those unable to access services online to complete forms. [150476]

Mr Hoban: Yes, universal credit will provide support for those claimants unable to access online services. We recognise that some claimants do not have access to computers or will require support to transact online. Our plans are to provide claimants with support based on needs, either directly or indirectly through third parties.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the steps somebody who is blind or partially sighted would need to take to claim universal credit if they are unable to make or manage a claim online. [150501]

Mr Hoban: The universal credit online system has been built to Web Content Accessibility guidelines including assistive technologies in order for blind claimants to be able to use it.

We will also offer alternative routes; via telephone where an agent will complete an online claim form on a claimant’s behalf or direct assistance in a local office, a local delivery partner or in, exceptional circumstances a home visit.

The Local Service Support framework will provide an outline of localised support services including getting online, managing on a monthly budget and paying rent.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to the local support services framework issued by his Department, how his Department plans to define the claimants who really need to use telephony and face-to-face services instead of an online process when claiming universal credit. [150578]

Mr Hoban: We are not seeking to provide a definition of which claimants will need to use telephony and face-to-face services instead of an online process when claiming universal credit. Any attempt to do so would risk some people with needs falling outside of any definitions and thus not receiving the help that they may need.

Work Capability Assessment

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what arrangements are in place to allow the reasons behind work capability assessment appeal decisions to be passed to Atos health care professionals. [150357]

15 Apr 2013 : Column 257W

Mr Hoban: Feedback from HMCTS in relation to appeals comes in the form of a decision notice which indicates, from a drop down menu, the main reason for the appeal being overturned and it may also include an indication of the ESA descriptors that have changed.

This feedback is primarily used by the decision maker who dealt with the appeal. These decision notices are not made available to Atos as the case will have been actioned by a decision maker and subsequently reconsidered by an independent decision maker at the dispute stage prior to the appeal being heard.

Regular meetings take place between DWP Operational Managers and Atos providers where cases can be discussed and any trends investigated.

Regular meetings also take place between Atos and HMCTS where areas of concern can also be raised and investigated.

Work Programme: Greater London

Dame Joan Ruddock: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how many residents of Lewisham, Deptford constituency have been referred to the Work programme since its inception; [150518]

(2) how many residents of Lewisham, Deptford constituency who have been referred to the Work programme since its inception have been placed in a job which generated a job outcome payment. [150517]

Mr Hoban: Statistics on how many residents of Lewisham, Deptford constituency have been referred to the Work programme since its inception to 31 July 2012 and how many have been placed in a job which generated a job outcome payment can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Guidance for users is available at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/guidance.pdf

Workfare

Mark Hendrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the total cost to the public purse was of historic Court of Appeal cases in respect of Workfare in terms of (a) legal bills and (b) compensation to claimants affected by judgment; and how many claimants were affected in each case. [151067]

Mr Hoban: The Court of Appeal has ruled on one such case, in the case of R. (on the application of Reilly) v. Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2013] EWCA Civ 66. In this case:

(a) The Department's external legal costs in the Court of Appeal were £19,092.00.

(b) No compensation has been paid to claimants affected by the judgment. Parliament has passed the Jobseeker's (Back to Work Schemes) Act 2013, which reverses the effects of the judgment and ensures that the Department for Work and Pensions does not have to repay benefit to people who were sanctioned for failing to participate in the relevant schemes without good reason.

The case related to two claimants, Mr Wilson and Ms Reilly. The Court of Appeal has not heard any appeals in other like cases.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 258W

Business, Innovation and Skills

Aerospace Technology Institute

Graham Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills where the recently announced Aerospace Technology Institute will be located. [149916]

Michael Fallon: No decision has yet been made on the location of the Aerospace Technology Institute. However, as the Aerospace Industrial Strategy explains, it will consist of a small core team—probably 30-50 staff—primarily seconded from industry and academia. Their role will be to lead on the development of the strategy, prioritise areas for work, scope programmes, map UK capabilities and assess actions needed to strengthen them, as necessary. The research and technology activity, to be funded jointly by Government and industry, will be distributed across the UK, benefiting a wide range of companies and universities.

Age: Discrimination

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent discussions he has had with (a) trades unions and (b) major employers on age discrimination in the (i) workplace and (ii) hiring process. [150077]

Jo Swinson: There have been no recent discussions with trade unions or major employers on age discrimination in the workplace or hiring process. However, I met Age UK last September as part of a panel discussion with employers and representatives of the voluntary sector in the context of our proposals on flexible working. We intend to look at the impact of the removal of the default retirement age in 2016 and we will seek views and issues from all interested parties as part of that.

Apprentices

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of companies which offer apprenticeships are from the (a) public and (b) private sector. [150404]

Matthew Hancock: We do not measure a breakdown of the number of apprenticeship starts in the public and private sector.

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts is published in a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR), last published on 27 March 2013:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/Statistics/fe_data_library/Apprenticeships/

Arms Trade: Bahrain

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether Air Vice Marshal Nigel Maddox discussed the sale of military equipment to Bahrain during his recent visit to that country. [150709]

Michael Fallon: In his role of Senior Military Adviser to UK Trade Investment Defence and Security Organisation, Air Vice Marshal Maddox has discussions

15 Apr 2013 : Column 259W

about equipment requirements with military personnel and officials from many countries, including Bahrain.

All export licence applications for the export of arms are assessed on a case by case basis against the Consolidated European Union and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria depending on the end-use and circumstances prevailing at the time of application.

Business: Advisory Services

Mr Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will take steps to promote the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales business advice service; and if he will make a statement. [R] [150513]

Michael Fallon: Through the Business in You campaign, my Department works closely with the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) in promoting the value of business advice to small businesses and signposting useful sources. We have already featured the service as part of the Business in You campaign through social media and in newsletters to campaign subscribers. We will be promoting the ICAEW Business Advice Service month taking place this June and are currently in discussion with it about the most effective way to do this.

Naomi Long: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what discussions he has had with the Northern Ireland Executive (a) orally and (b) in writing on the advice services to be offered by the proposed Government Business Bank. [150833]

Michael Fallon: Officials in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) have had discussions with officials in the Northern Ireland Executive about our overall plans for the Business Bank.

As part of the work on the Business Bank programme, a more integrated service for high growth and specialist small and medium-sized enterprises in England is planned. As this service is developed in more detail, BIS officials will engage with officials in the devolved Administrations on how it could link to the devolved Administrations' own dedicated advice services.

Business: East Midlands

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of companies with their registered office address in (a) Ashfield constituency, (b) Nottinghamshire and (c) the east midlands which were (i) newly incorporated and (ii) dissolved in each year since 2001. [149832]

Michael Fallon: Companies House estimates that the number of companies with their registered office address in (a) Ashfield constituency, (b) Nottinghamshire, and (c) the east Midlands is as follows:

 IncorporatedDissolved

Ashfield constituency

  

2001

492

250

2002

688

331

15 Apr 2013 : Column 260W

2003

1,155

271

2004

805

355

2005

806

446

2006

871

437

2007

965

507

2008

864

445

2009

826

974

2010

851

730

2011

1,065

671

2012

1,037

646

2013

270

140

   

Nottinghamshire

  

2001

2,402

1,560

2002

3,577

1,646

2003

4,551

1,670

2004

3,405

1,848

2005

3,430

2,049

2006

3,703

2,157

2007

4,076

2,317

2008

3,617

2,079

2009

3,708

4,771

2010

3,922

3,507

2011

4,552

3,007

2012

4,648

2,995

2013

1,182

652

   

East midlands

  

2001

19,697

12,226

2002

29,426

14,348

2003

38,066

14,174

2004

29,359

15,530

2005

31,569

17,086

2006

34,665

18,835

2007

39,952

19,989

2008

34,865

17,795

2009

36,302

42,864

2010

39,097

31,632

2011

43,597

28,494

2012

47,135

28,903

2013

11,659

6,571


These figures are estimates because Companies House derives its information from postcode areas, which can cross constituency, county, and regional boundaries.

Business: Loans

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether information gathered from the proposed data collection and management function of the new Government Business Bank will be shared with (a) the Scottish Government, (b) Scottish Enterprise and (c) COSLA. [150478]

Michael Fallon: The Government will first complete the design of the appropriate data management processes for the Business Bank, and will then decide what data can be shared, subject to data protection laws and regulations.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 261W

Climate Change

Graham Stringer: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether the claim that (a) every year since 1998 has been significantly warmer than the temperatures you would expect if there was no warming and (b) for the last three decades the rate of temperature increase is significant made by the Met Office in a climate science briefing sent to the chief scientific adviser on 8 February 2010 was supported by any statistical time-series analysis. [150533]

Michael Fallon: The full statements sent by the Met Office to the chief scientific adviser on 8 February 2010 are (a) every year since 1998 has been significantly warmer than the temperatures you would expect if there was no warming (baseline of 1861-1900) and (b) for the last three decades, the rate of temperature increase is significant even when uncertainties in the observations are factored in.

These statements are based on analysis of HadCRUT3, the global temperature dataset compiled by the Met Office and the university of East Anglia’s climatic research unit.

Copyright

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the judgements in the cases of SGAE v Padawan and Stichting de Thuiskopie v Opus and their implications for his proposal contained in the “Modernising Copyright” document published on 20 December 2012 to introduce a private copying exception without compensation. [149807]

Jo Swinson: The two cases mentioned were taken into account when the private copying measure was developed. All of the measures set out in “Modernising Copyright” will be implemented in accordance with European and international obligations and any relevant court judgments.

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will publish any legal advice he has received on the possibility of introducing a follow-on designs exception into UK law. [150450]

Jo Swinson: There are no plans to publish such information.

Disclosure of Information

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many civil servants in his Department have been subject to non-disclosure agreements in each year since 2010. [150025]

Jo Swinson: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has interpreted the hon. Gentleman's reference to ‘non-disclosure agreements’ to mean compromise agreements between the Department and individual members of staff, and CoT3 agreements—an ACAS conditional settlement form—resulting from employment tribunals.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 262W

Our records show that 10 compromise agreements were concluded in the period from 1 January 2010 to date. We are unable to provide the data in individual years as this could enable identification of individuals and further potentially breach any agreement the Department has reached on confidentiality of individual circumstances.

Economic Growth: Republic of Ireland

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the joint statement made by the Prime Minister and the Taoiseach on 12 March 2012, what progress has been made on the joint evaluation of the depth of economic relations between the UK and Ireland and the opportunities for closer co-operation in support of growth; and if he will make a statement. [150615]

Michael Fallon: Taking forward the commitment made in the joint statement in March 2012, HM Government and the Irish Government jointly commissioned an economic study into the value of the economic relationship between the UK and Irish economies.

An interim report was delivered in advance of the recent summit in March 2013 between the Prime Minister and the Taoiseach and the full report is being finalised. As agreed at the latest summit, the study will provide evidence to support ongoing bilateral engagement across a range of policy areas.

Energy: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the value of the energy sector is to the economy in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber. [151041]

Michael Fallon: The energy sector, defined as electricity, gas, steam and air-conditioning supply, contributed £19.4 billion gross value added (GVA) to the UK economy (1.5% of the UK total) in 2010.

In the Yorkshire and Humber region this industry contributed £1.6 billion gross value added, or 1.8% of total GVA for this area. Estimates of gross value added are not available below regional level.

Executives: Pay

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to question 148120, what assessment has been made of the High Pay Centre's recent findings on the trends of top executives' pay and bonuses. [150645]

Jo Swinson: I thank the High Pay Centre for its important and continuing contribution to the debate on high pay. Its various findings bring greater clarity on the trends in top executives’ pay and call for high earners to engage in the debate about what constitutes a fair reward. The Government reforms to the governance of directors’ remuneration reporting will encourage companies and investors to engage more effectively, boost transparency so that what executives are paid is clearer, and give shareholders more power through binding votes.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 263W

Foreign Investment in UK

Mr Dodds: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much business was generated for (a) Northern Ireland and (b) UK companies as a result of the Global Investment Conference held in London in 2012. [149842]

Michael Fallon: We expect the benefits of the Global Investment Conference to be spread across all nations of the UK, including Northern Ireland.

The Games were a unique opportunity to promote Britain as a place to do business, and we expect the benefits of this opportunity to be delivered both this year and in the years to come, including attracting new and retaining current foreign direct investment and infrastructure investment.

UK Trade and Investment aims to realise £11 billion of business benefits for the UK economy in the next four years—part of the Government's 10 year plan to realise a wide reaching legacy from the Games. The £11 billion is expected from outcomes from the British Business Embassy and related events, securing high- value opportunities and investment.

Higher Education: Admissions

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) which 20 universities admitted the most students (a) aged 25 years or over at the point of admission and (b) from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds in the latest period for which figures are available; [149687]

(2) which 20 UK universities admitted the most students (a) aged 25 years or over at the point of admission and (b) from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds in the latest period for which figures are available. [149802]

Mr Willetts: The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) collects and publishes data on student enrolments at UK higher education institutions (HEIs).

The 20 UK HEIs with the largest share of entrants aged 25 or over at the start of the academic year 2011/12 are shown in table 1.

The 20 UK HEIs with the largest share of entrants from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds in the academic year 2011/12 are shown in table 2.

Table 1: Institutions ranked by percentage share of entrants(1) aged 25 or over(2), UK domiciled(3) full-time first degree entrants, UK higher education institutions, academic year 2011/12
RankHEIAll entrantsPercentage aged 25 and over (%)

1

Glyndwr University

953

38

2

University of the Highlands and Islands

459

37

3

Birkbeck College

145

34

4

London South Bank University

3,278

33

5

University Campus Suffolk

1,397

32

6

University of the West of Scotland

3,379

23

7

University of West London

2,192

23

15 Apr 2013 : Column 264W

8

St George’s Hospital Medical School

600

23

9

University of East London

4,698

22

10

Bishop Grosseteste University College Lincoln

606

21

11

University College Plymouth St Mark and St John

823

20

12

Edinburgh Napier University

2,697

20

13

London Metropolitan University

5,515

20

14

University of Salford

4,379

20

15

Scottish Agricultural College

242

20

16

University of Worcester

2,359

19

17

Newman University College

634

19

18

University of Greenwich

4,424

19

19

University of Wolverhampton

4,202

18

20

Teesside University

2,797

18

 

All UK HEIs

394,585

10

(1) Covers all students in their first year of study. (2) Age refers to the students’ age at the start of the academic year. (3) Domicile refers to a student’s permanent or home address prior to entry to their course. Note: Figures are based on a HESA standard registration population and have been rounded up or down to the nearest five, so components may not sum to totals. Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) student record.
Table 2: Institutions ranked by percentage share of entrants(1) from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds(2), UK domiciled(3) full-time first degree entrants, UK higher education institutions, academic year 2011/12
RankHEIKnown ethnic backgroundAll entrantsOf those with known ethnicity BAME (%)

1

School of Pharmacy

168

170

95

2

London Metropolitan University

5,467

5,515

69

3

University of East London

4,644

4,698

69

4

City University

1,776

1,793

64

5

University of Bradford

2,599

2,614

64

6

London South Bank University

3,219

3,278

62

7

Aston University

1,513

1,525

60

8

University of Westminster

3,864

3,974

59

9

Middlesex University

4,197

4,280

59

10

Brunel University

2,884

2,912

55

11

Queen Mary and Westfield College

2,806

2,839

55

15 Apr 2013 : Column 265W

12

University of West London

2,176

2,192

54

13

Kingston University

5,283

5,317

52

14

London School of Economics and Political Science

686

702

50

15

University of Greenwich

4,358

4,424

50

16

St George’s Hospital Medical School

597

600

49

17

University of Buckingham

263

282

49

18

School of Oriental and African Studies

560

575

48

19

University of Hertfordshire

4,588

4,691

47

20

University of Bedfordshire

3,642

3,668

47

 

All UK HEIs

390,834

394,585

22

(1) Covers all students in their first year of study. (2) The ethnicity of the student is on the basis of their own self-assessment. (3) Domicile refers to a student’s permanent or home address prior to entry to their course. Note: Figures are based on a HESA standard registration population and have been rounded up or down to the nearest five, so components may not sum to totals. Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) student record.

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many university applications made through UCAS came from students at grammar schools in each of the last five years. [149688]

Mr Willetts: The information is given in the following table.

The classification of each educational establishment can change from cycle to cycle, which can affect year-on-year comparisons. A large number of grammar schools have converted to academies since 2010. Although these schools have retained their selective admissions arrangements they are no longer classified as grammar schools in these data. Therefore, while the figures show the number of applicants from grammar schools has fallen over the past two years, this is largely as a result of the classification change.

UK domiciled applicants to UCAS by their school or college type
 Year of entry
School/college type:20082009201020112012

Academies

36,292

Further education

102,452

103,824

101,366

89,780

82,045

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Grammar school

32,318

33,602

33,305

31,982

21,786

Higher Education

1,215

839

842

Independent

42,018

43,848

42,386

38,410

36,068

Sixth form college

82,477

91,582

91,190

85,148

79,230

State excl. Grammar

156,901

170,112

166,030

156,505

118,395

Other(1)

85,080

100,478

151,702

187,525

170,936

Total

502,461

544,285

586,821

589,350

544,752

(1) Includes applicants (including older applicants) who were not attached to a specific school or other educational establishment, and who applied directly to UCAS via their online application facility.

Higher Education: Scotland

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which Scottish higher education institutions (a) he and (b) the Minister of State for Universities have visited since May 2010. [149681]

Mr Willetts: I have visited the universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Strathclyde, Dundee, Abertay and Aberdeen since May 2010.

The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, the right hon. Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable), has visited the universities of Glasgow, Stirling, Edinburgh, Strathclyde and Heriot-Watt during the same period.

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many and what amount of grants funding were awarded by each UK research council to each university in Scotland in each of the last five years. [149685]

Mr Willetts: I refer the hon. Lady to the answer I gave to the right hon. Member for Edinburgh South West (Mr Darling), on 20 December 2012, Official Report, column 866W.

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) which Scottish universities admitted the highest (a) number and (b) proportion of students from socio-economic classes four to seven in each of the last three years; [149795]

(2) how many students (a) aged 25 years or over at the point of admission and (b) from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds were admitted by each Scottish university in each of the last three years; [149800]

(3) which Scottish universities admitted the most students (a) aged 25 years or over at the point of admission and (b) from black and minority ethnic backgrounds in each of the last three years. [149801]

Mr Willetts: Higher education in Scotland is a devolved matter. This information should be requested from the Scottish Government, or directly from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), the body responsible for

15 Apr 2013 : Column 267W

collecting information on higher education students at UK higher education institutions. More information on HESA can be found at

http://www.hesa.ac.uk/

Insolvency Service: Stockton On Tees

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether consideration was given to the top floor of Dunedin House, Stockton-on-Tees as a location for the Stockton Insolvency Service when the decision to relocate that office was made. [150935]

Jo Swinson: National Property Controls, as laid down by the Cabinet Office, ensure that Government Departments seek to relocate to existing surplus Government Estate in preference to using commercial leaseholds. The top floor of Dunedin House, Stockton-on-Tees, was not considered, as it is not on the Government Estate. The space was formerly occupied by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs, but was handed back to its private finance initiative (PFI) providers, Mapeley, in 2009.

Land Registry

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the future of HM Land Registry; and if he will make a statement. [150416]

Michael Fallon: Land Registry faces significant new challenges. I have asked Land Registry to consider alternative commercial models that would enable its better to deliver on its new Business Strategy. If there were to be any proposal for a change in the status of the Land Registry, we would embark on a full and careful consultation. No decision has yet been made.

Local Enterprise Partnerships

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many local enterprise partnerships have a chair from a (a) local authority and (b) business. [150402]

Michael Fallon: Local enterprise partnership (LEP) board membership is a matter for LEPs themselves, although Government do request that LEP chairs and 50% of the LEP board should come from the business sector. Currently, all of the 39 local enterprise partnerships have a chair from the private sector.

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many local enterprise partnerships have a representative from a further education college on their main board. [150403]

Michael Fallon: There are currently 14 local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) that have a representative from a further education college on their main board.

Last year's autumn statement 5 December 2012, Official Report, columns 871-882, announced that LEPs will be given a role setting skills strategies consistent with national objectives, and chartered status for FE colleges will reflect the extent to which they take account of the

15 Apr 2013 : Column 268W

skills priorities of local LEPs. In addition, the Government will encourage LEPs to have a seat on FE colleges' governing bodies.

Minimum Wage

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what guidance is provided by HM Revenue and Customs to employers concerning compliance with the requirements of the national minimum wage for workers engaged in episodic work; and if he will make a statement. [150718]

Jo Swinson: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave to my right hon. Friend the Member for Redcar (Ian Swales) on 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 609W.

Overseas Trade: Eritrea

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assistance has been given to any UK companies trading with Eritrea in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement. [150986]

Michael Fallon: UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) has no active coverage of Eritrea, but commercial leads are posted via the UKTI Business Opportunities Service and some information is available on the UKTI website. UKTI's business multiplier stakeholders, such as the Eastern Africa Association, also give advice to companies where possible. Support from the British ambassador is available where advice or lobbying of the Eritrean Government is sought by a UK company. Limited interest has been shown by UK companies in the Eritrean market in the last three years.

Overseas Trade: South Korea

Stephen Phillips: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to promote bilateral trade between the UK and South Korea. [149928]

Michael Fallon: In recognition of the importance of the bilateral trade relationship between the UK and South Korea, we have designated South Korea as a high-growth market, with an ambitious goal to double export trade by 2015.

As a result of the EU-South Korea Free Trade Agreement which was ratified in July 2011, the UK has already seen a steady increase in exports. Korea is now ranked 16th largest destination for UK goods in 2012. 200 Korean companies have now set up in the UK, including Doosan, Samsung, and LG Electronics.

In February 2013 we delivered a week-long programme “Opportunity Korea” to address knowledge gaps and inform British businesses of the opportunities Korea has to offer. Over 200 companies participated at events in London, Birmingham, Manchester, Edinburgh and Bristol.

We are also working to establish a Joint Economic and Trade Committee (JETCO) with Korea. Its aim will be to tackle market access issues and creating business opportunities for both British and Korean businesses.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 269W

In addition to the above a series of trade missions and high level visits to South Korea will take place this year including a GREAT campaign to showcase trade and investment and knowledge.

Postal Services: Northern Ireland

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps his Department is taking to safeguard universal Royal Mail service in Northern Ireland. [150951]

Michael Fallon: The Government are committed to securing the future of the universal postal service provided by Royal Mail, which is so important to our communities, society and the economy.

Parliament has guaranteed, through the Postal Services Act 2011, the continuation of collection and delivery of letters six days a week throughout the UK at uniform affordable prices. The Act also gives the postal regulator, Ofcom, a clear statutory duty to secure the provision of the universal postal service and powers to intervene if the universal service is at risk.

The steps we have taken so far to reform the regulatory framework and to support Royal Mail, coupled with securing access to private capital for the business, are the best way to safeguard the future of the one-price- goes-anywhere universal service throughout the United Kingdom.

Postal Services: Visual Impairment

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much has been spent on the Royal Mail's articles for the blind service in each of the last five years. [150410]

Michael Fallon: This Government were the first to make free services for the blind one of the minimum requirements of the universal postal service. We did this in the Postal Services Act 2011 because of the importance we attached to these services.

Provision of this service is an operational matter for Royal Mail. I have therefore asked its chief executive, Moya Greene, to respond directly to the hon. Lady and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

Students: Finance

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many students are currently in receipt of (a) grants towards their university fees and (b) non-repayable bursaries towards their maintenance costs. [149689]

Mr Willetts: In this academic year 2012/13, eligible English-domiciled students are able to apply for tuition loans of up to £9,000 (or up to £6,000 at privately funded universities), means-tested non-repayable maintenance grants of up to £3,250, and partly means- tested maintenance loans of up to £5,500. Different maintenance loan rates are available for students studying in London or living at the parental home.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 270W

The table shows a summary of the number of full-time applicants awarded student support who were domiciled in England in 2011/12, the latest year for which final data are available.

Number of applicants domiciled in England awarded full-time student support—Academic year 2011/12
Product typeNumber of applicants (thousand)

Maintenance loans

907.2

Tuition fee loans

851.4

Maintenance and special support grants(1)

579.9

Tuition fee grants(2)

0.4

HE grants(3)

0.3

Disabled students allowance (DSA)

(4)51.9

Other targeted support

40.0

Total

1,023.2

(1 )Means-tested maintenance grants are available to students entering higher education from 2006/07. (2) Tuition fee grants are only available to students who began their study before the 2006/07 academic year, and have not been available to new students since then. (3) The Higher Education Grant was a type of maintenance grant. Students who entered in 2004/05 and 2005/06 were eligible for the grant (plus those who delayed entry until 2006/07 and registered in advance for a gap year). (4) Provisional figure.

Further information is available in the Student Loans Company's statistical release “Student Support for Higher Education in England, academic year 2012/13 (provisional)”

http://www.slc.co.uk/media/525907/slcsfr052012.pdf

Figures on the student support products available to students domiciled elsewhere in the UK are available from the respective Administrations.

Telephone Services

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) his Department in each of the last three years. [149986]

Jo Swinson: No revenue has been retained by BIS for the use of its principal access number. The telephone provider has charged £562.48 for the use of the line over the last three years.

I have approached the chief executives of the Department's executive agencies (Insolvency Service, Companies House, National Measurement Office, Intellectual Property Office, UK Space Agency, Ordnance Survey, Met Office, Land Registry and the Skills Funding Agency) and they will respond to the right hon. Gentleman directly.

Letter from Peter Mason, dated 26 March 2013:

I am responding in respect of the National Measurement Office (NMO) to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 21 March 2013, asking the Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) about revenue retained in respect of principal access numbers.

NMO does not offer any premium rate telephone numbers to the public and therefore no revenue is retained in this respect by NMO, BIS or the telephone provider (Maintel).

15 Apr 2013 : Column 271W

Letter from Tim Moss, dated 22 March 2013:

I am replying on behalf of Companies House to your Parliamentary Question tabled 21 March 2013, to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, UIN 149986.

Companies House has only one principal access number, currently 0303 1234500. We cannot comment on what revenue is retained by the telephone provider for that line as this is part of the commercial arrangement between it and the other telephone companies. However, Companies House has not retained any revenue from the use of its principal access number in any of the last three years.

Letter from Emma Lord, dated 22 March 2013:

Thank you for your question addressed to the Secretary of State for the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills asking for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) his Department in each of the last three years.

The UK Space Agency uses the BIS enquiry number for public calls and therefore information relating to calls for the UK Space Agency will be included in any figures BIS have provided.

Letter from Kim Thorneywork, dated 4 April 2013:

Thank you for your question in asking the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, for each of the principal access numbers operated by his Department and the agencies for which he is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) his Department in each of the last three years.

Please be advised that the Non Geographic telephone numbers used by the Skills Funding Agency are not subject to a revenue sharing agreement; so neither the telephone provider, or the Agency have retained revenue during the last three years.

Letter from John Alty, dated 25 March 2013:

I am responding in respect of the Intellectual Property Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled 21 March 2013, to the Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Intellectual Property Office does not have any premium rate numbers. As such there is no revenue to be retained by the Office or the provider.

The Intellectual Property Office operates a main contact number (0300 300 200) this costs no more than a national rate call to an 01 or 02 number and 03 numbers also count towards any inclusive minutes in a phone contract in the same way as 01 and 02 calls.

Alternatively, we can be contacted via our switchboard (01633 81400) at standard rates.

Letter from Malcolm Dawson, dated 3 April 2013:

I write on behalf of Land Registry in response to Parliamentary Question 149986 tabled on 21 March 2013 which asked the following:

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) his Department in each of the last three years?

I can confirm that Land Registry does not have any revenue generating numbers across the department.

I hope this information is useful.

Letter from John Hirst, dated 8 April 2013:

I am replying on behalf of the Met Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 21 March 2013, UIN 149986 to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Met Office can be contacted any time of the day or night, by telephone, fax, email, and social media, through our Weather Desk. The principal access telephone numbers for the Met Office Weather Desk are 01392 885680 or 0870 900 0100.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 272W

The Met Office has not retained any revenue from the operation of these lines in each of the last three years and holds no information about whether any revenue has been retained by the providers of these lines.

I hope this helps.

Letter from Dr Vanessa Lawrence CB, dated 9 April 2013:

As Director General and Chief Executive of Ordnance Survey, I have been asked to respond to your Parliamentary Question asking the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, "for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) his Department in each of the last three years".

Ordnance Survey's principal access numbers (08456 05 05 05 (English) and 08456 05 05 04 (Welsh)) are non-geographic basic-rate services. Our provider, TalkTalk Group PLC, is entitled to receive a small revenue share premium but at the time of writing we have not been able to obtain information from the company on the total revenue retained. Ordnance Survey receives no revenue from these calls.

I hope this information is helpful.

Letter from Dr Richard Judge, dated 9 April 2013:

The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has asked me to reply to your question, for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) his Department in each of the last three years.

The Insolvency Service operates two 0845 numbers, 0845 6029848 and 0845 601 3546. All of the revenue is retained by the telephone providers for those lines.

We do not retain information on what revenue has been retained by the telephone providers for these lines, and the cost of obtaining the information would be disproportionate.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which telephone lines are operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible for public enquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone service provider is for each number; and which such lines (A) are free to the caller and (B) may incur a charge to the caller. [150009]

Jo Swinson: The principal access number for BIS is 0207 215 5000 and is supplied by Level 3 Communications. Calls to the number are charged at the national rate.

I have approached the chief executives of the Department's executive agencies (Insolvency Service, Companies House, National Measurement Office, Intellectual Property Office, UK Space Agency, Ordnance Survey, Met Office, Land Registry and the Skills Funding Agency) and they will respond to the right hon. Gentleman directly.

Letter from Peter Mason, dated 26 March 2013:

I am responding in respect of the National Measurement Office (NMO) to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 21 March 2013, asking the Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills about telephone lines for public enquiries or other services.

NMO operates telephone lines for its main switchboard and for automated enquiries concerning enforcement. The principal access numbers for these are 020 8943 7272 and 020 8943 7227 respectively, and the telephone service provider for both numbers is Maintel. NMO does not have any lines which are free to the caller and all calls to NMO are chargeable at the standard call charge.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 273W

Letter from Tim Moss, dated 22 March 2013:

I am replying on behalf of Companies House to your Parliamentary Question tabled 21 March 2013, to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, UIN 150009.

Companies House's principal access number is 0303 1234500 and the telephone service provider is Siemens PLC. Callers to this line will incur a charge at the equivalent of a national rate call. This means that the charge made is dependent on the charges incurred by the customer from their own provider. If their plan is inclusive of national calls, then calls to Companies House will also be inclusive and not incur any additional charges.

Letter from Emma Lord, dated 22 March 2013:

Thank you for your question addressed to the Secretary of State for the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills asking which telephone lines are operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible for public enquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone service provider is for each number; and which such lines (A) are free to the caller and (B) may incur a charge to the caller.

The UK Space Agency uses the BIS public enquiry number for public enquiries. The access number is 020 7215 5000. The UK Space Agency cannot provide information relating to the provider and whether the lines incur a charge as this information is held by BIS and would be provided within their return.

Letter from Kim Thorneywork, dated 4 April 2013:

Thank you for your question in asking the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, which telephone lines are operated by his Department and the agencies for which he is responsible for public enquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone service provider is for each number; and which such lines are free to the caller and may incur a charge to the caller.

Please be advised that the Skills Funding Agency has four non-geographic telephone numbers for public enquiries and other services:

Skills Funding Agency (main Number)—0845 377 5000

Professional and Career Providers Helpline—0845 000 0045 (advises callers to re-dial a new number for this service)

Data Service—0870 267 0001

Skills Funding Agency (internal) IT Helpdesk—0870 496 1111

The principal access number is 0845 377 5000

The telephone service provider is Level 3 Communications Ltd.

All of the non geographic telephone numbers listed above incur a charge to the caller.

Letter from John Alty, dated 25 March 2013:

I am responding in respect of the Intellectual Property Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled 21 March 2013, to the Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Intellectual Property Office operates a main contact number (0300 300 200); this costs no more than a national rate call to an 01 or 02 number and 03 numbers also count towards any inclusive minutes in a phone contract in the same way as 01 and 02 calls.

The service is provided via Virgin Media.

Letter from Malcolm Dawson, dated 3 April 2013:

I write on behalf of Land Registry in response to Parliamentary Question 150009 tabled on 21 March 2013 which asked the following:

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, which telephone lines are operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible for public enquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone service provider is for each number; and which such lines (A) are free to the caller and (B) may incur a charge to the caller

Our principal access number for public enquiries is 0844 892 1111. The service provider for this number is British Telecom. Land Registry operates this service on the lowest possible tariff for the customer, lower than the national call rate. Land Registry receives no revenue from this service.

I hope this information is useful.

15 Apr 2013 : Column 274W

Letter from John Hirst, dated 8 April 2013:

I am replying on behalf of the Met Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 21 March 2013, UIN 150009 to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The public can access the Met Office Weather Desk with weather related enquiries, any time of the day or night, by telephone, fax, email, and social media. To contact the Weather Desk by telephone, the public can choose to call either 01392 885680 or 0870 900 0100. These lines are provided by BT, through the Defence Fixed Telecommunications Service contract, and Cable and Wireless respectively. Callers to the Weather Desk may incur a charge depending on the contract the caller has with their telephone service provider, but no charge is made by the Met Office.

In addition, the Met Office ‘Talk to a Forecaster’ service can be accessed through 0870 076 7890. This line is provided by Spoke. Talk to a Forecaster is a commercial service provided by the Met Office to its customers and prices are available on the Met Office website. Callers to this service may also incur a charge from their telephone service provider.

I hope this helps.

Letter from Dr Vanessa Lawrence CB, dated 9 April 2013:

As Director General and Chief Executive of Ordnance Survey, I have been asked to respond to your Parliamentary Question asking the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, “which telephone lines are operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible for public enquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone service provider is for each number; and which lines (A) are free to the caller and (B) may incur a charge to the caller”.

Ordnance Survey has nine 0845 numbers that are available to the public. The two primary numbers are 08456 05 05 05 (English) and 08456 05 05 04 (Welsh). The remaining seven are used by customers who require more specialised information; an example being the OS OpenData helpline.

All these lines are provided by TalkTalk Group PLC, and may incur charges but also may be covered by an inclusive calls package. From BT lines the charge is equivalent to a geographic number but other providers may charge more.

I hope this information is helpful.

Letter from Dr Richard Judge, dated 8 April 2013:

The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has asked me to reply to your question, which telephone lines are operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible for public enquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone service provider is for each number; and which such lines (A) are free to the caller and (B) may incur a charge to the caller.

The Insolvency Service operates the following public enquiry lines:

Insolvency Enquiry Line 0845 6029848

Insolvency Hotline 0845 601 3546

The telephone lines are operated by BT and they both incur a charge to the caller.