Children: Savings

John Woodcock: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) how many child trust funds were created in the Barrow and Furness constituency in (a) 2007, (b) 2008, (c) 2009 and (d) 2010; [150183]

(2) how many junior ISAs were opened in Barrow and Furness constituency in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [150184]

Sajid Javid: Information on the number of child trust fund accounts in existence in the Barrow and Furness constituency as of 5 April 2012 can be found on the HM Revenue and Customs website at the following link:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/statistics/ctf.htm

Information in respect of earlier year-end dates can be found by following the link to ‘Reports for previous years’.

Drax Power Station

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment his Department has made of whether Government support for Drax's biomass conversion plans under the UK Guarantees Scheme represents the best total net present value for investment. [150154]

Danny Alexander [holding answer 26 March 2013]: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Brent North (Barry Gardiner) on 19 March 2013, Official Report, column 598W.

Funerals

Neil Parish: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will conduct an examination of consumer protection regulations relating to members of the public paying into funeral plans; and if he will make a statement. [150075]

Sajid Javid: Since 1 January 2002 funeral plans have been regulated under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000. Sales of funeral plans are covered by the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1177W

2000 and the Financial Services (Distance Marketing) Regulations 2004. Both regulations require that, at a minimum, consumers must be given clear information including details of the goods or services offered, supply arrangements, payment details, and the supplier's details before they buy. Consumers must also be provided with a cooling-off period.

International Organisations

Chris Leslie: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer to which international organisations the UK is due to pay subscriptions in 2012-13; how much each such subscription is; and on what dates those transactions will be made. [150217]

Greg Clark [holding answer 26 March 2013]: The UK maintains subscriptions to a wide range of international organisations and has met its obligations to these organisations in 2012-13.

HM Treasury does not hold detailed information on the individual subscriptions to international bodies paid by Departments.

Minimum Wage: Scotland

Pamela Nash: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people were in the HM Revenue and Customs national minimum wage team monitoring Scotland in January (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012 and (d) 2013. [149680]

Mr Gauke: The information requested is in the following table:

 Number of staff in Scotland

2010

11

2011

11

2012

10

2013

10

Mortgages: Government Assistance

Ann McKechin: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to the Financial Statement of 20 March 2013, Official Report, column 942, whether there will be for any individual a maximum on the number of concurrent mortgages that can be covered by the proposed mortgage indemnity guarantee or mortgage subsidy schemes. [150151]

Sajid Javid: Home buyers under the Help to Buy: equity loan scheme will have to divest any interest in any other property they own prior to the Help to Buy sale completing. This will be done through a legal declaration by the purchaser’s solicitor.

The Help to Buy: mortgage guarantee is designed to help people with small deposits buy their first home or buy a bigger home for their family. The Government published a scheme outline at Budget 2013 and will now discuss the detailed design of the scheme with industry.

National Employment Savings Trust Scheme

Jim Sheridan: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent discussions he has had with charities regarding the Government-backed private pension fund NEST. [150315]

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1178W

Sajid Javid: Treasury Ministers and officials engage with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

The Treasury publishes a list of ministerial meetings with external organisations. This is available online at:

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/minister_hospitality.htm

Northern Rock

Pamela Nash: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much has been repaid to the public purse by each bank that has been lent money from the public purse since the collapse of Northern Rock. [149702]

Sajid Javid: Details of loans to banks are published on an annual basis in HM Treasury's Report and Accounts, which are available on the HM Treasury website. Since the collapse of Northern Rock HM Treasury has paid a total of £35.99 billion of loans to Northern Rock and Bradford and Bingley. As at 31 March 2012 £8.17 billion had been repaid. The relevant information is summarised in Figure 4 of Chapter 8 of the 2011-12 Annual Report and Accounts and in the following table. Further details of repayments by individual bank are included in notes 15 and 26 to 36 of Chapter 9 of the 2011-12 Annual Report and Accounts.

£ billion
 Total loans advanced as at 31 March 2012Loans repaid as at 31 March 2012Outstanding loans at 31 March 2012

Northern Rock (Asset Management) loan

27.44

(7.60)

19.84

Bradford and Bingley working capital facility

8.55

(0.57)

7.98

Further details will be published in the HM Treasury Annual Report and Accounts 2012-13 later this year.

Poverty: Children

Jim Sheridan: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to the Financial Statement of 20 March 2013, Official Report, column 424, what assessment he has made of the effects of raising the personal tax allowance on child poverty in (a) Paisley and Renfrewshire North constituency, (b) Scotland and (c) the UK. [150316]

Sajid Javid: Treasury has not measured the impact of Budget 2013 on the narrow relative income measure of child poverty as the Government strongly believes looking at relative income in isolation is not a helpful measure to track progress towards our target of eradicating child poverty.

The Government are seeking a wide range of views as part of a consultation on better measures of child poverty, which include income but also wider measures to tackle the root causes of poverty, including worklessness and educational failure.

Public Expenditure

Pamela Nash: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what estimate he has made of public spending per head of population in (a) England, (b)

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1179W

Scotland,

(c)

Wales and

(d)

Northern Ireland on (i) education, (ii) health, (iii) transport and (iv) policing in the financial year 2012-13 to date. [149797]

Danny Alexander: Total public spending for years from 2007-08 to 2011-12 on education, health, transport and policing in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland per head of population were published in tables B.5, B.6, B.7 and B.8 respectively of the Country and Regional Analysis (CRA) 2012, published by HM Treasury in October 2012. These data for 2011-12 are the latest available and are presented in the following table.

 2011-12 Spending £ per head of population
 EnglandScotlandWalesNorthern Ireland

Education

1,446

1,466

1,450

1,498

Health

1,874

2,091

1,964

2,114

Transport

292

518

351

330

Policing

255

247

243

488

Total spending

8,491

10,088

9,740

10,624

Figures for 2012-13 will be published in the Country and Regional Analysis 2013 National Statistics release, which is due to be published in October 2013.

Public Expenditure: Wales

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer with reference to his letter to hon. Members of 19 March 2013, what Barnett consequentials will be awarded to the Welsh Government as a result of the £1 billion of additional funding to support the Government's industrial strategy over the next 10 years. [149810]

Danny Alexander: The proposed funding will be directed towards science and innovation on a UK-wide basis and, as these matters are reserved, there will be no Barnett consequentials.

However, Wales will benefit directly from this funding. For example, businesses in the aerospace cluster based around the North Wales border will benefit from access to the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI).

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what total Barnett consequentials will be awarded to Wales as a result of money allocated to convert the Olympic stadium for footballing purposes. [150339]

Danny Alexander: £38.7 million has already been accounted for through the Public Sector Funding Package and the Government's announcement confirms an additional £25 million is being provided from a number of Departments. This provision is on a contingency basis so there are no consequentials at this point. If and when the money is drawn down any consequentials will be considered in the normal way.

Telephone Services

John Healey: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer for each of the principal access numbers operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1180W

for which he is responsible, what revenue has been retained by (i) the telephone provider for that line and (ii) his Department in each of the last three years. [150001]

Sajid Javid: The information requested is as follows.

(a) The principal access numbers operated by HM Treasury are:

Treasury Press Office—020 7270 5238

Treasury switchboard—020 7270 5000.

(b) The Debt Management Office (DMO), an executive agency of HM Treasury, provides telephone numbers on its website for 10 contact points within the organisation. Details of those principal access numbers are given in the following table. The DMO has recently updated its website so that for the six contact points listed on the ‘contact us’ page of the DMO's website, two telephone numbers are provided for each contact point: a geographic (0207) number and a non-geographic (0845) number. 0845 numbers continue to be provided alongside the geographic alternative because of the key business continuity advantage of continuous access to 0845 numbers in the event of an interruption to geographic telephone services.

(i) and (ii) The Department and agencies do not hold information on what revenue has been retained by the telephone provider of the aforementioned telephone numbers nor do the Department or agencies retain any revenue from them.


John Healey: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer which telephone lines are operated by (a) his Department and (b) the agencies for which he is responsible for public inquiries or other services; what the (i) principal access number and (ii) telephone service provider is for each number; and which such lines (A) are free to the caller and (B) may incur a charge to the caller. [150024]

Sajid Javid: The information is as follows:

(a) (i. ii.)

The principal access numbers operated by HM Treasury are:

Treasury Press Office—020 7270 5238

Treasury switchboard—020 7270 5000

The telephone service provider of these numbers is Level 3 and as the number is a 0207 London number the caller may incur a charge.

(b) (i.ii.)

The Debt Management Office (DMO), an executive agency of HM Treasury, provides telephone numbers on its website for 10 contact points within the organisation. Details of those principal access numbers are given in the following table. The DMO has recently updated its website so that for the six contact points listed on the ‘contact us' page of the DMO's website, two telephone numbers are provided for each contact point, a geographic (0207) number, and a non-geographic (0845) number. 0845 numbers continue to be provided alongside the geographic alternatives because of the key business continuity advantage of continuous access to 0845 numbers in the event of an interruption to geographic telephone services.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1181W

Contact pointGeographic contact numberNon-geographic contact number

Switchboard

020 7862 6500

0845 357 6500

Markets

020 7862 6517

0845 357 6517

Public Works Loan Board

020 7862 6610

0845 357 6610

Press and policy

020 7862 6532

0845 357 6532

Research

020 7862 6516

0845 357 6516

Web

020 7862 6620

0845 357 6620

Credit guarantee scheme and asset-backed securities guarantee scheme

020 7862 6663

n/a

Commissioners for the Reduction of the National Debt

020 7862 6530

n/a

Debt Management Account Deposit Facility

020 7862 6505

n/a

Freedom of Information

020 7862 6528

n/a

The telephone service provider for both the geographic and the non-geographic numbers is Colt Technology Services Group Ltd.

Calling either the geographic or non-geographic contact numbers may incur a cost for the caller.

Tour de France

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what money has been made available from the Treasury reserve to fund the Yorkshire and UK staging of the Tour de France Le Grand Depart 2014. [149925]

Sajid Javid: Hosting the opening stages of the 2014 Tour de France offers a real opportunity to showcase what the UK has to offer as a tourism destination, to build on our success as a host of world class sporting events and to attract economic benefits, particularly in those regions through which the route will pass.

The Government will make funding available to UK Sport to support the Grand Depart 2014, subject to UK Sport working with Welcome to Yorkshire and other event partners to review current plans and identify how these can be made more robust to ensure value for money for any public investment. The level of support will be determined by the outcome of this exercise and subject to need.

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

John Woodcock: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what involvement (a) he and (b) other Treasury Ministers had in the approval of the severance package for Mr Tony Halsall, former chief executive of the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust; [146791]

(2) on what date he was made aware of the details of the arrangements for the severance of Mr Tony Halsall from the position of chief executive of University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay; and whether he was made aware of Mr Halsall's continued employment in the NHS. [149903]

Danny Alexander [holding answer 25 March 2013]: Treasury approval is required before any special severance payments—meaning payments outside their contractual entitlement—can be made to public sector staff.

As the hon. Member will be aware, no extra-contractual payments were made in this case, and therefore no approach was made to the Treasury for clearance. Other

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1182W

Treasury Ministers and I were first made aware of these arrangements, including Mr Halsall's current place of employment, in March 2013.

Education

16-19 Bursary Fund: Lancashire

Eric Ollerenshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many students in Lancaster and Fleetwood constituency will receive the new Bursary Fund; and how much will be spent under that fund in the next three years. [147884]

Mr Laws: Information on the numbers of young people at each location, who have received payments from the 16-19 Bursary Fund since it began in September 2011, is not held centrally. Information on payments made in Lancaster and Fleetwood will be held by the schools, colleges and training providers concerned.

The 16-19 Bursary Fund is worth £180 million a year nationally. Funding will continue until the end of the current spending review period in 2015.

Academies

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether Ofsted is permitted to inspect the groups to which school academies belong. [149790]

Mr Laws: Ofsted does not have an explicit power to inspect groups to which academies belong but has a duty (section 5 of the Education Act 2005) to inspect individual schools and a power (section 8 of the Education Act 2005) to inspect individual schools outside of normal inspection schedules. Ofsted may therefore take a view on the support and challenge provided by an overarching body during an individual school inspection.

Bain and Company

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which officials in his Department were part of the joint team with Bain and Company in the Departmental Review in 2012. [148065]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 14 March 2013]: The joint team leading the Departmental Review was led by Sinead O'Sullivan and Kate Chhatwal, and consisted of six other officials below Grade 6.

To ensure the Review provided a comprehensive picture of work across the Department, the team held workshops for all members of the senior civil service (approximately 135 deputy directors, approximately 30 directors and three directors general). This work was supplemented by over 100 staff volunteers and by attendees at over 40 staff sessions across all of our sites.

Brain: Tumours

Michael Fabricant: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will meet the charity HeadSmart to discuss how teachers might be trained to recognise the early symptoms of brain tumours in children. [149870]

Mr Laws: The Education and Childcare Minister, the hon. Member for South West Norfolk (Elizabeth Truss), met representatives of HeadSmart on 19 November 2012 to discuss their campaign.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1183W

Children in Care

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what progress his Department has made on implementing the recommendations of the Third Report from the Children, Schools and Families Committee, Session 2008-09, HC111, on looked-after children. [149058]

Mr Timpson: The Government provided a response to the 2008-09 report in 2011. This is available at:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201011/cmselect/cmeduc/924/92403.htm

and is supported by a radical programme of work to improve all aspects of the lives of children in care. Highlights include:

The Children and Families Bill, which has been introduced into Parliament;

Publication in January of ‘Further Action on Adoption: Finding More Loving Homes’. This is available at:

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/standard/AllPublications/Page1/DFE-00003-2013;

A revised and streamlined legal framework for looked-after children, in particular the revised regulations and guidance about care planning, placements and case review which came into force in April 2011.

Current programmes and activities focus in particular on improving educational outcomes for all looked-after children; securing a sufficient supply of foster carers to meet children's needs; improving the quality of the work force, including social work reform, and the skills of foster carers and residential care staff; reforming children's residential care; improving data and practice on children who go missing from care; and improving outcomes for care leavers.

Copies of these documents will be placed in the House Libraries

Child Poverty

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 25 February 2013, Official Report, column 46W, whether a summary of responses to the consultation will be published by the Government, along with the Government's response to them. [148896]

Mr Laws: The consultation closed on 15 February, and we are currently analysing all the responses. We anticipate that we will publish a summary of the responses to the consultation alongside the Government's response, which we will publish in the summer.

e-mail

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what advice or guidance Ministers of his Department have (a) discussed and (b) drafted on answering parliamentary questions relating to the use of private e-mail accounts for messages relating to Government business; and if he will make a statement. [148063]

Elizabeth Truss: Ministers in the Department for Education have not drafted, or taken part in any discussions about the preparation of, any advice or guidance on answering parliamentary questions relating to the use of private e-mail for Government business.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1184W

Foster Care

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which local authorities have signed up to the Foster Care Charter to date. [149819]

Mr Timpson: Local authorities are not required to inform the Department when they have signed up to the Foster Carers' Charter. Those which are known to have signed the Charter include:

Blackpool

Bolton

Bradford

Brent

Cheshire East

Cornwall

Coventry

Cumbria

Darlington

Devon

Derbyshire

Dorset

Ealing

East Riding

East Sussex

Essex

Halton

Hammersmith and Fulham

Hampshire

Hartlepool

Havering

Isle of Wight

Kensington and Chelsea

Kent

Knowsley

Lambeth

Leicestershire

Lewisham

Luton

Medway

Merton

Middlesbrough

Milton Keynes

Newcastle Upon Tyne

Newham

Northamptonshire

North East Lincolnshire

North Lincolnshire

North Somerset

North Tyneside

Northumberland

North Yorkshire

Nottingham City

Nottinghamshire County

Oldham

Peterborough

Plymouth

Poole

Redcar and Cleveland

Richmond upon Thames

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1185W

Rotherham

Sheffield

Slough

Solihull

Somerset

Southend-on-Sea

South Gloucestershire

South Tyneside

Southwark

Staffordshire

Stockport

Stockton on Tees

Suffolk

Sunderland

Surrey

Swindon

Tameside

Trafford

Wakefield

Warwickshire

Warrington

West Berkshire

Westminster

West Sussex

Wigan

Wiltshire

Wolverhampton.

Replying to a survey last year, a further nine local authorities reported that they were expecting to launch their Charter shortly, and another 37 local authorities said they were in the process of developing their Charter.

Free School Meals

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to ensure that all children in poverty receive free school meals. [148415]

Mr Laws: The Government recognise the benefits of healthy school meals and are committed to continuing to provide free school meals to those pupils who need them most. Our priority is to make sure that the most disadvantaged children are able to get a nutritious meal funded by schools.

We are working to encourage all families who meet the criteria to register for free school meals. We want disadvantaged children to benefit from a nutritious meal, and their schools to be able to receive pupil premium funding to help raise disadvantaged pupils' attainment.

Free school meals are not compulsory and there are many reasons why a family may choose not to claim a free school meal to which they are entitled. The fear of being stigmatised can prevent many children from taking a free school meal. But we have made progress in addressing this. For example, many schools now have cashless systems and other methods to ensure that it is not obvious which pupils are receiving a free school lunch. The Department for Education's eligibility checking system, used by local authorities, has also made it much easier and quicker to check anonymously which families are entitled to free school meals. National free school meal take-up increased by 60,000 between 2010 and 2012.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1186W

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent representations he has received on entitlement to free school meals for children in poverty. [148416]

Mr Laws: This year the Department has received a petition organised by the Children's Society and 38 Degrees. In addition, parliamentary questions were asked by the hon. Member for Blaydon (Mr Anderson), (PQ 147517). and the right hon. Member for East Ham (Stephen Timms), (114811), and we have responded to a number of letters from MPs and members of the public.

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on free school meals; and if he will make a statement. [148417]

Mr Laws: The Government recognise the benefits of healthy school meals and are committed to continuing to provide free school meals to those pupils who need them most.

We are working to encourage all families who meet the current criteria to register for free school meals. We want disadvantaged children to benefit from a nutritious meal, and also for their schools to receive additional funding through the pupil premium to help raise disadvantaged pupils' attainment.

The Department for Education's eligibility checking system, used by local authorities, has made it much easier and quicker to check anonymously which families are entitled to free school meals.

The Children's Food Trust (formerly The School Food Trust) has produced a ‘Free School Meals Matter Toolkit’ to provide schools with information and advice to help them encourage all eligible pupils to register for, and take, their free school meal. The Department has also published on its website ways to encourage parents to register their child's eligibility for free school meals. Take-up of free school meals in England increased by 60,000 between 2010 and 2012.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what representations he has received from (a) individuals and (b) organisations regarding the delivery of free school meals through universal credit. [149827]

Mr Laws: This year the Department has received a petition organised by the Children's Society and 38 Degrees. In addition, parliamentary questions were asked by the hon. Member for Blaydon (Mr Anderson), (PQ 147517), the hon. Member for Birmingham, Northfield (Richard Burden), (PQ 148468), and the right hon. Member for East Ham (Stephen Timms), (PQs 114811 and 148217), and we have responded to a number of letters from MPs and members of the public.

GCE AS-level

Pat Glass: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which university bodies have explicitly supported the proposed measures to establish AS levels as a stand-alone qualification. [146260]

Mr Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which university bodies have contacted him in support of the proposed measures to establish AS levels as a stand-alone qualification. [147254]

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1187W

Elizabeth Truss: I have discussed our plans for A-level reform with a wide range of organisations and individuals, including: the Russell Group and Universities UK. These discussions and Ofqual’s consultation showed widespread support for the AS-level, so we are retaining it as a stand-alone qualification to support breadth.

GCSE

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1188W

without statements of special educational needs who were

(a)

eligible and

(b)

not eligible for free school meals and who attended academies, achieved 5 A* to C grades including English and mathematics but excluding equivalents in each year since 2003. [148524]

Mr Laws [holding answer 18 March 2013]: The requested information for the academic years 2007/08 to 2011/12 is given in the table. Information for earlier years could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Achievements at GCSE for pupils(1 )without a statement of SEN at the end of key stage 4 by free school meal eligibility. Years: 2007/08 to 2011/12 (revised)(2. )Coverage: England, Academies(7)
 Pupils known to be eligible for free school mealsAll other pupils(3)
Pupils without a statement of SEN(5)Number of eligible pupils(1)Number achieving 5+ A*-C grades exc. equivalents inc. English and mathematics GCSEsPercentage achieving 5+ A*-C grades exc. equivalents inc. English and mathematics GCSEsNumber of eligible pupils(1)Number achieving 5+ A*-C grades exc. equivalents inc. English and mathematics GCSEsPercentage achieving 5+ A*-C grades exc. equivalents inc. English and mathematics GCSEs

2007/08

      

All academies(6)

2,987

630

21.1

8,644

2,977

34.4

Sponsored academies

2,987

630

21.1

8,644

2,977

34.4

Converter academies

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

       

2008/09

      

All academies(6)

4,504

991

22.0

14,862

5,490

36.9

Sponsored academies

4,504

991

22.0

14,862

5,490

36.9

Converter academies

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

       

2009/10

      

All academies(6)

7,477

1,621

21.7

23,546

8,707

37.0

Sponsored academies

7,477

1,621

21.7

23,546

8,707

37.0

Converter academies

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

       

2010/11

      

All academies(6)

10,032

2,347

23.4

34,671

15,127

43.6

Sponsored academies

9,766

2,230

22.8

30,024

11,656

38.8

Converter academies

266

117

44.0

4,647

3,471

74.7

       

2011/12

      

All academies(6)

22,061

6,509

29.5

153,672

93,345

60.7

Sponsored academies

11,592

2,698

23.3

35,637

14,118

39.6

Converter academies

10,469

3,811

36.4

118,035

79,227

67.1

 All pupils(4)
Pupils without a statement of SEN(5)Number of eligible pupils(1)Number achieving 5+ A*-C grades exc. equivalents inc. English and mathematics GCSEsPercentage achieving 5+ A*-C grades exc. equivalents inc. English and mathematics GCSEs

2007/08

   

All academies(6)

11,631

3,607

31.0

Sponsored academies

11,631

3,607

31.0

Converter academies

n/a

n/a

n/a

    

2008/09

   

All academies(6)

19,366

6,481

33.5

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1189W

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1190W

Sponsored academies

19,366

6,481

33.5

Converter academies

n/a

n/a

n/a

    

2009/10

   

All academies(6)

31,023

10,328

33.3

Sponsored academies

31,023

10,328

33.3

Converter academies

n/a

n/a

n/a

    

2010/11

   

All academies(6)

44,703

17,474

39.1

Sponsored academies

39,790

13,886

34.9

Converter academies

4,913

3,588

73.0

    

2011/12

   

All academies(6)

175,733

99,854

56.8

Sponsored academies

47,229

16,816

35.6

Converter academies

128,504

83,038

64.6

n/a = not applicable (1) Pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each academic year. (2 )Figures for 2007/08 to 2010/11 are based on final data, 2011/12 figures are based on revised data. (3 )Includes pupils not eligible for free school meals and for whom free school meal eligibility was unclassified or could not be determined. (4 )Includes pupils for whom free school meal eligibility or SEN provision could not be determined. (5 )Includes pupils with no identified SEN, SEN pupils without a statement (classified as School Action or School Action plus) and unclassified pupils. (6) Includes mainstream academies only; there are no pupils without a statement of SEN in special academies. (7 )Includes all academies and free schools that were open before 12 September 2011. Source: National Pupil Database (2007/03 to 2010/11) and Key Stage 4 attainment data (2011/12)

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average uncapped GCSE points score of pupils was in (a) London Challenge schools, (b) City Challenge schools and (c) all maintained secondary schools by ethnic group in each year since the start of the London Challenge programme. [148747]

Mr Laws: The requested information for the academic year 2007/08 to 2011/12 is given in the following tables. Information for earlier years could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Average uncapped GCSE point score of pupils in London Challenge schools(1), City Challenge schools(2) and all maintained secondary schools(3) by ethnic group, 2007/08 to 2011/12 (revised)(4), England
 WhiteMixedAsian
School typeNumber of eligible pupils(6)Average uncapped GCSE point score per pupil(7)Number of eligible pupils(6)Average uncapped GCSE point score per pupil(7)Number of eligible pupils(6)Average uncapped GCSE point score per pupil(7)

London Challenge schools(1)

      

2007/08

37,176

386.3

4,763

384.5

12,901

424.5

2008/09

35,442

412.6

5,002

416.7

13,031

445.5

2009/10

35,045

442.8

5,312

441.6

13,172

468.4

2010/11

33,797

463.4

5,523

462.5

13,635

487.7

2011/12

33,250

471.6

5,727

474.5

13,947

498.2

       

City Challenge schools(2)

      

2007/08

39,078

388.5

1,581

375.0

4,951

409.4

2008/09

36,495

415.7

1,512

403.0

4,987

428.6

2009/10

35,367

452.5

1,620

439.9

5,197

468.4

2010/11

34,056

476.6

1,685

475.2

5,251

488.8

2011/12

33,386

483.9

1,788

485.5

5,508

499.6

       

All state-funded secondary schools(3)

      

2007/08

500,995

392.4

16,122

387.9

39,413

415.3

2008/09

479,928

418.7

16,836

417.1

40,896

439.4

2009/10

476,575

448.5

17,982

445.7

41,908

471.1

2010/11

463,224

471.7

18,715

469.9

42,720

496.3

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1191W

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1192W

2011/12

454,458

480.4

20,077

480.1

44,256

505.4

 BlackChineseAll pupils(5)
School typeNumber of eligible pupils(6)Average uncapped GCSE point score per pupil(7)Number of eligible pupils(6)Average uncapped GCSE point score per pupil(7)Number of eligible pupils(6)Average uncapped GCSE point score per pupil(7)

London Challenge schools(1)

      

2007/08

14,449

367.0

609

504.4

74,710

390.4

2008/09

14,909

401.2

608

538.4

73,721

418.6

2009/10

15,266

427.1

601

565.0

74,253

446.1

2010/11

15,844

448.2

559

577.2

74,229

466.1

2011/12

16,129

454.9

567

594.5

74,541

474.9

       

City Challenge schools(2)

      

2007/08

1,325

392.6

208

512.5

48,075

390.4

2008/09

1,431

419.6

196

544.4

45,403

417.4

2009/10

1,422

454.9

177

550.2

44,600

454.1

2010/11

1,561

492.5

187

588.9

43,611

479.2

2011/12

1,607

491.5

192

598.5

43,227

487.0

       

All state-funded secondary schools(3)

      

2007/08

22,134

371.6

2,196

507.0

595,806

393.1

2008/09

23,269

405.2

2,219

535.7

576,420

419.9

2009/10

23,815

434.3

2,188

557.5

575,970

449.8

2010/11

25,084

460.4

2,255

580.0

564,863

473.3

2011/12

25,895

465.5

2,269

589.7

559,093

482.2

(1) London Challenge schools include all inner and outer London state-funded schools (including academies and CTCs). (2) City Challenge schools include all state-funded schools (including academies and CTCs within the local authorities of Dudley, Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton in the ‘black country’ and Bolton, Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan in ‘Greater Manchester’. (3) Includes all England state-funded schools (including academies and CTCs). (4) Figures for 2007/08 to 2010/11 are based on final data, 2011/12 figures are based on revised data. (5) Includes pupils for whom ethnicity was not obtained, refused or could not be determined. (6) Pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each academic year. (7) Total uncapped point score from GCSE and equivalents divided by the number of eligible pupils. Source: Notional pupil database (2007/08 to 2010/11) and key stage 4 attainment data (2011/12).

History: Curriculum

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what provision he has made in the schools curriculum to widen opportunities for children to study British history; [148230]

(2) if he will make provision in school curricula to widen opportunities for children to study local history. [148319]

Elizabeth Truss: We recently published proposals for the reform of the National Curriculum for public consultation. The proposed new programmes of study for history are designed to ensure that all pupils know and understand the main events, periods and personalities of British history by the end of key stage 3. The new curriculum requires that British history be taught as a coherent, chronological narrative from the earliest settlers to the present day.

Our proposals also make it clear that pupils should be given the opportunity to study local history throughout key stages 1 to 3.

Beyond the requirements of the National Curriculum, schools are free to design their own curricula in a way that will challenge and engage all their pupils.

Internet: Bullying

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what steps his Department is taking to engage with (a) five to 10-year-olds and (b) 10 to 15- year-olds about peer pressure online; [149583]

(2) what steps he is taking to reduce the incidence of cyber-bullying among (a) five to 10-year-olds and (b) 10 to 15-year-olds. [149581]

Mr Timpson: For 10 to 15-year-old children, internet safety is currently part of the National Curriculum at secondary level—in ICT key stage 3 and 4 pupils learn to recognise issues of risk, safety, and responsibility surrounding the use of ICT. Internet safety can also be taught as part of form tutor sessions and in PSHE (Personal, Social and Health Education) lessons. For five to 10-year-old children, from September 2014 it is proposed that internet safety is part of the National Curriculum computing programmes of study at primary

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1193W

level. The proposal, currently under consultation, requires pupils to show that they are responsible, competent, confident, and creative users of information and communication technology.

I co-chair the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) which brings together the internet industries, charities, academia, law enforcement and regulators to work in partnership to help keep children safe online. Each year there is a large awareness raising campaign for Safer Internet Day and the UKCCIS guidance on internet safety messages, which contains information about cyberbullying, peer pressure and other behavioural issues, is carried by responsible providers of services used by children.

Mobile Phones

Mr Streeter: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which company holds the largest contract to provide mobile telephony services to his Department; how much is paid each year under that contract; how many individual devices are covered by the contract; when the contract was awarded; and when and how the contract will next be reviewed. [148401]

Elizabeth Truss: The largest contract for mobile telephony services is Vodafone with an estimated contract value of £999,643.00 over the four-year term.

As at 26 February 2013 there are 2,203 individual devices covered by the contract which was awarded on 19 September 2011.

Supplier performance is currently reviewed on a weekly basis. The contract expires in September 2015; planning for contract exit and transition to a new supplier (if required) will begin in or around December 2014. The next mobile telephony contract will be procured via a Government Procurement Service (GPS) framework or other compliant route.

Ofsted

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he will publish the response to the consultation on Ofsted fees; and if he will make a statement. [142957]

Mr Timpson: We published the response to the consultation on proposed changes to Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Fees and Frequency of Inspections) (Children’s Homes etc) Regulations 2007 in March 2013. My Department has made the necessary final changes to the regulations and these came into force on 1 April 2013.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Henry Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Mid Dorset and North Poole of 4 March 2013, Official Report, column 671, how many students have been registered for the pupil premium in Crawley constituency in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012; and what steps his Department is taking to increase uptake of the pupil premium in Crawley constituency. [148262]

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1194W

Mr Laws: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011. Pupil premium funding is provided to schools which have on roll pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (the deprivation premium); children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months (the looked-after child premium); and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces (the service child premium). The Government are determined that the pupil premium is used by schools to close attainment gaps between disadvantaged pupils and their peers.

In the financial year 2011-12, 1,810 pupils attending schools in Crawley constituency area were eligible for the deprivation premium or service premium, attracting £884,000. It is not possible to identify, at constituency level, the number of pupils eligible for the looked-after child premium or the number of pupils eligible for the deprivation premium in alternative provision settings.

In the financial year 2012-13, eligibility for the pupil premium was extended to include those eligible for FSM at any point in the last six years. In 2012-13, 3,080 pupils attending schools in Crawley constituency area were eligible for the deprivation premium or service premium, attracting £1.913 million.

Illustrative pupil premium allocations using January 2012 pupil numbers show that Crawley constituency area will receive approximately £2.763 million of pupil premium funding in 2013-14. Final allocations for 2013-14 based on 2013 pupil numbers will be published in the autumn.

We are working to encourage all families who meet the criteria to register for free school meals. We want disadvantaged children to benefit from a nutritious meal, and their schools to be able to receive pupil premium funding to help raise disadvantaged pupils' attainment.

Free school meals are not compulsory and there are many reasons why a family may choose not to claim a free school meal to which they are entitled. The fear of being stigmatised can prevent children from taking a free school meal, but we have made progress in addressing this. For example, many schools now have cashless systems and other methods to ensure that it is not obvious which pupils are receiving a free school lunch. The Department for Education's eligibility checking system, used by local authorities, has also made it much easier and quicker to check anonymously which families are entitled to free school meals.

School Leaving

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he plans to require all schools and colleges to publish destination data for their pupils on a fixed and permanent basis. [148448]

Mr Laws: Education destination measures were published for the first time in July 2012. The measures show the percentage of students continuing their education in school, further education, 6th form college or higher education institution, and the percentage training, including through an apprenticeship. The measures are published at national, local and individual school or college level. The data are available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/STA/t001076/index.shtml

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1195W

The destination measures are published by the Department for Education rather than by individual schools and colleges. The measures are based on the data we already receive, meaning that they are comparable and there are no additional burdens on schools and colleges.

We have no plans to require schools to publish additional destination information themselves.

School Leaving: Birmingham

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils dropped out of school before the age of 16 in (a) Birmingham and (b) Birmingham, Selly Oak constituency in the last year. [148680]

Mr Laws: Information on pupils dropping out of school in Birmingham local authority and Birmingham Selly Oak constituency is not readily available and to produce this information would incur disproportionate cost.

Schools: Admissions

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of children were given a place at either their first or second choice (a) primary and (b) secondary school in (i) Bury St Edmunds constituency, (ii) Suffolk and (iii) England in each of the last three years. [148081]

Mr Laws: The available information of the proportion of children offered a place at either their first or second choice secondary school in Suffolk and in England in each of the last three years is set out as follows. Constituency level data are not collected. The Department does not currently collect primary preference data.

Secondary School Applications and Offers, 2010-12
Percentage
  Proportion receiving 1(st) preferenceProportion receiving 2(nd) preferenceProportion receiving 1(st) or 2(nd) preference

2012

England

85.3

7.8

93.1

 

Suffolk

96.8

2.1

99.0

     

2011

England

84.6

8.1

92.7

 

Suffolk

92.2

3.8

96.0

     

2010

England

83.2

8.6

91.8

 

Suffolk

91.4

3.1

94.5

Note: Total calculated on unrounded figures: may not match sum of rounded 1(st) and 2(nd) preferences.

Schools: Capital Investment

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department spent on building and refurbishing schools in each year for which figures are available. [148497]

Mr Laws [holding answer 14 March 2013]: The following table (Table 1) gives the capital funding provided by the Department in the years 2000-01 to 2012-13 and the average annual funding in each of the preceding three decades. The amount spent on school buildings may

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1196W

differ from the funding provided by the Department because much of that funding was devolved to support local decision-making. However, the Department does not hold records of local authorities' expenditure.

Table 1
 Capital Funding (£ billion)

2012-13

4.5

2011-12

5.1

2010-11

7.1

2009-10

7.4

2008-09

5.5

2007-08

5.2

2006-07

4.6

2005-06

4.3

2004-05

3.6

2003-04

3.3

2002-03

2.8

2001-02

2.0

2000-01

2.0

1990-91 to 1999-2000(1)

0.8

1980-81 to 1989-90(1)

0.4

1970-71 to 1979-80(1)

0.3

(1) Average per year. Notes: 1. Figures are nominal. 2. Capital funding includes conventional funding: capital grant and supported borrowing allocations and excludes investment through PFI.

Schools: Sports

Sir Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the Prime Minister’s statement at Millwall Rugby Club on 16 March 2013 that £150 million a year is to be allocated to primary schools for sports provisions, whether that funding has already been allocated to head teachers but will now be ring fenced solely for school sport. [149334]

Mr Timpson: The funding of £150 million per year for academic years 2013/14 and 2014/15, announced by the Prime Minister on 16 March 2013, has not yet been allocated to primary school head teachers. This is additional funding and will be distributed to eligible schools from September 2013.

Teachers

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many newly qualified teachers failed to join or left the teaching profession within the first three years of qualifying in the last 10 years. [149668]

Mr Laws: Information is available for teachers in England and Wales who gained qualified teacher status in each calendar year and whether they were in service in the publicly funded sector in each March. The latest available information is for March 2010. Therefore the most recent cohort of teachers for which information is available is for those who qualified between 1997 and 2006, of which there were 314,100. Of this group, 74,300 were recorded as out of service three years after they qualified.

The figure provided includes both teachers who never entered service and those who have left publicly funded service either permanently or temporarily. An unknown

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1197W

number of all the teachers gaining qualified teacher status will have taken up teaching appointments in other education sectors.

The source of this information is the Database of Teachers Records.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of possible changes in teacher numbers and training requirements as a result of the proposed introduction of new GCSE, A Level and national curriculum requirements. [149669]

Mr Laws: The Department makes teacher training places available in line with an estimate of demand from schools for new teachers. This includes using evidence as it becomes available of the likely impact of Government policy such as curriculum and qualification reform on that demand. The growth of school centred initial teacher training and the new school direct programme will also enable schools to plan locally for any requirement for new teachers as a result of the reforms.

Schools are best placed to decide which resources and continuing professional development meet their needs to ensure successful implementation of A-level, GCSE and national curriculum changes. We therefore expect schools to identify their priorities for action, building on current areas of strength and taking the opportunity to develop their own curriculum. To assist with this the Department is supporting initial teacher training providers in adapting existing training and working with a range of organisations to ensure that high quality support becomes available. These include publishers, teaching schools and subject associations.

Teachers: Conditions of Employment

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent discussions he has had with trades unions on teachers’ pay, pensions and conditions; and if he will make a statement. [147772]

Mr Laws [holding answer 14 March 2013]: We meet frequently at both ministerial and official level with the teaching unions to discuss areas of mutual interest, including pay and pensions.

In relation to teachers’ pay, the Secretary of State for Education, the right hon. Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), published the School Teachers’ Pay Review Body’s (STRB) 21st Report and the Government’s response to it on 5 December 2012 and, at the same time, launched a four-week consultation with statutory consultees (including the teaching and head teacher unions) on the proposals. As part of that consultation process, officials arranged a series of meetings with union officials to discuss the STRB’s recommendations. On 14 February 2013, we launched the consultation process in relation to revisions to the School Teacher’s Pay and Conditions Document (STPCD). Officials have again met with all of the statutory consultee unions and continue to do so on an ongoing basis to ensure that all of their views are understood and to discuss specific implementation issues.

In relation to teachers’ pensions, officials have met with trade union general secretaries approximately bi-monthly to discuss public sector pension reform and the impact on the Teachers’ Pension Scheme (TPS).

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1198W

Since September 2012, officials have met with trade union and employer representatives on a monthly basis to consider the technical aspects of the proposed new scheme. The new TPS will start in April 2015.

Teachers: Labour Turnover

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the teacher retention and wastage rates have been in the last 10 years; and what assessment he has made of trends in such figures over that period. [149678]

Mr Laws: The following table provides the full-time and part-time qualified teacher turnover and wastage rates in publicly funded schools in England for 2000-01 to 2009-10, the latest information available.

Turnover and wastage rates of qualified teachers in publicly funded schools by region, 2000-01 to 2009-10, England
Percentage
 Full-timePart-time(1)Full-time and part-time(1)
 Turnover rate(2)Wastage rate(3)Turnover rate(4)Wastage rate(5)Wastage rate(6)

2000-01

19.5

10.3

32.0

25.9

9.0

2001-02

18.7

10.5

32.1

26.4

9.4

2002-03

19.4

11.1

34.1

28.5

10.1

2003-04

18.5

11.0

31.0

25.4

9.7

2004-05

18.6

11.4

30.1

24.9

9.7

2005-06

18.2

11.5

32.9

27.4

10.0

2006-07

17.7-

10.9

31.0

25.6

9.7

2007-08(8)

18.5

11.0

28.7

23.6

9.0

2008-09(8)

18.7

11.1

27.4

22.6

8,9

2009-10(7,8)

18.6

10.5

28.5

22.8

8.6

(1) 10% to 20% of part-time teachers may not be included in the data. (2) Full-time turnover is defined as all teachers in full-time service in the English publicly funded schools sector on 31 March who were not in full-time service in the same establishment on 31 March a year later. Turnover therefore includes wastage, transfers to other establishments within the publicly funded schools sector and teachers leaving to part-time service. Not all employers record all movements between schools within their area so rates are understated. (3) Full-time wastage is defined as all teachers in full-time service in the English publicly funded schools sector on 31 March who were not in full-time service anywhere in the English publicly funded schools sector on 31 March a year later. This includes teachers leaving to part-time service. (4) Part-time turnover is defined as all teachers in part-time service in the English publicly funded schools sector on 31 March who were not in part-time service in the same establishment on 31 March a year later. Turnover therefore includes wastage, transfers to other establishments within the publicly funded schools sector and teachers leaving to full-time service. Not all employers record all movements between schools within their area so rates are understated. (5) Part-time wastage is defined as all teachers in part-time service in the English publicly funded schools sector on 31 March who were not in part-time service anywhere in the English publicly funded schools sector on 31 March a year later. This includes teachers leaving to full-time service. (6) Full-time and part-time wastage is defined as all teachers in full-time or part-time service in the English publicly funded schools sector on 31 March who were not in full-time or part-time service anywhere in the English publicly funded schools sector on 31 March a year later. This does not include moves between full-time and part-time service. (7) Provisional estimates. (8) Academies are included from 2007-08 onwards. Source: Database of Teacher Records

Between 2000-01 and 2009-10, the full-time turnover and wastage rates remained fairly constant with little variation between the years showing that there has been

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1199W

little variation in full-time teacher retention and wastage in the English publicly funded schools sector during this period.

However, between 2000-01 and 2009-10, the part-time turnover and wastage rates appear to have fallen very slightly, (it is important to note that data for 2009-10 are provisional and will be revised in future). This may be an indication that between 2000-01 and 2009-10, the retention of part-time teachers in the English publicly funded schools sector has improved slightly.

Teachers: Peterborough

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to assist Peterborough City Council in recruiting high quality graduates into teaching; and if he will make a statement. [149593]

Mr Laws: The Department is committed to raising the quality of trained teachers in all areas of the country. When allocating initial teacher training places, the Department takes into account geographical need. School centred initial teacher training and the new School Direct programme enable all schools to address their future staffing needs by giving them greater responsibility for the recruitment, selection and training of their own teachers.

We have also put a number of measures in place to attract high quality graduates into teaching, including:

bursaries of up to £20,000 to attract the best graduates in the subjects where they are most needed;

scholarships of £20,000 to attract excellent candidates in maths, physics, chemistry, and computer science.

Teachers: Recruitment

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to recruit additional teachers to teach the additional children expected to enter English schools over the next 10 years; and if he will make a statement. [149662]

Mr Laws: The number of initial teacher training (ITT) places the Department sets each year is informed by the national Teacher Supply Model (TSM). The TSM takes into account the latest national pupil projections and the likely future demand for teachers. School centred initial teacher training and the new School Direct programme will also enable schools to address their future staffing needs by giving them greater responsibility for the recruitment, selection and training of their own teachers.

The Government have introduced a number of measures to ensure a good supply of high quality trainee teachers as demand from schools rises. These include training bursaries of up to £20,000, prestigious teacher training scholarships and the tripling of the size of the Teach First programme over this Parliament.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of (a) teacher recruitment campaigns conducted between 2005 and 2010, (b) the effect of the suspension of advertising in 2010 and (c) the effect of resumption of such advertising in 2011. [149670]

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1200W

Mr Laws: The teacher recruitment campaigns have contributed to the successful recruitment of the required numbers of entrants to Initial Teacher Training (ITT) in the last eight years. Full evaluations of the campaigns have been completed, and, in recent years, have been part of the submissions to the Cabinet Office to seek its approval to continue marketing activity.

In the period 2006 to 2009, the total number of entrants into ITT each year was as follows:

Academic yearEntrants to ITT

2006/07

39,830

2007/08

38,360

2008/09

37,810

2009/10

39,500

Advertising was suspended in 2010 for a short period of time. Approvals were given by the Cabinet Office for spend on teacher recruitment marketing for various periods throughout 2010 and 2011. Recruitment to ITT in 2010/11 and 2011/12 was as follows:

Academic yearEntrants to ITT

2010/11

38,370

2011/12

36,590

Teacher recruitment campaign activity continued in 2011 and 2012 following approvals from the Cabinet Office and recruitment to ITT for 2012/13 was as follows:

Academic yearEntrants to ITT

2012/13

35,380

Teachers: South East

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what measures he intends to take to ensure that schools in London and the South East are not short of teachers in 2013-14 and 2014-15. [149677]

Mr Laws: The Department identifies the number of teachers needed in our schools each year, taking into account the latest national pupil projections and the likely future demand for teachers. The number of initial teacher teaching (ITT) training places the Department sets each year is informed by this national analysis. When allocating initial teacher training places to ITT providers, the Department takes into account geographical need as well as subject demand. School centred initial teacher training and the new School Direct programme enable all schools to address their future staffing needs by giving them greater responsibility for the selection and training of their own teachers. The Government have introduced a number of measures to ensure a good supply of high quality trainee teachers, including in London. These include training bursaries of up to £20,000, prestigious teacher training scholarships and the tripling of the size of the Teach First programme over this Parliament.

Teachers: Training

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the effect on recruitment to initial teacher training of adjusting bursaries, removing golden hellos and increasing fees. [149663]

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1201W

Mr Laws: Recruitment to training in 2012/13, the first year in which the £6,000 and £9,000 tuition fee caps and the reforms to teacher training bursaries apply, shows a significant improvement from recruitment in 2010/11, the final year for which golden hellos were offered. Provisional figures from the 2012 initial teacher training census suggest the overall proportion of first year post-graduate trainees with a 2.1 or above rose from 62% to 71% over that period. The number of physics trainees registering on courses rose from 670 to 900. The proportion of first year post-graduate maths, physics and chemistry trainees with a 2.1 or above rose by 11, 12 and 13 percentage points respectively.

10 Apr 2013 : Column 1202W

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the final figures for initial teacher training recruitment were in each subject and phase in (a) 2011-12, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2009-10; and whether in each such year this figure was a surplus or shortfall against his Department's target. [149679]

Mr Laws [holding answer 21 March 2013]: Table A shows the final figures for initial teacher training recruitment by subject and phase for academic years 2011/12, 2010/11 and 2009/10, as well as the percentage surplus or shortfall against each of the Department's targets.

Table A: Recruitment to initial teacher training by subject and phase in academic years 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 in England
Subject2011/12 Trainees2011/12 Target2011/12 Surplus/Shortfall (%)2010/11 Trainees2010/11 Target2010/11 Surplus/Shortfall (%)2009/10 Trainees2009/10 Target2009-10 Surplus/Shortfall (%)

Art

370

320

16

590

515

15

680

595

14

Biology and General Science

1,140

840

36

1,870

1,200

56

2,260

1,500

51

Chemistry

1,310

1,070

22

1,030

1,070

-4

970

1,005

-3

Citizenship

180

185

-3

280

260

8

280.

265

6

English (inc drama)

2,520

2,100

20

2,640

2,415

9

2,710

2,535

7

Geography(1)

690

615

12

780

665

17

800

715

12

History

690

545

27

660

545

21

760

620

23

Mathematics

2,840

2,635

8

2,880

2,635

9

3,020

2,685

12

Modern Languages

1,430

1,490

-4

1,580

1,390

14

1,750

1,525

15

Music

420

390

8

690

570

21

770

635

21

Other(2)

350

210

67

540

260

108

520

295

76

Physical Education

1,120

890

26

1,560

1,180

32

1,620

1,380

17

Physics

860

925

-7

670

925

-28

570

900

-37

Religious Education

480

460

4

870

655

33

900

695

29

Technology(3)

2,040

1,880

9

2,980

2,560

16

3,130

2,770

13

Secondary(4,5)

16,680

14,555

15

19,970

16845

19

21,280

18120

17

Primary

19,910

19,730

1

18,380

18640

-1

18,220

18050

1

Total

36,590

34,285

7

38,370

35485

8

39,500

36170

9

(1) Geography includes Leisure and Tourism for consistency across the time-series. (2) Other includes Classics, Dance, Economics, Social Sciences, Psychology. (3) Technology includes Design and Technology, Information and Communications Technology (ICT), Business Studies, Graphics, Textiles and Food Technology. (4) Vocational subjects include Applied Art and Design; Applied ICT; Applied Science; Applied Business; Engineering; Manufacturing, Creative and Media, Health and Social Care and Society, Health and Personal Development. (5) Diplomas are a qualification for 14 to 19-year-olds. Diplomas can be studied at three levels and were available to students from September 2009. Note: Numbers are rounded to the nearest 10, so totals may not appear to be the sum of their parts. Source: TDA/TA ITT Trainee Numbers Census 2009/10 to 2011/12