Horses: France

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) how many horses were (a) imported from and (b) exported to France in each of the last five years; [148521]

(2) how many horses were imported in each of the last five years. [148522]

Mr Heath: Equidae (which includes horses, ponies, asses, mules, donkeys and zebras) moving between European Union member states have to be accompanied by a health certificate and movements are recorded on TRACES (a pan European database). However, the United Kingdom, Ireland and France apply a derogation from these requirements through the Tri-Partite Agreement. TRACES therefore does not record the total number of horse movements between the UK and France.

Horses imported from France

Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs record the number of horses imported from France in the last five years, based on VAT returns, as follows:

 Number

2012

223

2011

289

2010

288

2009

2,985

20 Mar 2013 : Column 700W

2008

198

Horses licensed for export to France

The Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) issues export licences for some horse movements to France, but not for thoroughbreds used for racing, breeding and training.

 HorsesPoniesTotals

2013(1)

336

38

374

2012

5,203

602

5,805

2011

4,843

660

5,506

2010

3,918

953

4,871

2009

4,290

1,003

5,293

(1) Issued up to 1 March. Note: Figures are not available for 2008.

The number of equidae imported from third (non EU) countries and EU countries in each of the past five years is as follows (source TRACES):

Imported from third (non-EU) countries destined for the UK
 Number

2012

2,019

2011

6,502

2010

2,013

2009

1,866

2008

2,871

Imported from EU member states (other than France and the Republic of Ireland)
 Number

2012

3,855

2011

3,483

2010

3,363

2009

3,152

2008

3,878

Annual Leave

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies qualify for privilege days; and what the total cost to the public purse was of the number of privilege days utilised each year by such officials. [147738]

Richard Benyon: From March 2013, staff in core DEFRA and its Executive Agencies will not qualify for privilege days. They will receive a day off for the Queen's birthday, in addition to annual leave. This follows a review of terms and conditions, as part of the Civil Service Reform plan, in order to deliver a modern employment offer for the civil service.

Staff in the Department's non-departmental public bodies shown in the following table receive 1.5 privilege days and a day off for the Queen's birthday. Headcount for these organisations is shown as appropriate in the table.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 701W

NDPBHeadcount

Gangmasters Licensing Authority (GLA)

68

Joint Nature Conservation Council (JNCC)

174

Marine Management Organisation (MMO

322

Natural England (NE)

2,333

Consumer Council for Water (CCW)

(1)72

(1) Not funded by taxpayer.

No official estimate has been made of the cost to the public purse of the privilege days detailed above.

Marine Conservation Zones

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much funding has been allocated in (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 for further evidence gathering within the 96 marine conservation zones not being taken forward for designation in 2013. [147657]

Richard Benyon: In 2013-14, DEFRA and the Statutory Nature Conservation Bodies expect to spend around £1.6 million on further evidence gathering surveys on the Marine Conservation Zones not proposed for designation in 2013. Detailed plans for further surveys on potential MCZs are under development. Future budgets have not yet been confirmed.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 702W

Mr Tom Harris: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs for what reasons the Government have not published the report, Contribution of marine protected areas to protecting highly mobile species, MB0114; and if he will publish the report for stakeholders to examine prior to the closure of his Department's consultation on proposals for the designation of marine conservation zones. [148317]

Richard Benyon: A copy of the draft report of the Marine Protected Areas and Mobile Species desk study (MB0114) is available on DEFRA's website:

http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Default.aspx?Menu= Menu&Module=More&Location=None&Completed= 0&ProjectID=18033

Slaughterhouses

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many and what proportion of animals, by species, that were slaughtered for human or other consumption were slaughtered according to (a) Halal slaughter doctrine, (b) Kosher slaughter doctrine and (c) otherwise were not stunned before slaughter in the last four years for which figures are available. [148913]

Mr Heath: The Food Standards Agency undertook a one week survey in approved slaughterhouses in September 2011. The survey indicated that the number of animals slaughtered by Halal and Kosher methods during the survey period were as follows:

 HalalKosher 
SpeciesNumberPercentageNumberPercentageTotal number of animals slaughtered in the week

Poultry and Rabbits

4,759,586

30

71,236

0.5

16,101,844

Cattle, Sheep and Goats

156,526

45

2,413

0.7

351,284

During the survey period, it was found that three per cent of cattle, 10% of sheep and goats and 4% of poultry were slaughtered without prior stunning. The survey also showed that over 80% of animals slaughtered as Halal were stunned before being slaughtered.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent representations he has received on the clear labelling of non-stun slaughtered animals. [148914]

Mr Heath: DEFRA consulted on measures to implement Council Regulation (EC) No 1099/2009 (on the protection of animals at the time of killing) during September and October 2012. Although outside the scope of the consultation, many consultees confirmed their support for the introduction of a method of slaughter labelling. We are currently considering the responses received and will be publishing a summary of the responses together with the Government's response to all the points made. Separately, DEFRA has received and continues to receive, a regular flow of correspondence on this issue from members of the public and others with an interest.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much and what proportion of meat consumed in each of the last four years for which figures are available was sold as (a) Halal, (b) Kosher and (c) other meat which was not stunned before slaughter. [148915]

Mr Heath: We do not keep records of the proportion of meat consumed according to method of slaughter applied.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will discuss with (a) abattoirs, (b) the meat trade, (c) the retail sector, (d) the veterinary sector, (e) consumers and (f) religious groups the clear labelling of non-stunned before slaughter meat products. [148916]

Mr Heath: I discussed method of slaughter labelling with representatives of the British Veterinary Association at a meeting on 7 March 2013. Labelling was also one of the topics raised during a meeting between DEFRA, Food Standards Agency and the Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG) officials and representatives of the Jewish and Muslim Communities which took place on 14 March 2013. DEFRA officials also attended a meeting with the Sikh Council UK on 27 February 2013 which was hosted by DCLG, and which discussed method of slaughter labelling issues.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 703W

I have no specific plans at this time for further meetings to discuss this issue with any of the other groups mentioned in this question. However, I do maintain regular contact with them and this will provide an opportunity for further discussion of this topic if appropriate.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will undertake a review of the estimate of non-stun before slaughter practice in abattoirs. [148917]

Mr Heath: I have no plans to undertake a review of the estimate of non-stun before slaughter practices in abattoirs. However, I understand the Food Standards Agency Board has agreed to repeat the survey of approved slaughterhouses which was undertaken in September 2011. It is anticipated this will take place in September 2013. This will provide further information on the extent of non-stun slaughter practices.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he has made an estimate of the (a) amount and (b) proportion of meat sold in the UK from animals which has not been stunned before slaughter, but which has not been labelled clearly as such. [148918]

Mr Heath: There is currently no legal requirement in European Union or national law to indicate method of slaughter on meat labels. However, where meat is labelled voluntarily to show method of slaughter, this must be accurate and must not mislead the consumer. We have no information to show the proportion of meat sold in the United Kingdom from animals which have not been stunned before slaughter.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he has plans to review the regulation of labelling of meat products in respect of the animal welfare standards employed during slaughter. [148919]

Mr Heath: The Government supported the compromise agreement reached in the context of proposals for the European Union Food Information for Consumers Regulation 1169/2011, that method of slaughter labelling should be considered by the EU Commission in a welfare context. The Government will be working with the Commission to ensure all measures that help minimise the suffering of animals slaughtered without stunning are considered.

Nanotechnology

Mr Brady: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will make representations to the International Standards Organisation's Nanotechnologies Committee to report on an early day; and if he will ask the group to consider whether a common standard for particle size in regulating (a) nanotechnologies and (b) air pollution would be appropriate. [146001]

Richard Benyon: We have no plans to approach the International Standards Organisation's Nanotechnologies

20 Mar 2013 : Column 704W

Committee on the issue of applying a common particle size for regulatory purposes. This is because a number of studies have concluded that while the categorisation ‘nanomaterial’ relates to the particle size, the behaviour and effects of nanomaterials are determined by a range of properties. The European Commission has adopted a Recommendation on the Definition of a Nanomaterial (2011/696/EU), which is being applied in EU legislation where appropriate and will be reviewed and adapted in future as necessary. Particle size is already defined in the Ambient Air Quality Directive and associated guidance for the purposes of air pollution control, for particulate matter less than 10 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) and particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5).

Natural Resources

Barry Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what work his Department is currently undertaking on resource depletion and its implications for UK growth. [147727]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA recognises that business success and UK growth depend on the efficient use of resources, and ensuring that companies address and manage any potential risks around 'depletion' or supply interruption.

The Government's Resource Security Action Plan, published by DEFRA and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills in March 2012, set out the Government's position on the security of supply of materials, particularly metals and minerals. The action plan outlined the need for a partnership approach between business and the Government to manage the implications for the UK. It sets out actions by the Government and business to make the most of valuable resources, save money and address resource risks. It highlights the potential of improved resource efficiency, re-use, re-manufacturing and recycling to both address resource risks and contribute to a sustainable growing economy. Work is in progress to follow up the actions.

Overtime Payments

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the (a) average cost per member of staff and (b) total cost was of overtime payments in (i) his Department and (ii) each of its arm's length bodies in (A) 2010-11, (B) 2011-12 and (C) 2012-13 to date. [141478]

Richard Benyon: The amounts spent by core DEFRA and its arm's length bodies on overtime are set out in the table. The average has been calculated using the total number of staff, as reported in each organisation's Annual Report and Accounts for 2010-11 and 2011-12, divided by total spend on overtime. Therefore calculations reflect the average cost of overtime for all staff in each body, even though not all staff were paid overtime.

It is not possible to provide a similar average for 2012-13 as staff numbers for the year have not yet been published.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 705W

20 Mar 2013 : Column 706W

£
 2010-112011-122012-13(1)
 Average overtime cost per member of staffTotal cost of overtime paymentsAverage overtime cost per member of staffTotal cost of overtime paymentsTotal cost of overtime payments

Core DEFRA

144

358,186

154

348,453

306,884

      

Executive Agencies

     

Rural Payments Agency

139

356,533

414

999,201

411,720

Veterinary Medicines Directorate

176

26,600

150

23,334

34,305

Animal Heath and Veterinary Laboratory Agency

308

834,167

434

1,110,058

810,307

Food and Environment Research Agency

44

37,636

46

39,192

260,589

Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science

599

325,000

693

354,000

276,000

      

NDPBs

     

Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

421

313,465

434

309,751

236,000

Natural England

212

581,000

168

385,700

399,900

Marine Management Organisation

760

190,108

1583

400,453

223,677

Environment Agency

469

5,463,675

478

5,186,672

7,113,813

Joint Nature Conservation Committee

157

21,664

21

2,861

28,537

Consumer Council for Water

14

1,054

7

461

15

Gang masters Licensing Authority

4

297

5

314

n/a

Agriculture arid Horticulture Development Board

22

6,658

30

9,659

10,529

National Forest Company

455

8,833

578

9,125

8,640

(1) To 31 December 2012. n/a = Not available.

Plants

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much his Department spent on indoor and outdoor plants and trees in each year from 2005 to 2010. [147164]

Richard Benyon: The amount spent by core DEFRA on indoor and outdoor plants and trees in each financial year from 2005-06 to 2008-09 is shown in the following table. Costs for 2009-10 are not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Financial yearExpenditure (£)

2005-06

32,952

2006-07

40,457

2007-08

41,686

2008-09

36,481

Procurement

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs into which contracts of a value above £50 his Department has entered for the supply of food and drink primarily produced in Cumbria in the last 12 months. [147619]

Richard Benyon: Core DEFRA has not entered into any contract of above £50 for the supply of food and drink primarily produced in Cumbria in the last 12 months.

School Milk

Gordon Henderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Washington and Sunderland West of 7 March 2013, Official Report, column 1169W, on school milk, whether the Government plans to submit a response to the consultation; and if he will publish any such response. [147908]

Mr Heath: The Government will respond to the European Commission's consultation and we anticipate that the European Commission will publish all responses.

The timing of the consultation is unusual since it seeks opinions which might change future EU school milk and fruit schemes, when all member states are still negotiating the latest EU school programmes within wider CAP/SCMO 2013-2020 negotiations.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 707W

Sheep Worrying

Mr Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he will review the penalties available to a court for an offence of worrying sheep pursuant to section 1(1) of the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953; and if he will bring forward proposals to increase those penalties. [148648]

Mr Heath: There is no proposal to review the maximum penalty for the offence under section 1(1) of the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953, which currently stands at level 3 on the standard scale of fines (£1,000).

Whales: Japan

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what representations his Department has made to the Japanese Government to end whale slaughter. [148925]

Richard Benyon: I attended last year's International Whaling Commission meeting in July (IWC64) where I made clear to Japan the strength of feeling in this country about the killing of all cetaceans, and of the UK Government's support for the moratorium on commercial whaling.

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, my right hon. Friend the Member for East Devon (Mr Swire), raised UK concerns in relation to Japanese whaling on a visit to Japan in January. British officials also regularly meet with Japanese officials both in London and Tokyo to express opposition to Japan's so-called 'scientific' whaling.

Energy and Climate Change

Drax Power Station

Barry Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions he has had with his ministerial colleagues about the £75 million debt guarantee for the Drax coal to biomass conversion project. [149014]

Mr Hayes: DECC Ministers meet regularly with other Ministers to discuss a range of issues. As has been the case with successive Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer, my right hon. Friend the Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne), announced the UK Guarantee scheme in July 2012. Infrastructure UK within HM Treasury is charged with providing a stronger focus on the UK's long-term infrastructure priorities. Further details of the UK Guarantee scheme can be found at

www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/iuk_uk_guarantees.htm

Energy Company Obligation

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the potential effects on consumer energy bills if the costs of delivering the Energy Company Obligation prove to be higher than those forecast in his Department's impact assessment. [148878]

20 Mar 2013 : Column 708W

Gregory Barker: In the final Green Deal and ECO impact assessment, we estimated a total cost to energy companies of delivering ECO at around £1.3 billion a year on average. This is broadly comparable to the estimated costs of the previous schemes, CERT and CESP, and on this basis we have estimated there should be no significant change to pass-through costs to consumers—though whether and how costs are passed through to consumers is a question for individual energy companies. The IA also set out a number of sensitivities, including low and high demand scenarios, but £1.3 billion was the central, best estimate.

Under ECO, we have new powers to collect data on the actual costs of delivery, the costs of administering the scheme and the costs passed through to consumers.

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he will take to review the costs of delivering the Energy Company Obligation if the costs prove to be higher than those forecast in his Department's impact assessment; and if he will make a statement. [148879]

Gregory Barker: Under ECO, we have new powers to collect data on the actual costs of delivery, the costs of administering the scheme and the costs passed through to consumers. The Department will be closely monitoring all available data, and will welcome robust information from any party who is able to provide it.

Wind Power

Mr Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment his Department has made of the safety of wind turbines and the effects of their proximity to dwellings. [147629]

Gregory Barker: Wind generators, in the same way as all other industries, are covered by the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HSWA) which requires them as duty holders to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety of their employees and any members of the public who may be affected by their activities.

Duty-holders are responsible for assessing and controlling the risks from their undertaking—and it is for the sector to prepare industry standards. For example RenewablesUK have published wind turbine safety rules and guidance, details of which can be seen at

http://www.renewableuk.com/

There are also well established British and European Standards covering product safety.

In the UK, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) performs appropriate regulatory checks on the operation and maintenance of wind turbines and also commissions research as needed.

Mr Bellingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will list the sites of (a) established and (b) proposed (i) on-shore and (ii) off-shore wind farms; and what the generation capacity is of each. [148790]

Gregory Barker: There are currently 44 offshore wind farms either operational, under construction, awaiting construction or awaiting a planning decision.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 709W

For onshore wind there are currently 1,685 wind farms either operational, under construction, awaiting construction or awaiting a planning decision.

Details of all these wind farms including generating capacity, along with all other renewable developments, are in the public domain and can be found on the Department’s Renewable Energy Planning Database (REPD):

https://restats.decc.gov.uk/app/reporting/decc/monthlyextract

Health

Cancer

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what evaluation his Department (a) has made and (b) plans to make on patient satisfaction with the Cancer Care Review Process; [148996]

(2) what evaluation his Department (a) has made and (b) plans to make on what GPs have included as part of their Cancer Care Reviews; [148997]

(3) what proportion of those eligible did not receive a Cancer Care Review within six months of receiving confirmation of their diagnosis in the latest period for which figures are available. [148998]

Anna Soubry: Cancer reviews are carried out under the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), which is a voluntary part of the general practitioners (GPs) contract. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is responsible for keeping QOF indicators under review and making recommendations for changes.

In June 2012 NICE's independent QOF Advisory Committee reviewed the cancer review indicator. As a result, NICE published a recommendation in August 2012 that reviews should be carried out within three months of the practice receiving confirmation of a cancer diagnosis, rather than the current six months. This recommendation has been incorporated into the GP contract for 2013-14. Guidance, also developed by NICE, advises that as part of the review patients' health and support needs are considered, along with the co-ordination of care between sectors. The revised guidance for 2013-14 also refers to a template developed by Macmillan Cancer Support in collaboration with the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative to support GP practices in carrying out the review.

QOF data for England for 2011-12 (the most recent available) show 8.1% of eligible patients did not receive a review within the six month period.

More generally, the latest GP Patient Survey (2012) shows that 92% of patients reported as having cancer in the last five years rated their overall experience of their GP surgery as good compared to the general population rating of 88%.

Deep-vein Thrombosis

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department holds on the geographical variation in the prescribing of rivaroxaban for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and prevention of recurrent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. [148535]

20 Mar 2013 : Column 710W

Norman Lamb: Further to my reply of 12 March 2013, Official Report, columns 178-9W, giving a breakdown of primary care prescribing of rivaroxaban, a breakdown of the use of rivaroxaban in secondary care by strategic health authority is shown in the table.

Prescribing data do not include the indication for which the medicine has been given. It is therefore not possible to separate out prescribing for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and prevention of recurrent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism from other uses such as prevention of stroke arid systemic embolism.

Strategic health authority2011-12 cost (£)Cost per head of population (pence per head)

East Midlands

206,921

4.6

East of England

263,689

4.5

London

237,896

3.0

North East

25,125

1.0

North West

454,595

6.6

South Central

243,895

5.9

South East Coast

434,387

9.9

South West

271,018

5.1

West Midlands

184,165

3.4

Yorkshire and Humber

613,118

11.6

England

2,934,809

5.6

Source: Hospital Pharmacy Audit Index provided by the Health and Social Care Information Centre

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he has received reports of NHS trusts ceasing to prescribe rivaroxaban in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and prevention of recurrent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. [148536]

Norman Lamb: We are not aware of any such reports. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has published technology appraisal guidance recommending rivaroxaban as an option for treating deep vein thrombosis and preventing recurrent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after a diagnosis of acute deep vein thrombosis in adults. National health service organisations are legally obliged to fund drugs and treatments recommended in NICE technology appraisal guidance. Decisions on the prescribing of medicines are a matter for clinicians in discussion with their patients.

Epilepsy

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what resources he plans to make available to support the diagnosis and care of people suffering from Dravet syndrome; [148766]

(2) what recent assessment he has made of the suitability of the support available to the families of children suffering from Dravet syndrome through (a) the NHS and (b) other sources. [148767]

Norman Lamb: We have not assessed the suitability of the support available for those affected by Dravet syndrome.

From April 2013, specialised neuroscience services for children and young people and adult specialised neuroscience services will be commissioned by the NHS

20 Mar 2013 : Column 711W

Commissioning Board's (NHS CB) specialised commissioning teams. The provision of non-specialised health services for people with Dravet syndrome is a matter for the local national health service.

Local authorities are responsible for providing or arranging social care services for their populations and will provide or arrange such care based on need rather than on an individual having a particular diagnosis or condition.

In the Government's mandate to the NHS CB, we set an objective to ensure that whether NHS care is commissioned nationally by the Board, or locally by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) the results should be measured and published against the relevant areas in the NHS Outcomes Framework.

The mandate also includes a number of specific objectives relating to the support of people with long-term conditions such as Dravet syndrome. It emphasises the Government's ambition to provide people with a personalised care plan, should they want one, and experience better integrated, more co-ordinated care based on individual needs and preferences.

From April 2013, CCGs must co-operate with local authorities in the assessment of the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and disability (SEND), as part of their joint strategic needs assessments, and the agreement of a joint health and wellbeing strategy. In the Mandate, the NHS CB has been set a further objective to ensure that children and young people with SEND have access to the services in their agreed care plan, and that parents of children who could benefit have the option of a personal budget based on a single assessment across health, social care and education.

The forthcoming Children and Families Bill will introduce a duty on local authorities and CCGs to commission services jointly, to meet the needs of young people with SEND. The Bill will introduce a streamlined, single assessment involving professionals and commissioners and will identify education, health and care needs for the child or young person with SEND and inform an individual Education, Health and Care Plan focusing on outcomes and the integrated services to deliver them.

Family Nurse Partnership Programme

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 6 March 2013, Official Report, column 1059W, on Family Nurse Partnership Programme, how many first-time mothers under the age of (a) 16, (b) 18 and (c) 20 years old there were in the UK in the latest period for which figures are available. [148922]

Dr Poulter: The table provided lists the number of first-time mothers under 16, under 18 and under 20 in 2011-12. Figures are cumulative, i.e. first time mothers under 16 are also counted in the under 18 and under 20 figures.

These data are calculated using English Hospital Episode Statistics and as such relate to hospital births in England only.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 712W

 Number of previous pregnancies
Age of motherNoneOne or moreUnknown

Under 16

575

52

229

Under 18

5,688

1,007

2,241

Under 20

18,638

6,461

8,522

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 6 March 2013, Official Report, column 1059W, on Family Nurse Partnership Programme, how many (a) places and (b) applications to the programme there have been to date, by local authority. [148923]

Dr Poulter: Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is a voluntary programme targeted at first time mothers aged 20 and under.

The following table shows the number of FNP places in England by upper tier local authority as of 1 March 2013. FNP is currently delivered in 91 upper tier local authority areas. The Government are committed to expanding the number of places on the FNP programme to 13,000 by 2015. This expansion will focus on bringing FNP to those areas currently without FNP, especially those that are most disadvantaged, as well as expansion in existing areas with the highest levels of deprivation.

Young mothers are referred to the programme from a range of sources including self-referral, maternity services, general practitioners and other professionals. The number of individual referrals to FNP providers from all of these sources is not held centrally. Approximately 80% of mothers who were offered a place on the programme accepted it.

 FNP places

Barking and Dagenham

100

Barnet

100

Barnsley

150

Bath and North East Somerset

100

Birmingham

425

Blackpool

100

Bolton

100

Bracknell Forest

50

Bradford

200

Brighton and Hove

100

Buckinghamshire

100

Calderdale

100

Cambridgeshire

125

Cheshire East

150

Cheshire West and Chester

100

Cornwall

200

County Durham

200

Coventry

175

Croydon

100

Cumbria

150

Darlington

100

Derby

200

Derbyshire

200

Doncaster

100

Dudley

150

Ealing

100

East Riding of Yorkshire

50

East Sussex

300

20 Mar 2013 : Column 713W

Essex

50

Gateshead

100

Hammersmith and Fulham

75

Haringey

100

Hartlepool

50

Hertfordshire

100

Hounslow

100

Kingston upon Hull

175

Islington

100

Kensington and Chelsea

25

Kent

200

Kirklees

175

Knowsley

125

Lambeth

125

Leeds

225

Leicester

150

Lewisham

100

Liverpool

150

Manchester

250

Medway

125

Middlesbrough

50

Milton Keynes

100

Norfolk

225

North East Lincolnshire

50

North Lincolnshire

50

North Yorkshire

50

Northamptonshire

175

Nottingham

225

Nottinghamshire

200

Oxfordshire

200

Peterborough

100

Plymouth

125

Portsmouth

200

Reading

75

Redcar and Cleveland

50

Rotherham

100

Sandwell

150

Sheffield

150

Slough

50

Solihull

50

South Tyneside

100

Southampton

125

Southend-on-Sea

100

Southwark

150

Staffordshire

225

Stockton-on-Tees

50

Stoke-on-Trent

125

Suffolk

75

Sunderland

150

Swindon

125

Telford and Wrekin

100

Tower Hamlets

150

Wakefield

200

Walsall

150

Waltham Forest

100

Warwickshire

175

West Berkshire

25

West Sussex

100

Westminster

25

Wigan

100

Windsor and Maidenhead

50

20 Mar 2013 : Column 714W

Wirral

150

Wokingham

25

Total

11,475

Haemolytic Uremic Syndrome

Mr Virendra Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of future costs of the decision by his Department to refer to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence the evaluation of cost, benefit and affordability for eculizumab in the treatment of atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. [148642]

Norman Lamb: We have made no such estimate. The cost of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence's (NICE) evaluation of eculizumab for the treatment of atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome will be met from the resources agreed for NICE's overall work programme.

Mr Virendra Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will place in the Library the Advisory Group for National Specialised Services' recommendation for eculizumab in the treatment of atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. [148703]

Norman Lamb: The Advisory Group for National Specialised Services' full advice to Ministers on this issue is confidential.

Mr Virendra Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will consider meeting the manufacturers of eculizumab for the treatment of atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome; and if he will make a statement. [148704]

Norman Lamb: Departmental officials last met with Alexion, the manufacturer of eculizumab, on 31 January 2013. Ministers currently have no plans to meet with the company.

Mr Virendra Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what representations he has received from the NHS Commissioning Board on the Advisory Group for National Specialised Services' decision to recommend eculizumab in the treatment of atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. [148708]

Norman Lamb: We have received no such representations. The Department sought views from the NHS Commissioning Board to inform the advice provided to Ministers on the Advisory Group for National Specialised Services' recommendations.

Human Papillomavirus

Mr Blunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) for what reason parents of children about to receive the HPV vaccination are not given a copy of the relevant patient information leaflet prior to signing a consent form for vaccination; [148749]

20 Mar 2013 : Column 715W

(2) if he will make it his policy that parents should be given the option of providing consent for each HPV vaccination in the course of the three treatments. [148750]

Anna Soubry: Consent must be obtained before starting any medical treatment or physical investigation or before providing personal care for a patient. This includes the administration of vaccines.

When seeking consent, it is important that the individual concerned is given sufficient information to enable them to make an informed decision and ensure consent is valid. In schools, information leaflets about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination should be available for the child's own use and to share with parents prior to the date on which the immunisation is scheduled. The model consent form for HPV vaccine makes this clear. Responsibility for providing this information locally rests with the local national health service organisation and immunisation provider involved.

The model HPV form provides for consent to be given for all three doses of HPV vaccine. However, this is only an agreement for the child to be included in the immunisation programme and consent should be sought on the occasion of each immunisation visit. This consent may be given in writing, orally or by co-operation.

Full guidance on issues around consent for immunisation is contained in the Department's publication, ‘Immunisation against Infectious disease’, also known as the ‘Green Book'. A copy has been placed in the Library, along with copies of the Department's information leaflets on HPV vaccine.

Maternity Services: Northamptonshire

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has for investment in maternity services in (a) Corby town and (b) East Northamptonshire. [148876]

Dr Poulter: Primary care trusts are responsible for commissioning local health services, including maternity services, on behalf of their communities. From 1 April 2013, this responsibility will move to clinical commissioning groups.

Prostate Cancer

Clive Efford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many men were diagnosed with prostatitis or benign prostatic hyperplasia in each primary care trust in England in each of the last five years. [149000]

Anna Soubry: The Department does not hold information about the number of men diagnosed with prostatitis or benign prostatic hyperplasia centrally.

With regard to benign prostatic hyperplasia, in 2002, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence published ‘Improving Outcomes in Urological Cancers’ which set out best practice for the NHS for the diagnosis, care and treatment of patients with urological cancers.

The guidance estimates that benign prostatic hyperplasia is least four times as common as prostate cancer.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 716W

Sickle Cell Diseases

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure (a) that people with sickle cell disease benefit from integrated services under his planned health care reforms and (b) a smooth transition between the specialised sickle cell disease services commissioned by the NHS Commissioning Board and those services commissioned by clinical commissioning groups. [148760]

Norman Lamb: From April 2013 the NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) will be responsible for commissioning specialist haemoglobinopathy services, which includes sickle cell.

The NHS CB is in the process of finalising its 2013-14 service specifications and commissioning policies for these services and they are expected to be published very shortly.

Strokes: Children

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to reduce variations in the provision of transcranial doppler scanning for assessing stroke risk in children with sickle cell disease and to ensure such children at risk are rapidly identified and receive appropriate treatment. [148551]

Anna Soubry: From April 2013 the NHS Commissioning Board will be responsible for commissioning specialised haemoglobinopathy services on a national basis. This includes the requirement for specialist centres to provide transcranial Doppler scanning services for children with sickle cell disease to help identify those at high risk of stroke.

Suicide

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the suicide rates were for (a) those in full-time employment and (b) those who were long-term unemployed in each of the last 30 years; [148421]

(2) what the rate of suicide was in each region in each year for which figures are available; and how many suicides occurred in each such region in each such year. [148498]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated March 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent questions asking:

1. What the suicide rates were for (a) those in full-time employment and (b) those who were long-term unemployed in each of the last 30 years. [148421]

2. What the rate of suicide was in each region in each year for which figures are available; and how many suicides occurred in each such region in each such year. [148498]

It is not possible to provide suicide rates for (a) those in full-time employment or (b) those who were long-term unemployed. Whether a person was in full-time or part-time employment is not collected at death registration or routinely recorded by coroners. Although a person can be recorded as ‘unemployed’, the period of time for which they were unemployed is not registered.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 717W

ONS' suicide statistics are based on registrations, not occurrences. Figures for suicide registrations (numbers and rates) in the United Kingdom, England and Wales, and regions of England, by age and sex, are published annually on the ONS website. These figures, available from 1981 on, are based on deaths registered in each calendar year:

20 Mar 2013 : Column 718W

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html?definition=tcm%3A77-29400

We are unable to provide 30 years of suicide rates by region by year of occurrence due to disproportionate cost.

Number of deaths where suicide was the underlying cause, by region, in England, for deaths that occurred between 1981 and 2011(1,2,3,4,5)
 North EastNorth WestYorkshire and the HumberEast MidlandsWest MidlandsEast of EnglandLondonSouth EastSouth West

1981

320

844

532

358

508

512

985

820

555

1982

311

843

592

361

509

508

885

798

490

1983

266

773

557

371

529

495

885

811

500

1984

244

773

553

443

516

497

836

843

569

1985

287

829

664

412

552

582

848

887

550

1986

305

858

596

377

509

546

809

798

557

1987

259

824

595

408

509

533

825

769

570

1988

311

807

595

441

560

585

837

850

550

1989

261

704

527

423

530

523

784

780

502

1990

238

792

520

416

532

556

757

820

589

1991

271

818

533

418

485

552

721

835

531

1992

258

756

556

391

530

493

735

851

539

1993

275

722

510

415

546

475

717

769

472

1994

266

727

498

391

467

468

701

768

486

1995

276

735

527

388

494

487

685

743

517

1996

252

746

450

391

433

453

657

756

495

1997

286

747

548

364

462

433

693

742

468

1998

275

831

500

381

488

478

743

758

480

1999

307

768

521

428

565

438

715

738

523

2000

277

730

458

405

519

446

643

778

511

2001

236

675

475

406

513

458

625

709

471

2002

272

657

458

347

482

466

673

762

485

2003

260

686

440

389

443

470

668

748

500

2004

283

659

490

387

447

507

607

739

493

2005

207

674

431

393

445

468

640

668

472

2006

231

646

399

376

392

396

599

642

482

2007

252

636

440

348

411

468

580

624

413

2008

227

689

459

364

484

471

575

746

511

2009

250

637

396

340

434

445

547

684

500

2010

222

595

417

308

442

424

555

669

486

2011

132

349

233

215

224

256

305

401

206

(1) Suicide was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes X60-X84 (intentional self-harm) and Y10-Y34 (injury or poisoning of undetermined intent) for deaths registered from 2001 onwards (excluding Y33.9 where the coroner's verdict was pending for the years 2001 to 2006. From 2007, death registrations which were previously coded to Y33.9 are coded to U50.9.) For the years 1981 to 2000, suicide was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes E950-E959 (intentional self-harm) and codes E980-E989 (injury or poisoning of undetermined intent), excluding code E988.8 where the coroner's verdict was pending. Deaths were included where one of these codes was the underlying cause of death. (2) Figures are for persons aged 15 and over. (3) Based on boundaries as of February 2013. (4) Figures exclude deaths of non-residents. (5) Figures are based on deaths occurring, rather than deaths registered between 1981 and 2011. Figures for 2010 and 2011 are an underestimate as not all suicides that occurred in those years will have been registered. Further information on registration delays for a range of causes can be found on the ONS website: www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/user-guidance/health-and-life-events/impact-of-registration-delays-on-mortality-statistics/index.html Source: Office for National Statistics

Education

Academies: Homophobia

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what responsibilities are retained by local authorities for ensuring that academy schools comply with the provisions of the Equalities Act 2010 and the public sector equality duty in relation to homophobia. [146184]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 5 March 2013]: The Equality Act 2010 does not place any duties on local authorities to ensure that schools comply with their responsibilities under the Equality Act 2010. There is, therefore, no role for local authorities to ensure compliance for academies. Under the Equality Act, local authorities have a duty not to discriminate when carrying out their own education functions—such as organisation of schools and arranging admissions. The Equality Act clearly sets out the responsibilities on schools and academies in

20 Mar 2013 : Column 719W

respect of the discrimination provisions and the equality duties, and they are responsible for ensuring their own compliance.

Childbirth

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will commission research into the effects of premature birth on a child's long-term learning and development. [146163]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 4 March 2013]: The Department for Education does not currently have any plans to commission research into the effects of premature birth on a child's long-term learning and development. There is already a wealth of well documented research in this area, for example, the EPICure studies of the survival and later health among babies and young people who were born at extremely low gestations.

Child Poverty

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he will publish an analysis of the consultation responses received on Measuring Child Poverty: a consultation on better measures of child poverty published in November 2012. [147327]

Mr Laws: The consultation closed on 15 February and we are now working our way through the responses. The Government will respond in the summer, detailing the consultation results and setting out next steps.

Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Children Review

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what progress he has made on implementation of the Bailey Review's recommendations; and if he will make a statement. [147016]

Mr Timpson: Good progress has been made on implementing the recommendations made by Reg Bailey in the report of his review of the commercialisation and sexualisation of childhood, Letting Children be Children. The recommendations were directed mainly at businesses and regulators.

Members of the British Retail Consortium (BRC) developed a code of practice on retailing age-appropriate clothes for children, which was published in June 2011. The code is used by companies to inform their decisions about the children's clothes they put on sale so that they can avoid styles and designs that might imply the wearer is more sexually mature than their age suggests.

In September 2011, Ofcom issued guidelines to broadcasters on compliance with the 9 pm watershed on television, which for the first time included a specific focus on programmes which start before and end after the watershed. The guidelines help address concerns that programmes designed to draw mass audiences before the watershed should be family-friendly.

The four main fixed-line internet services providers (ISPs) published a code of practice in October 2011 promising that all new customers would be offered parental controls on home internet services by October 2012. Each of these ISPs has delivered on that promise. Through the UK Council for Child Internet Safety, the

20 Mar 2013 : Column 720W

Government is working with ISPs to go further and put in place systems that will actively encourage all customers to switch on parental controls if children are in the household and will be using the internet. We are also asking ISPs to put in place checks to ensure that the person setting up the parental controls is over the age of 18.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) issued a warning statement to advertisers in October 2011 setting out its intention to apply the rules on the use of sexual images in on-street advertising more stringently. In April 2012 the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) published further guidance based on the initial adjudications made by the ASA following its warning statement. As a result, some advertisements which would previously have been allowed have been banned because of their use of overly-sexualised images.

A number of well-known brands have pledged not to use children under the age of 16 in peer-to-peer marketing or as brand ambassadors. The CAP reviewed the practice of employing children for the use of these techniques, concluded that new, stricter guidelines were needed, and published new guidelines in February 2013.

The UK media regulators set up a single website, ParentPort, to make it easier for parents to complain about any advertisement, television or radio programme, television on demand service or videogame they think is inappropriate for their children to see. The Prime Minister launched ParentPort in October 2011. ParentPort also provides parents with tips to help children use of technology safely and other useful information on a wide range of media, consumer and technology issues.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport consulted in 2012 on whether changes should be made in relation to exemptions for music, sport, religious and educational videos from statutory age-classification otherwise required by the Video Recordings Act 1984. The consultation proposed that the threshold for exemption required by the Act should be lowered so that these genres should in future be age-rated and that only material likely to be suitable for younger children will remain exempt. The Government's response to the consultation will be published shortly.

We expect to publish a full report on progress towards the implementation of all the recommendations in Letting Children be Children shortly, and to say what further action we would like to see to tackle the excessive commercialisation and premature sexualisation of childhood.

Curriculum

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if the draft national curriculum documents will be set out according to key stage as well as subject areas to make them easier for schools to download and print. [146069]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 4 March 2013]: On 7 February, we published our proposals for the reform of the national curriculum for public consultation. The consultation will run until 16 April and we hope as many people as possible will respond. For the purposes of the consultation, the draft national curriculum documents are set out according to subject area only. There are currently no plans to publish the draft documents by key stage but we will of course keep the matter under review.

20 Mar 2013 : Column 721W

As part of the consultation process we will seek the views of schools and teachers on how best to present the final national curriculum documents when they are published later this year.

Education: Young Offender Institutions

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which organisations provide education in each young offender institution. [146171]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 4 March 2013]: The following table lists young offender institutions for those young people aged under 18 and also for those who are aged 18 and over, and their Offender Learning and Skills Service (OLASS) providers.

The table lists young offender institutions in England only. The list also excludes private young offender institutions where the operator is responsible for providing education under their contract with the National Offender Management Service.

EstablishmentOLASS provider

Under 18s

 

HMYOI Cookham Wood

CfBT

HMP/YOI Downview (Josephine Butler Unit)

CfBT

HMP/YOI Eastwood Park (Mary Carpenter Unit)

Norton Radstock College

HMP/YOI Feltham

CfBT

HMYOI Hindley

The Manchester College

HMP/YOI New Hall (Rivendell Unit)

The Manchester College

HMYOI Warren Hill

A4E Ltd

HMYOI Wetherby

The Manchester College

HMYOI Werrington

The Manchester College

  

Over 18s

 

HMP Lancaster Farms

The Manchester College

HMP Stoke Heath

The Manchester College

HMP Thorn Cross

The Manchester College

HMP Aylesbury

Milton Keynes College

HMP Reading

Milton Keynes College

HMP Portland

Weston College

HMPYOI Brinsford

Milton Keynes College

HMPYOI Swinfen

Milton Keynes College

HMPYOI Northallerton

The Manchester College

HMP/YOI Hatfield

The Manchester College

HMP/YOI Moorland

The Manchester College

HMP/YOI Doncaster

The Manchester College

HMP/YOI New Hall

The Manchester College

HMP/YOI Askham Grange

The Manchester College

HMPYOI Glen Parva

Milton Keynes College

HMP Deerbolt

The Manchester College

HMP/YOI ISIS

A4E Ltd

HMPYOI Feltham

A4E Ltd

HMP Rochester

The Manchester College

Free School Meals

Mr Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to ensure that all children in poverty receive free school meals; and what consultation he is planning on changes to the criteria for entitlement to free school meals. [147517]

20 Mar 2013 : Column 722W

Mr Laws: The Government recognise the benefits of healthy school meals and are committed to continuing to provide free school meals to those pupils who need them most. Our priority is to make sure that the most disadvantaged children are able to get a nutritious meal at school. The move to universal credit means that we need to introduce new criteria for free school meals, but these will not reduce the number of children eligible for free school meals.

We will allow good time to enable schools, local authorities and children's charities to comment on our proposals before we introduce new eligibility criteria.

Free Schools: North West

Eric Ollerenshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many applications for free schools have been made in (a) the North West of England and (b) Lancaster and Fleetwood constituency to date; and how many such applications (i) have been accepted, (ii) have been rejected and (iii) are still under consideration. [147523]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department has received the following numbers of applications to open a free school in the north-west region and in the Lancaster and Fleetwood constituency:

Numbers of free school applications
 ReceivedAcceptedRejectedUnder consideration

North-west

120

20

68

32

Lancaster and Fleetwood

2

0

1

1

The north-west region consists of the 39 local government districts in north-west England and includes 15 metropolitan districts in Greater Manchester and Merseyside, 18 non-metropolitan districts within Cumbria and Lancashire, and six non-metropolitan districts that are unitary authorities.

National Curriculum Tests

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the timetable is for the planned consultation on Key Stage 2 assessment. [146068]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 4 March 2013]: We will shortly publish a consultation on assessment and accountability arrangements for primary schools under the new national curriculum.

We will confirm the arrangements for assessment and accountability in September, alongside publication of the final national curriculum programmes of study.

Priority School Building Programme

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has made representations to the European Investment Bank for funding for the Priority Schools Building programme. [147241]

Mr Laws [holding answer 13 March 2013]: We continue to work closely with HM Treasury in the development of a financing solution for the privately financed schools

20 Mar 2013 : Column 723W

within the Priority School Building Programme and we expect this solution to be available for the first batches that we will deliver.

As a part of this development work, the Education Funding Agency is speaking with interested parties in the funding market, including the European Investment Bank, about possible participation in that funding solution.

Pupil Exclusions

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he plans to mandate schools to publish the full details of the number of pupils suspended, excluded or transferred to pupil referral units on a fixed and permanent basis. [146827]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department has no plans to mandate schools to publish the full details of the number of pupils receiving fixed-period exclusions, permanent exclusions, or being educated off site in pupil referral units.

Good behaviour in schools is essential to ensure that teachers can teach and pupils can benefit from the opportunities provided by education. Head teachers must have the option of excluding pupils when warranted, but all exclusions must be legal, reasonable and fair.

Schools: Finance

Steve Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he expects to make an announcement on basic needs funding; for what reasons this announcement has not yet been made; and if he will make a statement. [146000]

Mr Laws [holding answer 5 March 2013]:A two year allocation of basic need, the 2013-14 maintenance allocation and the launch of the Targeted Basic Need Programme were announced on 1 March. The details are available here:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/schoolscapital/a00222248/targeted-basic-need-programme

Special Educational Needs

Sir Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to ensure that child and adolescent mental health is included in professional competency frameworks for school staff. [146027]

Mr Timpson: The revised teachers' standards came into effect from September 2012. These require teachers to have a secure understanding of how a range of factors can inhibit pupils' ability to learn and how best to overcome these, including difficulties with mental health. Teachers must be aware of all special educational needs and take account of the social development of children and young people. They require all teachers to communicate effectively with parents regarding the pupils' well-being.

The national occupational standards for staff supporting teaching and learning in schools include a range of standards around the pastoral and welfare needs of pupils. These include, but are not limited to, supporting therapy sessions, prompting resilience and positive

20 Mar 2013 : Column 724W

relationships, and working in ways that support pupil well-being and prevent the development of challenging behaviours.

Teachers: Training

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many people in receipt of PGCE training bursaries in 2012-13 are (a) UK students and (b) non-UK students. [146564]

Mr Laws [holding answer 11 March 2013]:Training bursary awards for initial teacher training (ITT) are determined by a set of eligibility criteria which is assessed by the ITT provider.

Non-UK students can be awarded a training bursary if their ITT provider assesses that they satisfy all of the published eligibility criteria which include the subject in which they are training to teach, their eligibility to access the UK student support system and the classification of the trainees' academic award, which is based on assessment of their overseas degree using National Recognition Information Centre for the United Kingdom (UK NARIC).

There is currently no requirement for ITT providers to report to the Department for Education the number of non-UK students who are eligible for a training bursary award.

Detailed information on how the training bursary eligibility criteria for the academic year 2012/13 including the UK NARIC data can be found in the published guidance for training bursary guide academic year 2012/13.