Work Capability Assessment

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much his Department has spent on ATOS work capability assessment appeals since April 2012. [144986]

Mr Hoban: From 2 April 2012 to 31 January 2013 the cost of appeals related to work capability assessment was £22.1 million for DWP in respect of staff costs for employment support allowance and incapacity benefit reassessment appeals.

Work Programme

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of Work programme providers only provide appointments during school hours. [144828]

Mr Hoban: The Department does not specify the appointment system that Work programme providers should operate. Work programme providers have flexibility to offer a personalised approach based on a participant's circumstances to help them back to work.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what discussions his Department has had with the Department for Communities and

27 Feb 2013 : Column 563W

Local Government on how local economic partnerships can work more closely with Work programme providers. [144959]

Mr Hoban: The Work programme is designed so that providers have the freedom to develop relationships at a local level. We have had a number of discussions with DCLG on how to ensure that local partners are aware of the opportunities offered by the Work programme.

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will consider the merits of locating job centre advisors at the premises of Work programme providers in order to simplify the process of signing on. [145353]

Mr Hoban: Jobcentre managers already have the freedom and flexibility to locate advisers on Work programme provider premises to undertake jobsearch reviews. While this has some merit, there are difficulties that generally outweigh the potential benefits.

However, we are currently testing and evaluating a range of alternative approaches to the existing jobsearch review/signing-on process, including suspended signing and less frequent signing for Work programme participants.

Work Programme: Lone Parents

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what his Department's policy is on whether a lone parent is referred for benefit sanctions for missing a Work programme appointment as a result of their caring responsibilities. [144829]

Mr Hoban: Sanctions will not be imposed without good reason. If a participant fails to attend an appointment, the provider will first discuss the reasons with the participant and seek practical solutions to any problems that have prevented attendance. It will be for the provider to decide whether or not to refer the circumstances to Jobcentre Plus. All decisions on benefit sanctions are made by Jobcentre Plus decision makers, based on the circumstances of each individual case.

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of Work programme providers assist lone parents with their childcare arrangements while they are on the Work programme. [144831]

Mr Hoban: The Department places a general requirement on providers to deliver services flexibly to suit participants' individual circumstances. That does not include a specific requirement to assist with child care arrangements, and the Department does not hold information on the proportion of providers that may offer such assistance.

Health

Beef: Horsemeat

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the announcement of the Food Standards Authority of Ireland's results of 15 January 2013, when the first test for horse DNA was

27 Feb 2013 : Column 564W

conducted on a UK company's frozen burgers by the Food Standards Agency. [144784]

Anna Soubry: The first United Kingdom local authority sampling, following the publication of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland's results, took place on 16 January 2013. Samples were tested for horse and pork DNA, neither of which were detected.

Bexsero

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what representations he has received on making Bexsero form of the Meningitis B vaccine universally available on the NHS; [143707]

(2) what estimate he has made of the cost of making Bexsero form of the Meningitis B vaccine available on the NHS. [143708]

Anna Soubry: Since Bexsero received market authorisation by the European Commission on 22 January 2013, the Department has received five representations on making Bexsero vaccine available as part of the national health service immunisation programme. These include correspondence or meeting requests from hon. Members, the Meningitis Research Foundation, the vaccine manufacturer—Novartis, and a member of the public.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), the independent expert advisory committee to the Government on vaccination, is currently evaluating possible meningococcal B vaccination strategies, including their impact on the burden of disease and cost-effectiveness and is anticipated to be in a position to provide the Department with advice later this year.

The estimated costs of providing Bexsero as part of a national immunisation programme would depend on JCVIs advice and the price negotiated with the vaccine manufacturer.

Cancer

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what role strategic clinical networks will have in the commissioning of specialised cancer services. [143686]

Anna Soubry: Strategic clinical networks will bring together all commissioners and providers in the new health system to plan pathways of care which deliver the best outcomes for patients.

As most cancer treatment is ‘specialised', and will therefore be commissioned by the NHS Commissioning Board's specialised commissioning teams in future, strategic clinical networks will need to develop close links with these teams. An example of this will be the involvement of senior cancer specialists on the clinical reference groups that advise on clinical service specifications.

Sarah Newton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of people in each strategic health authority area who have received treatment attributable to the Cancer Drugs Fund. [144756]

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Norman Lamb: Information on the number of patients who have had cancer drugs funded by strategic health authorities (SHAs) under the interim cancer drugs funding arrangements in 2010-11 (from October 2010 to the end of March 2011) and under the Cancer Drugs Fund (from April 2011 to the end of December 2012) is shown in the table.

Strategic health authorityNumber of patients funded 2010-11Number of patients funded in 2011-12Number of patients funded from April 2012 to end December 2012Total number of patients funded since October 2010(1)

North East

420

696

367

1,483

North West

266

1,044

1,328

2,638

Yorkshire and the Humber

178

809

1,096

2,083

East Midlands

178

871

740

1,789

West Midlands

292

1,658

1,152

3,102

East of England

246

1,486

1,258

2,990

London

443

1,364

1,272

3,079

South East Coast

306

1,241

1,060

2,607

South Central

290

1,170

1,989

3,449

South West

161

1,459

1,864

3,484

Total

2,780

11,798

12,126

26,704

Note: (1) Some individual patients may be double-counted where a patient has received more than one drug treatment through the Cancer Drugs Fund. Source: Information provided to the Department by SHAs

Cardiovascular System: Diseases

Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (a) what progress he has made in developing the Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Strategy and (b) when he expects this strategy to be published. [143535]

Anna Soubry: The cardiovascular disease outcomes strategy is now reaching the final stages of development. The aim is to publish the strategy by the end of March 2013.

Childbirth

Mr Burley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to (a) raise awareness of the problems associated with premature births and (b) ensure that families of premature babies receive the best possible medical and emotional support from NHS services. [144846]

Dr Poulter: Information for parents about preterm birth and caring for preterm babies is available on the NHS Choices website. NHS Choices also provides links to sources of further information and support, such as Bliss (the sick and premature baby charity). The Department

27 Feb 2013 : Column 566W

has supported the work of Bliss for many years through grant aid, including projects to promote family centred care.

It is for the national health service to ensure preterm babies and their families receive high quality neonatal care and support. To support NHS commissioners and providers, two evidence based guidance documents—the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) “Quality Standard for specialist neonatal care and the NHS Toolkit for High Quality Neonatal Services”—have been published.

The Department has also asked NICE to develop a clinical guideline on the care of pregnant women considered to be at risk of preterm labour and birth. NICE published the draft scope of the guideline for consultation on 20 February 2013. The consultation period closes on 20 March.

In addition, the NHS Commissioning Board published a draft service specification for neonatal care services in December 2012, which reinforces the importance of delivering care in a family-centred way that seeks to minimise any adverse physical and psychological impact of neonatal care on the baby and their family.

Continuing Care

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent discussions he has had with the insurance industry on the provision of insurance policies to fund continuing care for the elderly. [143522]

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with the insurance industry on the provision of products to pay for social care up to the proposed funding cap; and if he will make a statement. [144121]

Norman Lamb: The Department ran an engagement in autumn 2011 on the role for financial services in helping people pay for their care. The engagement was run in partnership with the Association of British Insurers and involved many of its members. The engagement fed back to departmental Ministers in November 2011.

The engagement was supportive of a cap on social care costs on the basis this would protect people from very high care costs while allowing people to use products such as insurance, pensions and equity release to pay for their care.

Departmental officials maintain contact with the financial services and the care sector on a range of social care issues including how care is funded. The most recent meeting was held on 13 February to discuss the Government's proposals to introduce a capped cost system, as set out in an oral statement to Parliament on 11 February 2013, Official Report, columns 592-94W. The Secretary of State for Health, the right hon. Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), and I attended this meeting.

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to his statement of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 592, on social care funding, what estimate he has made of the total cost of his proposals for continuing care for the elderly; and how he intends these proposals to be funded. [143584]

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Norman Lamb: The estimated costs and how they will be funded were set out in an oral statement to Parliament on 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 592, by the Secretary of State for Health, the right hon. Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt). Further details are available in the policy statement on funding reform and legislative requirements, a copy of which has been placed in the Library and is available on the Department's website at:

https://www.wp.dh.gov.uk/caringforourfuture/files/2013/02/Policy-statement-on-funding-reform.pdf

27 Feb 2013 : Column 568W

Domestic Visits

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) hospitals and (b) GPs' surgeries he has visited in an official capacity in (i) England and (ii) the North East since his appointment as Secretary of State. [143873]

Dr Poulter: The following information provides details of the visits undertaken by the Secretary of State for Health and his ministerial team in an official capacity between September 2012 and February 2013:

The Secretary of State (Mr Jeremy Hunt)
(1) GP Surgeries
DateMinisterVisitType of organisationLocation

18 October 2012

Mr Jeremy Hunt

Adelaide Medical Centre

GP Surgery

London

(2) Hospitals
DateMinisterVisitType of organisationLocation

13 September 2012

Mr Jeremy Hunt

St Thomas' Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London

Hospital

London

11 October 2012

Mr Jeremy Hunt

Royal Marsden (Fulham site) AHPF

Hospital

Fulham, London

13 November 2012

Mr Jeremy Hunt

Kings College Hospital

Hospital

London

5 December 2012

Mr Jeremy Hunt

University Hospital South Manchester

Hospital

Manchester, North West

18 October 2012

Mr Jeremy Hunt

University College Hospital, Macmillan Cancer Centre,

Hospital

London

11 December 2012

Mr Jeremy Hunt

Chemo Day Unit, Guy's Hospital

Hospital

Southwark, London

13 December 2012

Mr Jeremy Hunt

Mid Staffordshire Hospital

Hospital

Stafford, London

11 January 2013

Mr Jeremy Hunt

Royal Surrey County Hospital

Hospital

Guildford, South East

28 January 2013

Mr Jeremy Hunt

Airedale Hospital

Hospital

Yorkshire and Humber


Minister of State (Norman Lamb)
DateMinisterVisitType of organisationLocation

13 November 2012

Norman Lamb

Raid Birmingham Heartlands Hospital

Hospital

Birmingham, Midlands and East

19 November 2012

Norman Lamb

South London and Maudsley NHS Mental Health Trust

Hospital

London

25 January 2013

Norman Lamb

Palliative Care Unit at James Paget Hospital FT

Hospital

Norfolk, Midlands and East

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (Anna Soubry)
DateMinisterVisitType of organisationLocation

12 September 2012

Anna Soubry

Watford General Hospital

Hospital

Watford, London


The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (Dr Daniel Poulter)
(1) GP surgeries
DateMinisterVisitType of organisationLocation

13 November 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Heysham Primary care centre

GP Practices, Dental Surgery, Pharmacy

Heysham, North West

13 November 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Morecambe Same Day centre

GP Practice (Health centre)

Morecambe, North West

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27 Feb 2013 : Column 570W

(2) Hospitals
DateMinisterVisitType of organisationLocation

18 September 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Bart's Health—Newham University Hospital

Hospital

London

18 October 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Darlington Memorial Hospital

Hospital

Darlington, North East

22 October 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Royal Marsden (Fulham site) AHPF

Hospital

Fulham, London

25 October 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

The Royal Manchester Children's Hospital

Hospital

Manchester, North West

25 October 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

St Mary's Hospital

Hospital

Manchester, North West

1 November 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Airedale Hospital

Hospital

Keighley, Yorks and the Humber

1 November 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Peterborough City Hospital

Hospital

Peterborough, Midlands and East

6 November 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Birmingham Children's Hospital

Hospital

Birmingham, West Midlands

13 December 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Visit to Blackpool Teaching Hospital

Hospital

Blackpool, North West

20 December 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Homerton Hospital

Hospital

Hackney, London

25 December 2012

Dr Daniel Poulter

Ipswich Hospital

Hospital

Ipswich, East of England

17 January 2013

Dr Daniel Poulter

Jessop Maternity Hospital at Sheffield Teaching Hospital FT

Hospital

Sheffield, Yorks and the Humber

17 January 2013

Dr Daniel Poulter.

Sheffield Children's Hospital FT

Hospital

Sheffield, Yorks and the Humber

24 January 2013

Dr Daniel Poulter

University Hospital Coventry

Hospital

Coventry, West Midlands

13 February 2013

Dr Daniel Poulter

Evelina's Children’s Hospital, St Thomas

Hospital

London

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (Earl Howe)
(1) GP Practices
DateMinisterVisitType of organisationLocation

23 November 2012

Earl Howe

Boulevard Medical Practice

GP Practice

Halifax, Yorkshire and Humber

23 November 2012

Earl Howe

Grange Group Practice

GP Practice

Huddersfield, Yorkshire and Humber

(2) Hospitals
DateMinisterVisitType of organisationLocation

26 September 2012

Earl Howe

Birmingham University Hospital

Hospital

Birmingham, Midlands and East

14 December 2012

Earl Howe

Amersham Hospital

Hospital

Amersham, South Central

Heart Diseases

Ed Balls: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will publish or place in the Library the self-assessment reports, attachments and appendices that were submitted in spring 2010 to the National Specialised Commissioning Team by the 11 hospital trusts that wished to be considered as future providers of children's cardiac surgery; which such documents were considered by the Independent Expert Panel chaired by Professor Sir Ian Kennedy; and by which members of that panel; [144790]

(2) which individuals at each of the 11 hospital trusts which were being considered as future providers of children's cardiac surgery had access before 1 July 2012 to the detailed sub-scores for each assessment criterion that were awarded in 2010 by the Independent Expert Panel chaired by Professor Sir Ian Kennedy; and on what dates each such individual was given access to that information. [144791]

Anna Soubry: The safe and sustainable review of children's congenital heart services was a national health service review, independent of Government. The matters raised, therefore, are for the Joint Committee of primary care trusts, which undertook the review.

In these circumstances, and given legal proceedings and a review by the Independent Reconfiguration Panel are underway, it would not be appropriate to comment further.

Horses: Slaughterhouses

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the total number of animals of each species slaughtered at each UK abattoir licensed to slaughter horses was in each of the last five years. [144793]

Anna Soubry: We are advised by the Food Standards Agency that the number of animals slaughtered at approved meat establishments is commercially sensitive information. We are therefore unable to provide figures

27 Feb 2013 : Column 571W

for the total number of animals of each species slaughtered at each United Kingdom abattoir approved for the slaughter of solipeds (horses).

The following table lists each of the slaughterhouses in the United Kingdom that is approved, for the slaughter of solipeds (horses and other domestic equines) and the additional species that each is approved to slaughter.

Approval numberApproval nameApproved species

2295

Bowood Farms Ltd T/A Bowood Yorkshire Lamb (formally Yorkshire County Meats - 2238)

Calves, Cattle, Goats, Sheep, Solipeds

4140

G and GB Hewitt Ltd

Calves, Cattle, Goats, Pigs, Sheep, Solipeds

4185

High Peak Meat Exports Ltd

Calves, Cattle, Solipeds

8231

Stillmans (Somerset) Ltd

Buffalo, Calves, Cattle, Deer, Goats, Pigs, Ruminants, Sheep, Solipeds, Wild Boar

8070

Philip Hayman (T/A PJ Hayman and Sons)

Buffalo, Calves, Cattle, Deer, Goats, Pigs, Ruminants, Sheep Solipeds

2163 - approval currently suspended

Peter Boddy (T/A Peter Boddy Licensed Slaughterers and Game Dealers)

Bison, Buffalo, Calves, Cattle, Deer, Farmed Land Mammals not Domestic Ungulates, Goats, Pigs, Ratites, Sheep, Solipeds, Wild Boar

UK 9080 EC - has ceased to slaughter horses and have surrendered their approval to slaughter horses.

Oakdale Meats (NI) Ltd

Bovine, Ovine, Caprine

Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

Mr David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps have been taken to reduce the number of deaths after surgery in Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals Trust. [145007]

Anna Soubry: All patients have a right to expect the very highest quality, safe care from the national health service. We expect all NHS trusts to examine their mortality data carefully and take appropriate action to improve performance where needed.

Information on steps taken by the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust to improve mortality rates can be requested from the trust directly.

The Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust is not part of the recently announced review of hospitals with high mortality rates.

Maternity Services: Asylum

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent discussions he has had with the UK Border Agency on facilitating access to maternity care for women in receipt of asylum support; and if he will make a statement. [144822]

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Anna Soubry: No such discussions have taken place between the Secretary of State for Health, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt, and the United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA), but there is regular contact at official level to discuss the asylum process and health issues including pregnancy. Women seeking asylum are fully entitled to national health service care without charge, as are UKBA supported women who have been refused asylum. In addition the Department of Health provides funding of approximately £1 million per year to provide health assessments and tuberculosis screening of asylum seekers in UKBA initial accommodation in England. The initial accommodation health teams work with local maternity services to ensure pregnant women receive the necessary maternity treatment while in initial accommodation and will liaise with the NHS, UKBA and their contractors during the dispersal process.

Phenylbutazone

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people at each (a) gender and (b) age have been admitted to hospital with conditions related to phenylbutazone in each region in the latest period for which figures are available. [143721]

Anna Soubry: The Department does not collect these data. Data standards advise that without knowing what conditions to search for they cannot supply any coding advice as generally speaking Hospital Episode Statistics do not identify specific chemicals.

However, reports of ‘suspected' adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are collected by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and Commission for Human Medicines through the voluntary reporting scheme, the Yellow Card Scheme. The MHRA has received a total of 1,713 suspected ADR reports associated with phenylbutazone United Kingdom-wide, 1964—present. Following advice from the Committee on Safety of Medicines in 1983, the indications for phenylbutazone products were restricted and supply was restricted to hospitals only. The majority of the ADRs were therefore reported prior to restriction of use in 1983. It is not possible to say how many of those cases were admitted to hospital. Only five cases have been received in the last 10 years and of these, only one ADR stated the patient was hospitalised.

Mr Tom Harris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what level the Food Standards Agency recommends as a safe limit for human consumption of phenylbutazone. [143770]

Anna Soubry: Phenylbutazone can cause aplastic anaemia in humans but there is not a clear link between the amount consumed and the subsequent risk of the disease. As such it has not been possible to identify a safe limit and therefore phenylbutazone is not permitted for use in food producing animals. However, it can be prescribed for humans in severe cases of one specific condition (ankylosing spondylitis) where other treatments have been found unsuitable.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 573W

Written Answers to Questions

Wednesday 27 February 2013

Education

Buildings

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what occupation costs of each type are incurred for each property used by his Department. [143290]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education and its Executive agencies currently occupy 12 properties which are listed in the following table:

PropertyCost per annum (c £ million)

Sanctuary Buildings, Central London

19.0

33 Greycoat Street, Central London

1.1

Bridge House, Guildford

0.2

Freshford House, Bristol

0.15

Earlsdon Park, Coventry

2.9

Castleview House, Runcorn

1.4

2 St Pauls Place, Sheffield

1.5

Piccadilly Gate, Manchester

2.2

Lime House, Nottingham

0.75

National College for School Leadership, Nottingham

1.2

Unit 1-3 Trust Court, Histon

0.25

Mowden Hall, Darlington

2.2

The costs set out in the table include, rent, building service charges (where applicable), rates, utilities and building maintenance and operating costs.

The Department for Education Review, published in November 2012 sets out the Department's intention to consolidate its office estate from 12 buildings to six. Final decision on which buildings will close are expected in April 2013 and until this time we will not be able to confirm whether any properties will become vacant.

Since May 2010 the Department has reduced the size of its estates from 30 properties, at a cost of circa £51 million per annum, to 12 properties costing circa £34 million per annum. This is a saving of circa £17 million per annum. The Department's current estate strategy includes further consolidation, reducing the size of the estate to 6 properties.

When the Department becomes responsible for a vacant leasehold property every effort is made to reduce the financial liability to the Department as quickly as possible. Where there is a lease break clause in the terms of the lease this would be operated. For leases without such a clause the Department is responsible for the property until lease expiry. As a matter of course the landlord would be contacted to explore the possibility of an early surrender, but they are under no obligation to agree to this. Once these options have been exhausted

27 Feb 2013 : Column 574W

the property would be marketed with a view to finding sub-tenants and reducing the Department's financial liability that way.

Children: ICT

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent estimate he has made of the number of hours children spend on a computer (a) in and (b) out of school per week. [142215]

Elizabeth Truss: The most recent estimate of the number of hours children spend on a computer in and out of school per week was by Ofcom.

The latest Ofcom survey on the media use and attitudes of children and parents was carried out in March 2012 with 1,717 in-home interviews with parents and children aged five-15. The survey asked parents of children aged five-11 and children aged 12-15 about internet use at home, and not computer use per se. It estimated that in 2012, 11.5% of children aged five-15 used the internet at home weekly. There were differences by age group, with only 6% of children aged five-seven using the internet weekly, compared to 8.1% of children aged eight-11 and 17.1% of children aged 12-15 (Ofcom, 2012).

References

Eynon, R. (2009) Harnessing technology: the learner and their context. Mapping young people's uses of technology in their own contexts—a nationally representative survey. University of Oxford.

Ofcom (2012) Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report. October 2012:

http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/research/media-literacy/oct2012/main.pdf

Children's Centres: Kingston upon Hull

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many Sure Start children's centres closed in (a) Hull and (b) Kingston upon Hull North constituency in each of the last three years. [144427]

Elizabeth Truss: Information supplied by Kingston upon Hull city council on the Sure Start-On database shows that there have been no outright children's centre closures in Hull since April 2010. Following consultation in 2011 the council conducted a reorganisation in which the previous 20 children's centres merged to form the present 10.

A reduction from 20 to 10 centres does not mean a halving in the number of places families can go to in order to get children's centre services. There were originally 20 centres across 22 sites. The council has confirmed that 22 sites remain open to the public.

The Department does not hold information about children's centres on a constituency basis.

Curriculum

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will incorporate the UK Youth Parliament's Curriculum for Life programme into the National Curriculum. [143499]

27 Feb 2013 : Column 575W

Elizabeth Truss: Our proposals for the new National Curriculum were published for consultation on 7 February. The proposals are based on the principle that the National Curriculum should set out a body of essential knowledge that children should be expected to acquire in key subjects during the course of their school career. One of these key subjects is citizenship in secondary schools, which would cover many of the aspects of the curriculum highlighted as important by the UK Youth Parliament and in particular will include the teaching of financial literacy for the first time.

The proposed new National Curriculum is deliberately slimmer than the existing one in order to free up teachers to create lessons that inspire and engage their pupils. Schools are free to teach any topic suggested by the UK Youth Parliament if they wish to do so.

The consultation will end on 16 April. Further information is available at:

www.education.gov.uk/nationalcurriculum

Cycling

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) who his Department's cycling champion is; [144436]

(2) what progress his Department has made on implementing the Cycle to Work guarantee; [144454]

(3) whether his Department has signed up to the Government's Cycle to Work scheme. [144467]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department does not have one named cycling champion. Work to encourage staff to cycle is managed across a range of corporate services leads to ensure that both the Department's facilities and its payroll support staff who wish to cycle.

The Department has not signed up to the Cycle to Work guarantee, but it has the following in place to support the use of cycling:

Secure, safe, and accessible bike parking facilities for all staff who want them at 10 out of its 11 sites.

Good quality changing and locker facilities for all staff who want them at eight out of its 11 sites, with some more limited availability of either showers or lockers at two further sites.

The availability of salary advances for bike purchases, with advances recovered over a 12-month period.

Education Act 2002

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has made any order under the provisions of section 2 of the Education Act 2002 in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [143842]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 February 2013]: In the period between 2010-11 and 2011-12, the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), made the following five orders under section 2(1) of the Education Act 2002:

1. The New Woodlands School (Amendment) Order 2010 [2010/2196] (in effect until 30 September 2013);

2. The Harbour School (Amendment) Order 2010 [2010/2804] (in effect until 16 December 2013);

3. The Morpeth School, Oaklands School and Swanlea School Order 2011 [2011/1903] (ceased to have effect from 31 August 2012);

27 Feb 2013 : Column 576W

4. The Conisborough College Order 2011 [2011/1449] (in effect until 5 July 2014); and

5. The Wiltshire Council (Arrangements for the Provision of Suitable Education) Order 2012 [2012/1107] (in effect until 31 July 2014).

First Aid: Education

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has any plans to include the teaching of CPR in schools. [144555]

Elizabeth Truss: Personal, Social, Health and Economic education can provide for pupils to be taught about emergency life-saving skills.

At primary level pupils can learn basic emergency procedures and where to get help. At secondary school, they can develop the skills to cope with emergency situations that require basic first aid procedures, including, at Key Stage 4, resuscitation techniques.

Food: Waste

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much surplus food was thrown away by his Department in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143450]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education does not throw away surplus food. Any food waste that is generated is a by-product of meal preparation and food consumption, such as vegetable peelings and plate scrapings. All food waste is then separated and sent to a waste treatment facility to produce energy from waste.

Means-tested Benefits

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what cash and non-cash means-tested benefits are provided by his Department; what the rules are in respect of means-testing for each such benefit; and how much his Department spent on each in 2011-12. [144162]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 February 2013]: The Department does not provide any cash or means tested benefits for its staff.

Ministers' Private Offices

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the floor area is of his private ministerial office. [142608]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 11 February 2013]: The total floor area for the private office of the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), measures 159m(2). This includes his office and the area of his private office team.

Official Residences

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education on how many occasions he has attended Chevening and Dorneywood in an official capacity in each of the last 12 months. [142082]

27 Feb 2013 : Column 577W

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 7 February 2013]:In the last 12 months, the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), has not visited Chevening, or Dorneywood, in an official capacity.

Ofsted

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) which organisation collects data on forced redundancies of Ofsted inspectors; for what reasons Ofsted inspectors can currently be made redundant; and how many Ofsted inspectors have been subject to forced redundancy in each region of the UK in each of the last 10 years; [143651]

(2) what information (a) his Department and (b) Ofsted holds on the (i) background, (ii) qualifications and (iii) teaching performance of Ofsted inspectors; whether the information in each category is held centrally or regionally; and in respect of which years this information is held. [143676]

Mr Laws: The Department does not hold information on Ofsted inspectors. The remainder of the question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to my hon. Friend, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 18 February 2013:

Your recent Parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

Ofsted directly employs Her Majesty's Inspectors (HMI) and Social Care Regulatory Inspectors (SCRI), but also holds contracts with Inspection Service Providers (ISPs) who themselves employ Additional Inspectors (AI). There have been no forced redundancies of Ofsted's directly employed inspectors during the last ten years. Ofsted would hold data if there was any such instance of forced redundancy amongst HMI or SCRI, the circumstances of which would be in line with Cabinet Office guidelines and protocols on compulsory redundancy.

Terms of employment for AIs are determined by the ISPs.

Last month, Ofsted published pen portraits of all current HMI. They give a biographical summary of individuals' expertise, including their previous experience and qualifications. The relevant document is available on the Ofsted website at:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/ofsted-hmi-pen-portraits

All inspectors undertaking section 5 school inspections are required to have a teaching qualification, and to have been teachers. This includes those qualified to teach in the 14-19 age range. Furthermore, as part of the recruitment and selection process, candidates are required to demonstrate success and effectiveness in their teaching career.

A copy of this reply has been sent to David Laws MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many regulations his Department introduced between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and what the anticipated cost is of each. [144206]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 February 2013]: In the period 1 June 2012 to 31 January 2013, the Department for Education made 36 regulations and orders (statutory instruments). In some cases, the effect of a particular statutory instrument would be sufficient to warrant an impact assessment (in line with the rules

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set out by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills). The impact assessment would include the cost to the frontline of implementing the regulation. Where an impact assessment has been produced, this would be indicated in the Explanatory Memorandum accompanying the regulation and available at:

www.legislation.gov.uk

School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012

Mr Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 478W, on School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012, what steps he is taking to ensure that primary schools comply with the requirement to publish on their website (a) the proportion of Year 6 pupils who achieve level 4 or above in English and mathematics, (b) the proportion of Year 6 pupils who are making expected progress, (c) the proportion of Year 6 pupils who achieve level 5 or above in English and (d) the proportion of Year 6 pupils who achieve level or above in mathematics in their Key Stage 2 national curriculum tests. [143550]

Mr Laws [holding answer 25 February 2013]:The amended regulations removed the requirement for schools to produce a hard copy prospectus each year and instead require schools to publish certain information online. For schools which have Year 6 pupils, this includes information about in the attainment and progress of pupils who have most recently taken Key Stage 2 tests.

The Department notified schools in a number of ways about the changes made to these regulations which came into force in September 2012. This has included notifying schools through several of the termly departmental Need to Know e-mails to all schools (before and after the changes came into force), publishing and updating information on the departmental website and working to communicate the changes through partners like the National Governors Association. Her Majesty's chief inspector has also recently written to all schools and in doing so has reminded schools of their obligations to make key information available online.

Governing bodies and head teachers have clear responsibilities to ensure that their school adheres to the law. If a parent believes that a school is not complying with the requirements they are entitled to raise this with the governing body. If their complaint is not resolved and they believe that the school has failed to discharge its duty or acted unreasonably, they can raise their complaint with the Secretary of State for Education. Any such a complaint would be handled as set out in the Department's published school complaints process.

Mr Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 478W, on School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012, what steps he is taking to ensure that secondary schools comply with the requirement to publish on their website (a) the proportion of pupils achieving 5+ A*-C GCSEs (or equivalent) including English and mathematics GCSEs, (b) the proportion of pupils achieving the English Baccalaureate and (c) the proportion of pupils making expected progress. [143551]

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Mr Laws: [holding answer 25 February 2013]:The amended regulations removed the requirement for schools to produce a hard copy prospectus each year and instead require schools to publish certain information online. For secondary schools this includes information about pupil attainment and progress.

The Department notified schools in a number of ways about the changes made to these regulations which came into force in September 2012. This has included notifying schools through several of the termly departmental Need to Know e-mails to all schools (before and after the changes came into force), publishing and updating information on the departmental website and working to communicate the changes through partners like the National Governors Association. Her Majesty's chief inspector has also recently written to all schools and in doing so has reminded schools of their obligations to make key information available online.

Governing bodies and head teachers have clear responsibilities to ensure that their school adheres to the law. If a parent believes that a school is not complying with the requirements they are entitled to raise this with the governing body. If their complaint is not resolved and they believe that the school has failed to discharge its duty or acted unreasonably, they can raise their complaint with the Secretary of State for Education. Any such a complaint would be handled as set out in the Department's published school complaints process.

Mr Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 478W, on School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012, what steps he is taking to ensure that primary schools comply with the requirement to publish on their website (a) in relation to each academic year, the content of the curriculum followed by the school for each subject and details as to how additional information relating to the curriculum may be obtained and (b) in relation to key stage 1, the names of any phonics or reading schemes in operation. [143552]

Mr Laws [holding answer 25 February 2013]: The amended regulations removed the requirement for schools to produce a hard copy prospectus each year and instead require schools to publish certain information online—this includes information about the content of the curriculum and for schools which have children in key stage 1 the names of any phonics or reading schemes they use. These changes give schools both increased scope to decide the information they wish to publish and greater flexibility as to how regularly they update it.

The Department notified schools in a number of ways about the changes made to these regulations which came into force in September 2012. This has included notifying schools through several of the termly departmental Need to Know e-mails to all schools (before and after the changes came into force), publishing and updating information on the departmental website and working to communicate the changes through partners like the National Governors Association.

Governing bodies and head teachers have clear responsibilities to ensure that their school adheres to the law. It is important that parents have information about the school's curriculum and, if a parent believes that a school is not complying with the requirements

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they are entitled to raise this with the governing body. If their complaint is not resolved and they believe that the school has failed to discharge its duty or acted unreasonably, they can raise their complaint with the Secretary of State. Any such a complaint would be handled as set out in the Department's published school complaints process.

Her Majesty's Chief Inspector has also recently written to all schools and in doing so has reminded schools of their obligations to make key information available online, including about the curriculum.

Mr Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 478W, on School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012, what steps he is taking to ensure that primary schools comply with the requirement to publish on their website the measures determined by the head teacher under section 89 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006. [143553]

Mr Laws [holding answer 25 February 2013]: The amended regulations removed the requirement for schools to produce a hard copy prospectus each year and instead require schools to publish certain information online. For primary schools this includes information about the measures head teachers set out in the behaviour policy. Under section 89 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006, the head teacher must include measures in the policy which aim to promote good behaviour, self-discipline and respect; prevent bullying; ensure that pupils complete assigned work; and regulate the conduct of pupils. These changes give schools both increased scope to decide the information they wish to publish and greater flexibility as to how regularly they update it.

The Department notified schools in a number of ways about the changes made to these regulations which came into force in September 2012. This has included notifying schools through several of the termly departmental Need to Know e-mails to all schools (before and after the changes came into force), publishing and updating information on the departmental website and working to communicate the changes through partners like the National Governors Association. Her Majesty's Chief Inspector has also recently written to all schools and in doing so has reminded schools of their obligations to make key information available online.

Governing bodies and head teachers have clear responsibilities to ensure that their school adheres to the law. If a parent believes that a school is not complying with the requirements they are entitled to raise this with the governing body. If their complaint is not resolved and they believe that the school has failed to discharge its duty or acted unreasonably, they can raise their complaint with the Secretary of State. Any such a complaint would be handled as set out in the Department's published school complaints process.

Mr Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 478W, on School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012, what steps he is taking to ensure that secondary schools comply with the requirement to publish on their website the measures determined by the head teacher under section 89 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006. [143554]

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Mr Laws [holding answer 25 February 2013]: The amended regulations removed the requirement for schools to produce a hard copy prospectus each year and instead require schools to publish certain information online. For secondary schools this includes information about the measures head teachers set out in the behaviour policy. Under section 89 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006, the head teacher must include measures in the policy which aim to promote good behaviour, self-discipline and respect; prevent bullying; ensure that pupils complete assigned work; and regulate the conduct of pupils.

These changes give schools both increased scope to decide the information they wish to publish and greater flexibility as to how regularly they update it.

The Department notified schools in a number of ways about the changes made to these regulations which came into force in September 2012. This has included notifying schools through several of the termly departmental Need to Know e-mails to all schools (before and after the changes came into force), publishing and updating information on the departmental website and working to communicate the changes through organisations like the National Governors Association. Her Majesty's Chief Inspector has also recently written to all schools and in doing so has reminded schools of their obligations to make key information available online.

Governing bodies and head teachers have clear responsibilities to ensure that their school adheres to the law. If a parent believes that a school is not complying with the requirements they are entitled to raise this with the governing body. If their complaint is not resolved and they believe that the school has failed to discharge its duty or acted unreasonably, they can raise their complaint with the Secretary of State. Any such a complaint would be handled as set out in the Department's published school complaints process.

Mr Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 478W, on School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012, if he will take steps to ensure that secondary schools comply with the requirements in Schedule 4, Paragraph 7 of the amended School Information (England) Regulations 2008 to publish on their website (a) in relation to each academic year, the content of the curriculum followed by the school for each subject and details as to how additional information relating to the curriculum may be obtained and (b) in relation to key stage 4 a list of the courses provided which lead to a GCSE qualification and a list of other courses offered at key stage 4 and the qualifications that may be acquired. [143888]

Mr Laws: The amended regulations removed the requirement for schools to produce a hard copy prospectus each year and instead require schools to publish certain information online. For secondary schools this includes information about content of the curriculum and courses leading to qualifications at Key Stage 4.

The Department notified schools in a number of ways about the changes made to these regulations which came into force in September 2012. This has included notifying schools through several of the termly departmental Need to Know e-mails to all schools (before and after the changes came into force), publishing and updating information on the departmental website and working

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to communicate the changes through partners like the National Governors Association. Her Majesty's Chief Inspector has also recently written to all schools and in doing so has reminded schools of their obligations to make key information available online, including about the curriculum.

Governing bodies and head teachers have clear responsibilities to ensure that their school adheres to the law. If a parent believes that a school is not complying with the requirements they are entitled to raise this with the governing body. If their complaint is not resolved and they believe that the school has failed to discharge its duty or acted unreasonably, they can raise their complaint with the Secretary of State. Any such a complaint would be handled as set out in the Department's published school complaints process.

Mr Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 478W, on School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2012, if he will take steps to ensure that secondary schools comply with the requirements in Schedule 4, Paragraph 7 of the amended School Information (England) Regulations 2008 to publish on their website information on where and by what means parents may access the school performance tables published by the Secretary of State on his Department's website. [143977]

Mr Laws [holding answer 25 February 2013]:The amended regulations removed the requirement for schools to produce a hard copy prospectus each year and instead require schools to publish certain information online. For secondary schools the performance data they are required to publish relates to attainment and progress of pupils at the end of KS4, accompanied by a link to the school's entry on the Performance Tables website.

The Department notified schools in a number of ways about the changes made to these regulations which came into force in September 2012. This has included notifying schools through several of the termly departmental Need to Know e-mails to all schools (before and after the changes came into force), publishing and updating information on the departmental website and working to communicate the changes through partners like the National Governors Association. Her Majesty's chief inspector has also recently written to all schools and, in doing so, has reminded schools of their obligation to make key information available online.

Governing bodies and head teachers have clear responsibilities to ensure that their school adheres to the law. If a parent believes that a school is not complying with the requirements they are entitled to raise this with the governing body. If their complaint is not resolved and they believe that the school has failed to discharge its duty or acted unreasonably, they can raise their complaint with the Secretary of State for Education. Any such a complaint would be handled as set out in the Department's published school complaints process.

School Meals

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health on guidelines for school meals. [142923]

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Elizabeth Truss: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), has not had discussions on guidelines for school meals with the Secretary of State for Health, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt). However, this Department continues to work with the Department for Health on school food issues.

The Department for Education has also commissioned Henry Dimbleby and John Vincent to lead an independent review of school food. As part of their work, the reviewers have been looking into school food guidelines and have met senior officials at Public Health England to discuss the impact of school meals on the nation's heath. The reviewers' team is in on-going contact with officials in the Department of Health.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will estimate his Department's total staffing requirement in full-time equivalent posts for fulfilling its minimum statutory obligations. [143331]

Elizabeth Truss: Following publication of the Department for Education Review in November, the Department is currently engaged in a business planning process, to identify the resource needed to deliver its work. This includes both ministerial priorities and statutory obligations.

WNS

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has given any contracts to WNS Management; and under what tendering process any such contracts were awarded. [143616]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 February 2013]: WNS Global Services (UK) Ltd provided some pro

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bono advice to the Education Funding Agency (EFA) on developing business processes to improve efficiency and service standards. Subsequently the EFA commissioned further workshops to equip their staff with the skills needed to implement improved processes. These were procured on a single tender basis at a cost of £18,000 plus VAT.

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what role WNS Management will play in his Department's Review. [143617]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 February 2013]: The Review of the Department concluded in November 2012 and WNS Global Services (UK) Ltd played no role in it. As set out in my answer to PQ143616 today, WNS has, however, provided advice to the Education Funding Agency on developing business processes to improve efficiency and service standards.

Young Offenders: Numeracy

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the level of numeracy was of those detained in the secure youth estate in the most recent year for which figures are available. [144075]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 February 2013]: Data on the educational attainment of those detained are not collected centrally for the entire youth secure estate. Some data are collected centrally by the Education Funding Agency for the provision it funds for those aged under-18 in public sector young offender institutions.

Of the 3,348 entrants, aged between 16 and 18, to these institutions who were newly assessed for numeracy skills in 2011/12: 6% were assessed on entry as being at level 2 or above (equivalent to GCSE Maths at Grade C or above); 35% at level 1 (equivalent to GCSE Maths at Grades D-G); and 59% at entry level or below (below the level of GCSE Grade G).