Military Bases

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence at which sites outside the UK armed forces personnel are based; how many personnel are based at each site, by service; and for what purpose. [131534]

Mr Francois [holding answer 4 December 2012]:The information requested is in the following table as at 1 October 2012:

 Duty/purposeNaval serviceArmyRoyal Air Force

Overseas total

 

730

18,000

1,980

     

Europe (excluding UK)

 

390

16,910

1,450

Germany

Garrison; attaché defence section support; personnel exchange programme; bi-lateral engagement

40

14,900

200

Cyprus

Garrison; support to operations

20

1,710

850

Belgium

NATO staff, defence diplomacy, EU

60

120

140

Gibraltar

Garrison; support to Gibraltar Patrol Boat Squadron

120

40

60

Italy

NATO staff; attaché and defence section support; personnel exchange programme; bi-lateral engagement

50

50

40

Netherlands

NATO staff; personnel exchange programme; attaché and defence section support; bi-lateral engagement

30

40

90

Portugal

NATO staff; bi-lateral engagement

20

10

19 Dec 2012 : Column 834W

Norway

NATO, attaché and defence section support, personnel exchange programme; bi-lateral engagement; individual and collective training

20

10

10

France

EU, training; personnel exchange programme; capability development; bi-lateral engagement

20

10

20

Czech Republic

NATO; EU: bi-lateral engagement; collective training

10

     

Asia (excluding middle east)

 

60

180

20

Brunei

Gurkhas, individual and collective training, secondment; defence sales

10

130

10

British Indian Ocean Territory (inc. Diego Garcia)

Wider regional engagement/influence; support to operations

40

Nepal

Gurkha support

20

     

North Africa/middle east

 

80

150

140

Saudi Arabia

Bi-lateral engagement; wider regional engagement; attaché and defence section support; defence sales; training; counter terrorism

20

40

70

Oman

Bi-lateral engagement; wider regional engagement/influence; attaché and defence section support; defence sales; individual and collective training naval support, training; counter terrorism

20

40

30

19 Dec 2012 : Column 835W

Bahrain

Bi-lateral engagement; wider regional engagement; attaché and defence section Support; defence sales; Training Naval Support; support to Operations; counter terrorism

20

Kuwait

Training; bi-lateral engagement; wider regional engagement; attaché and defence section support; defence sales; individual training; counter terrorism

20

10

     

Sub-Saharan Africa

 

10

210

10

Kenya

BMATT; wider regional engagement/ influence; attaché and defence section support; defence sales; individual mentoring and training; counter terrorism

170

Sierra Leone

Training; wider regional engagement/influence; attaché and defence section support; individual mentoring and collective training; counter terrorism

20

     

North America

 

170

480

330

United States

Personnel exchange programme; attaché and defence section support; defence sales; collective training; capability development

160

100

300

Canada

Personnel exchange programme; BATUS

10

380

30

     

Central America/Caribbean

 

10

19 Dec 2012 : Column 836W

Belize

Wider regional engagement/influence; individual mentoring and collective training; counter terrorism

10

     

South America

 

10

     

South Atlantic

 

40

30

Falkland Islands

Garrison; support to Atlantic Patrol Task (South); wider regional engagement/ influence

40

30

     

Oceania

 

20

20

10

Australia

Personnel Exchange Programme; wider regional engagement/influence; attaché And defence section support; defence sales; capability development

20

20

10

Rounding: 1. Where rounding has been used, totals and sub-totals have been rounded separately and so may not equal the sums of their rounded parts. When rounding to the nearest 10, numbers ending in "5" have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent systematic bias. 2. Where countries have 5 or less personnel, these are rounded to zero and the country does not appear in the table.

To specify the numbers of personnel at exact locations within these countries would incur disproportionate costs.

The UK regular forces figures represent the number of service personnel who are stationed at that location. This may differ from the actual number of people working at that location at that time, for example due to deployments. It does not include those in operational theatres such as Afghanistan or the Falkland Islands, nor does it include figures for civilians employed in support of the military personnel.

Pay

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many employees of his Department were paid (a) between £80,000 and £100,000 and (b) in excess of £100,000 per year in each of the last five years. [132141]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]: The number of employees of this Department who were paid in excess of £100,000 and between £80,000 and £100,000 in each of the last five years is set out in the following table. All figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

19 Dec 2012 : Column 837W

 Staff with basic salary over £100,000Staff with basic salary £80,000 to £100,000
 CivilianMilitaryTotalCivilianMilitaryTotal

2008

50

660

710

90

1,110

1,200

2009

50

810

860

90

1,360

1,450

2010

50

920

970

80

1,450

1,530

2011

30

970

1,000

80

1,360

1,440

2012

30

930

960

70

1,340

1,410

Saudi Arabia

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) civilians based in the UK, (b) military personnel based in the UK, (c) civilians based in Saudi Arabia and (d) military personnel based in Saudi Arabia worked on the Saudi Arabia National Guard Communications Project as at 1 April 2012. [134421]

Dr Murrison: As at 1 April 2012, one Ministry of Defence (MOD) civilian and no military personnel based in the UK worked on the Saudi Arabia National Guard Communications Project. The project employed 20 military personnel and 50 MOD civilians based in Saudi Arabia.

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost was of UK support for the Saudi Arabia National Guard Communications Project in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12; and whether any of the cost was met by the Government of Saudi Arabia. [134427]

Dr Murrison: The costs of UK support for the Saudi Arabia National Guard Communications Project are met by the UK Ministry of Defence in the first instance and then recovered in full from the Government of Saudi Arabia. I am withholding information about costs as disclosure would prejudice relations between the UK and another state.

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the relationship is between the Ministry of Defence Saudi Armed Forces Project and the Saudi Arabia National Guard Communications Project. [134428]

Dr Murrison: The Ministry of Defence Saudi Armed Forces Project and the Saudi Arabia National Guard Communications Project are established under separate memoranda of understanding. They carry out different functions in support of separate governmental organisations in Saudi Arabia.

Communities and Local Government

Official Hospitality

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how much his Department has spent for hospitality purposes on (a) Champagne, (b) wines, (c) spirits, (d) soft drinks, (e) flowers, (f) laundry, (g) porterage, (h) china, (i) cutlery and (j) venue hire since May 2010. [132874]

19 Dec 2012 : Column 838W

Brandon Lewis: We can provide the total expenditure figures on hospitality. My Department has taken a series of steps to reduce spending in this area, as illustrated by the following table.

SpendingAmount £

April 2008 - March 2009

553,230

April 2009 - March 2010

456,142

April 2010

52,864

May 2010 - March 2011

141,939

April 2011 - March 2012

32,054

April 2012 - October 2012

42,225

My Department daily holds conferences, seminars and meetings with representatives from across the local government, communities, housing and planning sectors, at which light refreshments may be served.

However, guidance to staff now states that refreshments may only be ordered for meetings with external attendees of longer than four hours. Staff should avoid arranging meetings over lunchtime where possible and attendees should normally be asked to bring their own refreshments where practical.

Public Appointments

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which recruitment consultants his Department used to select candidates for public appointments within his departmental remit in each year for which figures are available since 2007; and how much was paid in fees to each such company in each year since 2007. [132793]

Brandon Lewis: As a general rule, recruitment consultants are not used to select candidates for public appointment in my Department. However, the following table provides details of known public appointments where recruitment consultants were used together with the associated costs under the last Administration.

OrganisationNumber of postsFinancial yearRecruitment consultantCost (£)

Fire Service College

2

2009/10

Veredus

25,000

Commission for Local Administration in England

1

2009/10

Odgers

37,000

Homes and Communities Agency

n/a

2008/09

Unknown

68,000

Standards Board for England

3

2007/08

KMC

56,000

 

1

2009/10

Odgers

37,000

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government when his Department last assessed (a) the utility and (b) the value of psychometric testing in its recruitment and selection of candidates for public appointments on advisory boards. [132795]

Brandon Lewis: Based on our central records, my Department has not used psychometric testing in its recruitment and selection of candidates in any of its recent public appointments to advisory boards. All

19 Dec 2012 : Column 839W

recruitment and selection to our non-departmental public bodies is conducted within the principles set out by the Commissioner for Public Appointments, i.e. that the appointment procedures adopted should be proportionate to the size and purpose of the public body in question and the post (s) to be filled.

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what his Department's policy is on the payment of travel expenses to candidates in respect of their attendance at assessment centres and interviews when pursuing applications for selection to a public appointment. [132796]

Brandon Lewis: The decision whether to pay travel expenses to candidates for attendance at assessment centres and interviews is a matter for each public body to consider at the appropriate time.

As a general rule, candidates are encouraged to use the most cost-effective method(s) of transport that will help them reach their destination safely, in good time and in reasonable comfort. Wherever practicable, travel should be by public transport and reimbursement should be made on production of appropriate receipts.

Travellers

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will estimate the number of Slovak Roma in the UK; and if he will make an assessment of the distribution of Slovak Roma in the UK. [133915]

Mr Foster: I refer the right hon. Gentleman to the answer I gave him on 8 November 2012, Official Report, column 734W. The Government hold no statistics or estimates on the number or distribution of Slovak Roma, or Roma generally, in the UK.

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what recent discussions he has had with the Foreign Secretary on the integration of Slovak Roma in the UK; [133916]

(2) what discussions he has had with the Foreign Secretary on the potential funding streams from the European Union budget for support to aid integration of Roma entering the UK. [133917]

Mr Foster: Ministers and officials within the Department for Communities and Local Government regularly meet colleagues from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to discuss a range of matters.

Education

Further Education: Inspections

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what guidance his Department issues on the proportion of an education institution's provision that should be inspected as part of an Ofsted inspection. [133137]

Mr Laws: The Department has not issued guidance on this matter. The Department sets the statutory requirements within which Ofsted is required to inspect and it is for HM Chief Inspector to set the guidance for

19 Dec 2012 : Column 840W

inspectors on how Ofsted will meet these requirements in conducting its inspections. For schools, this forms part of ‘The framework for school inspection’ and the supporting guidance in the ‘School inspection handbook’. For colleges, this is set out in the ‘Common Inspection Framework for further education and skills’ and the ‘Handbook for the inspection of further education and skills’.

Ofsted

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the budget for Ofsted will be in (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14, (c) 2014-15 and (d) 2015-16; and how many (i) full-time staff and (ii) inspectors it employs. [133134]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Gentleman, providing him with the information requested, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 10 December 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

Ofsted received its budget allocation for 2012-15 in the 2010 Comprehensive Spending Review. No budget has yet been announced for-2015-16.

Ofsted's budget allocation for (a) 2012-13 is £171.0m (b) 2013-14 is £159.6m (c) 2014-15 is £142.3m. The figures for 2013-14 and 2014-15 do not include any further budget reduction announced in the Chancellor's Autumn Statement.

As at 30 November 2012 Ofsted employed (i) 1,146 full time staff and (ii) 520 inspectors (494.1 full time equivalents).

A copy of this reply has been sent to David Laws MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the amount of service pupil premium that will be allocated to each parliamentary constituency in 2013-14; and what percentage change that will be compared to in 2012-13. [127774]

Mr Laws: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011 and allocations have so far been made for the financial years 2011-12 and 2012-13 only. The service premium, introduced as part of the main pupil premium, is provided to schools in respect of children whose parents are serving in the armed forces. Eligibility for the service premium has been extended for 2012-13 to include children whose parents have died in service and who are in receipt of pensions under the armed forces compensation scheme (AFCS) and the war pensions scheme (WPS). We are also ensuring that those children eligible for the service premium in 2011-12 and who would otherwise no longer be covered will retain their eligibility. In England, 52,370 children qualified for the service premium in 2012-13. Annex A, which provides a breakdown of the service premium by parliamentary constituency for 2012-13, has been placed in the House Libraries. The number of service children at constituency level is slightly lower than the national figure as it is not

19 Dec 2012 : Column 841W

possible to identify at constituency level the number of pupils eligible for the service premium in alternative provision settings.

In 2013-14, the service premium level of funding will increase to £300 per pupil. We are not yet able to provide estimates of the numbers of service children at parliamentary constituency level for 2013-14. As with the pupil premium, the service premium allocations for 2013-14 will be based on pupil numbers as recorded in the January 2013 school census, which are not yet known. We intend to provide provisional allocations later in the year, based on pupil numbers from the January 2012 census.

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils eligible for the pupil premium have been formally registered for the premium; and how many such pupils' schools are in receipt of the premium. [130422]

Mr Laws: In 2012-13, the pupil premium is being paid to over 21,000 schools in England, in respect of some 1,924,920 children. Pupils do not have to register specifically for the pupil premium as we identify eligible pupils from the School Census return, local authority return SSDA903 and Ministry of Defence child pensions data.

Benefits data from Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs (HMRC) suggest that around 200,000 pupils aged four to 15 in England are entitled to receive free school meals (FSM) but are not claiming. Some of these 200,000 pupils will still receive the pupil premium through our “Ever 6” FSM measure, which extends eligibility to pupils who have claimed FSM at any point in the last six years. It is nevertheless important that all eligible pupils are registered for FSMs to ensure that pupils receive a healthy school meal, and that schools are able to attract the appropriate pupil premium funding for their disadvantaged pupils. That is why the Department has recently published research which highlights local areas where take-up rates are low(1).

(1) ‘Pupils not claiming free school meals’ research can be found at:

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/RSG/AllPublications/Page1/DFE-RR235

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children will be subject to the pupil premium. [130450]

Mr Laws: In 2012-13, the pupil premium is paid in respect of some 1,924,920 children. The premium is paid to schools at a rate of £623 per pupil for children known to be eligible for free school meals at any point in the last six years and children in care who have been continuously looked after for six months. The service premium, for eligible children of parents in the armed forces, is paid at a rate of £250 per pupil. In 2012-13, of the 1,924,920 children who received the premium, around 52,370 were eligible for the service premium.

We do not yet know how many pupils will be eligible for the pupil premium in 2013-14 as we will need to include eligible pupils from the January 2013 school census. In 2013-14, pupil premium funding will increase from £1.25 billion to £1.875 billion per year.

19 Dec 2012 : Column 842W

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much funding under the pupil premium was allocated to schools in Portsmouth for (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13. [130797]

Mr Laws: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011. Pupil premium funding is provided to schools which have on roll pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (the deprivation premium); children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months (the looked-after child premium); and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces (the service child premium).

In the financial year 2011-12, 5,980 pupils in Portsmouth local authority area were eligible for the deprivation premium, the looked-after child premium or service child premium, attracting £2.740 million.

In the financial year 2012-13, 8,500 pupils in Portsmouth local authority area were eligible for the deprivation premium, the looked-after child premium or service child premium, attracting £5.029 million.

In 2013-14, pupil premium funding will rise from £1.25 billion to £1.875 billion per year. This will enable the level of funding for the deprivation and looked-after child premium to increase to £900 per pupil and the service child premium will increase to £300 per pupil.

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much has been spent as part of the pupil premium in (a) the north-west, (b) Cumbria and (c) Westmorland and Lonsdale constituency since the introduction of the premium; and how many schools have received funding through the premium in (i) the north-west, (ii) Cumbria and (iii) Westmorland and Lonsdale constituency. [131523]

Mr Laws [holding answer 4 December 2012]: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011. Between April 2011 and March 2013, £275,303,000 of pupil premium funding has been allocated to the north-west, £11,965,000 has been allocated to Cumbria local authority and £962,000 has been allocated to Westmorland and Lonsdale constituency.

I can confirm that, nationally, over 99% of schools have pupils who attract the pupil premium. We are unable to provide the exact number of schools, as it is for local authorities to decide whether to allocate the premium to non-mainstream provision. Rather than allocate the premium to these schools, the local authority may decide to hold it back to make central provision for the relevant pupils.

In 2013-14, pupil premium funding in England will rise from £1.25 billion to £1.875 billion per year.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much has been allocated through his Department's Summer Schools programme to date; and how much funding has been budgeted. [133956]

Mr Laws [holding answer 17 December]: In 2012, 1,748 schools took part in the first year of the Summer Schools programme. 63,829 disadvantaged pupils were invited to attend, of whom 38,170 took up the offer.

19 Dec 2012 : Column 843W

The Department for Education budgeted up to £50 million in 2012-13 for the programme. The programme was voluntary for schools and in the first year £23.8 million has been allocated.

The 2013 Summer Schools programme has been announced and further details will be shared with schools early next year. Our aim is to give them more certainty about the 2013 scheme earlier in the school year.

Schools: Admissions

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education for what reasons his Department does not gather information on pupil turnover rates. [132095]

Mr Laws: The Department's approach is to collect data at child level that can then be used for a wide range of analyses. The National Pupil Database (NPD) is populated with data from child-level data collections and to an extent it is possible to use NPD data to calculate measures of pupil turnover by tracking where pupils attend school at different points in time. Pupil turnover can, however, be defined in a number of ways, depending on the purpose.

The 2012 School and College Performance Tables will for the first time include a measure linked to turnover. Key Stage 2 tables will show the attainment and progress of non-mobile pupils, defined as those who have been in the same school throughout years 5 and 6. Similarly, the Key Stage 4 tables will include non-mobile pupils, defined as those who have been in the same school throughout years 10 and 11.

Schools: Asbestos

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what information his Department holds on (a) the presence of asbestos in schools, (b) the effect of asbestos management on the condition of school buildings, (c) incidences of schools being closed due to discovery of asbestos and (d) the removal of asbestos from schools; and if he will make a statement; [133266]

(2) what guidance his Department provides to governors and headteachers of free schools and academies regarding the management of asbestos in schools; [133267]

(3) what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) reviewed in respect of incidences of asbestos-related diseases of people working in schools; [133268]

(4) if he will introduce a central online register, accessible to the public, identifying school buildings whose fabric contains asbestos and providing information on regulations for the management of asbestos and compliance of those schools with such regulations; and if he will make a statement. [133274]

Mr Laws: The Department for Education does not collect information on the presence and condition of asbestos in schools. The Control of Asbestos Regulations requires duty holders—local authorities or schools themselves—to collect this information. Nor does the Department collect information on incidences of schools being closed due to the discovery of asbestos or the removal of asbestos from schools. These are matters for the duty holders and the local management of schools.

19 Dec 2012 : Column 844W

Online guidance on managing the risks from asbestos -containing materials was published on the departmental website on 24 October. This is aimed at headteachers, school governors, other members of the school management team and those who oversee the maintenance and repair of school buildings:

www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/schoolscapital/buildingsanddesign/managementofpremises/b00215518/asbestosmanagementschools

The Department has not commissioned any research into asbestos-related diseases of people working in schools. A research report was commissioned by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) relating to a case control study that covered teachers as well as other professions and this was published in 2009. HSE also publishes analyses of mesothelioma mortality by occupational groups including teachers. The approach to the management of asbestos as enacted by the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006 is informed by the results of such research.

A central national register of school buildings containing asbestos is unnecessary as it would duplicate records which those responsible for managing asbestos are required to keep. Under the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, schools must maintain and regularly update an asbestos register with the location and condition of asbestos containing materials in the school.

Schools: Inspections

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what arrangements are in place for an education institution to follow when it is unhappy with the conclusions reached in an Ofsted inspection. [133135]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. The Deputy Chief Inspector, Education, Children's Services and Skills, John Goldup, has written to the hon. Gentleman, providing him with the information requested, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from John Goldup, dated 12 December 2012:

Your recent Parliamentary question has been passed to Ofsted for response. Her Majesty's Chief Inspector is away, and I am replying on his behalf.

Where concerns arise during an inspection, education institutions can raise them immediately with the lead inspector so that they can be dealt with quickly whilst the inspection is taking place. Concerns can also be raised at the feedback stage, where they are recorded.

Following the inspection, schools receive a draft report for factual accuracy checks and comments. Any outstanding concerns can be raised in a written response and resolved informally prior to publication of the inspection report. If it has not been possible to resolve the concerns informally, the institution can make a formal complaint.

A complaint may be made, in writing or online, at any stage during an inspection or up to 30 calendar days from the date a report is published—or 30 calendar days from the end of the inspection where there is no report. Where there is good reason, Ofsted may look at complaints up to three calendar months from the inspection.

The complainant is sent an acknowledgement letter within one working day of Ofsted receiving the complaint, and this explains the investigation process and timeframe. To ensure independence, only Her Majesty's Inspectors (HMI) or additional inspectors

19 Dec 2012 : Column 845W

employed by the inspection service providers who have had no prior involvement in the inspection are deployed to investigate complaints.

Ofsted's target is to provide a substantive response to all aspects raised within 25 working days from receipt of the complaint. If the investigation cannot answer concerns within 25 working days, Ofsted keeps the school informed about when they will receive a response.

If a school is not satisfied after receipt of a response, they may write to Ofsted's second stage complaints manager to request a review of the handling of their initial complaint. The request must be made within one-month of the date of Ofsted's response to the original complaint.

The second stage complaint investigation is carried out by one of Ofsted's senior HMI managers who have had no previous involvement in the case. The review considers whether the original complaint was handled fairly and properly and if all the matters raised by the complainant have been fully investigated. Ofsted will normally respond within 20 working days. This concludes the complaints handling process within Ofsted.

If the school still remains dissatisfied with the way the complaint has been handled they may appeal to the Independent Complaints Adjudication Service for Ofsted. They are required to send their complaint to the adjudication service within three months of the date of the second stage complaint investigation response letter. The submission of this appeal must be on a prescribed form.

If a school is not satisfied with the outcome of the adjudicator's review, they can write to the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman.

A copy of this reply has been sent to David Laws MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Special Educational Needs

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many school support staff (a) nationally and (b) working in schools in (i) Reading and (ii) Reading West constituency made applications to the special educational needs support scholarship programme in the latest period for which figures are available. [119554]

Mr Laws: The National Scholarship Fund for Teachers was launched in June 2011. This year, the fund has been extended to SEN support staff. The fund has been introduced to encourage and support school support staff in continuing to improve their knowledge of SEN and disability (SEN/D) and enhance their ability to support the teaching and learning of pupils with SEN/D. It is expected that this will also lead to the sharing of learning, knowledge and expertise across the school system, and to increasing public perception of SEN support staff as scholars.

Applications from school support staff are assessed against defined criteria and verified by an expert panel of eminent educationalists.

(a) This year, we received 482 applications from school support staff nationally. Funding was awarded to 274 support staff.

(b) (i) This year, we did not receive any applications from school support staff in Reading; (ii) we received three applications from school support staff in Reading West. These applications were unsuccessful.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether, under the Government's new funding arrangements, a further education or sixth form college which enrols students with a learning difficulty or disability from more than one local authority will have to request

19 Dec 2012 : Column 846W

(a)

additional support funding and

(b)

top-up funding from each of those local authorities; and if he will encourage local authorities to develop standard procedures in this regard. [133637]

Mr Laws: One major aspect of our funding reforms is to bring together all funding for those young people with high-cost additional support needs into a single system in which local authorities will be both commissioner and funder. The purpose of the reforms is to enable integrated health, education and social care plans for high-needs young people and create a more level playing field by ending the current different funding treatment for different types of institution providing for the same young people.

From the 2013/14 academic year the funding for each high-needs student will be provided to all institutions through three distinct elements. Element 1, the core education funding for the course being studied, and Element 2, the first £6,000 of support for the additional support, will go directly from the Education Funding Agency.

Local authorities will have an enhanced role whereby each will have a single high-needs budget to cover their education funding responsibilities for all provision for high-needs children and young people resident in their area. The Education Funding Agency will transfer a budget to each local authority, element 3, to put them in funds to perform this role, based on spend for high-need students resident in each local authority area. Top-up funding, defined as element 3, is the funding required above elements 1 and 2 to meet the total costs of the education provision and will require colleges and other institutions to work with the local authorities that place young people.

Local authorities are encouraged to develop standard procedures and, although statutory duties towards young people with special educational needs remain unchanged, the Department is attaching two important conditions to these arrangements. The first is that local authorities are required to continue with existing placements when the new arrangements come into effect, and the second is that local authorities will be required to look at placements in all institutions on a fair and equivalent basis.

Teachers: Males

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many boys who were (a) eligible and (b) not eligible for free school meals attended a primary school at which there were (i) one, (ii) two and (iii) three full-time equivalent male teachers in the most recent year for which figures are available. [131067]

Mr Laws: The requested information is shown in the table.

Information on the number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals as at January 2012 is published in the Statistical First Release ‘Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2012', which is available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001071/index.shtml

19 Dec 2012 : Column 847W

State-funded primary schools(1,2): number of boys known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals in schools with one, two or three full-time equivalent male teachers(3,4)
 Number of boys known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(3,4)Number of boys not known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(3,4)

State-funded primary schools with one full-time equivalent male teacher(5)

90,215

415,525

State-funded primary schools with two full-time equivalent male teachers(6)

83,440

359,995

State-funded primary schools with three full-time equivalent male teachers(7)

60,180

239,065

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes all primary academies and free schools. (3) Includes pupils who are sole or dual main registrations. Includes boarders. (4) Pupils who have full-time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils who have part-time attendance and are aged between five and 15. (5) Includes schools with one but less than two teachers. (6) Includes schools with two but less than three teachers. (7) Includes schools with three but less than four teachers. Note: Pupil numbers have been rounded to the nearest 5. Source: School Census (January 2012) and School Workforce Census (November 2011)

Health

Arthritis

Mrs Riordan: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what consideration the Government have given to the implementation of a best practice tariff to support the care of people with early inflammatory arthritis. [134473]

Dr Poulter: A new best practice tariff will be introduced in 2013-14 for patients referred to an out-patient clinic with suspected early inflammatory arthritis. The aim of this best practice tariff is to improve clinical outcomes and reduce short-term morbidity and long-term disability.

Mrs Riordan: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps the Government are taking to improve the care of people with rheumatoid arthritis in primary care. [134474]

Norman Lamb: Guidance on the contribution of primary care towards the care of people with rheumatoid arthritis is available from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), and a NICE quality standard is in preparation. In addition, the Government propose to implement the four new indicators relating to rheumatoid arthritis recommended by NICE for the Quality and Outcomes Framework. In the meantime, primary care clinicians may wish to take account of the “10 standards of care” published by the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society, in particular standard 2, which refers to the “red flags” which may aid early diagnosis.

19 Dec 2012 : Column 848W

Arthritis: Young People

Simon Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what support he makes available to young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. [134317]

Dr Poulter: We expect the national health service to meet the needs of young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, in line with the new guidelines for the NHS issued by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in February 2012. The Department funds NHS Choices, which provides information for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis or their families on their condition, and access to sources of further information, such as that provided by Arthritis Care, and information on how to access treatment across primary and secondary care. From 2014, young people with special educational needs resulting from their juvenile idiopathic arthritis will have an Education, Health and Care plan, setting out the support from the three sectors, and be entitled to receive a personal budget to pay for their continuing health care.

Child Abuse

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many cases of fabricated or induced illness have been diagnosed in (a) England and Wales and (b) Leeds in each of the last five years; [134005]

(2) how many cases of fabricated or induced illness have resulted in a child's permanent removal from their family home in each of the last five years. [134006]

Norman Lamb: The following table shows the number of finished admission episodes in each year in England and in Leeds Primary Care Trust with a primary or secondary diagnosis of ‘fabricated or induced illness’. Information on the number of such episodes in Wales is not collected.

 EnglandLeeds PCT

2007-08

257

(1)

2008-09

277

6

2009-10

315

0

2010-11

429

(1)

2011-12

420

(1)

(1) Values between one and five are suppressed in order to protect patient confidentiality, Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Information on children's permanent removal from their family home as a result of fabricated or induced illnesses is not collected centrally.

Clinical Trials: Young People

Simon Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment his Department has made of access to clinical trials by (a) young people and (b) young people as they transition to adulthood. [134315]

Dr Poulter: The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency reports that there has been at least a 30% increase in the number of trials in the United Kingdom involving children under the age of 18 years

19 Dec 2012 : Column 849W

since the introduction of the European Paediatric Regulation in 2007. This legislation obliges new medicines and those being investigated for new uses to have paediatric development plans in return for a reward of extended supplementary patent protection.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Medicines for Children Research Network (MCRN) was established to improve the co-ordination, speed and quality of trials and other well-designed studies of medicines for children and adolescents. Recruitment to trials and studies hosted by the MCRN has increased from 331,226 in 2008-09 to 595,540 in 2011-12. Data on recruitment to MCRN studies by age are not routinely collected.

The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) established a Teenage and Young Adult Clinical Studies Group in April 2005. The group has two main remits: to ensure that teenagers and young adults are considered for and have opportunities to enter disease-specific research protocols generated by NCRI Clinical Studies Groups that relate to specific disease areas, and, where appropriate develop and promote specific protocols for studies in the teenage and young adult age group with particular reference to:

psychosocial factors in that age group;

special biological factors relating to the aetiology and behaviour of cancer in that age group;

research into the optimal provision of health care for patients in that age group; and

occasionally to develop and promote new specific therapeutic trials in this age group ensuring adequate statistical power is obtained by appropriate national and international collaboration.

Drugs: Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how much the NHS spent on anti-psychotic drugs for children in each of the last 10 years; [134307]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of prescriptions that were issued to children for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in each of the last 10 years; [134333]

(3) how many prescriptions for (a) anti-depressant and (b) anti-psychotic drugs were issued to people under 18 in each of the last 10 years. [134334]

Norman Lamb: Information is not available on the number of prescriptions issued, only the number dispensed. The data used in quantifying the number of prescription items dispensed in the community in England are derived from the reimbursement and remuneration of dispensing contractors in England undertaken on behalf of the Department by the NHS Prescription Services. Neither the age of the patient nor the condition for which the item is prescribed is collected.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which drugs approved by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence for the treatment of children have proven mood-altering effects. [134309]

Norman Lamb: The information requested is not held by the Department. I have asked the Chief Executive of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to write to the hon. Gentleman with this information. A copy will be placed in the Library.

19 Dec 2012 : Column 850W

Epilepsy

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what comparative assessment he has made of the level of avoidable epilepsy mortality in the UK and in other European countries; and if he will review his Department's guidance on that issue. [134435]

Norman Lamb: No comparative assessment has been made of the level of avoidable epilepsy mortality in the United Kingdom and in other European countries. In the case of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), which is the largest cause of epilepsy-related death, heightened awareness among pathologists and coroners has led to better reporting. It is therefore inappropriate to compare national statistics across different countries.

The previous Administration published the National Service Framework (NSF) for Long-Term Conditions in 2005 as a 10-year strategy to improve access, experience and outcomes for people with a long-term neurological condition. By implementing the NSF's Quality Requirements, local service commissioners would support improvements to areas such as diagnosis, treatment and information provision, which would reduce the risk of seizures and epilepsy-related deaths. We have made no overall assessment of the effectiveness of implementation of the NSF, though the Long-Term Neurological Conditions Research Initiative has provided some information on its impact.

The mandate to the NHS Commissioning Board sets out the objectives for the national health service and highlights the areas of health and care where the Government expect to see improvements. The objectives in the mandate focus on those areas identified as being of greatest importance to people and include reducing premature deaths and managing on-going physical and mental health conditions. In terms of the latter, the mandate seeks improvements in the way care is provided to people by centring care on the person rather than on the specific condition.

General Practitioners

Anne Marie Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many GP appointments were missed by patients in each primary care trust in England in each of the last three years. [132457]

Dr Poulter: This information is not held centrally.

Health: Children

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent comparative assessment he has made of the well-being of children in the UK and other European countries. [134308]

Dr Poulter: The report of the latest World Health Organisation International Health Behaviour of School Aged Children Study (HBSC) was published in May 2012. The Department funds the England survey of this study.

The HBSC study is an international collaborative study that focuses on the health behaviour and social context of young people. England has been represented since 1997. The England survey collects data on over 4,000 young people aged between 11, 13 and 15.

19 Dec 2012 : Column 851W

The survey examines the broader social environment of young people, including their family, school and community, and moves beyond simply monitoring the prevalence of risk behaviours among young people. It provides a means to understand and respond to the social determinants of health and well-being.

Young people's life satisfaction was measured across all countries. The findings for young people in England follow similar trends across the international survey.

Higher life satisfaction is correlated with higher family affluence.

Boys tend to have higher life satisfaction compared to girls across all ages. However, English boys do not show a decrease in life satisfaction as they get older:

at age 13, 91% report high life satisfaction compared to 88% at age 11.

Girls report a decline from age 11 to 15 in life satisfaction.

England is ranked in the top half of the 43 countries for life satisfaction at ages 13 and 15, but in the bottom third at age 11.

The findings for self-reported health show that England is close to the HBSC average at each age group. As is seen in most HBSC countries, girls report a decrease in self-reported health as they get older. England does not follow the trend for boys, however, with a decrease seen at age 13 (followed by a drop at age 15).

A full copy of the report can be found at:

www.euro.who.int/en/what-we-do/health-topics/Life-stages/child-and-adolescent-health/publications/2012/social-determinants-of-health-and-well-being-among-young-people.-health-behaviour-in-school-aged-children-hbsc-study

Health: Greater London

Siobhain McDonagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what criteria were used to determine the level of public health transition funding for the London boroughs of Merton and Sutton; and if he will make a statement. [134049]

Anna Soubry: In common with other primary care trusts (PCTs), Sutton and Merton PCT received transitional support funding which included a combination of fixed costs reflecting transition costs felt by all public health services irrespective of size, and population-based costs, reflecting costs that vary with the size of the public health unit that is moving to the local authority.

Where a PCT covers more than one local authority we recommended that these monies be divided on the basis of population.

Immigration

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will estimate the additional cost of the delivery of those public services for which his Department is responsible arising from inward migration since 1997. [134302]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not routinely produce estimates of this nature. To do so would require the Department to incur disproportionate cost.

Mental Health Services: Lancashire

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what funding has been allocated for mental health provision in (a) Pendle constituency and (b) Lancashire in each of the last three years. [134342]

19 Dec 2012 : Column 852W

Norman Lamb: Information is not available in the format requested. Funding for national health service services is currently allocated to primary care trusts (PCTs). PCTs commission services to meet the healthcare needs of their local populations, taking account of national and local priorities. From 2013-14, the NHS Commissioning Board will be responsible for the allocation of resources to clinical commissioning groups.

The following table shows the reported spend for adult mental health services in Lancashire by PCT. Data are not available by constituency. Pendle falls within East Lancashire PCT.

£000
PCT2009-102010-112011-12

NHS East Lancashire

32,619.63

29,476.36

33,227.02

NHS Central Lancashire

33,739.91

35,646.03

41,861.71

NHS North Lancashire

37,962.08

38,649.64

36,509.82

Notes: 1. The report, which is conducted independently by Mental Health Strategies, is commissioned annually by the Department and published on the Department's website. 2. The survey is non-mandatory and includes some estimated data. 3. Data cover services provided for working-age adults (age 18-65). Source: 2011-12 National Survey of Investment in Mental Health Services, Mental Health Strategies (2012)

NHS: Finance

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of whether each NHS trust in England will hit its financial target for this financial year. [134313]

Dr Poulter: At quarter one of 2012-13, national health service trusts (excluding foundation trusts) are forecasting an overall surplus of £71 million.

There are five NHS trusts forecasting a gross operating deficit of £160 million at quarter one of 2012-13. These are South London Healthcare NHS Trust (£54 million operating deficit), Barking, Havering and Redbridge Hospitals NHS Trust (£40 million operating deficit), Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust (£26 million operating deficit), Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust (£19 million operating deficit) and North West London Hospitals NHS Trust (£21 million operating deficit).

While it is important to recognise the strong overall financial position of the service, it remains important to focus on the small number of organisations which are not managing their finances. The Department is continuing to work in conjunction with strategic health authorities to make sure the organisations reporting a deficit have robust plans in place for financial recovery while continuing to improve the quality of services to patients.

Additionally, it is important to ensure that these organisations are in a suitable position to meet the requirements for foundation trust status.

Plastic Surgery

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the three most common cosmetic surgery operations have been in each year for which information is available; [134266]

19 Dec 2012 : Column 853W

(2) how many cosmetic surgery operations have been conducted in the UK in each year for which information is available. [134267]

Dr Poulter: Data from the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS), the professional body for cosmetic surgeons in the United Kingdom, indicate that breast augmentation, blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery) and breast reduction were the most common cosmetic surgery procedures carried out in 2011. The total number of cosmetic surgery operations carried out by members of BAAPS in each year is given in the following table.

 Total number of cosmetic surgery procedures carried out by BAAPS members

2003

10,738

2004

16,367

2005

22,041

2006

28,921

2007

32,453

2008

34,187

2009

36,482

2010

38,274

2011

43,069

Source: BAAPS

We do not have data on cosmetic surgery procedures carried out by surgeons who are not members of BAAPS.

Prescriptions: Fees and Charges

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people are eligible for free prescriptions in Leeds North West constituency. [134129]

Norman Lamb: Information is not available at local level.

Procurement

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when his Department's consultation on procurement will be published. [134314]

Dr Poulter: The review—commissioned by the NHS chief executive—will conclude at the end of December 2012 and the report will be published early next year.

Secondment

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people have been seconded to assist his Department's consultation on procurement; and how many such people are seconded from the (a) private and (b) public sector. [134312]

Dr Poulter: The Procurement Review Team contains two seconded members. One of these is on secondment from the private sector and the other is on secondment from the public sector.

Smoking: Death

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many deaths have been caused by smoking in each of the last 10 years. [134310]

19 Dec 2012 : Column 854W

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated December 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many deaths have been caused by smoking in each of the last 10 years. (134310)

Deaths due to smoking-related illness cannot be directly estimated, as smoking status is not included on the death certificate. However, research published by the NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care in August 2012 estimated that one in five deaths were attributable to smoking in England in 2011. The report Statistics on Smoking: England, 2012 is available at:

https://catalogue.ic.nhs.uk/publications/public-health/smoking/smok-eng-2012/smok-eng-2012-rep.pdf

The number of deaths registered in England and Wales each year by sex, age and cause are published annually on the National Statistics website at:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/mortality-statistics--deaths-registered-in-england-and-wales--series-dr-/index.html

Smoking: Health Education

Fiona Bruce: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many people are employed in local NHS stop smoking services in (a) each primary care trust area and (b) England in 2012-13; and how many such people are planned to be employed in local NHS stop smoking services in 2013-14; [134283]

(2) how much funding his Department has allocated to local NHS stop smoking services in (a) each primary care trust area and (b) England in (i) 2012-13 and (ii) 2013-14. [134284]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not hold data on the numbers of persons working in stop smoking services in each primary care trust area or in England as a whole.

The Department does not directly fund stop smoking service activity. Funding that was allocated in 2012-13 for services was allocated by primary care trusts. Funding for 2013-14 will be allocated by the local authority from the ring-fenced public health budget.

Varian Medical Systems UK and Hospital Corporation of America

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many meetings officials of his Department have had with representatives of (a) Varian and (b) HCA International since 2010; and what was discussed at each such meeting; [133936]

(2) with reference to his Department's document on the value for money addendum to the strategic outline case for the national proton beam therapy (PBT) service development programme, section 4.11, if he will publish the private correspondence with University College Hospital, London that forms the basis of the annual PBT cost base; [134063]

(3) with reference to his Department's document on the value for money addendum to the strategic outline case for the national proton beam therapy (PBT)

19 Dec 2012 : Column 855W

service development programme, section 4.11, whether

(a)

Varian Medical Systems and

(b)

HCA International were involved in assessing the annual PBT cost base; [134064]

(4) with reference to his Department's document on the value for money addendum to the strategic outline case for the national proton beam therapy (PBT) service development programme, section 4.10, whether (a) Varian Medical Systems and (b) HCA International were involved in the costing discussions with University College Hospital, London and the Christie Hospital, Manchester. [134065]

Anna Soubry: Since 2010, no meetings have taken place between officials of the Department and the Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) International or Varian Medical Systems.

However, the previous Minister of State, my right hon. Friend the Member for Chelmsford (Mr Burns), visited Varian Medical System's United Kingdom plant on 12 July 2012 where he was given a presentation about its business in the UK. Radiotherapy technology was discussed, as well as the capital fund negotiated with the NHS supply chain to bulk purchase medical equipment for the national health service.

With regard to the Value for Money Addendum to the Strategic Outline Case for Proton Beam Therapy, neither Varian Medical Systems nor HCA International were involved in any of the costing discussions with the two trusts, or in assessing the costings. There are no plans to publish correspondence entered into with trusts or other detailed working papers produced in the development of the strategic outline case and value for money addendum.

19 Dec 2012 : Column 856W

Women and Equalities

Homosexuality: Marriage

Ian Lucas: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities what representations on equal marriage for homosexual couples she has received from the Church in Wales. [133982]

Mrs Grant [holding answer 17 December 2012]: The Church in Wales submitted a formal response to the Government's consultation on equal civil marriage, which was fully taken into account in preparing our proposals for enabling same-sex couples to marry. We will continue to work with the Church in Wales, and other religious organisations, as we prepare the legislation.

Public Appointments

Mr Weir: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities which recruitment consultants her Department used to select candidates for public appointments within her departmental remit in each year for which figures are available since 2007; and how much was paid in fees to each such company in each year since 2007. [132769]

Jo Swinson: The following payments were made for the services of recruitment consultants in respect of the recruitments to the Equality and Human Rights Commission and the Women's National Commission.

£
Recruitment consultant200720082009201020112012

Rockpools

46,588

0

0

0

0

0

Appointments Commission(1)

0

0

91,833

25,209

12,885

0

Gatenby Sanderson

0

0

0

0

0

59,309

(1) The Appointments Commission was an arm’s length body of the Department of Health.