Education

Academies

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of converter academies have (a) formal and (b) other arrangements to help another school raise its performance. [125553]

Elizabeth Truss: As of 1 November 2012, 673 converter academies, or 35%, are working to help another school raise its performance through formal chain arrangements. A further 98 converter academies, or 5.1%, are accredited sponsors and are looking for projects. 74 converter academies, or 3.85% of the 1,920 converter total, have formal sponsor arrangements in place to help raise performance in another academy.

Children: Day Care

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what estimate he has made of the change in spending by local authorities on supporting graduate leaders in childcare settings since May 2010; [128771]

(2) what estimate he has made of the change in spending by local authorities on supporting the upskilling of the childcare and early education workforce since May 2010. [128772]

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Elizabeth Truss: No such estimates have been made. Local authorities have had funding since May 2010 which they have been free to choose how to spend. This funding has, since 2011, included the Early Intervention Grant (EIG). Local authorities have had particular flexibility in how they use the EIG and have been able to use this to fund the improvements needed in their area. In 2012-13, the EIG is worth around £2.37 billion.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many responses to the call for evidence for the Childcare Commission were from (a) individuals describing themselves as parents, (b) individuals describing themselves as childminders, (c) other individuals working in the sector, (d) owners and managers of child care settings, (e) trade bodies or unions, (f) organisations with an interest in child development and (g) employers not in the child care sector. [128776]

Elizabeth Truss: The call for evidence received 328 written responses. Respondents were invited to select the category which they considered best described them from the following list. The breakdown of responses is as follows:

 Responses

Parent/Carer

64

Childminder

58

Local Authority

48

Nursery

35

Sector Representative Body

28

Other

22

Breakfast/After-school Care Provider

19

Pre-School/Playgroup

13

Charity

11

Consultant

7

Children's Centre

6

Holiday Care Provider

5

Union/Membership Organisation

5

Maintained School

4

Nanny

2

Independent School

1

The “Other” category includes women's groups, insurance and investment companies, child care voucher suppliers, researchers, and those who gave no information in response to this question.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to increase flexibility within the childcare market. [128780]

Elizabeth Truss: In September 2012, we introduced new measures to make the early education programme for three and four year olds more flexible to enable more children to access their full entitlement. Parents can now take their child’s full 15 hour entitlement over a minimum of two days rather than the previous three days and new guidance allows local authorities to fund providers to deliver free hours between 7.00am and 7.00pm rather than 8.00am to 6.00pm, as was the case previously.

Together with the Department for Work and Pensions, the Department is currently looking at a range of issues relating to the affordability, availability and quality of

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childcare, through the childcare commission. We are considering ways in which to increase flexibility for providers within the childcare market, particularly through one of the key themes of the commission—identifying any regulation that burdens childcare providers unnecessarily because it is not needed for reasons of quality or safety.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education from which budget his planned £100 million of capital funding for childcare providers expanding to provide nursery education for disadvantaged two year olds will be taken. [128782]

Elizabeth Truss: The funding has not come from a single budget but from efficient management of the Department's entire capital programme. Surpluses from more than one of the Department's centrally managed capital programmes in 2012-13 have been reallocated to local authorities early education programmes.

Child Protection

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the cost was of preparing the report by Lord Carlile of Berriew on child protection in Doncaster. [129860]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 26 November 2012]:Following publication of the Serious Case Review (SCR) overview report on the case of the 'J' children in Edlington, the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), asked Lord Carlile of Berriew CBE QC to carry out an independent review of the issues arising from the case. The SCR did not meet the Secretary of State's expectations and he wanted to be confident that all the necessary lessons had been identified and improvements made.

The direct cost of preparing Lord Carlile's report was £37,971. This covers payments to Lord Carlile's chambers, for his time and expertise and to two meeting venues in Doncaster at which Lord Carlile held a number of interviews with stakeholders.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the terms of reference were for Lord Carlile of Berriew in producing his report into child protection in Doncaster; and if he will make a statement. [129861]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 26 November 2012]: Lord Carlile was asked on 29 March 2012 to carry out an independent review of the Edlington case following full publication of the Serious Case Review.

The full terms of reference were posted on the Department for Education's website in March 2012 along with information on the Serious Case Review Report—“J” Children in Edlington and can be found at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/healthandwellbeing/safeguardingchildren/a00205927/serious-case-review-report-j-children-in-edlington

In addition the full terms of reference can be found in annex 1 of the report.

The review's main objective was to determine whether or not all the necessary lessons arising from the “J” children’ case had been identified and appropriate and

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sufficient action was being taken to ensure that all necessary improvements have been embedded in the practice of the council and its partners.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many serious case reviews have been (a) commissioned, (b) published in full and (c) published with an executive summary only since June 2010. [129862]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 26 November 2012]:Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCBs) have statutory responsibility for undertaking and publishing Serious Case Reviews (SCRs). The information the hon. Member has requested that this Department holds is based on information we have received to date from individual LSCBs.

From that information we understand that 147 SCRs have been initiated by LSCBs since June 2010. Of the 80 SCRs that we understand have been completed, 28 SCR overview reports have been published by LSCBs having first been anonymised and redacted in line with statutory guidance. We know of four SCRs where only the executive summary has been published.

We are frustrated that more SCRs have not been published. We will consider all available options, including legislation, to ensure that SCRs are initiated and published where appropriate.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on bringing forward legislative proposals to require local safeguarding children's boards to commission more serious case reviews. [129863]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 26 November 2012]: We are committed to ensuring that serious case reviews are undertaken where appropriate and are published so that the lessons from tragic incidents lead to improvements in practice. This is a fundamental part of the Government's ambition to improve the child protection system and bring about long lasting reforms to help vulnerable children.

The current criteria for when a serious case review should be initiated are clearly set out in statutory regulations. Over the summer we consulted on revising relevant statutory guidance (“working Together to Safeguard Children”) including setting out those criteria more clearly in guidance. We are currently analysing those responses.

We will continue to keep under review the number of serious case reviews that are both initiated and published. We will consider all available options, including legislation, to ensure that serious case reviews are initiated and published where appropriate.

Children's Centres

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the number of Sure Start children's centres which have ceased providing on-site day care since May 2010. [128781]

Elizabeth Truss: In the past, children's centres in the most disadvantaged areas but not elsewhere were required to provide full day care. In 2010, the Government

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removed the requirement for children's centres in the most disadvantaged areas to provide full day care where there was no demand.

The Department for Education collects information on the provision of child care through the annual Childcare and Early Years Provider Survey. This information allows us to estimate the number of Sure Start children's centres providing full day care provision on site. Estimates from the survey show that in 2010 the number of children's centres providing on-site full day care was 800 and that in 2011 this figure had fallen to 550. The 2011 survey indicates that increases in the broader supply of full day care provision may have impacted on demand for provision specifically based in children's centres. The survey estimates that between 2010 and 2011 the number of full day care providers increased from 16,700 to 17,600.

Early Intervention Grant

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether his Department has undertaken an impact assessment of the planned transfer of the early intervention grant to the Department for Communities and Local Government; [128765]

(2) for what reason the Government proposes to transfer the early intervention grant to the Department for Communities and Local Government; [128766]

(3) which Minister in his Department is responsible for Sure Start and early intervention policy; [128767]

(4) whether his Department will retain policy responsibility for Sure Start and early intervention when the early intervention grant is transferred to the Department for Communities and Local Government. [128768]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education will retain policy responsibility for Sure Start and early intervention. I am the Minister responsible for Sure Start policy. Early intervention is a cross-cutting policy area across a wide range of the Department's responsibility, and responsibility is shared between Ministers.

From April 2013, the Government will be introducing a business rates retention scheme to put a strong financial incentive for economic growth at the heart of the local government funding system.

The Government intend to roll in a number of currently separate grant funding streams, including the Early Intervention Grant, through the new Business Rates Retention Scheme. This will maximise the size of the local share, thereby increasing the financial incentive for local authorities to drive forward economic growth. It also provides greater local flexibility and freedom for local authorities to make decisions and manage budgets efficiently.

The Department for Communities and Local Government published in July an equalities impact assessment alongside their technical consultation on the Business Rates Retention Scheme.

The impact of rolling in these grants will be further to simplify and decentralise funding. Councils will be incentivised to support additional business growth through increased economic activity, which local communities

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will benefit from. This will mean that councils will be encouraged to foster good relationships with all businesses in their community.

The impact assessment is available at:

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20120919132719/www.communities.gov.uk/publications/localgovernment/businessratesequality

Offshore Employment Companies

Catherine McKinnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on the use of offshore employment companies in the supply of public sector workers in his Department and its associated public bodies. [128735]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education does not use offshore employment companies to supply it with public sector workers. Where it is deemed appropriate to use companies to supply public sector workers, the Department utilises the services of suppliers from Cabinet Office Frameworks.

Extended School Services

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department has taken to encourage schools to (a) provide and (b) host (i) breakfast clubs, (ii) after school clubs and (iii) holiday activities since the end of his Department's funding for wraparound childcare. [128774]

Elizabeth Truss: The Government want schools to decide which extended services to offer based on the contribution they are making to improving pupil outcomes, particularly for disadvantaged pupils. The funding for extended services was mainstreamed into the Dedicated Schools Grant from April 2011 following the spending review.

The Childcare Commission is looking at how to improve the accessibility of child care for working families. This will include child care for the over-fives, particularly the wrap-around child care that many families need before school, after school and in the holidays. The intention is to identify ways to enable parents and other volunteers to set up the schemes they want in their area; and to promote partnerships between schools and voluntary and private providers. The Commission will report later in the autumn.

GCSEs

Mr Brady: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what percentage of children achieved (a) five A* to C GCSEs including English and mathematics and (b) two or more A grades at A level in each local education authority (LEA) in each of the last three years, by ethnic origin and classification of the LEA as (i) selective, (ii) partially selective and (iii) comprehensive; and what the average proportion of children in each category was in each year, by ethnic origin. [129714]

Elizabeth Truss: The information requested has been placed in the House Libraries.(1)

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There is no recognised term whereby local authorities would be classed as wholly 'comprehensive'. All remaining authorities would consist of those with no, or few selective schools.

(1) Local authorities that are classed as wholly 'selective' have been highlighted in the tables.

Home Education: Government Assistance

Christopher Pincher: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he has taken to support parents who wish to home-teach their children. [129787]

Elizabeth Truss: The Government respect the right of parents to educate their children at home. Parents who home educate their children have always taken on the full responsibility for their education. Local authorities are responsible for ensuring that provision set out in statements for children with special educational needs is met, including for those who are home educated. Local authorities also have wider duties towards children in their area who have special educational needs, and can support home educators in providing for such children. From 2013-14, parents of home educated young people wishing to send their child to a further education college will be able to register directly with the college without needing to seek the agreement of the local authority.

Outdoor Education

Simon Hart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to ensure that children are able to carry out play and learning outside the classroom when the only available facilities are located some distance from the school site. [129512]

Elizabeth Truss: The Government recognises the positive contribution that learning outside the classroom and play can make to pupils' study and development as part of a broad and balanced curriculum. However, individual schools are best placed to determine how to include such experiences in their curriculum.

Pay

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many employees in his Department are paid in excess of (a) £80,000 and (b) £100,000. [128559]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 20 November 2012]: The number of staff employed in the Department, paid in excess of £80,000 and £100,000 respectively, is set out in the following table:

 Number

Number of DFE staff earning £100,000 and over

19

Number of staff earning between £80,000 and £100,000

70

Primary Education

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the Prime Minister's press statement of 12 November 2012, if he will place

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in the Library a list of the 400 primary schools he intends should be required to convert into primary academies. [129319]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 22 November 2012]: The Department is in discussion with a range of schools nationally where we believe sponsored academy status would bring about the transformational change required. It is not our policy publicly to name schools where we would like to explore academy options. We believe this has the potential to disrupt the process of school improvement at the schools concerned, and may cause negative publicity that will distress parents, staff and pupils.

Pupils: Databases

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what funding his Department has contributed to the construction by Capita of its One pupil database; [128672]

(2) what discussions he has had with Capita on the security of the data held by Capita on its One pupil database; [128673]

(3) who has access to the data held on the Capita One pupil database; and if he will make a statement; [128674]

(4) how many pupil records are held on the Capita One pupil database; and what categories of information are held. [128675]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 19 November 2012]: The Capita One system is not a responsibility of the Department for Education. It is a commercially available system that Capita provide to meet the management information needs of their local authority customers. The Department does not fund this system nor have we had discussions relating to data security.

Schools: Counselling

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what assessment he has made of the Welsh Government's decision to make it a statutory duty for local authorities in Wales to provide school-based counselling in all secondary schools through the School Standards (Wales) Bill; and if he will consider introducing similar measures for local authorities in England; [129707]

(2) what assessment he has made of the findings of the Welsh Government's report entitled Evaluation of the Welsh School-based Counselling Strategy: Final Report published in November 2011; and if he will make a statement. [129734]

Mr Timpson: The Evaluation of the Welsh School-based Counselling Strategy shows the importance of supporting young people who are unhappy, unwell or struggling with their family life. Good head teachers know this. Ofsted evidence also shows schools whose pupils do well academically recognise the importance of childrens' wider development and well-being.

In July 2012 the “No Health Without Mental Health Implementation Framework” was published, which describes the role that both schools and local authorities should play in supporting children and young people's

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mental health and well-being. It is for them to decide how best to support the children and young people in their care.

Schools: Governing Bodies

Dr Phillip Lee: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on the payment of school governor's expenses from public funds. [129762]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 26 November 2012]: Governing bodies in maintained schools have the power to pay governors for any out of pocket expenditure necessarily incurred to enable them to carry out their governor duties. The Articles of Association for each academy set out the arrangements for the payment of governor expenses. Payment is at the discretion of the governors and subject to audit scrutiny by local authorities or external auditors, for maintained schools and academies respectively.

Schools: ICT

Harriett Baldwin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the extent to which the Government secure intranet connects schools and academies with Government Departments and local authorities. [128575]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education has not made an assessment of the extent to which the Government secure intranet connects schools and academies with Government Departments and local authorities.

Schools and academies generally use the public internet to access online services from government. Schools generally have internet access provided via a regional broadband consortium (RBC), local authority or private provider, which is a more cost-effective method of accessing government services.

Secondary Education: Mental Health Services

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of secondary schools have a professional school counsellor in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland. [129708]

Mr Timpson: The information requested is not collected centrally for England.

Information for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland is a matter for the devolved Administrations of those countries.

Special Educational Needs

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he estimates the number of young people with a learning difficulty assessment to be higher or lower than the number who will receive an education, health and care plan after 2014. [127357]

Mr Timpson: We anticipate that the SEN reforms will not result in any significant change between the numbers of young people with learning difficulty assessments in the current system and those with education, health and care plans in the new system.

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Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of (a) children with special educational needs and (b) disabled children are educated in mainstream schools. [129782]

Mr Timpson: The available information on pupils with special educational needs is shown in the table. Information on disability is not collected.

Information on pupils with special educational needs is published in the “Special Educational Needs in England, January 2012” Statistical First Release at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001075/index.shtml

and in the “Children with Special Educational Needs: An Analysis—2012” Statistical Release at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/STR/d001092/index.shtml

All schools: number of pupils by special educational needs status(1,2), January 2012, England
 Pupils with statements of special educational needs(1)
 Pupils on roll(1)Number of pupilsPlacement of pupils(4)

All schools

8,178,200

226,125

100

    

State-funded schools

   

Maintained nursery

39,395

305

0.1

State-funded primary(5,6)

4,217,000

58,535

25.9

State-funded secondary(5,7)

3,234,875

62,630

27.7

Maintained special(8)

91,590

88,230

39.0

Pupil referral units(9)

13,495

1,610

0.7

    

Other schools

   

Independent(10)

577,515

10,630

4.7

Non-maintained special

4,325

4,185

1.9

 Pupils with special educational needs without statements(1,3)
 Number of pupilsPlacement of pupils(4)

All schools

1,392,215

100

   

State-funded schools

  

Maintained nursery

4,855

0.3

State-funded primary(5,6)

721,120

51.8

State-funded secondary(5,7)

591,985

42.5

Maintained special(8)

2,435

0.2

Pupil referral units(9)

9,195

0.7

   

Other schools

  

Independent(10)

62,575

4.5

Non-maintained special

50

0.0

 All pupils with special educational needs(1,2)
 Number of pupilsPlacement of pupils(4)

All schools

1,618,340

100

   

State-funded schools

  

Maintained nursery

5,155

0.3

State-funded primary(5,6)

779,655

48.2

State-funded secondary(5,7)

654,620

40.4

Maintained special(8)

90,665

5.6

Pupil referral units(9)

10,805

0.7

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Other schools

  

Independent(10)

73,205

4.5

Non-maintained special

4,235

0.3

(1) Includes pupils who are sole or dual main registrations. (2) Includes pupils with a statement of special educational needs, at School Action and at School Action Plus. (3) Includes pupils at School Action and at School Action Plus. (4) Placement of pupils—the number of pupils with special educational needs expressed as a percentage of the number of pupils with special educational needs in all schools. (5) Includes middle schools as deemed. (6) Includes all primary academies, including free schools. (7) Includes city technology colleges and all secondary academies, including free schools. Includes all-through schools. (8) Includes general hospital schools and special academies. (9) Includes pupils registered with other providers and in further education colleges. (10) Includes direct grant nursery schools. Note: Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest 5. Source: School Census

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether it remains his intention to include measures relating to special educational needs in a children's Bill in the current Session of Parliament. [129859]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 26 November 2012]:The Department is working to bring forward legislation relating to SEN in the current Session of Parliament. This legislation is currently undergoing pre-legislative scrutiny.

Students: Plagiarism

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to tackle websites which offer to students essays or dissertations which they may submit as their own work. [129235]

Elizabeth Truss: We fully condemn any form of cheating. For exams taken in schools, the regulator, Ofqual, requires awarding organisations to put in place arrangements to ensure that students take responsibility for producing and submitting their own work and that schools put in place appropriate procedures to prevent and tackle

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plagiarism. Addressing plagiarism within universities is a matter for autonomous higher education institutions; it is a matter they take very seriously.

The processes for moderating coursework and controlled assessment include a requirement for moderators to be able to detect and report incidents of plagiarism and unauthorised collusion. The Joint Council for Qualifications produces a set of policies and procedures on dealing with suspected malpractice in examinations and assessments. This includes information on plagiarism and the penalties that are associated with it. Ofqual has also published guidance to educate students, parents and carers, and teachers about plagiarism, including advice to teachers on how to detect plagiarism. Ofqual is keen to encourage people to report all incidents of cheating to the relevant exam board or to the regulator, so that appropriate action can be taken.

Teacher Training

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what steps he has taken to ensure the adequate and systematic training in relation to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child of (a) teachers and (b) officials in his Department working with children; [129827]

(2) what proportion of (a) teachers and (b) officials in his Department working with children have received training in relation to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. [129828]

Mr Timpson: The Department for Education does not determine the content of teacher training but leaves it to training providers to design training programmes that enable teachers and trainee teachers to meet the teachers’ standards. The standards include clear expectations around tolerance of, and respect for, the rights of others, and the demonstration of good subject and curriculum knowledge. Teachers who work in rights respecting schools or who are responsible for citizenship or PSHE lessons can also access the many online materials that are available to improve their understanding of the UNCRC.

The Department has taken a number of steps over the past year to raise awareness of the UNCRC among its officials, including several detailed training sessions for those involved in developing new policy or legislation. We do not keep a record of the proportion of staff involved in this ongoing work.