Dementia

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will assess the implications for his policies of the findings of the University of Manchester's recent study into the quality of care provided to people with dementia. [120102]

Norman Lamb: The report highlights the need for people with dementia to receive regular reviews of their care.

The Government recognise the need to improve the care and support people with dementia and their carers receive, which is why we launched the Prime Minister's challenge on dementia on 26 March. Driving improvements in health and care is a key strand of the challenge and we want to see all people with dementia receive a written integrated care plan.

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to improve the (a) diagnosis of dementia and (b) treatment for people with dementia. [120537]

Norman Lamb: Dementia diagnosis rates have increased in England in the last year, but we recognise that there is more to do which is why improving diagnosis rates is a key part of the national dementia strategy and the Prime Minister's challenge on dementia.

Through the Prime Minister's challenge we will ensure that general practitioners and other health professionals make patients aged 65 and over aware of memory clinics and refer those in need of assessment.

We will work to ensure that there are adequate memory services across the country and we are working with the Royal College of Psychiatrists to drive up the proportion of memory services which are accredited.

From April 2013, there will be a quantified ambition for diagnosis rates across the country, underpinned by robust and affordable plans.

We are developing a new tool which will help clinical commissioning groups calculate the prevalence of dementia within their local area. The tool will also help them to

12 Sep 2012 : Column 254W

map the demand for and supply of appropriate dementia services, and to create local trajectories for increased diagnosis.

Improving health and care support for people with dementia is one of the key strands of the Prime Minister's challenge and, as part of the challenge, we have developed the dementia care and support compact.

The purpose of the compact with major care providers is to improve care and support for people with dementia living at home and in care homes. Through this vehicle, the care sector is committing to leading initiatives to improve the quality of care for people with dementia. The compact focuses on quality of life for people with dementia and the delivery of relationship-based care and support. Currently over 190 organisations, including the leading providers of care and support, have signed up to the compact.

From April 2012, £54 million will be available through the Dementia CQUIN (Commissioning for Quality and Innovation) payment framework to hospitals offering dementia risk assessments to all over-75s admitted to their care. From April 2013, this will be extended to the quality of dementia care delivered. Also from April 2013 access to all CQUIN rewards will be dependent on delivering support for carers in line with the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence/Social Care Institute for Excellence guidelines.

We are working with the Royal Colleges to respond to the challenge of dementia by bringing forward plans to ensure that all their members are capable and competent in dementia care.

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans his Department has to improve awareness of dementia among (a) NHS staff, (b) local GPs and (c) the public. [120538]

Norman Lamb: The Prime Minister's challenge on dementia, published in March 2012, calls on the Royal Colleges to respond to the challenge of dementia by bringing forward plans to ensure that their members are capable and competent in dementia care. Objective 13 of the national dementia strategy also concerns an informed and effective work force for people with dementia. The Department has established a Workforce Advisory Group, chaired by Professor Alistair Burns, National Clinical Director for Dementia, to support the delivery of objective 13 across health and social care.

The Department will launch a national dementia awareness campaign starting 21 September and running until January 2013. It will consist of television, press, magazine and digital advertising supported by public relations and social media. The campaign aims to increase early diagnosis of dementia by raising awareness of the signs and symptoms, and encouraging people to discuss any concerns they have with their general practitioner.

Haemophilia

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure that people with haemophilia who contracted hepatitis C through contaminated blood transfusions are being treated with the most up-to-date hepatitis C treatment recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. [120169]

12 Sep 2012 : Column 255W

Anna Soubry: Primary care trusts are legally required to make funding available to enable clinicians to prescribe treatments recommended by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance. This must occur within three months of publication of the technology appraisal. The Government have committed to ensuring that NHS commissioners will continue to be required to make funding available for drugs and treatments recommended by NICE technology appraisals. This includes recommendations on hepatitis C treatments, the most recent of which were published in April 2012. Decisions on the prescribing of drugs for the treatment of individuals patients are made by clinicians.

Health

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on the responsibility deal; and whether he plans to propose changes to any aspect of the responsibility deal. [120409]

Anna Soubry: Through the public health responsibility deal over 415 public health, voluntary, public sector and commercial organisations have signed up to play their part in improving the public's health by helping people to adopt a healthier diet, foster a culture of responsible drinking, increasing physical activity levels and improving the health of their staff. The responsibility deal will continue to play an important part in delivering these ambitions.

Health Services

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) when the proposed ban on age discrimination in the provision of services will be applied within the NHS; [120112]

(2) what effect the implementation of the Equality Act 2010 will have on age inequalities in breast cancer services; [120113]

(3) what steps his Department is taking to ensure that commissioners are fully aware of the requirements of the Equality Act 2010; and if he will make a statement; [120114]

(4) what guidance his Department plans to issue on implementation of the Equality Act 2010 in respect of (a) health and social care and (b) breast cancer services; [120115]

(5) what effect the implementation of the public sector duty in the NHS will have on breast cancer services; [120116]

(6) how progress in delivering reductions in inequalities in breast cancer services will be measured following the implementation of the Health and Social Care Act 2012. [120117]

Anna Soubry: Information and guidance about duties under the Equality Act 2010 have already been made available to the national health service, including commissioners, via the Equality Delivery System published in 2011 and publicised through the NHS Operating Framework for England and the Department's regular bulletins for senior NHS managers. This is in addition to information and guidance published by the NHS Commissioning Board Authority and the Government Equalities Office and the Equality and Human Rights Commission for all public authorities.

12 Sep 2012 : Column 256W

The ban on age discrimination in the provision of services will be applied from 1 October 2012. Guidance on the ban on age discrimination has been available to the NHS since May 2010 and there have been a number of subsequent communications to the NHS to update on progress towards the ban, which have included a link to this guidance. The most recent of these communications was in June 2012 as follows:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/06/the-week-issue-252/

The Equality Act 2010 public sector Equality Duty supports the NHS Constitution core principle that NHS services should be available to all, and that patients and the public have the right not to be discriminated against. The Equality Duty will help ensure that NHS services, including breast cancer services, consider the needs of all individuals.

Measuring reductions in inequalities in breast cancer services following the implementation of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 will be a matter for the NHS Commissioning Board.

Specifically on breast cancer, Statement 6 of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Quality Standard on Breast Cancer states:

“People with early invasive breast cancer, irrespective of age, are offered surgery, radiotherapy and appropriate systemic therapy, unless significant comorbidity precludes it”.

In addition, in partnership with Macmillan Cancer Support we are funding the Improving Cancer Treatment, Assessment and Support for Older People Project: to test and evaluate new methods of clinical assessment of people with a diagnosis of cancer; co-ordinate and deliver short-term practical support packages for older people undergoing treatment for cancer; and promote age equality to address age discriminatory behaviour in cancer services.

Hospitals: Crimes of Violence

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many assaults took place in NHS hospitals in each of the last five years. [120572]

Dr Poulter: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to her by the Under-Secretary of State for Health, my hon. Friend the Member for Broxtowe (Anna Soubry), on 7 September 2012, Official Report, column 551W.

The numbers of reported physical assaults against staff in the national health service in England have been collected annually since 2004-05.

Information on the numbers of assaults other than those against staff is not available.

Mental Health Services

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make an assessment of the conclusions of the Centre for Economic Performance report entitled “How mental illness loses out in the NHS” published in June 2012. [120594]

Norman Lamb: The Department has assessed the Centre for Economic Performance's report, “How mental illness loses out in the NHS”, and agrees with the report's conclusions on the importance of investment in mental health services and on the necessity of treating mental ill health as seriously as physical ill health.

12 Sep 2012 : Column 257W

Our mental health strategy “No Health Without Mental Health” and the recently published implementation framework make our commitment to these principles clear.

Ministerial Policy Advisers

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the duties are of special advisers working in his Department. [120478]

Dr Poulter: As set out in the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010, the role of special advisers is to assist a Minister of the Crown. Specifically in health this will be to advise on health and social care policy or media and communications depending on the role to which they are appointed.

12 Sep 2012 : Column 258W

NHS: Negligence

Mr Baron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many cases brought against the NHS Litigation Authority were funded by (a) legal aid, (b) a conditional fee agreement and (c) another form of funding in each of the last five years; and how many in each category resulted in a compensation payment. [120445]

Dr Poulter: The NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) manages certain types of claims on behalf of NHS defendants. It provided information on clinical negligence and non-clinical claims in the following tables. It should be noted that non-clinical claims are mainly employers' and public liabilities claims.

Table 1: Number of clinical negligence claims by type of funding and NHSLA notification year as at 31 August 2012
NHSLA notification yearLegal AidUnsettled as at 31 August 2012No. resulted in a compensation payment as at 31 August 2012CFAUnsettled as at 31 August 2012No. resulted in a compensation payment as at 31 August 2012Other fundingUnsettled as at 31 August 2012No. resulted in a compensation payment as at 31 August 2012

2011-12

1,112

705

213

5,588

2,951

1,705

2,176

1,017

632

2010-11

1,392

493

543

4,714

976

2,633

2,405

445

1,108

2009-10

1,343

252

719

3,238

308

2,261

2,061

123

1,151

2008-09

1,537

199

866

2,465

80

1,770

2,089

45

1,031

2007-08

1,358

112

832

2,080

29

1,584

2,029

12

970

Table 2: Number of non-clinical claims by type of funding and NHSLA notification year as at 31 August 2012
NHSLA notification yearLegal AidUnsettled as at 31 August 2012No. resulted in a compensation payment as at 31 August 2012CFAUnsettled as at 31 August 2012No. resulted in a compensation payment as at 31 August 2012Other fundingUnsettled as at 31 August 2012No. resulted in a compensation payment as at 31 August 2012

2011-12

24

6

9

4,279

2,402

1,088

252

96

60

2010-11

16

3

5

4,028

909

2,066

239

29

82

2009-10

18

0

7

3,583

340

2,269

384

19

179

2008-09

18

0

9

3,314

86

2,245

313

6

127

2007-08

22

0

11

3,014

27

2,044

278

0

114

Nurses: Schools

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure that school nurses transferring to health visiting are replaced. [120222]

Dr Poulter: It is the responsibility of strategic health authorities (SHAs), in conjunction with their associated deaneries, higher education institutes, primary care trusts and national health service trusts to commission the appropriate level of healthcare work force training posts to meet the needs of the local population including taking into account staff moving between work force groups.

It is entirely appropriate that individual healthcare providers plan and develop their work force. However, a measure of co-operation and joint planning for the development of the work force is required in healthcare and this is currently supported by the SHAs. The SHAs are best placed to commission the education and training programmes, on behalf of providers, to benefit from economies of scale and contract management expertise.

SHAs will remain responsible for commissioning pre-registration courses until April 2013 and will be responsible for the safe transfer of training contracts to new local education and training boards from this date.

Orthopaedics

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients are waiting for orthopaedic operations; and what the comparable figures were in each of the previous five years. [120224]

Anna Soubry: The information is shown in the following table:

Referral to treatment (RTT) waiting times, England
As at June each yearNumber of trauma and orthopaedics RTT patients waiting at the end of the month

2008

396,024

2009

365,473

2010

389,159

12 Sep 2012 : Column 259W

2011

383,336

2012

367,045

Note: The table shows the number of trauma and orthopaedic patients still waiting to start treatment at the end of the month. Not all of these patients will be waiting for an orthopaedic operation. Source: Department of Health RTT waiting times statistics (Unify2 data collection).

Information has not been provided for June 2007 as the Department's RTT waiting times data for patients waiting to start treatment have been published since August 2007.

Out-patients: Attendance

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what penalties he is considering imposing on people who fail to attend hospital appointments. [120214]

Anna Soubry: Across the national health service, organisations should be seeking to understand and address how best to achieve reductions in missed appointments in their areas. The introduction of new technologies that allow patients to book and cancel appointments online, combined with improved telecommunication systems with the use of SMS texts, e-mail and appointment reminder systems, can all help to reduce missed appointments. We believe that encouraging patients to use the NHS sensibly and responsibly is the right approach, and have no plans for imposing financial penalties on patients, which may also impact upon those most in need and least able to pay.

Thalidomide

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the effect of the Government's review of payments made to people affected by thalidomide on their levels of stress and mental state. [120376]

Norman Lamb: The Government have not made any assessment of the effect of their evaluation of the three-year thalidomide grant pilot scheme on the mental state and stress levels of its recipients.

Home Department

Animal Experiments

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to her Department's publication entitled “Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals, Great Britain 2011”, published on 10 July 2012, what the precise nature was of the procedures in which cats were used; what the aims were of such procedures; what the reasons are for the increase in the number of procedures involving cats between 2010 and 2011; what the evidential basis is for the statistics on the sources of cats used in procedures set out in Table 2, on page 24; and if she will make a statement. [119560]

12 Sep 2012 : Column 260W

James Brokenshire: Cats (along with dogs, non-human primates and horses) are given special protection under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and may only be used if no other species is suitable or it is not practicable to obtain animals of any other species that are suitable for the purposes of the relevant programme of work.

Of the 235 procedures using cats reported in the “Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals, Great Britain 2011”, 227 were of mild severity and eight of moderate severity. Details of the precise aims and nature of those procedures are not held centrally. Total procedures using cats rose by 26% in 2011, a rise of 48, mainly in studies relating to cat health and nutrition.

The annual return of procedures submitted by project licence holders provides the evidence base for the sources of cats set out in Table 2, on page 24 of the 2011 annual statistics.

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will take steps to ensure that stray cats and dogs continue to be protected from being used in laboratory experiments; and if she will make a statement. [120252]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 10 September 2012]: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given on 3 September 2012, Official Report, column 190W.

Animal Experiments: Scotland

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many regulated procedures were carried out under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland in 2011; [119356]

(2) how many (a) mice, (b) rats, (c) guinea pigs, (d) hamsters, (e) rabbits, (f) horses and other equids, (g) sheep, (h) pigs, (i) birds, (j) amphibians, (k) reptiles, (l) fish, (m) cats, (n) dogs, (o) new world primates and (p) old world primates were used in regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2011; [119357]

(3) how many animals were used in regulated procedures under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland in 2011; [119358]

(4) what proportion of regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were carried out for (a) fundamental and applied studies other than toxicity and (b) toxicity tests or other safety and efficacy evaluation in 2011; [119359]

(5) what proportion of procedures regulated under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and carried out in Scotland were conducted without anaesthesia in 2011; [119360]

(6) how many regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 involved (a) mice, (b) rats, (c) guinea pigs, (d) hamsters, (e) rabbits, (f) horses and other equids, (g) sheep, (h) pigs, (i) birds, (j) amphibians, (k) reptiles, (l) fish, (m) cats, (n) dogs, (o) new world primates and (p) old world primates in 2011; and how many such procedures involved (i) genetically-modified animals and (ii) animals with a harmful genetic defect; [119366]

12 Sep 2012 : Column 261W

(7) what proportion of regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2011 were performed in (a) public health laboratories, (b) universities and medical schools, (c) NHS hospitals, (d) Government Departments, (e) other public bodies, (f) non-profit-making organisations and (g) commercial organisations; [119365]

(8) how many (a) genetically-modified animals and (b) animals with a harmful genetic defect were used in regulated procedures conducted in Scotland under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2011. [119367]

James Brokenshire: The number of regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland in 2011 was 655,910.

During 2011, in Scotland, 315,723 mice, 38,572 rats, 997 guinea pigs, 549 hamsters, 1,399 rabbits, 91 horses and other equids, 4,563 sheep, 746 pigs, 15,859 birds, 265 amphibians, no reptiles, 265,191 fish, no cats, 312 dogs, no new world primates and 58 old world primates were used in regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986.

During 2011, in Scotland, the number of regulated procedures started for non-toxicological purposes under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 was 594,014 (90.6 per cent), and the number started for toxicological purposes was 61,896 (9.4%).

There were a total of 655,910 regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland in 2011 of which 529,961 (81%) used no form of anaesthesia.

During 2011, in Scotland, there were 315,793 procedures using mice, 38,574 using rats, 1,005 using guinea pigs, 549 using hamsters, 3,078 using rabbits, 2,038 using horses and other equids, 6,295 using sheep, 767 using pigs, 15,860 using birds, 1,672 using amphibians, none using reptiles, 265,226 using fish, none using cats, 452 using dogs, none using new world primates and 244 using old world primates used in regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986.

During 2011, in Scotland, a total of 655,910 regulated procedures were started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, of which 215,530 involved genetically modified animals and 11,855 involved animals with a harmful genetic defect.

During 2011, in Scotland the total number of procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 was 655,910. Of these, 572,972 or 87% were carried out at universities or medical schools, 19,322 or 3% at Government Departments, 29,802 or 5% at other public bodies, 33,550 or 5% at commercial organisations, and 264 or 0.04% at non-profit making organisations. None was started at public health laboratories or NHS hospitals.

During 2011, in Scotland, a total of 647,569 animals were used in regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, of which 215,508 were genetically modified and 11,855 were animals with a harmful genetic defect.

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many infringements of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were recorded in Scotland in 2011; and how many such infringements led to a prosecution. [119361]

12 Sep 2012 : Column 262W

James Brokenshire: Four infringements of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were reported at designated establishments in Scotland during 2011. No prosecutions resulted.

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many project licences were granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2010; and how many such project licences were in force at the end of 2011 in respect of work to be carried out in Scotland. [119362]

James Brokenshire: During 2010 515 project licences in total were granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in the United Kingdom of which 100 were granted at designated establishments in Scotland.

A total of 467 project licences were in force on the 31 December 2011 at designated establishments in Scotland; 88 of those were granted during 2011.

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of project licences granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Scotland were in the (a) mild, (b) moderate, (c) substantial and (d) unclassified severity banding at the end of 2011. [119363]

James Brokenshire: During 2011, in Scotland, of the project licences granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 that were in force at 31 December 2011 37% were in a mild severity banding, 59% in moderate, 2% in substantial and 2% were in an unclassified severity banding.

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many places in Scotland were designated as a (a) supplying establishment, (b) breeding establishment and (c) scientific procedure under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 at the end of 2011. [119364]

James Brokenshire: As at 31 December 2011 in Scotland there were 28 user, eight supplying and 14 breeding establishments designated under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. An establishment can be a user, breeder and/or a supplier.

Animal Experiments: Wales

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what proportion of regulated procedures conducted in Wales under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were carried out for (a) fundamental and applied studies other than toxicity and (b) toxicity tests or other safety and efficacy evaluation in 2011; [120170]

(2) what proportion of procedures regulated under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, which were carried out in Wales, was conducted without anaesthesia in 2011; [120173]

(3) what proportion of regulated procedures conducted in Wales under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were performed in (a) public health laboratories, (b) universities and medical schools, (c) NHS hospitals, (d) Government Departments, (e) other public bodies, (f) non-profit-making organisations and (g) commercial organisations in 2011; [120176]

12 Sep 2012 : Column 263W

(4) how many regulated procedures conducted in Wales under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 involved (a) mice, (b) rats, (c) guinea pigs, (d) hamsters, (e) rabbits, (f) horses and other equids, (g) sheep, (h) pigs, (i) birds, (j) amphibians, (k) reptiles, (l) fish, (m) cats, (n) dogs, (o) new world primates and (p) old world primates in 2011; and how many such procedures involved (i) genetically-modified animals and (ii) animals with a harmful genetic defect; [120177]

(5) how many regulated procedures were carried out under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Wales in 2011; [120178]

(6) how many (a) genetically-modified animals and (b) animals with a harmful genetic defect were used in regulated procedures conducted in Wales under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2011; [120179]

(7) how many (a) mice, (b) rats, (c) guinea pigs, (d) hamsters, (e) rabbits, (f) horses and equids, (g) sheep, (h) pigs, (i) birds, (j) amphibians, (k) reptiles, (l) fish, (m) cats, (n) dogs, (o) new world primates and (p) old world primates were used in regulated procedures conducted in Wales under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2011; [120180]

(8) how many individual animals were used in regulated procedures under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Wales in 2011. [120181]

James Brokenshire: During 2011, in Wales, the number of regulated procedures started for non-toxicological purposes under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 was 54,330 (100%), and none was started for toxicological purposes.

There were a total of 54,330 regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Wales in 2011 of which 44,322 (82%) used no form of anaesthesia.

During 2011, in Wales the total number of procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 was 54,330. Of these, 52,366 or 96% were carried out at universities or medical schools, 1,791 or 3% at public health laboratories and 173 or less than 1% at commercial organisations. None was started at NHS hospitals, Government Departments, other public bodies or non-profit making organisations.

During 2011, in Wales, there were 44,781 procedures using mice, 4,681 using rats, 746 using guinea pigs, none using hamsters, two using rabbits, none using horses and other equids, 314 using sheep, none using pigs, 293 using birds, 72 using amphibians, none using reptiles, 3,400 using fish, none using cats, none using dogs, none using new world primates and none using old world primates used in regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986.

During 2011, in Wales, a total of 54,330 regulated procedures were started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, of which 28,937 involved genetically modified animals and 821 involved animals with a harmful genetic defect.

During 2011, in Wales, a total of 53,311 animals were used in regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, of which 28,841 were genetically modified and 821 were animals with a harmful genetic defect.

12 Sep 2012 : Column 264W

During 2011, in Wales, 44,356 mice, 4,249 rats, 746 guinea pigs, no hamsters, two rabbits, no horses and other equids, 279 sheep, no pigs, 254 birds, no reptiles, 3,400 fish, no cats, no dogs, no new world primates and no old world primates were used in regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. In addition, a small number of amphibians were used in 72 regulated procedures started under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 but data on the number of animals used and reused are subject to further quality assurance.

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many project licences were granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in 2010; and how many such project licences were in force at the end of 2011 in respect of work to be carried out in Wales. [120171]

James Brokenshire: During 2010 515 project licences in total were granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in the United Kingdom of which eight were granted at designated establishments in Wales. A total of 70 project licences were in force on 31 December 2011 at designated establishments in Wales; 17 of those were granted during 2011.

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many infringements of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were recorded in Wales in 2010; and how many such infringements led to a prosecution. [120172]

James Brokenshire: There was one recorded infringement of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 at a designated establishment in Wales during 2010. It did not result in a prosecution.

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of project licences granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 in Wales was in the (a) mild, (b) moderate, (c) substantial and (d) unclassified severity banding at the end of 2011. [120174]

James Brokenshire: As at 31 December 2011, in Wales, 53% of the project licences granted under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 were in the mild severity banding, 46% in moderate and 1% in substantial or unclassified.

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many places in Wales were designated as a (a) supplying, (b) breeding and (c) scientific procedure establishment under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 at the end of 2011. [120175]

James Brokenshire: As at 31 December 2011 in Wales there was one supplying, two breeding and seven user establishments designated under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. An establishment can be a user, breeder and/or supplier.

12 Sep 2012 : Column 265W

Automatic Number Plate Recognition

Karl McCartney: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many automatic number plate recognition cameras were in use in (a) England and (b) Wales in each of the last six years; and how many she expects to be in use in the next two years. [120196]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 10 September 2012]: Automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) cameras are operated by a wide range of public authorities and private organisations, and the information requested is not held centrally. The number of ANPR cameras in use by police forces in England and Wales varies on a daily basis. Information supplied by the National Police Improvement Agency indicates that, during the week ending 5 September 2012, 5,670 cameras were being operated by police forces in England, 294 cameras were being operated by police forces in Wales and 48 cameras were being operated by the British Transport Police (which operates in England, Wales and Scotland).

The Government have not made any estimate on the number of ANPR cameras that are likely to be used in the future.

Civil Disorder: Greater London

Richard Graham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department has taken to identify the causes of the public disorder of August 2011 in London and to prevent any recurrence of such disorder. [119058]

Damian Green: The riots were not about protests, unemployment or cuts. They were about criminality.

The Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), took decisive action and commissioned Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) to review the police response. HMIC made four overarching recommendations which are being taken forward by the Association of Chief Police Officers. Good progress is being made with a strengthened national capability put in place to support the successful policing of the London 2012 Olympic games.

This work is underpinned by the strategic policing requirement which sets out the Home Secretary's view of the national threats that the police must address and the appropriate national policing capabilities required to tackle those threats. These threats include public disorder.

Immigration Controls

Mike Wood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people travelling from Canada were denied entry at UK ports and airports in each of the last three years; and what the ethnicity was of each of those denied entry. [120608]

Mr Harper: The Home Office only collects data for those refused entry to the UK at ports or airports based on nationality not the country from which they travelled. Home Office statistics that show the number of Canadian nationals refused entry to the UK can be found at:

12 Sep 2012 : Column 266W

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-tabs-q2-2012/before-entry2-q2-2012-tabs

Table be.08: Passengers initially refused entry by nationality
 Geographical regionCountry of nationalityTotal refusalsOf these: refused at juxtaposed controls

2009

Americas

Canada

747

112

2010

Americas

Canada

618

109

2011

Americas

Canada

558

110

Information on ethnicity is not captured for any person denied entry to the UK.

Immobilisation of Vehicles

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress she has made towards a ban on wheel clamping and towing on private land; and if she will make a statement. [120504]

James Brokenshire: Section 54 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, which gained Royal Assent on 1 May 2012, contains provisions which will make it an offence to clamp, tow, block in or otherwise immobilise a vehicle without lawful authority if the intention is to prevent the motorist from removing that vehicle.

The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 (Commencement No. 2) Order 2012 contains the commencement details for sections 54-56 and schedule 4 of the Act, which will come into force on 1 October in England.

This order can be found on the Parliamentary legislation website at:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2012/2075/made

After 1 October, it will be a criminal offence to clamp, tow, block in or otherwise immobilise a vehicle without lawful authority. The maximum penalty for the new offence will be an unlimited fine on conviction in the Crown court; or a fine of up to the statutory maximum (currently £5,000) in the magistrates court.

Internet: Harassment

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) whether she plans to regulate providers of social media, where that medium is used to stalk or harass victims; [120360]

(2) whether she plans to encourage providers of social media to introduce a code of conduct on the misuse of that medium if it is used to stalk or harass victims. [120363]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Government take all forms of harassment very seriously. We are working with internet service providers and social media to identify effective practice and improve the response to online harassment and stalking.

Licensing Laws

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many alcohol licences have been withdrawn due to the sale of alcohol to children in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber since 2003. [120623]

12 Sep 2012 : Column 267W

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Alcohol, Entertainment and Late Night Refreshment Licensing Statistical Bulletin collects the number of licences revoked, but does not indicate why they were revoked. Licences may be revoked following a review by the licensing authority for a number of reasons, including persistent selling of alcohol to children.

Data for Brigg and Goole constituency are not collected centrally. The constituency falls within the combined licensing authority area of East Riding of Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire. The latest available information

12 Sep 2012 : Column 268W

shows the number of premises licences, club premises certificates and personal licences surrendered, lapsed, revoked, forfeited, suspended or withdrawn in the East Riding of Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire licensing authorities and the Yorkshire and Humber region, between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2010.

These figures can be seen within the following tables. They include all such authorisations for licensable activities under the Licensing Act 2003, including the sale of alcohol.

Table 1: Premises Licences surrendered, lapsed, suspended by a court, closure notice, East Riding of Yorkshire, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Lapsed(2)Suspended by a court(3)Closure notice(4)

2006-07

(5)

(5)

(5)

(6)

2007-08

10

4

0

0

2008-09

42

8

0

0

2009-10

20

8

0

0

(1) Where a Premises Licence is surrendered under Section 28 of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a Premises Licence has lapsed due to the death, incapacity, insolvency etc. of the licence holder, as set out under Section 27 of the Licensing Act 2003. Excludes instances where a Premises Licence was in effect for a limited period, but the period has since expired (e.g. one-off events). (3) Where a Premises Licence is suspended by a court, under Section 147B(1) of the Licensing Act 2003 (as amended by the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006) for the sale or supply of alcohol, following an offence of persistently selling to underage children. (4) Where a premises is prohibited from selling alcohol for 48 hours following a closure notice under S.169A. (5) Unknown (not provided in 2006-07). (6) Unknown (not collected in 2006-07).
Table 2: Club Premises Certificates surrendered, lapsed, withdrawn, East Riding of Yorkshire, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Lapsed(2)Withdrawn(3)

2006-07(2)

(4)

(4)

(4)

2007-08

1

0

0

2008-09

1

0

0

2009-10

1

0

0

(1) Where a Club Premises Certificate is surrendered under Section 81(3) of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a Club Premises Certificates has lapsed because it had effect for a limited period, but that period has since expired. (3) Where a Club Premises Certificate is withdrawn under Section 90 of the Licensing Act 2003. (4) Unknown (not provided in 2006-07).
Table 3: Personal Licences surrendered, revoked, forfeited, suspended by a court, East Riding of Yorkshire, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Revoked(2)Forfeited(3)Suspended by a court(4)

2006-07

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

2007-08

0

0

0

0

2008-09

0

0

0

0

2009-10

2

0

0

0

(1) Where a Personal Licence is surrendered under Section 116 of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a Personal Licence is revoked under Section 124 of the Licensing Act 2003. (3) Where a Premises Licence has been forfeited following a court order under Section 129 of the Licensing Act 2003 in the time period specified (and where that order has not been suspended, pending an appeal under Sections 129(4) or 130 of the Licensing Act 2003). (4) Where a Personal Licence is suspended following a court order under Section 129 of the Licensing Act 2003 in the time period specified (and where that order has not been suspended, pending an appeal under Sections 129(4) or 130 of the Licensing Act 2003). (5) Unknown (not provided in 2006-07).
Table 4: Premises Licences surrendered, lapsed, suspended by a court, closure notice, North Lincolnshire, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Lapsed(2)Suspended by a court(3)Closure notice(4)

2006-07

(5)

(5)

(5)

(6)

2007-08

2

2

0

0

2008-09

13

0

0

0

2009-10

7

2

0

0

(1) Where a Premises Licence is surrendered under Section 28 of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a Premises Licence has lapsed due to the death, incapacity, insolvency etc. of the licence holder, as set out under Section 27 of the Licensing Act 2003. Excludes instances where a Premises Licence was in effect for a limited period, but the period has since expired (e.g. one-off events). (3) Where a Premises Licence is suspended by a court, under Section 147B(1) of the Licensing Act 2003 (as amended by the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006) for the sale or supply of alcohol, following an offence of persistently selling to underage children. (4) Where a premises is prohibited from selling alcohol for 48 hours following a closure notice under S.169A. (5) Unknown (not provided in 2006-07). (6) Unknown (not collected in 2006-07).
Table 5: Club Premises Certificates surrendered, lapsed, withdrawn, North Lincolnshire, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Lapsed(2)Withdrawn(3)

2006-07(2)

(4)

(4)

(4)

2007-08

0

0

0

2008-09

0

0

0

12 Sep 2012 : Column 269W

12 Sep 2012 : Column 270W

2009-10

0

0

0

(1) Where a Club Premises Certificate is surrendered under Section 81(3) of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a Club Premises Certificates has lapsed because it had effect for a limited period, but that period has since expired. (3) Where a Club Premises Certificate is withdrawn under Section 90 of the Licensing Act 2003. (4) Unknown (not provided in 2006-07).
Table 6: Personal Licences surrendered, revoked, forfeited, suspended by a court, North Lincolnshire, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Revoked(2)Forfeited(3)Suspended by a court(4)

2006-07

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

2007-08

0

0

0

0

2008-09

0

0

0

0

2009-10

0

0

0

0

1 Where a Personal Licence is surrendered under Section 116 of the Licensing Act 2003. 2 Where a Personal Licence is revoked under Section 124 of the Licensing Act 2003. 3 Where a Premises Licence has been forfeited following a court order under Section 129 of the Licensing Act 2003 in the time period specified (and where that order has not been suspended, pending an appeal under Sections 129(4) or 130 of the Licensing Act 2003). 4 Where a Personal Licence is suspended following a court order under Section 129 of the Licensing Act 2003 in the time period specified (and where that order has not been suspended, pending an appeal under Sections 129(4) or 130 of the Licensing Act 2003). 5 Unknown (not provided in 2006-07).
 
Table 7: Premises Licences surrendered, lapsed, suspended by a court, closure notice, Yorkshire and the Humber, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Lapsed(2)Suspended by a court(3)Closure notice(4)

2006-07

244

22

7

(5)

2007-08

464

58

3

5

2008-09

422

118

0

35

2009-10

505

94

0

57

(1) Where a Premises Licence is surrendered under Section 28 of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a Premises Licence has lapsed due to the death, incapacity, insolvency etc. of the licence holder, as set out under Section 27 of the Licensing Act 2003. Excludes instances where a Premises Licence was in effect for a limited period, but the period has since expired (e.g. one-off events). (3) Where a Premises Licence is suspended by a court, under Section 147B(1) of the Licensing Act 2003 (as amended by the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006) for the sale or supply of alcohol, following an offence of persistently selling to underage children. (4) Where a premises is prohibited from selling alcohol for 48 hours following a closure notice under S.169A. (5) Unknown (not collected in 2006-07).
Table 8: Club Premises Certificates surrendered, lapsed, withdrawn, Yorkshire and the Humber, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Lapsed(2)Withdrawn(3)

2006-07(2)

8

0

0

2007-08

19

0

1

2008-09

22

2

2

2009-10

38

1

0

(1) Where a Club Premises Certificate is surrendered under Section 81(3) of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a Club Premises Certificates has lapsed because it had effect for a limited period, but that period has since expired. (3) Where a Club Premises Certificate is withdrawn under Section 90 of the Licensing Act 2003.
Table 9: Personal Licences surrendered, revoked, forfeited, suspended by a court, Yorkshire and the Humber, 2006-07 to 2009-10
Financial yearSurrendered(1)Revoked(2)Forfeited(3)Suspended by a court(4)

2006-07

28

0

0

0

2007-08

13

2

0

1

2008-09

45

0

0

1

2009-10

31

2

0

0

(1) Where a Personal Licence is surrendered under Section 116 of the Licensing Act 2003. (2) Where a Personal Licence is revoked under Section 124 of the Licensing Act 2003. (3) Where a Premises Licence has been forfeited following a court order under Section 129 of the Licensing Act 2003 in the time period specified (and where that order has not been suspended, pending an appeal under Sections 129(4) or 130 of the Licensing Act 2003). (4) Where a Personal Licence is suspended following a court order under Section 129 of the Licensing Act 2003 in the time period specified (and where that order has not been suspended, pending an appeal under Sections 129(4) or 130 of the Licensing Act 2003).

National Crime Agency

Mark Durkan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has for the (a) composition, (b) recruitment and (c) deployment of the National Crime Agency (NCA); and whether she plans to engage NCA Specials. [120551]

Mr Jeremy Browne [holding answer 11 September 2012]:The National Crime Agency (NCA) will be an agency of operational crime fighters, comprising four commands (Organised Crime, Border Policing, Economic Crime and Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP)) and a National Cyber Crime Unit. It will be driven by an “intelligence hub” and an effective set of tasking and co-ordination arrangements. Subject to the passage of legislation, the NCA will be established by the end of 2013. As set out in the NCA plan, the intention is that the NCA will be UK-wide, in recognition of the reach and threat of serious and organised crime, and it will respect devolution of policing in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The majority of the NCA's work force, which will number approximately 4,000, will be made up of staff from existing precursor bodies, for example: the Serious Organised Crime Agency including CEOP; and transferred capabilities from the National Police Improvement Agency and the Metropolitan Police Central e-Crime Unit.

12 Sep 2012 : Column 271W

In addition, to drive the design and build of the agency, senior posts have been recruited including Keith Bristow (former chief constable of Warwickshire), who was appointed as the NCA's first director general at the end of last year.

The Crime and Courts Bill also allows for the recruitment of volunteer NCA Specials to complement the NCA's wider work force. They may be designated by the Director General with policing powers in England and Wales; however, the Bill makes it clear that an NCA Special cannot be designated with the powers and privileges of a Northern Ireland constable.

Olympic Games 2012: Security

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she plans to impose any penalties on G4S as a result of it not training enough security staff for the London 2012 Olympics. [117893]

James Brokenshire: The contract for venue security at the London 2012 Games is between G4S and the London Organising Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG). The contract contains penalty clauses for non-delivery and LOCOG is seeking to enforce relevant provisions. This will be reflected in the settlement that the Government pay to reimburse LOCOG for venue security costs.

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the nature was of the delays encountered by G4S in training security staff for the London 2012 Olympics. [117901]

James Brokenshire: G4S indicated to the Home Office at the end of June that they were encountering specific problems with their scheduling system for security staff. As these problems continued we started making further contingency plans over and above those we had already put in place, notwithstanding continued G4S assurances

12 Sep 2012 : Column 272W

that they could meet the Games-time requirement. On 11 July G4S told us that, because of these problems, their targets could no longer be met. Accordingly, we immediately took the decision to deploy an additional 3,500 troops over and above the 7,500 already allocated.

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has discussed with (a) G4S and (b) others the recruitment to serve in security roles at the London 2012 Olympics of experienced retired personnel from Northern Ireland who have served in both the Police Service of Northern Ireland and the Army. [118168]

James Brokenshire: The contract to provide security guards for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games is between the London Organising Committee, LOCOG, and G4S. I understand that applications for security roles from former police and military personnel were especially welcomed in view of their background and experience. We are grateful to the Police Service of Northern Ireland for their help in providing officers under mutual aid arrangements, funded by the Home Office, to help deliver a safe and secure Games.

Police: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) police community support officers and (b) police officers there were in (i) Bexley, (ii) Bromley, (iii) Harrow and (iv) Havering on 5 April (A) 2010, (B) 2011 and (C) 2012; and if she will make a statement. [120431]

Damian Green [holding answer 11 September 2012]: Figures are collected by the Home Office for the number of police community support officers and police officers within Bexley, Bromley, Harrow and Havering boroughs, as at 31 March 2010 and 31 March 2011 and are given in the following table.

Police community support officer and police officer strength within the London boroughs of Bexley, Bromley, Harrow and Havering, as at 31 March 2010 and 31 March 2011(1, 2)
 Police community support officersPolice officers
 31 March 201031 March 201131 March 201031 March 2011

Bexley

114

97

406

400

Bromley

169

149

524

511

Harrow

117

99

404

392

Havering

124

113

395

387

(1) These figures are based on full-time equivalents that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. (2) Figures include those officers on career breaks or maternity/paternity leave.

Figures at London borough level ceased to be collected centrally by the Home Office from 2011-12.

Security Guards: Licensing

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many licence applications were received by the Security Industry Authority in each month from January 2012; and how many such applications resulted in a licence being issued in each such month. [119136]

James Brokenshire: The following table shows the number of correctly completed net applications received and the number of licences granted per month from January to August 2012.

 Net applications receivedLicences granted

January 2012

12,465

12,353

February 2012

12,170

11,985

March 2012

14,988

12,444

April 2012

13,506

9,859

May 2012

16,083

18,587

June 2012

15,321

15,038

July 2012

17,978

16,698

August 2012

13,727

13,545

Total

116,238

110,509

12 Sep 2012 : Column 273W

Metal: Theft

Mike Crockart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what legal advice she has received on the legality of banning cash payments for scrap metal; and if she will place a copy of any such advice in the Library. [120449]

Mr Jeremy Browne: Legal advice is by law subject to legal professional privilege. For this reason the Government do not normally comment on what legal advice they have received on any matter.

Education

Academies

Karl McCartney: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many applications for judicial review of an academy school's admissions appeals panel's decision were brought in each of the last three years for which figures are available; and how many were successful. [113563]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 25 June 2012]:Academies are their own admissions authority and, as such, it is their responsibility to determine the admission arrangements for their schools and to establish an independent appeals panel to hear appeals from parents. In line with our overall policy to reduce burdens on the school system, we do not collect data on admission appeals, or any consequential applications for judicial review of appeals panel decisions taken in respect of any school type including academies.

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which are the parties to funding agreements signed in respect of schools converting to academy status. [117856]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 17 July 2012]: The parties to funding agreements signed in respect of schools converting to academy status are the Secretary of State for Education and the academy trust.

The funding agreement is the method by which academies are held accountable to the Department. It is a contract between DFE and the academy trust which specifies how the academy is run, what duties it is under and what powers the Secretary of State for Education has over the academy.

The Department has developed templates for the funding agreement and these are available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/primary/steps/b00204874/supporting-documents-for-schools-converting-to-academies/model-documentation-for-single-academies

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the respective roles and responsibilities are of (a) local education authorities, (b) school governing bodies, (c) officials in his Department and (d) sponsors in the (i) negotiation and (ii) approval of funding agreements in respect of a school converting to academy status. [117857]

12 Sep 2012 : Column 274W

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 17 July 2012]: The approval of a funding agreement between the Secretary of State for Education and the academy trust is the final stage in the process of a school becoming an academy. To reach that agreement, officials in the Department will have had discussions with the school governing body, the local authority and a sponsor where applicable. The school governing body has particular responsibility for consulting locally and passing a resolution to become an academy.

Further information on becoming an academy is set out in the guidance documentation on the Department's website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department has paid in legal fees to transfer school title deeds from local authorities to academies since June 2010. [119147]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 5 September 2012]: The Department for Education does not hold the information in the format requested.

For converter academies, a flat rate of £25,000 is paid to contribute towards pre-opening costs including any legal costs incurred by the school.

For sponsored academies, funding is provided as part of project development costs. The amount within this that is spent on legal costs will vary dependent upon the complexity of the case.

Since June 2010, 2,106 schools have opened as an academy, and a further 561 have received an academy order to become an academy.

Academies: Birmingham

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 3 July 2012, Official Report, columns 587-8W, on academies: primary education, with which schools in Birmingham officials in his Department have engaged directly; what the results of that engagement have been in respect of each school; and if he will make a statement. [117805]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 17 July 2012]: All schools, including special schools and pupil referral units, are able to become academies. Departmental officials engage with schools to find the best route for them to achieve academy status. For schools that wish to convert, engagement takes place when the Department receives an expression of interest or application from the school to convert. For schools below the floor standard or in Ofsted “special measures” and “notice to improve” categories, officials in the Department, working closely with the local authority when possible, will make contact with the school to discuss options for a sponsored solution to drive up performance. As of 1 September there are 41 primary schools in Birmingham in the pipeline to become academies, and 15 are open as academies. When an academy solution is agreed for a primary school, the name of the school will be added to the Department's published lists of academies in development at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/academies/b00208569/open-academies

12 Sep 2012 : Column 275W

We do not name schools where we are in the early stages of exploring sponsored academy options. We believe this has the potential to disrupt schools concerned.

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education for which schools in Birmingham he has issued an academy order, by date; on which dates he notified Birmingham city council of those orders; and on which dates he notified the relevant hon. Member where a funding agreement had already been signed in respect of each school. [117854]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 17 July 2012]: 92 schools in Birmingham have been issued with an academy order, of which 46 are open as academies (31 converters and 15 sponsored).

In all cases, Ministers write to local authorities to notify them when an academy order is issued in relation to a school. We also write to the Member of Parliament in whose constituency the school is located when a funding agreement is signed.

A full list of all open and pipeline academies, showing the name of each school in the pipeline, and dates on which academies opened, is available on the DFE website at:

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/xls/p/publication% 20list%20for%20converter%20academies%20july%202012.xls

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what funding agreements have been signed in respect of schools converting to academy status in Birmingham, by date and school; and when he expects funding agreements not yet signed to be completed by school. [117855]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 17 July 2012]: As of 1 September, 46 funding agreements have been signed for schools converting to academy status in Birmingham. Of these, 31 are converters and 15 are sponsored. A further 46 are in the pipeline for conversion to academy status (18 converters and 28 sponsored). Funding agreements for each of these pipeline schools will be signed once the school has completed the relevant stages of the conversion process. I am unable to give an expected opening date for conversion, as the pace is driven by the individual schools concerned.

A full list of schools working towards achieving converter academy status is available on the DFE website at:

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/xls/p/publication%20list%20for%20converter% 20academies%20july%202012.xls

An additional list shows sponsored academies currently progressing:

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/xls/p/publication%20list%20for%20sponsored%20 academies%20july%202012.xls

English Language

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) if he will make it his policy that the Standards and Testing Agency's new English grammar, punctuation and spelling test should not be introduced; and if he will make a statement; [119558]

12 Sep 2012 : Column 276W

(2) what account the Standards and Testing Agency's new English grammar, punctuation and spelling test takes of compositional aspects of writing skills in addition to secretarial, grammatical and lexical aspects; and if he will make a statement. [119557]

Elizabeth Truss: A statutory Key Stage 2 test of grammar, punctuation and spelling will be introduced in May 2013. The new test was recommended by Lord Bew's independent review of Key Stage 2 testing and assessment in June 2011.

As recommended by Lord Bew, the test will not assess pupils' writing composition skills. Instead, writing composition will be subject to a teacher assessment judgment. This will encourage pupils to undertake a broader range of writing during Year 6, and allow them to demonstrate their achievement in this area.

Currently a quarter of all pupils do not achieve the expected level for writing at the end of Key Stage 2, leaving them ill-equipped to participate in the more demanding written activities required by the secondary curriculum. The new arrangements for the assessment of writing, replacing the previous Key Stage 2 writing test, will bring a renewed focus to basic writing skills and help ensure that children leave primary school highly competent in writing.

Food Technology: Primary Education

Laura Sandys: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on the inclusion of food technology in the national curriculum for all primary schools. [119466]

Elizabeth Truss: Food technology is currently part of design and technology which is a compulsory national curriculum subject in primary schools. On 11 June 2012, the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), announced that design and technology would continue to be compulsory in the new national curriculum for primary schools. We are currently considering what the national curriculum programme of study for design and technology should cover and will make an announcement in due course.

Frank Website

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the cost to the public purse was of marketing the Frank website in each year since 2008. [118880]

Mr Jeremy Browne: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Home Department.

The following table shows Frank marketing spend for each financial year since 2008-09. These figures relate to advertising media costs (e.g. TV, cinema, radio, print, poster and online media) and exclude VAT, production costs and agency fees. They do not include the cost of running the Frank website itself.

 Spend (£)

2008-09

3,770,000

2009-10

3,320,000

12 Sep 2012 : Column 277W

2010-11

16,000

2011-12

856.000

Free School Meals

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make it his policy to include within the criteria for eligibility for free school meals those children living in poverty after housing costs who currently do not qualify; and if he will make a statement. [118358]

Mr Laws: The Department for Education is considering options for new eligibility criteria for free school meals once universal credit is introduced. Given the current economic climate we cannot at present afford to extend entitlement to free school meals but we will aim to ensure that those families on the lowest incomes are entitled to free school meals.

Communications

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what selection criteria were used by his Department to recruit its last three heads of communications. [116592]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education is committed to ensuring that individuals are appointed to the civil service through fair and open competition on the basis of merit.

As a senior civil service position, candidates applying for the last three director of communications posts would have been required to show that they have the appropriate level of professional skills and breadth of experience.

Candidates would have been measured against the Professional Skills for Government (PSG) competence framework which is a common set of skill requirements across Government which include behavioural indicators setting out the skills that staff in the civil service need to do their job well, at all grades, no matter where they work.

Money Advice Service

Mark Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he last met the Chair of the Money Advice Service; and what was discussed. [118941]

Elizabeth Truss: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), has not met the Chair of the Money Advice Service.

Mark Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what representations he has received from the Money Advice Service on financial education in schools as part of his review of the national curriculum. [118942]

Elizabeth Truss: The Money Advice Service did not respond to the national curriculum review's call for evidence.

12 Sep 2012 : Column 278W

New Schools Network

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will publish any slides and written material used in presentations by the New Schools Network to his Department since May 2010. [118979]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department does not routinely publish such materials.

Pre-school Education

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children aged (a) three and (b) four years old are in free nursery places in (i) Dartford constituency, (ii) Kent and (iii) the UK. [119028]

Elizabeth Truss: The number of three and four-year-old children attending maintained, private, voluntary, and independent providers based in Dartford constituency, Kent, and England who were benefiting from some free early education is shown in the table.

Number of three and four-year-old children benefiting from free early education(1, 2, 3 )January 2012
 Three-year-oldsFour-year-olds

Dartford

1,350

1,380

Kent

16,860

17,230

England

625,440

638,970

(1 )Count of children aged three and four at 31 December in the previous calendar year. (2 )Numbers of three and four-year-olds in schools may include some two-year-olds. (3) Numbers rounded to nearest 10. Source: Early Years Census (EYC), School Census (SC), and School Level Annual School Census (SLASC)

The latest figures on early education places for three and four-year-olds in England were published in Statistical First Release (SFR) 13/2012 “Provision for children under five years of age in England: January 20127”, available at the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001074/index.shtml

The Department for Education has responsibility for England only so figures have been provided for England instead of the UK.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Richard Graham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to increase the level of the pupil premium. [119338]

Mr Laws: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011. Pupil premium funding is provided to schools which have on roll pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (the deprivation premium); children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months (the looked after child premium); and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces (the service child premium).

The pupil premium is additional funding and was worth £625 million in financial year 2011-12 and £1.25 billion in financial year 2012-13. The deprivation and looked after children premium per pupil amount for financial year 2011-12 was £488, and has risen to £600 for financial year 2012-13. The service children

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premium per pupil amount for 2011-12 was £200 and rose to £250 in financial year 2012-13. The pupil premium is set to continue to rise each year until 2014-15 when it will be worth £2.5 billion.

Richard Graham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much pupil premium funding his Department has allocated to Gloucester since its introduction. [119339]

Mr Laws: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011. Pupil premium funding is provided to schools which have on roll pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (the deprivation premium); children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months (the looked after child premium); and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces (the service child premium).

In the 2011-12 financial year 2,870 pupils in Gloucester constituency were eligible for either the deprivation premium or service child premium, attracting £1.363 million. It is not possible to identify, at constituency level, the number of pupils recorded as being in care or recorded in the alternative provision census.

The number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in 2012-13 has not yet been confirmed but the provisional estimate is that 3,960 pupils will be eligible for the deprivation premium or the service child premium in Gloucester, attracting £2.329 million. This estimate is based on January 2011 school census data and data for pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) since 2006. It reflects the decision to extend eligibility for the deprivation premium to those eligible for FSM in the previous six years.

International Development

Fairtrade Foundation

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps she is taking to promote the work of the Fairtrade Foundation (a) in the UK and (b) internationally. [120555]

Mr Duncan: DFID helps the work of the Fairtrade Foundation through support we provide to the global Fairtrade system. DFID has a £12 million Programme Partnership Arrangement (2010-11 to 2013-14) with Fairtrade International, the umbrella organisation that unites labelling initiatives and networks of producer organisations. DFID's support is focused on strengthening, broadening and deepening the activities of Fairtrade International.

DFID also promotes the work of the Fairtrade Foundation through our support to Fairtrade Fortnight each year. This year, DFID Ministers visited companies and groups that promote Fairtrade, ahead of Fairtrade Fortnight.

South Sudan

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what reports she has received on the first official publication from the National Audit Chamber in South Sudan; and what steps her Department is taking to assist the development of effective, democratic and transparent governance mechanisms in South Sudan. [119480]

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Justine Greening: We welcome the audit reports on the financial statements of the Government of Southern Sudan for the financial years 2007 and 2008 which were produced by the South Sudan Audit Chamber in July. We are very concerned by the Audit Chamber's findings, including on weak budget execution, lack of complete payroll data, and poor data on oil revenues.

We are working with the Government of South Sudan to ensure that tackling corruption remains high on their agenda. The UK's support through the World Bank- managed Multi-donor Trust Fund (MDTF) and through the Joint Donor Office in Juba has enabled the National Audit Chamber to fulfil its functions more effectively, including the production of annual reports. We are providing support to help strengthen budget systems, and we are initiating a bilateral programme of accountability support to the South Sudan Anti-Corruption Commission. In addition the UK, together with its Troika partners, US and Norway, and the European Union, hold a regular high level dialogue with a group of senior Ministers of the Government of South Sudan, with a strong focus on tackling corruption. Finally, UK officials regularly raise corruption concerns in meetings with Government Ministers.

Cabinet Office

Older People: Swindon

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office by what percentage the over-85 population in Swindon is forecast to rise over the next 20 years. [120489]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated September 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking the Minister for the Cabinet Office by what percentage the over 85 population in Swindon is forecast to rise over the next 20 years. [120489]

Estimates of future population are available as population projections. The most recent subnational population projections are based on mid-year population estimates for 2010.

Subnational population projections are not forecasts and do not attempt to predict the impact of future government policies, changing economic circumstances or the capacity of an area to accommodate a change in population. They provide an indication of the future size and age structure of the population if recent demographic trends continued.

Between mid-2010 and mid-2030, the over 85 population in Swindon is projected to rise from 3,119 to 7,184, an increase of 130 percent. Looking at this as a proportion of the total population, the over 85 population is projected to increase by approximately one percent from 1.6 to 2.9 percent. The over 85 age group has been defined as 86 and over.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Apprentices

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many apprenticeship starts there were in (a) Swindon and (b) England in each of the last 10 years. [120492]

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Matthew Hancock: The following table shows the number of apprenticeship programme starts in Swindon local authority between 2005/06 to 2010/11 academic year and for England between 2002/03 to 2010/11. 2005/06 is the earliest year for which comparable sub-national data are available and 2010/11 is the latest year for which final data are available.

 Apprenticeship programme starts in Swindon local authority, 2005/06 to 2010/11England total

2002/03

167,700

2003/04

193,600

2004/05

189,000

2005/06

490

175,000

2006/07

660

184,400

2007/08

830

224,800

2008/09

940

239,900

2009/10

1,080

279,700

2010/11

1,640

457,200

Notes: 1. Figures for Swindon are rounded to the nearest 10; England figures are rounded to the nearest 100. 2. Geography is based on the home postcode of the learner. Geographic information is based on boundaries of regions as of May 2010. 3. Figures for England include some postcodes which are outside of England. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts by geography is published in a supplementary table to a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 28 June 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statistical firstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statistical firstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/Apprenticeship_sfr_supplementary _tables/

Apprentices: Greater London

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many apprenticeships were offered in the (a) public sector and (b) private sector to young people in each London local authority in each of the last five years. [120320]

Matthew Hancock: We do not measure the number of apprenticeship starts in the public and private sector.

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts by sector subject area is published in a supplementary table to a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 28 June 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/Apprenticeship_sfr_supplementary_ tables/

Business: Regulation

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what progress he has made in cutting red tape for small and medium-sized enterprises in (a) England and (b) Northamptonshire since May 2010. [120001]

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Michael Fallon [holding answer 7 September 2012]: This Government have taken significant and concrete steps to reduce the burden of regulation on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) which will benefit SMEs in England including Northamptonshire:

We have recently announced that from April 2013 hundreds of thousands of businesses will be exempted from burdensome, regular health and safety inspections.

In addition, the Government will introduce legislation next month to ensure that businesses will only be held liable for civil damages in health and safety cases if they can be shown to have acted negligently. This will end the current situation where businesses can automatically be liable for damages even if they were not negligent.

The Government are also continuing to take radical action on red to boost growth and jobs in the economy. The Government are systematically examining some 6,500 substantive regulations that it inherited, through the Red Tape Challenge process. The Government have committed to abolish or substantially reduce at least 3,000 of these regulations. We will complete the identification of the regulations to be scrapped or overhauled by December 2013.

These commitments constitute the most ambitious action ever proposed by a modern British Government to slash the burden of regulation and set businesses free. They will save British companies millions of pounds in wasted time and money, and help spur economic growth and innovation across the UK.

These new commitments are part of our relentless drive to tackle the burden which regulation places on smaller businesses. We have already delivered significant savings:

We have saved SMEs £388 million by not extending the right to request time to train to businesses with fewer than 250 employees;

We have exempted smaller retailers for three years from the display ban on tobacco, which applies to supermarkets and very large stores from April 2012;

We are phasing implementation of pensions auto enrolment, so that small businesses will not need to comply until June 2015;

We have achieved agreement in Brussels to exempting up to 1.4 million UK small businesses from certain EU accounting rules.

More widely, we have introduced a three-year moratorium on new domestic regulation for micro-businesses and start-ups from 1 April 2011 in order to support growth and establish a period of increased regulatory stability for the smallest businesses.

We have also introduced the one-in, one-out rule, so that if a Department wants to introduce a new regulation which generates costs for business, they must first identify a corresponding cut in regulation elsewhere with the same value.

Finally, Focus on Enforcement, a new campaign and call for evidence launched at Budget this year, is undertaking a series of sector-based regulatory reviews looking at how enforcement of legislation is experienced from the point of view of business. Each review is identifying where inappropriate or excessive enforcement of regulation by national and local regulators is holding business back and seeking to identify good practice that could be replicated elsewhere.

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many submissions have been made to the Red Tape Challenge since its launch. [120490]

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Michael Fallon: As of September 2012, the Red Tape Challenge has received over 29,000 comments posted on its website. A further 1,000 submissions have been sent to the Red Tape Challenge inbox.

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what consideration he has given to the potential contribution of the submissions to the Red Tape Challenge to the Government's objective to cut red tape. [120491]

Michael Fallon: All comments and submissions received as part of the Red Tape Challenge have been thoroughly analysed by Departments and fed into their proposals for cutting red tape.

In many cases, comments and submissions to the Red Tape Challenge have directly led to decisions being taken. For example, comments during the retail theme highlighted issues with overlapping and costly consumer legislation. As a consequence we have committed to scrap or improve some 12 pieces of consumer legislation. Submissions to the hospitality, food and drink theme raised problems with regulations governing entertainment licensing at small venues. The Government have consulted on removing parts of the Licensing Act 2003 to solve these problems. In response to concerns raised through the employment-related law theme we are introducing major reforms to employment tribunals.

Further examples can be found on the Red Tape Challenge website at:

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http://www.redtapechallenge.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/

Developing Countries: Trade

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent assessment he has made of progress on the Doha Round; and if he will make a statement. [120213]

Michael Fallon: The UK remains strongly committed to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the multilateral system. Recognising that it will be very difficult to conclude the full Doha Round in its current form, we are looking at where progress could be made on the most advanced areas of the round and to prioritise elements that are of concern to the poorest countries.

The WTO can make progress on these issues as shown by its adoption of the revised procedures for the accession of least developed countries which were adopted by the WTO in July this year.