Hospitals: Staff

Sir Roger Gale: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of (a) the number of hospital medical secretariat in England whose posts have been (i) abolished and (ii) downgraded from grade five to grade four or grade three and (b) the number of hospital staff posts in England at grade six and above in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available. [117089]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Kidney Disease

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of people with (a) autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and (b) autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease; and if he will make a statement. [116657]

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Mr Simon Burns: Information on the numbers of people with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is not collected centrally. However, we do collect the number of finished hospital admissions(1) with a primary diagnosis of autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease(2) or an unspecified polycystic kidney disease. For 2010-11 these are as follows:

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: 577

Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease: 106

Unspecified polycystic kidney disease: 417.

These are figures for admissions to hospital for treatment for polycystic kidney disease and are not a count of people who have the disease but did not require admission to hospital, nor are they a count of people as the same person may have been admitted more than once in a year.

Please read the following notes when interpreting these data:

(1) Finished admission episodes

A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.

(2) Primary diagnosis

The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.

The ICD10 codes used are as follows:

Q61.1 Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

Q61.2 Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

Q61.3 Unspecified polycystic kidney disease

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much funding his Department made available for research into polycystic kidney disease in the latest period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [116658]

Mr Simon Burns: The usual practice of the Department's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is not to ring-fence funds for expenditure on particular topics: research proposals in all areas compete for the funding available. The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including polycystic kidney disease (PKD). These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the scientific quality of the proposals made. In all disease areas, the amount of NIHR funding depends on the volume and quality of scientific activity.

The NIHR is not currently funding any research with a specific focus on PKD, but is funding research relevant to treating associated symptoms and kidney failure.

The NIHR Clinical Research Network is currently hosting three industry-sponsored studies in PKD.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress has been made in the development of treatment for people with polycystic kidney disease in the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement. [116953]

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Paul Burstow: Treatment for people with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is similar to treatment for people with other kinds of kidney disease and, dependent on the stage of the disease, includes treatment for complications such as anaemia and bone mineral disorders as well as a kidney transplant or dialysis.

The Renal National Service Framework (NSF), published in two parts in 2004 and 2005, identified standards and markers of good practice to help the national health service reduce the development and progression of chronic kidney disease, including PKD. NHS Kidney Care has been helping the NHS implement the NSF. We also understand that clinical trials of potential treatments for PKD involving some patients and investigators from the United Kingdom are currently under way.

Medical Treatments: Research

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost to his Department has been of every project undertaken by the Health Technology Assessment Programme; when each project was commissioned; and what the name of each project was. [116666]

Mr Simon Burns: Details of published and ongoing research projects funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme, including cost, start date and title, are available on the programme website at

www.hta.ac.uk


NHS: Correspondence

Sir Roger Gale: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) which hospital trusts in England currently send consultants’ letters electronically to the Indian subcontinent for typing and return to the UK for printing, editing and signature; what estimate he has made of the number of such letters that were sent in 2011-12; and if he will make a statement; [117090]

(2) what comparative assessment he has made of the average time taken for a letter dictated by a hospital consultant to be (a) typed by a medical secretary in-house, checked, signed and posted and (b) sent electronically to India, typed, returned to the UK, edited, checked, signed and posted; and if he will make a statement. [117091]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department does not hold information on hospital trusts in England who send consultants’ letters electronically to the Indian subcontinent for typing and return to the United Kingdom for printing, editing and signature. Individual trusts would hold this information.

NHS: Drugs

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he (a) has taken and (b) plans to take to reduce wastage of drugs. [116573]

Mr Simon Burns: Following publication of the research into the scale, causes and cost of waste medicines in England in November 2010, the Department and key interested parties took part in a round table event hosted by the King's Fund in January 2011 to consider

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practical next steps that could be taken, either nationally or locally, to reduce the amount of waste medicines in the national health service.

There was agreement among all who attended that medicines wastage is a serious issue for the NHS and that action must be taken to tackle avoidable wastage of medicines as well as optimising medicines use to improve health outcomes.

As a result, a steering group to improve the use of medicines and reduce waste was set up last year and tasked with developing an action plan. The group is now finalising its conclusions, which are expected later this year.

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on the capacity for use of unused, in-date, seal-intact drugs returned to pharmacies. [116574]

Mr Simon Burns: The Government do not promote the reuse of medicines returned by patients in this country, as it is not possible to guarantee the quality of a returned medicine by physical inspection alone.

This is in line with the World Health Organisation's guidelines, which recommend that no drugs should be reused that have been issued to patients, and then returned to a pharmacy.

NHS: Finance

Mr Leech: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much he plans to allocate for (a) clinical networks and (b) cancer networks in 2013-14. [117113]

Mr Simon Burns: The NHS Commissioning Board Authority will publish its proposals for clinical networks in the new health system, including details of the funding arrangements for networks in 2013-14, by the end of July.

NHS: Pay

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people employed by the NHS earn more than £65,738 per annum. [116553]

Mr Simon Burns: Information is not held centrally on the salaries of national health service staff.

The Government Actuary's Department estimate that, as at 31 March 2010, 90,000 NHS Pension Scheme members had whole time equivalent pensionable pay of over £66,000 per annum.

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the highest level of pensionable pay in the NHS was for (a) consultants, (b) GPs, (c) senior managers and (d) other managers in each financial year since 1997-98. [116667]

Mr Simon Burns: This information requested for years 1997 onwards is not available. Data collected by NHS Pensions are not broken down into occupational groups and would involve disproportionate costs in order obtain this level of data.

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NHS: Standards

Alison McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to introduce national care outcome standards in England. [117250]

Paul Burstow: In March 2011, the Department launched the first Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework, which was updated for this year in March. The framework, which has been developed jointly by the Department and local government, is a set of robust, comparable measures of social care outcomes for people who use care and support services in England, and carers. The framework measures the success of the adult social care system in delivering high quality care services in which people have a positive experience of their care and support, and are supported to achieve better outcomes. The framework for 2013-14 will be published in the autumn, to align with the publication of updated NHS and public health outcomes frameworks.

North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for what reason the current chief executive of the North Cumbria University Trust will be retained after the appointment of the new acting chief executive; and how much he will be paid. [117609]

Mr Simon Burns: These are matters for the national health service locally.

The hon. Member may wish to contact the chair at North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust about this issue.

Obesity: Children

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to reduce levels of childhood obesity. [117763]

Anne Milton: The Government published “Healthy Lives, Healthy People: A call to action on obesity in England” in October 2011. This sets out how obesity among children will be reduced in the new public health and national health service systems, and the role of key partners.

The Government have set a new national ambition for reversing the trend in the level of excess weight in children by 2020. The “Call to action” sets out a number of initiatives to reduce childhood obesity: this includes the Change4Life programme, the National Child Measurement Programme, the School Games and Change4Life Sports Clubs.

A copy of “Healthy Lives, Healthy People: A call to action on obesity in England” has already been placed in the Library.

Palliative Care

Mr Leech: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when his Department expects to publish an update of the progress made by the quality, innovation, productivity and prevention programme end of life workstream on improving the quality and cost-effectiveness of end of life care. [117100]

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Paul Burstow: We have not published any reports specifically on the quality, innovation, productivity and prevention (QIPP) end of life care workstream. However, information on this work is included in the “End of Life Care Strategy Third Annual Report” (September 2011), which has already been placed in the Library, and is available on the National End of Life Care Programme website at:

www.endoflifecareforadults.nhs.uk/

We expect to publish a fourth annual report in the autumn.

Information on primary care trusts (PCTs) reported efficiency savings during 2011-12 have been regularly published in “The Quarter”. PCTs reported total efficiency savings of £5.8 billion in 2011-12 towards the QIPP challenge. This information was published in “The Year: NHS Chief Executive’s Annual Report 2011/12”.

Sexually Transmitted Infections

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients had repeat treatments for sexually transmitted infections on the NHS (a) fewer than five times, (b) between five and 10 times, (c) between 10 and 20 times, (d) between 20 and 30 times, (e) between 30 and 50 times and (f) more than 50 times between 1997 and 2010; and what the total cost was for each group. [117149]

Anne Milton: Not all of these data are collected centrally. However, officials are currently working to collate as much relevant information as possible. The Department will write to the hon. Member when the information is available, and a copy will be placed in the Library.

Social Services

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to reform the adult social care system in England. [116668]

Paul Burstow: The Government has recently published its care and support White Paper, Caring for our future, a progress report on funding reform and a draft care and support Bill. Together, these documents represent the most radical reform of the social care system since 1948.

The White Paper, together with the draft Bill sets out how the social care system will be transformed from a service that reacts to crises to one that focuses on prevention and is built around the needs and goals of people.

As a result of the reforms that we are undertaking, people will be confident about the quality of care and be treated with dignity and respect, everyone will know what they are entitled to and will have control over their care, and carers will have new rights to public support.

The draft Care and Support Bill, published alongside the White Paper, provides the legal framework needed to make the Government's vision a reality, and achieves a fundamental reform of the legislation which underpins social care. It brings together over a dozen Acts of Parliament dating back over 60 years, into a single, modern statute for care and support.

The progress report on funding sets out the Government's agreement that the principles of the Dilnot Commission's model—financial protection through capped costs and

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an extended means test—would be the right basis for any new funding model for social care. It also commits to introducing a universal deferred payments scheme. The Government will consider in more detail variants under the principles of the Dilnot Commission's funding model, before coming to a final view in the next spending review.

Public Sector Staff

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many staff of his Department were in the civil service redeployment pool on the latest date for which figures are available; and how many of these had been in the redeployment pool for more than six months at that date. [116782]

Mr Simon Burns: There are currently a total of 36 departmental officials in the redeployment pool, as at 12 July 2012, none of whom have been registered for more than six months.

As the Department is going through a period of change and restructuring, it is expected that this number will rise. However, we are not yet able to accurately predict the future numbers, as this is affected by external factors such as staff securing roles in new bodies or by their successful redeployment to other posts, including in other Government Departments.

Tobacco: Advertising

Brandon Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the effect on independent retailers of an advertising ban on tobacco products. [117272]

Anne Milton: The Tobacco Advertising and Promotion Act 2002 controls the advertising and promotion of tobacco products in the United Kingdom.

No specific assessment has been made by the Department on the effect of the Tobacco Advertising and Promotion Act 2002 on independent retailers.

A number of published studies have shown that levels of awareness of tobacco promotion declined significantly among smokers in the UK after implementation of the Tobacco Advertising and Promotion Act 2002.

Tobacco: Packaging

Brandon Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the effect of implementing plain cigarette packaging on illicit or counterfeit tobacco production. [117117]

Anne Milton: The Government have an open mind about introducing standardised tobacco packaging. On 16 April 2012, the Government published the “Consultation on Standardised Packaging of Tobacco Products”. Through the consultation, we want to understand whether there is evidence to demonstrate that the standardised packaging of tobacco products would have an additional public health benefit, over and above existing tobacco control initiatives.

Through the consultation, we are also seeking views on whether there might be legal or other implications if standardised packaging requirements were introduced.

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A consultation stage impact assessment (IA), “Standardised Packaging of Tobacco Products”, has been published alongside the consultation document, which provides an initial assessment of the potential impacts of introducing standardised packaging. Interested parties are invited to provide views on this IA with supporting evidence, including any impact that standardised packaging might have on the illicit or counterfeit tobacco market.

The consultation will be open from 16 April to 10 August 2012. Any person, business or organisation with an interest is encouraged to respond.

A copy of the impact assessment has been placed in the Library.

Vulnerable Adults: Social Services

Alison McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will assess the potential for increased

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employment opportunities of more closely matching the needs of vulnerable people and their families to the provision of care services. [117209]

Paul Burstow: On 11 July the Government published the White Paper ‘Caring for our Future: Reforming Care and Support’ setting out a new vision for a reformed care and support system. This highlights the need to redesign the social care work force to meet the challenges of the new agenda, including encouraging the work force to work in different, more integrated ways, develop new skills and work flexibly across organisational boundaries.

The Department will continue to work with delivery partners and stakeholders on the work force implications of increased personalised services and increased demand for services as a result of changing demography.