Electronic Tagging

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many electronically monitored offenders on (a) community sentences, (b) bail and (c) release from prison on licence (i) deliberately tampered with their tag and (ii) breached their curfew in (A) 2009, (B) 2010 and (C ) 2011. [115098]

Mr Blunt: The data are not collected centrally at this level of detail and it is not possible to provide this information except at disproportionate cost. The information is held within administrative databases by the two electronic monitoring contractors; however, extracting the data is complex as their databases are not designed to handle requests of this nature.

Negotiations are currently under way with bidders for the next generation of electronic monitoring contracts; these include proposals for improved provision of management information. The new contracts are due to commence in April 2013.

Legal Aid Scheme

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many civil servants in his Department are working on a system to make legal aid available to welfare cases involving points of law in the lower tribunal. [115536]

Mr Djanogly: Six members of staff have been working on this matter, among other duties they are responsible for.

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps his Department is taking to devise a system to make legal aid available to welfare cases involving points of law in the lower tribunal. [115537]

Mr Djanogly: We are giving serious thought to this issue and are considering the exact scope of the concession as well as how such work will be delivered in the future. Once we have considered in full we will make an announcement.

Life Imprisonment

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners serving life sentences are held in (a) closed prisons and (b) open prisons. [115363]

Mr Blunt: As at 31 March 2012 there were 7,819 prisoners serving life sentences, of which 7,226 were in closed prisons and 593 in open prisons in England and Wales. The figures for open prisons include those held in open prisons/YOIs and the relevant parts of multi-site establishments. It does not include those held in semi-open prisons or in small (under 50 place) open units at closed prisons.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

The numbers of such prisoners held in category D/open conditions will depend on how many of those prisoners pass the necessary robust risk assessment and the availability of spaces in the open prison estate at any one time.

Manchester Declaration

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent contribution his Department has made to implementation of the 2005 Manchester Declaration. [114821]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: The Ministry of Justice's implementation of the 2005 Manchester Declaration, and of the 2009 Malmo Declaration and eGovernment Action Plan which supersede it, follows the Government's approach to Digital by Default as recommended by Martha Lane Fox as UK Digital Champion in her report published in November 2010. The Ministry of Justice digital strategy will be published alongside the Government digital strategy in December 2012.

Progress on the Digital Agenda can be seen across the Ministry, including increased use of video services, enablement of digital working in the courts, and improved digital sharing of information across the CJS.

5 July 2012 : Column 787W

Offenders: Employment Schemes

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what progress he has made with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions in exploring how the Work programme can best get offenders receiving community sentences into employment and reduce reoffending. [115179]

Mr Blunt: Offenders serving community sentences can choose to access the Work programme at the three-month point of their claim for jobseeker's allowance, in the same way as other jobseekers defined as disadvantaged in the labour market. Otherwise, they are supported by Jobcentre Plus after making their claim for benefits and are mandated to the Work programme at nine or 12 months from the date of their claim, according to their age and other circumstances.

For those offenders unable to access the Work programme, flexible support is offered through the Support Contract, Get Britain Working measures and the European social fund.

The Ministry of Justice and the Department for Work and Pensions through the National Offender Management Service and Jobcentre Plus continue to work together to provide support to offenders to improve employment prospects because of the clear link to reduction in reoffending.

From March 2012 employment support has been available through the Work programme to prisoners immediately on release.

Pleural Plaques: Compensation

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether he has any plans to review the case for pleural plaques compensation following the recent ruling on mesothelioma triggers. [115441]

Mr Djanogly: No: the mesothelioma trigger ruling has no bearing on the position in relation to pleural plaques.

Prison Service: Clinical Psychologists

Mr Ronnie Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many trainee psychologists who enter training with the prison psychological services have abandoned, suspended or otherwise ended their training in each of the last five years. [115520]

Mr Blunt: At any one time the Prison Service has a number of trainee psychologists employed. Trainee psychologists leave their training and/or employment with the Prison Service for a variety of reasons. This may be linked to experiencing difficulties with the training route, choosing an alternative career, changing employers or requiring a career break for domestic reasons.

This table provides information on the number of individual trainee psychologists who have left the public sector Prison Service or National Offender Management Service headquarters over the required time period. It does not record those who may have left contracted prison sites.

5 July 2012 : Column 788W

 Number

2007-08

44

2008-09

58

2009-10

47

2010-11

30

2011-12

23

Total

202

Prisoner Escapes

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners have escaped from custody (a) during transfer between prisons and (b) in other circumstances in each month of the last five years. [115362]

Mr Blunt: The number of escapes has been falling since 1995 when central recording of escapes began. Table 1 shows the number of escapes(1), by month over the last five financial years from (a) prison establishment, (b) prison escort(2), and (c) contractor escort(3) (which includes escapes from court(4)). Over this period there was just one escape of a prisoner during transfer between prisons. This occurred in May 2011.

(1 )An escape is defined as when a prisoner is at liberty for 15 minutes or more before recapture, or an offence is committed during an escape lasting less than 15 minutes.

(2) A prison escort is an escort performed by prison staff, often to hospitals.

(3) A contractor escort is one undertaken on behalf of NOMS by a contractor to a court, originating from either a police station or a prison, or transferring prisoners between prisons.

(4) Escapes from contractor escorts include escapes from court; the majority of contractor escapes are from insecure docks rather than escort vehicles.

Table 1: escapes, by month and escape type, from April 2012
 Prison establishmentPrison escortContractor escort

April 2007

0

0

2

May 2007

0

0

1

June 2007

0

0

1

August 2007

1

0

3

September 2007

2

0

1

October 2007

0

1

2

November 2007

0

0

2

December 2007

0

0

1

January 2008

0

1

2

March 2008

1

0

1

April 2008

0

0

3

May 2008

0

1

1

June 2008

0

0

1

October 2008

0

1

2

November 2008

0

1

1

December 2008

0

0

3

January 2009

0

1

1

February 2009

0

0

1

March 2009

1

0

2

April 2009

0

1

0

May 2009

1

0

1

July 2009

1

0

1

September 2009

0

0

2

October 2009

0

0

3

November 2009

0

0

1

December 2009

0

1

0

February 2010

0

0

3

March 2010

0

1

1

5 July 2012 : Column 789W

May 2010

0

1

2

June 2010

1

0

1

July 2010

0

0

2

August 2010

0

0

2

December 2010

0

0

1

January 2011

0

0

1

March 2011

0

0

1

May 2011

0

1

1

June 2011

0

0

4

July 2011

0

0

3

October 2011

2

0

0

November 2011

0

0

2

December 2011

0

0

1

January 2012

0

1

2

March 2012

0

0

1

Total

10

12

67

Note: Months when there are zero escapes in all three categories are not shown.

Prisoners

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners convicted of murder are held in (a) closed and (b) open prisons. [115097]

Mr Blunt: As at 31 March 2012 there were 4,821 prisoners under sentence for murder in closed prisons and 363 in open prisons in England and Wales. The figures for open prisons include those held in open prisons/YOIs and the relevant parts of multi-site establishments. It does not include those held in semi-open prisons or in small (under 50 place) open units at closed prisons.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

The numbers of such prisoners held in Category D/open conditions will depend on how many of those prisoners pass the necessary robust risk assessment and the availability of spaces in the open prison estate at any one time.

All murderers will be serving indeterminate sentences. Depending on the minimum sentence or “tariff” and the risk they pose, such prisoners move through their sentence via a series of progressive transfers into lower security establishments in the closed prison estate. The decision to transfer indeterminate sentenced prisoners (ISPs) to open conditions is a categorisation decision which is a matter for my right hon. and learned Friend the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice. The Secretary of State may take this decision after seeking advice from the Parole Board or executively where the prisoners have demonstrated exceptional progress in closed conditions.

ISPs are normally considered for recategorisation to open conditions no earlier than three years before the end of their tariff.

Moving ISPs to open conditions is an important part of the offender's rehabilitation. It tests their suitability for eventual release while still maintaining many of the restrictions of a closed prison. Should the offender's behaviour in open conditions give rise to concerns, he/she can be returned to closed conditions.

5 July 2012 : Column 790W

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what account is taken of the views of the family of the victim in deciding to transfer a person convicted of murder to an open prison. [115100]

Mr Blunt: Under the statutory victim contact scheme operated by Probation Trusts, by virtue of Section 35 of the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004, victims of certain serious sexual or violent crimes, including victims bereaved by murder, where the offender has been sentenced to 12 months imprisonment or more may elect to receive information about key developments in the offender’s sentence. This includes notification that a prisoner is being considered for a move to an open prison and the outcome.

When a prisoner is being considered for allocation to open conditions, where the victim lives is one of the factors taken into account in determining to which open prison he should be transferred, if a transfer is approved.

Prisons: Mother and Baby Units

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many mothers with babies were held in prison in each of the last five years. [115364]

Mr Blunt: The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) began to collect information centrally on how many mothers with babies were held in prisons in England and Wales from 2010. The average number of women in prison with babies on a Mother and Baby Unit from June 2010 to May 2012 was 49. Data for 2007-2009 are not available.

Remand in Custody: Young People

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent progress has been made by the Youth Custody Pathfinder pilots in reducing the number of young people in the pilot areas who are remanded in custody. [115370]

Mr Blunt: Pathfinder is a two year project that has now been running for six months. The four Pathfinder areas have used this period to implement and embed a range of innovative approaches and processes. Given the relatively early stage of the initiative, it is premature to gauge achievement in terms of numbers. However, an independent evaluation has been commissioned. This will report in 2014.

Reoffenders

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent estimate he has made of the cost to the economy of reoffending by offenders sentenced to less than 12 months in prison in the latest period for which figures are available. [115421]

Mr Blunt: The Ministry of Justice does not make a routine estimate of the cost to the economy of reoffending.

The latest Ministry of Justice Statistics (for the 12 months ending June 2010) show that 56.8% of prisoners sentenced to less than 12 months are reconvicted within a year of release. For more information on reoffending see the MoJ website:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/reoffending/proven-re-offending

5 July 2012 : Column 791W

The latest cost estimates available on reoffending come from a 2010 National Audit Office (NAO) study, which estimates an economic and social cost of £7 billion to £10 billion a year for prisoners sentenced to less than 12 months. The estimate is based on a 1999 Home Office study of the economic and social cost of crime in England and Wales adjusted for inflation and changed crime levels to 2007-08 costs. For more information please see the National Audit Office website:

http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/0910/short_custodial_sentences.aspx

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds: Private Prosecutions

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what information his Department holds on the number of private prosecutions brought before the courts by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds in each of the last three years. [115314]

Mr Blunt: : Information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on the Court Proceedings Database does not include the circumstances behind each case beyond the description provided in the statute. It is not possible to identify from this centrally held information the number of private prosecutions brought before the courts by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

Squatting

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) whether he has made any plans to extend the squatting provisions of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 to public parks; [115310]

(2) what discussions he has had with representatives of the police on the commencement of the squatting provisions of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. [115311]

Mr Blunt: My officials have been working closely with the Department for Communities and Local Government to liaise with the police, local authorities and homelessness organisations to raise awareness of the offence and to prepare for commencement. One of the keys to effective enforcement will be joined up working between the different agencies. We are not planning to extend the offence to land at this stage, but will keep the situation under review.

Unpaid Fines: Sentencing

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) women and (b) men were held in prison for non-payment of fines in the last five years. [115419]

Mr Blunt: The following table shows the numbers of women and men held in prisons in England and Wales, as at 30 June of each year, for non-payment of fines. These figures are published annually in table A1.1 of the Offender Management Statistics Annual tables available at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/prisons-and-probation/oms-quarterly

5 July 2012 : Column 792W

 2007200820092009(1)20102011

Female

6

11

14

13

18

11

Male

62

99

99

86

111

118

(1) Due to the introduction of a new prison IT system in 2010 prison population data are now taken from a different source. The 2009 figures from both the old and new systems have been presented to aid comparison.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Victim Support Schemes

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the administrative cost of transferring responsibility for commissioning victims' services to police and crime commissioners; and if he will make a statement. [115367]

Mr Blunt: In January when the consultation “Getting it right for victims and witnesses” was published, we stated our aim that administration costs would not exceed 10% of the total victims' funding provided to police and crime commissioners (PCCs). We now believe that actual costs will be much less. The office of the PCC will already have the infrastructure and skills to commission services in respect of community safety, and adding victims' services to this ought to be achieved at minimal cost.

The current process through which providers bid to central Government for funding is not without bureaucracy and nor is it free of costs.

Yvonne Fovargue: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he expects to publish his Department's response to the consultation, “Getting it right for victims and witnesses”. [115385]

Mr Blunt: We published the Government response to the consultation on 2 July.

Work Capability Assessments: Appeals

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the cost to his Department was of appeals made to the Tribunal Service against work capability assessment decisions in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012 to date. [115329]

Mr Djanogly: Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions decisions on entitlement to employment and support allowance (ESA) (decisions in which the work capability assessment is a key factor) rather than appeals against work capability assessment decisions themselves.

The total cost of the 189,459 ESA appeals disposed of during the financial year 2011-12 in which the work capability assessment was a factor is estimated £45 million.

These estimated costs were calculated by multiplying the average cost of an individual First-tier Tribunal—Social Security and Child Support case in 2010-11 (the latest period for which these data are available) by the number of ESA appeals disposed of, in which the work capability assessment was a factor.

5 July 2012 : Column 793W

There is currently no information available for the 2012-13 financial year as we have not yet finalised and published the first quarters' financial data to enable an estimate to be provided.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the response of his colleague of 21 May 2012, Official Report, column 511W, on work capability assessments: appeals, if he will publish statistical information on the outcome of appeals to the work capability assessment decisions within and between tribunals. [115093]

Mr Djanogly: Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions decisions on entitlement to employment and support allowance (ESA) (decisions in which the work capability assessment is a key factor) rather than appeals against work capability assessment decisions themselves.

5 July 2012 : Column 794W

In the period 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2012, there were 189,459 ESA appeals disposed of, in which the work capability assessment was a factor. I will write and place information in the House, when details of the outcomes of hearings are available.

The Ministry of Justice is considering the cost and benefits of producing and publishing data for tribunals at a local area level.

Young Offenders

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many and what proportion of 10 and 11-year-olds convicted in court had committed a non-violent offence by (a) age and (b) offence in 2010-11. [114910]

Mr Blunt: The number of defendants aged 10 and 11 years found guilty at all courts, by offence group, in England and Wales, in 2010 and 2011, can be viewed in the following table:

Defendants aged 10 and 11 found guilty at all courts, by offence group, England and Wales, 2010 and 2011(1,2)
 20102011
Age and offence groupFound guiltyPercentage (%)(3)Found guiltyPercentage (%)(3)

10 years

    

Violence against the person

2

4.8

3

8.8

Sexual offences

Burglary

6

14.3

4

11.8

Robbery

3

7.1

1

2.9

Theft and handling stolen goods

10

23.8

2

5.9

Fraud and forgery

Criminal damage

1

2.4

7

20.6

Drug offences

Other indictable offences

Indictable motoring offences

Indictable total

22

52.4

17

50.0

     

Summary offences (excluding motoring)

19

45.2

17

50.0

Summary motoring offences

1

2.4

Total summary offences

20

47.6

17

50.0

     

All offences

42

100.0

34

100.0

     

11 years

    

Violence against the person

22

8.4

22

10.5

Sexual offences

6

2.3

6

2.9

Burglary

18

6.9

17

8.1

Robbery

10

3.8

12

5.7

Theft and handling stolen goods

50

19.2

41

19.6

Fraud and forgery

1

0.5

Criminal damage

22

8.4

16

7.7

Drug offences

1

0.5

Other indictable offences

4

1.5

8

3.8

Indictable motoring offences

Indictable total

132

50.6

124

59.3

     

Summary offences (excluding motoring)

126

48.3

83

39.7

Summary motoring offences

3

1.1

2

1.0

Total summary offences

129

49.4

85

40.7

5 July 2012 : Column 795W

5 July 2012 : Column 796W

All offences

261

100.0

209

100.0

‘—’ = Nil (1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2 )Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Proportion of defendants proceeded against who were found guilty. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Young Offenders: Enfield

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) juvenile offenders and (b) young offenders from the London Borough of Enfield have been held in a (i) secure children's home, (ii) secure training centre and (iii) under 18 young offender institution in each month from May 2005 to April 2012. [115104]

Mr Blunt: Table 1 shows the number of juvenile offenders (aged 10 to 17 years) either sentenced or remanded in custody attached to the Enfield Youth Offending Team (YOT) who have been held in a (i) secure children's home (SCH), (ii) secure training centre (STC) and (iii) under 18 young offender institution (YOI) in each month from May 2005 to April 2012.

This data has been provided by the Youth Justice Board (YJB). The YJB holds data at the YOT area level, not at the local authority level. YOT area data may cover more than one local authority area.

Data provided for table 1 is based upon monthly snapshot population data. Therefore one young person who is held more than one month in custody may be shown in more than one month in the table.

Data from April 2011 onwards are provisional. Data for the financial year 2011-12 will be finalised when the 2011-12 Annual Youth Justice Statistics are published in 2013 and data for the financial year 2012-13 will be finalised in 2014.

Young adult offenders (aged 18 to 20 years) are not held in secure children's homes, secure training centres, or under 18 young offender institutions. Some juvenile offenders, however, remain in the youth secure estate after they have turned 18 if they have only a short period of their custodial sentence to serve.

Table 2 shows the number of young adult offenders aged 18 years old from the London borough of Enfield who were held in under 18 young offender institutions. These data have been provided by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS). One month's worth of data was collected centrally in May 2009 and has been available on a bi-monthly basis from September 2010.

Table 1: Number of young people (10-17) in custody attached to Enfield Youth Offending Team by establishment type
 Secure Children's HomesSecure Training CentresYoung Offender Institutions

May 2005

0

1

23

June 2005

0

1

16

July 2005

0

1

15

August 2005

1

3

15

September 2005

1

5

13

October 2005

0

1

18

November 2005

0

1

20

December 2005

0

2

21

January 2006

0

2

20

February 2006

0

2

23

March 2006

0

2

23

April 2006

2

2

21

May 2006

1

1

26

June 2006

1

0

22

July 2006

1

0

27

August 2006

1

2

28

September 2006

0

3

28

October 2006

0

1

25

November 2006

0

3

25

December 2006

1

2

26

January 2007

0

3

28

February 2007

0

3

29

March 2007

0

3

24

April 2007

0

2

27

May 2007

0

2

26

June 2007

0

2

25

July 2007

0

2

20

August 2007

1

2

16

5 July 2012 : Column 797W

5 July 2012 : Column 798W

September 2007

1

3

22

October 2007

0

3

22

November 2007

0

2

22

December 2007

0

1

23

January 2008

0

2

16

February 2008

0

3

17

March 2008

0

2

17

April 2008

0

0

20

May 2008

0

0

20

June 2008

0

2

20

July 2008

0

1

22

August 2008

0

2

19

September 2008

0

2

16

October 2008

0

1

17

November 2008

0

1

18

December 2008

0

1

14

January 2009

0

0

16

February 2009

1

0

19

March 2009

1

0

16

April 2009

1

1

18

May 2009

1

3

17

June 2009

0

3

15

July 2009

0

1

15

August 2009

0

0

16

September 2009

0

2

16

October 2009

0

1

16

November 2009

0

2

11

December 2009

0

0

9

January 2010

0

0

7

February 2010

0

1

12

March 2010

0

0

9

April 2010

0

2

11

May 2010

1

2

13

June 2010

0

2

17

July 2010

0

3

15

August 2010

0

2

14

September 2010

0

3

13

October 2010

0

4

13

November 2010

0

2

14

December 2010

0

3

10

January 2011

0

3

11

February 2011

0

1

18

March 2011

0

2

20

April 2011

1

2

17

May 2011

0

1

14

June 2011

0

1

20

July 2011

0

4

16

August 2011

0

3

17

September 2011

1

4

22

October 2011

0

5

21

November 2011

0

3

26

December 2011

0

3

24

January 2012

0

2

24

February 2012

0

2

19

March 2012

0

3

15

5 July 2012 : Column 799W

5 July 2012 : Column 800W

April 2012

0

3

12

Notes: 1. The data come from the Youth Justice Board's Secure Accommodation Clearing House System (SACHS). 2. These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and may be subject to change over time. 3. The YJB does not hold data at local authority level. However, it does hold data down to Youth Offending Team area, some of which cover more than one local authority area. 4. The table shows the number of young people aged 10-17 attached to the Enfield Youth Offending Team who have been held in a (i) secure children's home, (ii) secure training centre and (iii) under 18 young offender institution in each month since May 2005 to April 2012. 5. This is based upon monthly snapshot population data. Therefore one young person who is held more than one month in custody, may be shown in more than one month in the table below. 6. Please note, data from April 2011 onwards are provisional. Data from April 2011 onwards will be finalised when the 2011-12 Annual Youth Justice Statistics are published in 2013 and data from April 2012 will be finalised in 2014.
Table 2: Number of young adult offenders (aged 18) held in under 18 young offender institution attached to London borough of Enfield
 Numbers of young adult offenders (held in under 18 YOIs)

May 2009

2

September 2010

0

November 2010

0

January 2011

0

March 2011

1

May 2011

1

July 2011

1

September 2011

1

November 2011

1

January 2012

2

March 2012

2

May 2012

4

Notes: 1. These figures have been drawn from the NOMS administrative IT system, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. 2. Information on offenders’ residences is provided by offenders on reception into prison and recorded on a central IT system. Addresses can include a home address, an address to which offenders intend to return on discharge or next of kin address and these figures are provided in the table above. 3. If no address is given, an offender’s committal court address is used as a proxy for the area in which they are resident. These figures are also included in the table above. No address has been recorded and no court information is available for around 3% of all offenders, these figures are excluded from the table above. 4. One month’s worth of data were collected centrally in May 2009 and have been available on a bi-monthly basis from September 2010.

Defence

Armed Forces: Housing

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what estimate he has made of expenditure on service accommodation after 2015; [114467]

(2) how much of the budget for service accommodation will be spent on (a) upgrading service accommodation and (b) new service accommodation in (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14, (iii) 2014-15, (iv) 2015-16 and (v) 2016-17; [114473]

(3) what estimate he has made of the likely level of spend on service accommodation from the defence budget in (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14, (c) 2014-15, (d) 2015-16 and (e) 2016-17. [114564]

Mr Robathan: The majority of expenditure on service accommodation is by the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO). The DIO's budget for new or upgraded service accommodation is treated as a single source of funding.

The planned expenditure currently contained within the DIO's Control Totals on accommodation and the provision of new and upgraded accommodation in financial years 2012-13 to 2016-17 is expressed in the following table. This reflects the pause in provision of new and upgraded service accommodation between 2013-14 and 2015-16 which is partially offset by the additional £100 million for 2013-14 of investment announced in this year's budget.

£ million
  Of which:
Financial yearEstimated DIO expenditure on accommodationPlanned expenditure on new and upgraded accommodation

2012-13

487

118

2013-14

490

117

2014-15

399

17

2015-16

410

18

2016-17

538

136

The current estimate of expenditure on service accommodation after 2015 is some £538 million per financial year, rising to some £562 million in 2019-20.

Armed Forces: Redundancy

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Army personnel were made redundant within (a) three months, (b) six months and (c) one year of qualifying for their full pension rights in the most recent period for which figures are available. [114606]

Mr Robathan: No Army personnel have been selected, within the specified periods, of qualifying for their full pension rights. This is because full pension rights are only granted at the completion of a full military career and all Army personnel within the last three years of their engagement were ineligible for consideration under the redundancy scheme.

There will, however, be some Army personnel who have been selected, within the specified periods, of qualifying for their immediate pension point, this being the point at which a pension is paid immediately on

5 July 2012 : Column 801W

leaving the Army. Because of the complexity of pension calculations, the exact number of Army personnel affected by this could only be determined by a manual analysis of the records of those selected for redundancy, which could only be provided at disproportionate cost. However, early analysis indicates approximately 55 (roughly 1.4%) of the 3,820 Army personnel selected for redundancy in Tranches 1 and 2 are non-applicants who will be within one year of qualifying for an immediate pension or equivalent on their redundancy exit following a reduction in the qualifying period for the majority of other ranks from 22 years to 18 years enabling many redundees to receive an immediate income for which they would otherwise not have qualified.

Armed Forces: Training

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) whether his Department has any plans to review the defence training estate; and if he will make a statement; [115026]

(2) what plans his Department has for the rationalisation of the defence training estate; and if he will make a statement. [115062]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 3 July 2012]: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is developing its “Footprint Strategy” to determine an affordable and sustainable infrastructure of the right type, size and quality in the right place to support Future Force 2020 operational capability. The Defence Training Estate will form part of the “Footprint Strategy” review.

The return of the Army from Germany, restructuring under Army 2020 and other strategic defence and security review initiatives will result in changes to the basing of units and the estate required for them to train. The Defence Infrastructure Organisation is working with each command headquarters to draw up plans to meet the future training requirement.

The MOD will continue to look to make the most efficient use of the Defence Training Estate and will continue to identify and dispose of sites that are no longer needed, ensuring that we are making optimum use of the sites that remain.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department plans to review the structure of training for armed forces personnel. [115063]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 3 July 2012]: Training of armed forces personnel remains under constant review. The implementation of Lord Levene's report on defence reform has led to some restructuring in the areas of joint and collective training under the joint forces command. In addition, the Defence Technical Training Change programme will transform Defence Technical Training, rationalising the training estate in line with Defence objectives, reducing the military manpower involved in the delivery of training, and maintaining training to the standards required by the front line commands. The three services continue to deliver individual and special-to-role training.

5 July 2012 : Column 802W

Defence: Procurement

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 21 May 2012 on defence procurement, what the urgent operational requirements are which are referred to in the answer. [115081]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 3 July 2012]: Urgent operational requirements (UORs) address urgent and unforeseen capability gaps in support of a current or imminent military operation. Often this means responding to new or evolving threats posed by our adversaries and as such, much of the detail on specific equipment remains operationally sensitive. It would not be appropriate to release information on individual UORs that could compromise the safety of our troops.

While specific details of the 327 UORs referred to in the answer given on 21 May 2012 cannot be disclosed, I can confirm that the majority of UORs have been in the areas of force protection, counter improvised explosive device (C-IED), rotary wing, tactical air transport, situational awareness, and protected mobility.

Lost Property

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the cost of items lost or stolen from his Department in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [114506]

Mr Robathan: The estimated value of losses due to suspected theft was £2,452,485 in 2009-10; £967,103 in 2010-11 and £2,206,518 in 2011-12.

Estimates of loss are provided when suspicions are initially reported. These figures will fluctuate on an annual basis depending on the particular allegations under investigation in any one year.

Departmental Staff

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what target he has set to reduce headcount across his Department, its non-departmental public bodies and executive agencies in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12 and (c) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [110239]

Mr Robathan: The Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) announced planned reductions in the civilian workforce of 25,000 to be achieved by 2015. This was subsequently increased to about 28,500, as a result of further Defence Transformation decisions announced to the House by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Defence, on 18 July 2011, and will constitute a reduction of one third of pre-SDSR numbers. Figures shown reflect the full time equivalent civilian workforce figures for 1 April 2010, 2011 and 2012, as published in the Quarterly Civilian Personnel Report for 1 April 2012, which can be found at:

www.dasa.mod.uk

 NumberCumulative difference

1 April 2010

85,850

1 April 2011

83,060

-2,790

5 July 2012 : Column 803W

1 April 2012

70,940

-14,910

Mental Health

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he is taking to promote good mental health and wellbeing in his Department. [114617]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) takes the health and wellbeing of both its military and civilian staff very seriously. For military staff, I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 26 June 2012, Official Report, column 193-194W, to the hon. Member for North Tyneside (Mrs Glindon). Specifically for civilians, the MOD strives to help them to maintain or improve their health and wellbeing by the promotion of a number of activities, including sport and exercise, healthy eating and the provision of an occupational health and welfare service. A health and welfare champion has recently been appointed at senior level to encourage progress on this agenda.

Property

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the properties and their uses owned or leased by his Department outside the UK and Germany. [115461]

Mr Robathan: A list of all of the Ministry of Defence properties outside the UK and Germany together with their uses is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Education

Adoption

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what the average time taken was for the adoption process from first application to completion in the latest period for which figures are available; [114596]

(2) how many adoptions have been completed in (a) the last year for which figures are available and (b) each of the previous 10 years. [114597]

Tim Loughton: The only information that the Department collects on prospective adopters is their gender, legal status and relationship status.

For children adopted during the year ending 31 March 2011, the average time taken between entry into care and adoption was two years and seven months.

However, within this period, the child will be ‘placed for adoption’, meaning he/she goes to live with the prospective adopters. At this stage, it is for the prospective adopters to apply to the court for an adoption order.

For children adopted during the year ending 31 March 2011, the average time taken between entry into care and being placed for adoption was one year and three months.

5 July 2012 : Column 804W

Further information on the average time between the different stages of the adoption process are shown in Table E2 of the national tables in the publication, “Children looked after by Local Authorities in England (including adoption and care leavers)—year ending 31 March 2011”, which is available on the Department's website via the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/statistics-by-topic/childrenandfamilies/a00196857/children-looked-after-by-las-in-england

The numbers of looked after children who were adopted during the years ending 31 March, for the latest 10 years are shown in the following table.

Looked after children who were adopted during the years ending 31 March(1, 2)—Years ending 31 March 2002 to 2011, Coverage: England
 Number

2002

3,430

2003

3,540

2004

3,760

2005

3,770

2006

3,700

2007

3,330

2008

3,180

2009

3,330

2010

3,200

2011

3,050

(1) Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. (2) Historical data may differ from older publications. This is mainly due to the implementation of amendments and corrections sent by some local authorities after the publication date of previous materials. Source: SSDA 903

Alcoholic Drinks and Drugs: Rehabilitation

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what assessment his Department has made of the recommendations of the report by Addaction entitled A Better Future for Families; [114647]

(2) what assessment his Department has made of new models of intervention developed as part of Addaction's Breaking the Cycle project for working families with substance misuse problems. [114648]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 3 July 2012]: Addaction's report and project will help improve the knowledge about interventions that work for families affected by substance misuse. The DCLG who lead on the Government's Troubled Families Programme will consider the report's recommendations and findings, particularly around the benefits of their family based interventions. Officials from the DCLG Troubled Families Unit recently visited the Brent project to meet staff and service users in the Breaking the Cycle project.

Atos

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the total monetary value is of each contract between his Department and Atos. [111196]

Tim Loughton: The Department has one contract with Atos (Origin IT Services) and the total monetary value of that current contract is £363,635.

5 July 2012 : Column 805W

Children in Care

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children's care homes there are in each council area in England and Wales; and how many are (a) privately owned and (b) run by the council in each such area. [114241]

Tim Loughton: The information requested has been placed in the House of Commons Library. Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) is required to register all children's homes and maintain a record of this information. This is in the public domain and can be accessed via the following link:

www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/official-statistics-childrens~ social-care-providers-and-places

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate his Department has made of the (a) number and (b) proportion of looked-after children who have been provided with an independent visitor in the latest period for which figures are available. [114710]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 2 July 2012]: Local authorities looking after a child have a duty to appoint a person to be a child's independent visitor where it appears to them to be in the child's interest to do so and where the child wants one.

Information on the number of looked-after children who have been provided with an independent visitor are not collected by this Department.

The information that is collected by this Department relating to looked after children is published in the Statistical First Release ‘Children Looked After by Local Authorities in England (including adoption and care leavers)—year ending 31 March 2011' which can be found on the Department's website via the following link below.

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001026/index.shtml

Class Sizes

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department is taking steps to decrease the average class size in schools. [113523]

Mr Gibb: Current legislation limits the size of an infant class to no more than 30 pupils to one school teacher. There is no class size limit for children aged eight and over and schools are best placed to decide on the shape and size of their classes, based on the resources available to them.

Each local authority is responsible for managing the supply and demand for primary and secondary school places in their area. We are aware that in some areas there is a significant demand for more places. To support this, the Government is making £15.8 billion of capital funding available to local authorities over the next four years to ensure there are sufficient school places to meet the local need.

5 July 2012 : Column 806W

Human Trafficking: Children

Mr Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what process is used to establish how child victims of human trafficking are placed in local authority care. [114685]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 2 July 2012]: Responsibility for the care, protection and accommodation of child trafficking victims rests with local authorities under their duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of all children, and in accordance with the Council of Europe Convention on Human Trafficking. Separated and vulnerable children from abroad have the same entitlements as UK born or resident children.

Where a child is suspected of being trafficked and becomes looked after by a local authority, a social worker will be responsible for putting in place an individualised care plan covering the full range of the child's needs. The social worker will also make an assessment of the type of placement which best matches the needs of the child, including the need to safeguard them from contact with traffickers.

Leveson Inquiry

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much it cost to provide him with legal advice in relation to his appearance at the Leveson Inquiry. [112774]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 19 June 2012]:I refer you to the response given by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport on 21 June 2012, Official Report, column 1088W.

Low Associates

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has received any representations from Low Associates since May 2010. [111593]

Tim Loughton: No representations have been received from Low Associates.

Mental Health

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to promote good mental health and well-being in his Department. [114682]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education has a range of policies and procedures that facilitate the management of health and well-being for employees. Managers are encouraged to proactively implement processes as required with the support of shared services and HR as appropriate. Examples of approach are:

Attendance: Managers are guided to proactively manage absence which includes reviewing the level and reasons for absence at various trigger points;

return to work interviews to discuss issues/ potential issues and implement appropriate actions.

5 July 2012 : Column 807W

Stress Management: provides good practice guidelines for managers to identify and as far as is reasonably practical, minimise the workplace factors which may lead to stress; supporting colleagues who are experiencing stress.

Flexible working: the DfE encourages flexible working patterns; managers are required to ensure staff can achieve a good work/life balance and that business objectives are delivered by positive approach to flexible working.

In addition to contractual leave entitlement, the DfE offers special leave which covers a range of situations when staff may need to be away from work, but that cannot be reasonably accommodated in their annual leave entitlement.

Additional support available

Advice and support is available from:

Medigold—DfE's occupational health provider

Right CoreCare—DfE's employee assistance provider

Management information—used to identify trends and appropriate strategies

The Department encourages staff to join sport and social activities; this includes an annual DfE sports and families day and the opportunity to join in various clubs and social activities across DfE sites.

Procurement

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of contracts issued by his Department were awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises in 2011-12; and what proportion this represented of the monetary value of contracts awarded by his Department in 2011-12. [111922]

Tim Loughton: From the information that has been published, the number of contracts awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises (SME's) from April 2011 to January 2012 was 61. The total spend with SME's in the financial year 2011/12 was £47.6 million.

Further information can be found in the Cabinet Office publication “Making Government business more accessible to SMEs—One Year On”, which was released in March 2012. This is a progress report on enabling more SMEs to tender for Government procurements.

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/making-government-business-more-accessible-smes-one-year

The Department does not hold contract information centrally and to report on the details of this question would incur disproportional costs.

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many contracts issued by his Department were awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises in 2011-12; what proportion of that figure represents of all contracts let; and what the monetary value was of such contracts. [113960]

Tim Loughton: The Department does not hold contract information centrally and to report on the details of this question would incur disproportional costs.

From the information that has been published, the number of Department for Education contracts awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises (SME's) from April 2011 to January 2012 was 61. The total spend with SME's in the financial year 2011/12 was £47.6 million.

5 July 2012 : Column 808W

Public Bodies

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the budget was of each public body he has abolished in the last full year of its operation; and what the budget was of each such body which he plans to abolish in the last year for which figures are available. [114236]

Tim Loughton: The following table details the arm’s length bodies that have been abolished detailing their last full year of operation and the organisations budget for that year.

Last full year of OperationOrganisationBudget (£ million)

2010-11

British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (BECTA)

173

2011-12

Training and Development Agency (TDA)

557

2011-12

Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC)

111

2011-12

General Teaching Council for England (GTCE)

11

2011-12

National College for School Leadership (NCSL)

112

2011-12

Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA)

12,606

2011-12

Partnership for Schools (PfS)

5,328

2010-11

Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency (QCDA)

42

There are no plans to abolish any other bodies at present.

Publications

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many publications his Department has issued since May 2010; and what the title was of each (a) publication and (b) consultation document issued by his Department since May 2010. [114164]

Tim Loughton: The information requested is as follows:

(a) The Department has issued 15 publications since May 2010. Other information has been published on our website rather than as a printed publication. This is in order to secure value for money and promote wider access to our material. The publications are listed here by title:

1. Teachers' pension scheme (England and Wales) resource accounts 2009-10; (for the year ended 31 March 2010)

2. Department for Children, Schools and Families resource accounts 2009-10: (for the year ended 31 March 2010)

3. The School Food Trust (a charitable company limited by guarantee) annual report and financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2010

4. Draft statutory guidance for local duties on child poverty (Child Poverty Act 2010): report on and response to formal consultation held March to June 2010

5. The importance of teaching

6. Review of the Office the Children's Commissioner (England)

7. Support and aspiration: a new approach to special educational needs and disability; a consultation

5 July 2012 : Column 809W

8. A new approach to child poverty: tackling the causes of disadvantage and transforming families' lives

9. The Munro Review of Child Protection: final report: a child-centred system

10. Letting children be children: report of an Independent Review of the Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Childhood

11. Teachers' pension scheme (England and Wales) annual accounts 2010-11: (for the year ended 31 March 2011)

12. Department for Education annual report and accounts 2010-11: (for the year ended 31 March 2011)

13. Independent Review of Key Stage 2 testing, assessment and accountability: Government response

14. Post-legislative assessments of the Education and Inspections Act 2006, Childcare Act 2006 and Children and Adoption Act 2006: memorandum to the Education Committee of the House of Commons

15. The Government response to the Family Justice Review: a system with children and families at its heart

(b) The Department has published 72 consultation documents since May 2010. A list of the consultations follows, showing those which have been completed and those which are still running.

Completed consultations

1. Independent review of the Office of the Children's Commissioner—Call for Evidence

2. Consultation on school funding.2011-12: Introducing a pupil premium

3. Tickell review of the Early Years Foundation Stage—Call for Evidence

4. Capital review—Call for Evidence

5. Regulations governing fostering services, children's homes providers and adoption and fostering panels and statutory guidance on children's homes and fostering

6. Green paper: children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities—Call for Views

7. Arrangements for placement of children by voluntary organisations and others (England) regulations 2011

8. Year 1 phonics check consultation

9. Schools White Paper

10. Key stage 2 testing and accountability review—Call for Evidence

11. FE improvement

12. Tackling child poverty and improving life chances: consulting on a new approach

13. Independent review of personal, social, health, and economic education

14. National curriculum review—Call for Evidence

15. National signposting service

16. Bailey review on the commercialisation and sexualisation of childhood (stakeholder version)

17. Bailey review on the commercialism and sexualisation of childhood (parents and carers version)

18. Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability

19. Financial support for 16 to 19-year-olds in education or training

20. Ensuring good behaviour in schools: Guidance for governing bodies, head teachers, school staff and employers

21. Academies' pre-16 funding: Options for the 2012/13 academic year

22. A consultation on school funding reform: Rationale and principles

23. Proposed changes to performance management and capability arrangements for teachers

24. Consultation on the changes to the admissions framework

5 July 2012 : Column 810W

25. Consultation on a revised Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

26. Establishing a new Office of the Children's Commissioner for England (OCCE): Consultation on legislative proposals

27. Implementation of the 2010-11 review of education capital (The James Review)

28. A consultation on school funding reform: Proposals for a fairer system

29. Proposed changes to the teacher disciplinary and induction regulations following the abolition of the General Teaching Council for England

30. Qualifications for 14-16 year olds and performance tables

31. Review of Personal, Social, Health and Economics (PSHE) education

32. Consultation on proposed increases to contributions for members of the Teachers' Pension Scheme

33. Changes to the Care to Learn child care support scheme

34. Sure Start Children's Centre core purpose survey

35. Auxiliary aids for children with disabilities

36. Proposed changes to the newly qualified teacher (NQT) induction regulations for England

37. Proposed changes to allow qualified teachers from further education and from the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand to become permanent teachers in English schools

38. Revised statutory guidance on the roles and responsibilities of the Director of Children's Services and the Lead Member for Children's Services

39. 16 to 19 funding formula review

40. Study programmes for 16 to 19-year-olds

41. Removing the statutory duty to deliver work related learning at key stage 4

42. Proposed amendment to the school governance (Constitution) (England) regulations 2007

43. Consultation on the review of inter-country adoption legislation

44. Call for Evidence for the independent review of early education and child care qualifications

45. Consultation on revised school premises regulations

46. The academies (land transfer schemes) regulations 2011

47. Consultation on the changes to the admissions regulations

48. Supporting families in the foundation years: Proposed changes to the entitlement to free early education and child care sufficiency

49. A consultation on revised statutory guidance and regulations for exclusions from schools and pupil referral units in England

50. Consultation on a revised Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) (Learning and Development Requirements) (Amendment) Order 2012

51. The Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation: Determination of turnover for monetary penalties

52. Consultation on proposed changes to the school staffing (England) regulations 2009 to require governing bodies to share information with prospective employers about whether head teachers and teachers have been in capability procedures

53. Removing the duty on maintained schools to follow the information and communication technology (ICT) programmes of study, attainment targets and statutory assessment arrangements

54. Consultation on the Raising the Participation Age (RPA) regulations

55. Children's safeguarding performance information consultation

56. Consultation on the education (Pupil Referral Units) (Application of Enactments) (England) (Amendment) regulations 2012

57. Consultation on revised Sure Start Children's Centres statutory guidance

5 July 2012 : Column 811W

58. Consultation on draft revised statutory guidance for local authorities on services and activities to improve young people's well-being

59. New statutory guidance for the induction of newly qualified teachers (NQTs) in England

60. Proposed changes to allow schools to more easily employ industry experts to work as .instructors in schools

61. Consultation on school funding reform: Next steps towards a fairer system

62. Proposed changes to allow initial teacher training (ITT) in Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) from September 2012

63. A consultation on improving the assurance system for financial management in local authority maintained schools

64. Reform of alternative provision

65. Consultation on revision of the education (Independent School Standards) (England) regulations 2010

Live consultations

66. Review of regulations and national minimum standards for residential family centres

67. Consultation on careers guidance for schools, sixth form colleges and further education institutions

68. Protection of biometric information of children in schools: Consultation on draft advice for proprietors, governing bodies, head teachers, principals and school staff, young people, parents and representative bodies

69. Safeguarding children: proposed changes to child performance legislation

70. Regulations for removing the duty on maintained schools to follow the Information and Communication technology (ICT) national curriculum programmes of study, attainment targets and statutory assessment arrangements

71. Consultation on revised safeguarding statutory guidance

72. Co-operative parenting following family separation: Proposed legislation on the involvement of both parents in a child's life.