These figures exclude lump sum payments made as a result of members sacrificing future pension payments in favour of an additional lump sum payment.

4 July 2012 : Column 724W

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department has paid towards teachers' pensions through employer pension contributions in each year since 2000. [114707]

Mr Gibb: The following table provided details of the employer pension contributions paid into the scheme since 2000. The figures are based on the contributions shown in the Teachers' Pension Scheme (England and Wales) Annual Accounts, adjusted to exclude contributions paid by members and for contributions paid into the scheme by the independent schools sector.

Year ending 31 MarchEmployer contributions (£ billion)

2000

0.92

2001

1.00

2002

1.10

2003

1.32

2004

2.29

2005

2.35

2006

2.43

2007

2.58

2008

2.75

2009

2.86

2010

2.93

2011

3.01

2012

2.98

It has been assumed that 10% of the contributions received relate to the independent sector for each year. This is in line with current levels.

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much the Government will pay towards teachers' pensions in employer pension contributions in each of the next 10 years. [114708]

Mr Gibb: Contribution forecasts have only been calculated to year ending 31 March 2017. These are included in the following table and have been taken from the latest forecasts provided to the Office for Budgetary Responsibility (OBR). The OBR forecasts have been adjusted to take into account contributions received from the independent sector. These figures do not taken into account contribution changes that might occur as a result of changes to the Teachers' Pension Scheme as these are not yet known.

Year ending 31 MarchEmployer contributions (£ billion)

2013

3.00

2014

3.03

2015

3.11

2016

3.20

2017

3.30

It has been assumed that 10% of the contributions received relate to the independent sector for each year. This is in line with current levels.

Truancy: West Midlands

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has made an assessment of truancy rates in (a) primary schools and (b) secondary

4 July 2012 : Column 725W

schools in (i) Coventry, (ii) Coventry North East constituency and (iii) the West Midlands in each of the last five years; and what steps he is taking to reduce truancy rates. [114107]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 28 June 2012]:The closest measure we have to assess truancy rates is the unauthorised

4 July 2012 : Column 726W

absence rate. This includes family holidays taken during term time but not agreed by the head teacher, late arrival at school, and any absence that is not authorised.

Information on unauthorised absence from 2006/07 to 2010/11 is shown in the table.

State-funded primary and secondary schools(1, 2, 3): Unauthorised absence rates. Academic years 2006/07-2010/11 (First 2.5 terms of the academic year). England, the West Midlands region, Coventry local authority and Coventry North East parliamentary constituency
Unauthorised absence rate
 EnglandWest MidlandsCoventry local authorityCoventry North East parliamentary constituency
 State-funded primary schools(1, 2)State-funded secondary schools(1, 3)State-funded primary schools(1, 2)State-funded secondary schools(1, 3)State-funded primary schools(1, 2)State-funded secondary schools(1, 3)State-funded primary schools(1, 2)State-funded secondary schools(1, 3)

2006/07

0.5

1.5

0.5

1.4

0.4

1.4

0.6

1.6

2007/08

0.6

1.5

0.6

1.4

0.4

1.4

0.6

1.7

2008/09

0.6

1.5

0.7

1.4

0.6

1.5

0.9

1.8

2009/10

0.7

1.4

0.8

1.4

0.7

1.5

1.0

1.8

2010/11

0.7

1.4

0.8

1.4

0.8

1.3

1.1

1.8

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes primary academies. (3) Includes city technology colleges and secondary academies. (4 )The number of sessions missed due to unauthorised absence expressed as a percentage of the total number of possible sessions. Source: School Census

The latest data on absence, for the school year, are published as Statistical First Release 04/2012 ‘Pupil Absence in Schools in England, Including Pupil Characteristics: 2010/11' at

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001060/index.shtml

World War I: Curriculum

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make it his policy that the history of the First World War forms part of the national curriculum during the four years of the commemoration of the centenary; and if he will make a statement. [114840]

Mr Gibb: World war one is currently a compulsory part of the history curriculum in secondary schools. We are reviewing the national curriculum with the aim of focussing it on the body of essential knowledge in key subjects that all children need to learn. As part of the review we are considering which subjects, beyond English, mathematics, science and PE, should be part of the national curriculum in future and at which key stages.

As part of our national commemoration of the centenary of world war one we will encourage all children and young people to understand its significance as an important part of our historical and cultural inheritance.

Young People: West Midlands

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what comparative assessment he has made of the proportion of young people (a) in the West Midlands and (b) nationally who are not in education, employment and training. [115016]

Tim Loughton: Official estimates of the number and proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds not in education, employment or training (NEET) in England are published by the Department in a Statistical First Release (SFR) each June and can be found on the Department's website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001072/index.shtml

These estimates cannot be broken down below national level. However, local authorities collect information on the number and proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds NEET in each local area, which are published annually of the DFE website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/16to19/participation/neet/a0064101/strategies-for-16-to-18-year-olds-not-in-education-employment-or-training-neet

Figures for the West Midlands and England at the end of 2011 are shown in the following table.

 16 to 18-year-olds NEET
 NumberProportion (percentage)

West Midlands

12,170

6.2

England

104,080

6.1

Due to methodological differences, the local authority estimates of NEET are lower than the official national estimates.

Young People: Yorkshire and Humber

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of young people aged (a) 16, (b) 17 and (c) 18 years living in (i) York and (ii) Yorkshire and the Humber were in (A) full-time education and (B) full-time education, employment or training in (1) 1992 and (2) each year since 1992. [111423]

4 July 2012 : Column 727W

Tim Loughton: Official estimates of the number and proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds in full-time education and work based learning in England are published by the Department in a Statistical First Release (SFR) each June and can be found on the Department's website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001011/index.shtml

These estimates do not include young people undertaking employer-funded training or employment. However, information on a wider range of activities can be extracted from the databases maintained by local authorities to record young people's participation in education, training and employment. Figures for young people aged (a) 16, (b) 17 and (c) 18 years in (i) York and (ii) Yorkshire and the Humber are shown in the following tables. These data were not collected at local authority level before 2005.

 Age 16(1)Age 17Age 18
As at DecemberCount%Count%Count%

York: 16,17 and 18-year-olds in full-time education

      

2005

1,513

81

2,025

75

1,360

57

2006

1,584

83

2,054

76

1,641

59

2007

1,752

86

2,279

78

1,570

62

2008

1,643

88

2,216

79

1,558

56

2009

1,328

92

2,056

87

1,458

67

2010

1,869

93

2,465

89

1,830

71

2011(2)

1,130

87

1,635

82

1,247

65

       

York: 16, 17 and 18-year-olds in full-time education, employment or training

      

2005

1,745

94

2,494

93

2,088

87

2006

1,794

94

2,513

93

2,162

88

2007

1,931

94

2,703

92

2,385

94

2008

1,780

95

2,585

92

2,293

82

2009

1,378

96

2,241

95

1,921

88

2010

1,959

97

2,633

95

2,268

88

2011(2)

1,229

94

1,841

93

1,645

86

       

Yorkshire and the Humber: 16,17 and 18-year-olds in full-time education

      

2005

30,316

71

41,163

62

30,534

47

2006

32,457

73

41,842

64

32,017

49

2007

33,452

75

45,084

67

32,760

51

2008

34,465

78

46,103

69

33,706

51

2009

33,645

82

48,142

74

36,214

56

2010

34,285

84

48,396

77

38,169

59

2011(2,3)

31,842

84

44,829

82

36,534

61

       

Yorkshire and the Humber: 16, 17 and 18-year-olds in full-time education, employment or training

      

2005

37,569

88

53,946

81

49,753

76

2006

39,571

89

54,264

83

50,965

78

2007

40,142

90

57,912

86

51,667

80

2008

40,705

92

58,493

87

52,752

82

4 July 2012 : Column 728W

2009

38,174

93

57,763

89

51,457

88

2010

38,384

94

57,196

91

53,718

83

2011(2,3)

35,782

94

52,293

93

48,381

81

(1) Excludes young people aged 16 who are below the compulsory school leaving age. (2) Figures for 2011 relate to the local authority where the young person resides; earlier figures relate to the area where the young-person was in education. (3) Excludes East Riding of Yorkshire, who did not supply data.

Youth Custody

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many secure children's homes have (a) opened and (b) closed in each year since 2003; what the reason for opening or closing was in each case; how many homes remain open; and what plans his Department has to open or close any in the future. [111514]

Tim Loughton: In 2003 there were 28 secure children's homes in England. Since then no new homes have opened, while 12 homes have closed, of the 16 homes now in operation, 15 of these are provided by local authorities and the other by a charitable organisation.

The following table shows the number of homes that closed in each year since 2003.

Closure of secure children's homes 2003-12
 Number of closures

2003

1

2004

3

2005

2

2006

1

2007

.2

2008

1

2009

2

2010

0

2011

0

The Department does not keep a record of the reasons why individual homes have closed. But our understanding is that in most cases homes closed as the local authorities managing them reached a view that changes in professional practice and in how services were commissioned and funded meant that the provision of these very specialised high cost services ceased to be financially viable.

The approval of the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), must be secured before any children's homes can provide secure accommodation but the Department is not directly responsible for delivering these services. Any decision to establish a new secure children's home would be for local authorities or other potential providers of these services based on their assessment of the future market for these services.

Cabinet Office

Emigration

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people emigrated from the UK in each of the last five years. [115500]

4 July 2012 : Column 729W

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated July 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to respond to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many people emigrated from the UK in each of the last five years. (115500)

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) produces estimates of long-term international migration, primarily based on the International Passenger Survey (IPS).

Please find following a table showing emigration from the UK for the last five years:

Long-term International Migration: Emigration from the UK, 2006 to 2010
 Estimate

2006

398,000

2007

341,000

2008

427,000

2009

368,000

2010

339,000

Long Term International Migration (LTIM) estimates are available on the ONS website:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/long-term-international-migration/november-2010/long-term-international-migration-2-series.zip

Please refer to Table 2.01a "LTIM Citizenship 1991 - 2010", which provide estimates of the number of people who have emigrated from the UK in each of the last five years.

The IPS migrant data provide the foundation of the LTIM estimates with adjustments for asylum seekers, people whose intentions change with regard to their length of stay, and for international migration to and from Northern Ireland.

Long-term international migration data produced by the ONS applies the UN definition of someone who moves from their country of previous residence for a period of at least a year, irrespective of citizenship.

Government: Pay

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what guidance his Department has issued to Government departments and non-departmental public bodies on paying a living wage to all employees in the last 12 months. [114758]

Mr Maude: Departments, agencies and non-departmental public bodies have delegated authority to determine reward arrangements for their own staff below the senior civil service. These arrangements should meet their business needs and enable them to recruit, retain and motivate their workforce.

Public Expenditure

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office whether his Department has any plans to fund social impact bonds. [114778]

4 July 2012 : Column 730W

Mr Hurd: Social impact bonds are a useful new tool for public service delivery, and the Government is keen to see more of them. The Cabinet Office is promoting the development of more social impact bonds in central and local government.

The Ministry of Justice launched the world's first social impact bond in 2010, aiming to reduce reoffending among short-sentence prisoners released from Peterborough prison. The return for investors will depend on the degree of success in reducing reconvictions, up to an overall cap of around £8 million. The results for the first cohort will be known in 2014. The Department for Work and Pensions is supporting further social impact bonds under its Innovation Fund, targeting disadvantaged young people and those at risk of disadvantage. Six social investment projects have so far been selected for support. The available funding is up to £30 million over three years from 2012.

Public Sector: Procurement

Stephen McPartland: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps he is taking to encourage electronic procurement and invoicing across the public sector as a means of delivering cost savings and efficiency gains. [114822]

Mr Maude: The Government fully supports measures that simplify and streamline the procurement process, including the use of electronic procurement and invoicing. Under the principles of Lean Sourcing, all central Government procurements are required to use the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) compliant e-sourcing tools to help manage the full process. If an organisation does not have access to its own e-sourcing tools, it can use those available through the Government Procurement Service.

Additionally, issuing and responding to bids via our Dynamic Marketplace is done electronically, making the procurement process quicker and more cost-effective.

Voluntary Work

Mr Buckland: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what recent estimate his Department has made of the proportion of the population involved in volunteering. [114990]

Mr Hurd: The Data from the Citizenship Survey, last conducted by DCLG in 2010-11, show:

25% take part in formal volunteering (which is classed as giving unpaid help through groups, clubs or organisations to benefit other people or the environment) once a month;

39% take part in formal volunteering once a year;

29% take part in informal volunteering (which is classed as giving unpaid help as an individual to people who are not relatives) once a month;

55% take part in informal volunteering once a year.