Work and Pensions

Disability: Employment

Sir Malcolm Bruce: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what plans he has to provide improved information to employees and employers on the support available to help disabled people move into and remain in work; and if he will make a statement. [113856]

Maria Miller: Access to Work provides additional support for individuals whose health or disability affects the way they do their job.

During her independent review of specialist disability employment provision, Liz Sayce found Access to Work to be a highly effective and popular programme and recommended that it should be transformed from being the best kept secret in Government to being a recognised passport to successful employment.

We have therefore launched a targeted marketing campaign to increase awareness of the support Access to Work can provide for disabled people both looking for employment and to maintain current employment.

The campaign will focus on under-represented groups of disabled people—including those with learning disabilities and mental health issues—and employers looking to recruit or retain a disabled person. The overarching objective of the campaign is to increase take up of Access to Work to ensure it is able to support or retain as many disabled people into employment as possible and we will work with a wide range of employer and disability organisations to ensure the Access to Work service is effectively promoted.

Employment and Support Allowance

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 23 April 2012, Official Report, column 652W, on employment and support allowance, how many staff based in his

26 Jun 2012 : Column 218W

Department's London headquarters at Caxton House, Tothill Street, work on employment and support allowance

(a)

policy and

(b)

administration. [113918]

Chris Grayling: There are seven officials in Caxton House dedicated specifically to ESA policy (including WCA policy, and supporting professor Harrington's independent reviews). It should be noted however, that there are other officials who provide input as a part of their role. These include analysts, lawyers, doctors and other policy officials.

The administration of ESA is not carried out by officials at Caxton House—this is a matter for operational teams.

Incapacity Benefit

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will publish data on the number of appeals made against incapacity benefit reassessment outcomes. [113914]

Chris Grayling: The requested information is not available.

The Department does intend to publish appeals data on the number and outcomes of completed appeals against work capability assessment outcomes for incapacity benefit reassessment cases.

The data will be released once we have performed the required quality assurance and are satisfied with the quality of the statistics.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of completed incapacity benefit reassessments have been (a) found fit for work, (b) placed in the Support Group or (c) placed in the Work Related Activity Group. [113915]

Chris Grayling: In March 2012 the Department released official statistics on the outcomes of incapacity benefits reassessment claims that had been referred for reassessment by the end of July 2011. These are the latest data available.

The publication can be found on the departmental website at the following link:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/workingage/index.php?page=esa_ibr

Motability

Karl McCartney: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the total cost to the public purse was of assistance provided for taxing vehicles acquired under the Motability scheme in each region in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available. [113847]

Maria Miller: All recipients of War Pensioners Mobility Supplement or the higher rate mobility component of disability living allowance are entitled to an exemption from Vehicle Excise Duty, whether or not they choose to lease a Motability vehicle.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency are responsible for administering Vehicle Excise Duty exemptions. They have advised that the information requested is not collated centrally and can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 219W

Universal Credit

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether an equality impact assessment has been made of his policy on universal credit. [111123]

Maria Miller: An equality impact assessment for universal credit was published in November 2011 and is available on the Department's website at:

www.dwp.gov.uk

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of potential savings arising through online access to universal credit. [111124]

Chris Grayling: The universal credit programme currently estimates that up to half of transactions with claimants will be conducted online from go-live in 2013, building towards a target of 80% by the end of the four year migration window. This delivers an estimated saving of £62 million in SR10 rising to £240 million per year from 2018-19.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps his Department has taken to determine how many benefit recipients are able to access the internet; and what proportion of benefit claimants his Department estimates will use the internet to access universal credit in (a) 2013, (b) 2014 and (c) 2015. [111126]

Chris Grayling: A survey of potential claimants to universal credit was conducted in 2011 to determine the percentage of claimants who were at that time able to access the internet. We will publish the results of this survey on 12 July 2012. We expect the proportion of claimants who use the online system, to be in line with published Cabinet Office guidelines of 80% from 2017 onwards. Initial take-up is estimated to be around 50% in 2013 and 2014, 55% in 2015, and to increase towards the target.

Work Capability Assessment

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what issues are taken into account when determining whether to call in a person in receipt of employment and support allowance for a repeat work capability assessment. [113916]

Chris Grayling: As part of the WCA, a healthcare professional will give advice on when they think a claimant's functional capability may have changed sufficiently that a return to work may be possible.

They must also give a justification for this advice, which is used by the Department to decide when to reassess claimants.

We recognise that asking customers to attend an unnecessary examination is in no-one's interests, for example, those people with terminal illnesses will not undergo a face-to-face assessment.

In addition, claimants who are unlikely to return to work in the longer term will be reassessed after two years if they have limited capability for work and after

26 Jun 2012 : Column 220W

three years if they have limited capability for work- related activity. This is because it is important not to write people off completely, even if an individual is unlikely to see an improvement in their condition.

Wherever possible, these reassessments will not involve a face-to-face assessment and a decision will be made using paper-based evidence.

Culture, Media and Sport

Government Procurement Card

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many procurement card holders in his Department were (a) paid off-payroll, (b) employed on a part-time basis and (c) employed as a non-permanent employee in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12. [113335]

John Penrose: The number of procurement card holders in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) who were (a) paid off-payroll, (b) employed on a part-time basis and (c) employed as a non-permanent employee in (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12 is shown in the following table.

 Paid off-payrollPart-time employeesNon-permanent employees

2010-11

1

5

5

2011-12

1

5

6

DCMS does not hold information for the financial year 2009-10.

Mobile Phones

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport with reference to the Government's response to the report from the Culture, Media and Sport Committee on Spectrum, HC 1771, Session 2010-12, whether it remains his policy that linking spectrum licence fees to the market value of the spectrum determined by the 4G auction is the most likely way to ensure the fees charged to mobile network operators are fair and appropriate to the market value of their spectrum holdings. [113550]

Mr Vaizey: The setting of licence fees is a matter for the regulator, Ofcom. Government directed Ofcom in December 2010, once the 4G auction was completed, to revise the licence fees to reflect the full market value of the frequencies and to have particular regard to the sums bid for licences in the auction in setting the revised level of the fees. We remain convinced that this approach is the best way of setting market-based fees for the spectrum in question.

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what estimate he has made of the likely date for commencement of the roll-out of 4G; and what steps his Department is taking to facilitate this process. [113958]

Mr Vaizey: The auctioning of 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz spectrum is a matter for Ofcom, the Independent regulator. Ofcom remains on schedule for the UK auction process

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to start by the end of 2012. This is compatible with the spectrum becoming available to allow successful bidders to start rolling out 4G services in these bands in 2013.

Additionally, Ofcom recently undertook a consultation on liberalising the licensing requirements for the 1800 MHz band to allow deployment of 4G services in that band. Ofcom's proposals stemmed from a request from Everything Everywhere to authorise the use of LTE technology under their licences for 1800 MHz spectrum. This consultation closed on 8 May 2012 and the responses raised a number of detailed issues that Ofcom must now consider. Ofcom intends to publish a statement on the proposed variation as early as possible.

Olympic Games 2012

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what plans his Department has for the expected London 2012 Olympics budget underspend. [113230]

Hugh Robertson: Any underspend will be shared between the National Lottery, the Government and the Greater London Authority, as funders of the £9.3 billion Public Sector Funding Package for the Games. In addition, the National Lottery is entitled to receive £675 million from receipts from the sale of land in the Olympic Park after the Games.

Rural Areas: Broadband

Dr Phillip Lee: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps he plans to take to provide information for the public on the progress of the rural broadband roll-out programme. [113553]

Mr Vaizey: I am answering this question because broadband is within my area of responsibility.

The Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) provides regular updates on the progress being made on the rural broadband programme, which can be found on our website at:

http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/telecommunications_and_online/7763.aspx

Local authorities are leading the rollout in their areas and I anticipate that councils will provide regular updates on the progress they are making.

Health

Antidepressants

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department holds on the levels of prescribing of antidepressant drugs in other countries; and if he will make a statement. [113513]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not held centrally. The Department collects information relating to England only.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) publication, ‘Health at a Glance 2011’, provides the latest comparable data and trends on different aspects of the performance of health systems

26 Jun 2012 : Column 222W

in OECD countries. That part of the publication concerning antidepressant consumption (section 4.11.2), contains tables with information on use of antidepressants.

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for what reasons selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other antidepressants are not included as part of his Department's review of policy on addiction to prescribed medication. [113780]

Anne Milton: The generic actions agreed by the expert roundtable which I convened to advise on the prevention and treatment of dependence on medicine are relevant whichever medicine is giving rise to dependence.

The scope for people to experience withdrawal symptoms when they abruptly stop taking Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) or Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors is well documented. There are warnings about this risk in the product information for prescribers and in the Patient Information Leaflets. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidance recommends that all patients prescribed antidepressants should be informed about the risk of withdrawal reactions and the importance of gradual withdrawal over several weeks. There is no clinical consensus that the symptoms which some people experience when they stop taking SSRIs constitute dependence.

Central Nervous System Tumours

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for what reasons cases of brain and central nervous system tumours are not systematically and consistently registered using NICE classifications across England. [113889]

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated June 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking for what reasons cases of brain and central nervous system tumours are not systematically and consistently registered using NICE classifications across England. [113889]

The NICE report on 'Improving Outcomes for People with Brain and Other CNS Tumours'(1) classified brain and CNS tumours into seven clinical groups, which are not directly comparable with the classification used for statistical purposes.

In England, cancer registration is carried out by eight regional registries that collect information on cancers registered to residents of their areas. These cancer registrations are subsequently submitted to ONS as a standard dataset, validated and quality assured. ONS then uses this information to publish National Statistics on cancer incidence and survival for England, for all cancer types. ONS carries out this work on behalf of the Department of Health, to agreed quality standards, to enable the Department, the NHS and others to monitor changing levels and patterns of the disease.

The cancer site codes and descriptions used by the cancer registries to submit information to ONS reflect the adoption by the NHS in 1995 of the International Classification of Diseases (Tenth Revision, ICD-10), which is published by the World Health Organization. Statistics based on ICD-10 are internationally comparable.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 223W

Brain and Central Nervous System (CNS) tumours are systematically and consistently registered by all English cancer registries. All brain and CNS tumours are registrable conditions, and so ONS receives data on all malignant, benign and unknown/uncertain behaviour brain and CNS cancers diagnosed in the population of England.

The latest published figures on incidence of cancer in England are available on the National Statistics website:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/vsob1/cancer-registrations-in-england/2010/index.html

The latest published figures on cancer survival in England are available on the National Statistics website.

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/cancer-unit/cancer-survival/index.html

(1) National Institute for Health & Clinical Excellence (2006). “Improving Outcomes for People with Brain and Other CNS Tumours”. Available from:

http://www.nice.org.uk

Cancer

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will ensure that the NHS Commissioning Board provides cancer networks with adequate funding beyond 2013 and that they are closely involved in the development of the new system. [113421]

Paul Burstow: We have made it clear that there is a role for clinical networks, such as cancer networks, in the new health system, as a place where clinicians from different sectors come together to improve the quality of care across integrated, pathways.

The cancer networks are a clear example of how this way of working delivers better quality. That is why the Secretary of State for Health announced in May 2011 that cancer networks would continue to be funded in 2012-13 and that the NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) would support strengthened cancer networks.

The review of clinical networks, including cancer networks, has been considering the functions, structures and governance that will most effectively support commissioners to improve outcomes for patients. The review has received input from over 800 stakeholders, including representatives from cancer networks.

The NHS CB authority will publish its recommendations for clinical networks in the new health system in summer.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will consider developing an indicator based on the National Cancer Patient Experience in the NHS Outcomes Framework and Commissioning Outcomes Framework to incentivise improvements at local level. [113422]

Paul Burstow: We will shortly be publishing the results from the national Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2011 and we expect that they would continue to be used in supporting local action to bring about improvements.

The current focus of patient experience measures in the NHS Outcomes Framework takes a generic approach recognising that people often have more than one condition. While we are committed to keeping the framework under review, we are keen to maintain this balance so that the framework represents the breadth of national health service activity.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 224W

For the Commissioning Outcomes Framework, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published a list of potential indicators as part of their public consultation on 1 February. This list included an appendix of further potential indicators to be considered for future development as they would not be ready for April 2013. The appendix included an indicator on patient experience of cancer services. NICE's independent advisory committee met in public on 21-22 May to consider the evidence base. NICE is expected to publish recommendations on 1 August. The NHS Commissioning Board will then make decisions on the shape of the framework for 2013-14.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will include one and five year survival rates of all types of cancer in the NHS Outcomes Framework and the Commissioning Outcomes Framework. [113933]

Paul Burstow: The indicators in the NHS Outcomes Framework were selected to provide a balanced focus, to reflect the breadth of national health service activity. We are currently considering whether it is possible to develop a composite indicator showing one-year survival rates for all cancers, to replace some or all of the individual survival rate indicators.

The Commissioning Outcomes Framework will be developed by the NHS Commissioning Board, informed by advice from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). NICE published a list of potential, measures for the Commissioning Outcomes Framework for public consultation in February. The consultation included indicators on five-year survival rates for specific cancers, and some potential indicators for one-year survival rates and patient experience of cancer services. NICE's independent advisory committee met in public to consider the evidence base on 21-22 May. NICE is expected to publish its recommendations on 1 August. The NHS Commissioning Board will then make decisions on the shape of the framework for 2013-14.

Cancer: Children

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what funding his Department has allocated for research and development of genetic therapies to treat cancer in children in (a) 2011-12, (b) 2012-13, (c) 2013-14, (d) 2014-15 and (e) 2015-16. [113287]

Paul Burstow: In August 2011, the Government announced £800 million investment over five years from April 2012 in a series of National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) biomedical research centres and units. From this investment, £0.7 million will fund research on gene therapy for cancer in children.

Total expenditure on gene therapy for cancer in children in each year from 2012-13 to 2015-16 through research programmes, research centres and units, and research training awards will depend on the volume and quality of scientific activity. The usual practice of the NIHR is not to ring-fence funds for expenditure on particular topics: research proposals in all areas compete for the funding available. The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including gene therapy for cancer in children. These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition,

26 Jun 2012 : Column 225W

with awards being made on the basis of the scientific quality of the proposals made.

The Department funded no research on gene therapy for cancer in children in 2011-12 through research programmes, research centres and units, and research training awards.

Community Nurses

Mr Virendra Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to improve access to 24/7 community nursing. [113522]

Anne Milton: Local health care organisations decide how best to use their funds to meet national and local priorities and to determine the work force required to meet people's needs locally, including the provision of 24 hours a day community nursing care.

The Department is working with community nurses and professional organisations as part of a development programme to scope a renewed model for community nursing, focusing on district nursing services.

Congenital Abnormalities

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he is taking to monitor people affected by foetal anti-convulsion disorder as they make the transition into adulthood; and if he will make a statement; [113232]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of people affected by foetal anti-convulsive syndrome owing to NHS prescriptions of (a) phenytoin, (b) carbamazepine and (c) sodium valproate; and if he will make a statement. [113233]

Anne Milton: We have made no estimate of the number of people affected by foetal anti-convulsive syndrome, nor is the Department monitoring people affected by the condition as they make the transition into adulthood.

We recognise the importance of effective transition between children's and adults' services. It is for local health service organisations to commission a comprehensive service for all people within their local communities, including adolescents and adults and those moving through transition. Clinical commissioning groups, working in conjunction with Health and Wellbeing Boards, will be required to take account of their population's needs and commission and provide services accordingly.

There are initiatives being undertaken by Government that are seeking to improve health-related services for children and young people.

Many of the outcomes within the NHS Outcomes Framework, which sets the national outcomes that the national health service should be aiming to achieve, seek to make improvements for children and young people specifically. The Public Health Outcomes Framework also helps set a clear direction for children's health.

The Commissioning Board will also have a role in commissioning certain services, for example, highly specialised services for children and young people with a disability, where the numbers requiring such services in an area are too low for it to be viable for these services to be commissioned locally.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 226W

The Department is developing an Outcomes Strategy, which aims to improve the quality of health care services and outcomes for children and young people. The strategy focuses on the themes of public health, acutely sick children, mental health and long-term medical conditions.

Diabetes

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to promote the prevention and early identification of diabetes. [113691]

Paul Burstow: The Government are committed to the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. All work on promoting an active lifestyle and tackling obesity will support this aim. It is important to identify people with diabetes early to ensure that they receive prompt treatment to manage their diabetes and to help delay or prevent long-term complications of the condition.

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his Department's strategy is for dealing with diabetes. [113692]

Paul Burstow: The Department is currently producing three policy documents which will directly influence the commissioning and development of diabetes services: the Diabetes Action Plan, the Long Term Conditions (LTC) Outcomes Strategy (which will include a diabetes companion document), and the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Outcomes Strategy.

The Diabetes Action Plan will set out the actions the national health service is taking to increase identification and improve prevention and treatment of diabetes, and will be published later this year.

The Long Term Conditions Outcomes Strategy is aimed at improving outcomes for all people with LTCs. The strategy will look at all of the aspects that impact on the lives of people with LTCs, and outline how the key players (Government Departments, local authorities, charities and individuals) can act in future in order to reduce LTC incidence, and improve outcomes for those with LTCs. We aim to publish the strategy towards the end of 2012, and a companion document on diabetes will be published at the same time.

The Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Strategy will outline how the health care system can improve outcomes for people with—or people at risk of—CVD. The strategy will consider the whole of the patient pathway from prevention through to long term care. As diabetes is a major risk factor for CVD, it will be considered as part of the strategy's development.

Drugs: Misuse

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will estimate the cost to the NHS of the illegal use of controlled substances in (a) England, (b) the East Midlands, (c) Nottinghamshire and (d) Ashfield constituency. [113920]

Anne Milton: I refer the hon. Member to the written answer I gave the hon. Member for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland (Tom Blenkinsop) on 24 May 2012, Official Report, column 859W.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 227W

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department switched its (a) gas or (b) electricity supplier in any of the last 10 years. [113459]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has switched its gas and electricity supplier on a number of occasions over the last 10 years. The latest change of supplier has taken place from 1 April 2012.

This latest change of supplier was organised through a framework with the Government Procurement Service (GPS). All GPS frameworks are awarded on the basis of a fully competitive process governed by Official Journal of the European Union rules. Under Cabinet Office guidance, GPS is also the recognised provider for all central Government energy supplies. The latest changes of suppliers have been as follows:

Gas from Total Gas and Power to Corona;

Electricity Non Half Hourly for Scottish and Southern Energy to British Gas; and

Half Hourly from Scottish and Southern Energy to EDF Energy.

Government Procurement Card

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many procurement card holders in his Department were (a) paid off-payroll, (b) employed on a part-time basis and (c) employed as a non-permanent employee in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12. [113341]

Mr Simon Burns: The breakdown by staff type of Government procurement card holders is given in the following table. It should be noted that our cardholder records do not distinguish between full-time and part-time civil servants. For the purposes of this response the term ‘non-permanent-employees’ has been defined as ‘on-payroll staff on fixed term contracts’.

Off-payroll staff include those seconded into the Department from other organisations to fulfil a civil service role, such as from national health service bodies and other Government Departments.

 On payroll permanentOn payroll fixed termOff payrollTotal cardholders

2009-10

424

1

15

440

2010-11

338

2

20

360

2011-12

289

4

21

314

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on which dates his Department has published Government procurement card spending over £500 since May 2010. [113359]

Mr Simon Burns: Government procurement card (GPC) data for the Department have been published on the Department's web site since October 2011. The following table gives the publication dates:

GPC data periodPublication date

April 2011 to August 2011

27 October 2011

September 2011

30 December 2011

October 2011

30 December 2011

November 2011

31 January 2012

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December 2011

29 February 2012

January 2012

30 March 2012

February 2012

30 April 2012

Health

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what changes he plans to make to the formula for the allocation of the public health funding to local authorities; [113655]

(2) what account will be taken of population (a) age and (b) deprivation in determining public health allocations to local authorities; and if he will make a statement. [113656]

Anne Milton: On 14 June, the public health finance update document, ‘Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Update on Public Health Funding’, was published. A copy has already been placed in the Library and the document can be accessed on the Department's website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/06/ph-funding-la

This document sets out the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation's (ACRA) interim recommendations on the public health allocations formula, gives an update on the health premium and sets out proposed conditions for the ring-fenced public health grant including proposals for local authority reporting on public health spend.

ACRA's interim formula is based principally on a measure of population health that will be applied to small areas. This means that funding is targeted towards those areas with the poorest health outcomes and greatest deprivation. Building up from small areas means the formula can take account of pockets of deprivation in local authorities that otherwise have good health outcomes.

These are interim recommendations. As part of this publication, ACRA identified areas needing further work before making its final recommendations for the formula for making 2013-14 allocations. This includes consideration of an adjustment for the age profile of the population.

The Department is now undertaking a focussed engagement process with a full range of stakeholders including public health and local government representatives and the wider national health service community. This feedback will help the work to finalise ACRA's recommendations to support the 2013-14 allocations to local authorities.

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what training and guidance his Department plans to provide prior to implementing new public health duties for local authorities; and if he will make a statement. [113657]

Anne Milton: The Department is continuing to work with key stakeholders including the Local Government Association to produce a number of guidance documents prior to transferring public health duties to local authorities.

Documents already published include information on the range of functions transferring, including emergency preparedness and health protection issues, and are available on the Department and LGA websites.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 229W

We are also discussing with employers and employee representatives in the national health service and local authorities to agree and produce guidance on the smooth transfer of staff, their rights on transfer and the responsibilities of councils as the new employers, bearing in mind varying local circumstances.

Later this year we will be publishing statutory guidance on the role of the Director of Public Health and a Public Health Workforce Strategy, which will consider the training requirements and career development of staff in the new public health system.

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what split of public health responsibilities he proposes between Public Health England and local authorities. [113757]

Anne Milton: Sections 11 and 12 of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 confer separate, but related, public health duties on the Secretary of State and on upper tier and unitary local authorities in England. From April 2013 the Secretary of State will have a duty to take the steps he considers appropriate to protect the health of the people of England. As well as this general duty the Act sets out some specific functions of the Secretary of State, including existing statutory functions of the Health Protection Agency (which the Act abolishes). Public Health England will be an executive agency of the Department, established to undertake the Secretary of State's duties.

The duty on local authorities is to take the steps they consider appropriate to improve the health of the people in their area. The Act gives the Secretary of State the power to prescribe in regulations particular steps that local authorities must take. On 20 December 2011 the Department published a series of fact sheets describing roles and responsibilities in the reformed public health system. The fact sheet “Public health in local government: local government's new public health functions” sets out those services that my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health intends to prescribe in regulations, and “Public health in local, government: commissioning responsibilities” lists other public health services that local authorities will be responsible for commissioning from 2013. Copies of these fact sheets have been placed in the Library.

Health Services: Channel Islands

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when officials from his Department last met officials from the (a) Health and Wellbeing Department in Jersey and (b) Health and Social Services Department in Guernsey; and what issues were discussed at those meetings. [113787]

Anne Milton: Officials from the Department and the Governments of Jersey and Guernsey were among the participants at the meeting of the British Irish Council's Sectoral Group on the Misuse of Drugs which met on 29 May. The main discussion topic was the problem of addiction to medicine and approaches to tackling it.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 230W

Health Visitors: Recruitment

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many additional Sure Start health visitors have been recruited since May 2010; [113922]

(2) when he expects his target to recruit 4,200 additional Sure Start health visitors will be met. [113923]

Anne Milton: The number of health visitors recorded on the NHS Electronic Staff Record (ESR) in March 2012 was 8,199 full-time equivalents. This represents an increase of 1.3% (107 full-time equivalents) since May 2010.

Additionally, strategic health authorities report there were over 200 full-time equivalent health visitors not recorded on ESR at this time—for example, those working in organisations such as local authorities and social enterprises.

“The Health Visitor Implementation Plan 2011 to 15—A Call to Action”, (published in February 2011), set out plans, accountabilities and partnership working related to the growth of the health visitor workforce. A copy has already been placed in the Library. The Department has put in place a four year transformational programme of recruitment and retention, professional development and improved commissioning linked to public health improvement. This programme of activity is on track to deliver an increase in the workforce of 4,200 full-time equivalent health visitors by April 2015.

Homeopathy

George Freeman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department has made any estimate of the (a) funding and (b) bed capacity that would need to be made available in the event that a full range of homeopathic remedies were to be provided by the NHS; and if he will make a statement. [113235]

Anne Milton: The Department has made no such assessment.

The Department does not maintain a position on any particular complementary or alternative therapy including homeopathy. It is the responsibility of local national health service organisations to make decisions on the commissioning and funding of such treatments, taking account of issues to do with safety, clinical and cost-effectiveness and the availability of suitably qualified/regulated practitioners.

Malnutrition

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what consideration he has given to the use of incentives to improve the standard of nutritional care in (a) hospitals, (b) care homes and (c) general practice; and if he will make a statement. [113636]

Paul Burstow: For hospitals on national health service national standard contracts, NHS commissioners can already choose the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation framework to reward providers for ambitious improvements in nutritional care. This is a locally agreed incentive scheme, which can also be offered to providers on joint NHS and local authority contracts, which may include patients receiving continuing NHS care in care homes.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 231W

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how the Care Quality Commission's second phase of the Dignity and Nutrition Inspection Programme will assess the quality of nutritional care provided by home care or domiciliary care services; and if he will make a statement. [113638]

Paul Burstow: The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has provided the following information.

The second phase of Dignity and Nutrition Inspections are split into two programmes, one involving 500 inspections of care homes, the other 50 inspections of national health service trusts.

As part of its assessment the CQC inspectors will speak to users of the services and their relatives, observe the interaction between patients/people and staff as well as reviewing documentation including care plans and speaking to staff. The inspectors will use direct observation of mealtimes, including evening meals and weekends to assess whether the nutritional and hydration needs of individuals are being met. They will look at service users' records to see how nutrition and hydration are monitored. Inspectors will also make use of a short observational framework designed to help understand the quality of the experiences of people including during

26 Jun 2012 : Column 232W

mealtimes for those who are unable to provide feedback due to their cognitive or communication impairments.

The assessment of the quality of nutritional care by domiciliary care services is not a feature of the themed inspection programmes CQC is running at present.

The CQC undertakes regular planned and responsive inspections of domiciliary care agencies, if inspectors identify concerns during these inspections that relate to nutritional care they have the option to review this outcome area (Outcome 5—Meeting nutritional needs).

Mental Illness

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what proportion of (a) adults and (b) children were diagnosed with mental illness in each year for which figures are available. [113515]

Paul Burstow: This information is not collected centrally as the data sources do not include primary care where a large proportion of mental health care takes place. In-patient (HES) data only cover secondary care and the Mental Health Minimum Dataset (MHMDS) is based on secondary care and does not include children. However, the Health and Social Care Information Centre MHMDS 2003-04 to 2010-11 annual returns provides the following:

Number of people using adult and elderly NHS funded(1) secondary mental health services, 2003-04 to 2010-11
 NHS providers only
 2003-042004-052005-062006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11

Total number of people

1,079,016

1,132,434

1,149,472

1,151,260

1,190,542

1,222,365

1,270,731

1,285,594

         

Admitted

113,772

114,435

111,088

106,561

105,719

102,571

107,765

104,645

Non-admitted

814,252

916,534

930,374

936,629

982,704

1,026,366

1,078,091

1,094,138

No care

150,992

101,465

108,010

108,070

102,119

93,428

84,875

86,811

(1) Includes services provided by independent sector providers.
2010-11
 Independent sector providersAll providers

Total number of people

2,136

1,287,730

   

Admitted

2,074

106,719

Non-admitted

0

1,094,138

No care

62

86,873

Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre MHMDS 2003/04 to 2010-11 annual returns.

While no estimate has been made on the number of children diagnosed with mental illness, information on the prevalence of mental disorders in children and young people has been published by other organisations. The Mental Health of Children and Adolescents in Great Britain, 2004 (ONS) reported that 9.6% of 5 to 16-year-olds had a clinically recognisable mental disorder.

NHS Walk-in Centres: Closures

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS walk-in centres have closed since June 2010. [113912]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not held centrally.

Out of Area Treatment: North East

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients registered at an address in the North East received treatment at a hospital in another region of England in each month since May 2010. [113658]

Mr Simon Burns: Data showing the count of finished admission episodes. where the strategic health authority (SHA) of residence is the North East, and the SHA of the main provider is elsewhere in England for the period May 2010 to February 2012 is shown in the following table.

Activity in English NHS hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector
 North WestYorkshire and the HumberEast MidlandsWest MidlandsEast of EnglandLondonSouth East CoastSouth CentralSouth WestTotal

May 2010

130

119

13

22

27

78

6

21

19

435

June 2010

120

120

25

22

22

66

11

19

34

439

26 Jun 2012 : Column 233W

26 Jun 2012 : Column 234W

July 2010

120

151

19

28

33

84

15

17

26

493

August 2010

128

152

39

31

40

84

16

25

52

567

September 2010

129

129

20

16

25

82

17

11

21

450

October 2010

96

113

26

25

23

70

19

10

26

408

November 2010

102

102

18

16

11

76

*

*

16

356

December 2010

95

90

13

17

22

48

10

11

19

325

January 2011

96

122

20

27

20

68

15

7

18

393

February 2011

102

98

12

15

14

48

*

*

25

330

March 2011

89

101

21

17

21

51

18

15

23

356

April 2011

117

124

21

22

29

62

*

*

20

410

May 2011

115

124

22

21

28

54

15

12

23

414

June 2011

131

118

35

27

25

68

13

17

31

465

July 2011

128

118

34

27

33

77

19

14

25

475

August 2011

136

152

36

26

23

90

23

23

36

545

September 2011

128

110

15

22

30

81

21

17

23

447

October 2011

114

124

21

19

22

68

10

11

12

401

November 2011

130

115

17

18

19

68

6

14

19

406

December 2011

101

100

22

30

31

71

18

25

24

422

January 2012

108

98

29

26

17

65

10

17

7

377

February 2012

97

101

12

16

28

45

6

21

16

342

Notes: 1. A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. 2. The strategic health authority (SHA) or primary care trust (PCT) of residence is that which contains the patient's normal home address. This does not necessarily reflect where the patient was treated, as they may have travelled to another SHA or PCT for treatment. 3. The SHA of main provider is the area where patients were treated, not necessarily where they live or where they were injured. 4. HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and so no longer included in admitted patient HES data. 5. Data from April 2011 to February 2012 is provisional. Where data is provisional it may be incomplete or contain errors for which no adjustments have yet been made. Counts produced from provisional data are likely to be lower than those generated for the same period in the final dataset. This shortfall will be most pronounced in the final month of the latest period, i.e, November from the (month 9) April to November extract. It is also probable that clinical data are not complete, which may in particular affect the last two months of any given period. There may also be errors due to coding inconsistencies that have not yet been investigated and corrected. 6. To protect patient confidentiality, figures between one and five have been replaced with "*" (an asterisk). Where it was still possible to identify numbers from the total an additional number (the next smallest) has been replaced. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Primary Care Trusts

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what arrangements he plans to put in place for the future management of former primary care trusts' property portfolios; and what his plans are for the management of that estate in the medium term. [113756]

Mr Simon Burns: All existing primary care trust (PCT) property will transfer on 31 March 2013 to either national health service providers or NHS Property Services Ltd. The Department announced in August 2011 that NHS providers would be given the opportunity to acquire ‘service critical clinical infrastructure’. The solution for the remaining estate, a limited company wholly owned by the Secretary of State for Health, ‘NHS Property Services Ltd’ (NHS PS), was announced in January 2012.

NHS PS will hold property for use by community and primary care services, cut the costs of administering the estate by consolidating the management of over 150 estates and dispose of property identified by the local NHS as surplus to requirements, in order to return vital funds to frontline NHS services.

While it is a national company, NHS PS will also have a regional management structure, with four regions co-terminus with those of the NHS Commissioning Board Authority. At a local level, it is intended to continue with the existing arrangements that PCT clusters currently have in place for the operational management of their estates and facilities, in the immediate to medium term.

Royal College of General Practitioners

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether a drug policy official from his Department attended the Royal College of General Practitioners' 17th National Conference. [113782]

Anne Milton: On 11 May 2012, two officials from the Department gave presentations on the misuse of prescribed medications and on payment by results for drug and alcohol recovery at the conference on managing drug and alcohol problems in primary care which was organised by the Royal College of General Practitioners.

Tranquillisers: Misuse

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if his Department will make an assessment of the survey of services provided for involuntary tranquilliser addiction by the All Party Parliamentary Group for Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction. [113781]

26 Jun 2012 : Column 235W

Anne Milton: We welcome the initiative of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction in working with local areas to collect information on the provision of services for people who are addicted to benzodiazepines and z drugs. The responses provided from primary care trusts illustrate both the way that in some areas general practitioners are working with other agencies to give people the vital support that they need, and highlights the need for further improvement.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Adult Education: Bexley

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many residents of

26 Jun 2012 : Column 236W

(a)

Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency and

(b)

the London Borough of Bexley (i) started and (ii) completed a course at an adult education college in each of the last five years. [113226]

Mr Hayes: Table 1 shows Government-funded further education and skills learner participation and achievements in general further education colleges in Bexleyheath and Crayford parliamentary constituency and the London borough of Bexley local authority, by age, for academic years 2006/07 to 2010/11, the latest full years for which final data are available.

Table 1: General further education colleges learner participation and achievement by geography and age, 2006/07 to 2010/11
 Age2006/072007/082008/092009/102010/11

Participation

      

Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency

Under 19

930

1,040

1,010

1,080

1,080

 

19+

1,370

1,710

1,730

1,460

1,230

 

Total

2,300

2,750

2,740

2,530

2,310

       

Bexley Local Authority

Under 19

2,460

2,630

2,590

2,680

2,610

 

19+

3,750

4,250

4,500

3,880

3,310

 

Total

6,210

6,880

7,090

6,560

5,920

       

England

Under 19

630,630

654,060

662,530

682,240

694,460

 

19+

1,573,700

1,551,600

1,768,040

1,635,590

1,338,480

 

Total

2,204,300

2,205,700

2,430,600

2,317,800

2,032,900

       

Achievement

      

Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency

Under 19

670

740

770

830

880

 

19+

910

1,120

1,290

1,010

900

 

Total

1,570

1,860

2,060

1,840

1,780

       

Bexley Local Authority

Under 19

1,780

1,860

1,930

2,060

2,110

 

19+

2,440

2,720

3,280

2,710

2,420

 

Total

4,220

4,580

5,220

4,770

4,530

       

England

Under 19

457,610

489,320

521,120

546,780

558,360

 

19+

1,089,100

1,060,260

1,221,600

1,187,170

975,860

 

Total

1,541,700

1,549,600

1,742,700

1,734,000

1,534,200

Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10 except for the England totals which are rounded to the nearest 100. 2. Geography is based upon the home postcode of the learner. Geographic information is based on boundaries of regions as of May 2010. The England totals include some postcodes which are not known. 3. These data include both young people (under 19) and adults (aged 19+) participating in Apprenticeships, Workplace Learning, Community Learning and Education and Training provision taken at General Further Education Colleges (Including Tertiary) only. 4. Age is based on age at the start of the academic year. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Information on further education and skills participation and achievement by geography is published in a supplementary table of a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 29 March 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/

Business: Complaints

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether his Department has had discussions with representatives of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) regarding granting SME representative bodies super complaint status in the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill; and which bodies were consulted. [113067]

26 Jun 2012 : Column 237W

Norman Lamb [holding answer 21 June 2012]: The Government consulted on proposals to grant SME representative bodies super-complainant status in a public consultation on competition reform, ‘A Competition Regime for Growth: A Consultation on Options for Reform'. During the consultation period officials at the Department for Business Innovation and Skills held discussions on the proposals contained in that document with a number of stakeholders including the Forum of Private Business, British Chambers of Commerce and the Confederation of British Industry (CBI).

Cancer: Research

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what funding his Department has allocated for research and development of genetic therapies to treat cancer in children in (a) 2011-12, (b) 2012-13, (c) 2013-14, (d) 2014-15 and (e) 2015-16. [113286]

Mr Willetts: The Medical Research Council (MRC) is one of the main agencies through which the Government supports medical and clinical research, including cancer research.

The MRC does not normally allocate funding for specific disease areas and future research funding is dependent on the quality and strategic relevance of proposals submitted by the research community and is determined through peer review. Information on future funding that may be awarded for this area is not available. However, the MRC would welcome proposals which may support research leading to the development of genetic therapies to treat cancer in children. This may include fundamental research through to pre-clinical development, and early clinical testing of novel therapeutics, devices and diagnostics.

In 2010 the MRC's overall expenditure on cancer was £107.9 million(1). This includes a broad portfolio of site-specific and general underpinning cancer research some of which will be relevant to cancer in children. The MRC does not hold a breakdown of expenditure on research directly relating to research and development of genetic therapies to treat cancer in children. It would not be possible to undertake the necessary analysis in the time available.

(1) Source—National Cancer Research Institute CaRD

Competition and Markets Authority

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what discussions on the resource requirements of the merged Competition and Mergers Authority his Department had with (a) the Office of Fair Trading and (b) the Competition Commission. [113833]

Norman Lamb [holding answer 25 June 2012]: The Government are working closely with the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) and the Competition Commission (CC) in planning for the transition to the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) and has established a CMA Transition Board whose key purpose is to oversee the creation of the CMA and plan for the transition from CC and OFT. The board member organisations are the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, HM Treasury, OFT and CC. When appointed the CMA Chair-designate will chair the CMA Transition Board.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 238W

Conditions of Employment

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 292W, on conditions of employment, how many meetings Adrian Beecroft had with policy officials across Government; and how many factual questions were responded to by such officials. [113113]

Norman Lamb: Adrian Beecroft had 22 meetings with policy officials across Government, half of which included other Government Departments. These meetings were to provide information about employment related law to assist him in making his personal contributions to the red tape challenge, and as such it is impossible to quantify the number of factual questions to which officials responded.

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 13 June 2012, Official Report, column 510W, on conditions of employment, if he will publish the letter sent by the former Minister for Employment Relations, Consumer and Postal Affairs to Adrian Beecroft on 29 July 2011 to commission the report. [113114]

Norman Lamb: We have placed a copy of the letter in the Libraries of both Houses.

Consultants

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the cost was to his Department of the use of external consultants in each of the last two years. [110617]

Norman Lamb: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 292W.

Environmental Protection

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what programmes his Department has put in place to encourage development of the UK's green economy. [113530]

Mr Prisk: Last year the Government published “Enabling the Transition to a Green Economy” which will serve as a tool to inform continuing dialogue between government, business and communities. It sets out the range of policies we are using to support the transition to a green economy, the opportunities that are created and the implications for the way in which businesses operate.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has a number of programmes that are relevant to the development of the UK's green economy. Among them is the £125 million Advanced Manufacturing Supply Chain fund, which aims to increase growth potential in manufacturing by improving the competitiveness of supply chains, and is open to businesses in the renewable energy and other low carbon sectors. There is also support available to the supply chain through the Regional Growth Fund, which several companies involved in renewable energy have benefited from. The Department is also supporting innovation through the Technology Strategy Board's catapult centres, one of which is the

26 Jun 2012 : Column 239W

Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre that is able to provide engineering expertise for new technology development. The Manufacturing Advisory Service includes within its remit low carbon and supply chain diversification themes.

The Government recognise that development of appropriate skills is an important part of the green economy. A report “Skills for a Green Economy” was published in October 2011, and maps out possible skills needs and gaps across different green sectors. The Government have put learners and employers in the driving seat, giving them the support, funding and information to make the right choices and to help employers shape the skills system. Taken together, we are creating a strong and flexible platform to meet the skills needs for the green economy transition.

The UK Green Investment Bank (UK GIB) is being developed as a key component of the Government's transition to a green and growing economy. The Bank's mission is

‘to provide financial solutions to accelerate private sector investment in the UK's transition to a green economy’.

Funded with £3 billion, it will tackle finance gaps which still remain despite a range of strong policies to incentivise green investments. It will work towards a ‘double bottom line' of both achieving environmental policies and making positive financial returns.

New Businesses: Government Assistance

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what plans his Department has to assist start-up businesses. [113532]

Mr Prisk: We want to make the UK the best place in the world to start and grow a business, and for the next decade to be the most entrepreneurial and dynamic in Britain's history. That is why, in January, my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister launched “Business in You”, a major year-long campaign, to inspire people to realise their business ambitions and to highlight the range of support available for start-ups and growing businesses.

We recognise that these are challenging times for new businesses. In addition to ensuring that we have the right environment to help businesses grow, for example through reducing red tape and enabling small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) more easily to access public procurement opportunities, we have introduced a range of measures to encourage people to set up their own business.

Ensuring individuals can access the support and advice they need to start and grow their business

We have transformed the way that we enable people to access the information, guidance and advice they need to start and grow a business. We have put in place a range of services including;

An improved:

www.businesslink.gov.uk

website including My New Business, a comprehensive start-up service.

A Business Link helpline which will support those who are unable to access the internet.

A mentoring portal

www.mentorsme.co.uk

providing an easy route to find experienced business mentors.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 240W

Ensuring businesses can access the finance they need

Ensuring the flow of credit to viable SMEs is essential for supporting growth and is a core priority for this Government. The Government have:

Introduced a new National Loan Guarantee scheme: up to £20 billion of guarantees for bank funding will be available over two years allowing banks to offer lower cost lending to SMEs.

Increased the funds available to invest through the Business Finance Partnership (BFP) to £1.2 billion. Government have invited the first round of proposals to help businesses access non-bank finance through the BFP, and will allocate £100 million of the BFP to invest through non-traditional lending channels.

Announced the continuation of the Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme until 2014/15, providing, subject to demand, over £2 billion in total over the next four years.

Announced continuation of the Government's Enterprise Capital Funds programme, increasing our commitment by £200 million over the next four years, providing for more than £300 million of venture capital investment to address the equity gap for early stage innovative SMEs.

Launched a new Startup Loan scheme to provide advice and start-up finance for 18-24 year olds looking to start their own business.

Encouraged Business Angel investment through a new £50 million Business Angel Co- Investment Fund.

We know that positive encouragement is also necessary to show that starting a business is a great idea. You may be aware that my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister, has appointed my Noble Friend Lord Young of Graffham to advise on small business and enterprise issues. A key objective of my Noble Friend Lord Young's work is to demonstrate that this is a great time to start a business, with record numbers of people becoming their own boss, supported by a wide range of help and encouragement to entrepreneurs from all ages and backgrounds. On 28 May, my Noble Friend Lord Young published his independent report on small business and enterprise, entitled “Make Business Your Business”. The report includes a guide to starting and developing a business which showcases much of the support on offer. The report can be accessed at:

http://www.startupbritain.org/resource/binary/userfiles/Make_Business_Your_Business_2.pdf

We will continue to work with the SME community to explore barriers to business start-up and to develop policies to help address these barriers.

Office of Fair Trading: Competition Commission

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what savings his Department has estimated will arise from the proposed merger of the Office of Fair Trading and the Competition Commission over and above those expected from the 2010 Spending Review. [113068]

Norman Lamb [holding answer 21 June 2012]: The Government have always made clear that the main purpose of creating the new Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) and implementing reforms is to strengthen the competition regime to support growth. Savings will mainly be from streamlining, and eliminating overlaps between the phase 1 and phase 2 of investigations. The impact assessment identified the potential costs and savings and quantified some of these. In preparing for the transition to the new CMA the Government will continue to refine these estimates as the structure and nature of the transition becomes clearer.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 241W

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the potential number of investigations that would be delayed during the merger of the Competition Commission and the Office of Fair Trading. [113159]

Norman Lamb [holding answer 21 June 2012]: Ministers consider the work of the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) and Competition Commission to be vital to the economy. The Government are committed to ensuring a smooth transition process and will work closely with OFT and Competition Commission to minimise disruption to the organisations while they continue to carry out their important roles and services.

Overseas Trade

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to the recommendations by the British Chambers of Commerce in its report entitled “Exporting is Good for Britain but Red Tape Stifles Growth”, if he will take further steps to open up new markets to UK exporters through free trade arrangements. [113784]

Mr Prisk: The British Government support the call made by the British Chambers of Commerce in its paper.

The Government are strongly committed to pursuing trade liberalisation, which benefits the UK not only in terms of new markets for UK exporters, but also through greater access to innovation, productive inputs and consumer goods. For this reason, the Government have, for example, led calls in the EU for the opening of negotiations for an EU-Japan Free Trade Agreement; and for negotiations with Singapore and Canada to be concluded this year. The British Government have also been the strongest advocate in the EU for launching negotiations with the US to increase further trade and investment flows across the Atlantic.

Procurement

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of contracts issued by his Department were awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises in 2011-12; and what proportion this represented of the monetary value of contracts awarded by his Department in 2011-12. [111921]

Mr Prisk: For core-BIS and those of its Agencies and non departmental public bodies (NDPBs) for which records are centrally held contracts to a value of 34% (£424,704,295) of a total procurement spend of £1,263,329,762 were awarded to small and medium enterprises in financial year 2011-12.

Further information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Research: Disclosure of Information

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what his policy is on allowing public access to publicly-funded academic research; and what plans he has for such access. [111705]

Mr Willetts: As stated in the Innovation and Research Strategy for Growth published in December 2011, the

26 Jun 2012 : Column 242W

Government are committed to ensuring that publicly funded research should be accessible free of charge. The Government's approach was further explained in my speech to the Publishers' Association of 2 May 2012, see

www.bis.gov.uk/news/speeches/david-willetts-public-access-to-research

As stated in paragraph 6.8 of the strategy, see

http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/innovation/docs/i/11-1387-innovation-and-research-strategy-for-growth.pdf

“Government will work with partners, including the publishing industry, to achieve free access to publicly-funded research as soon as possible and will set an example itself.

We have helped establish an independent working group chaired by Janet Finch to consider how to improve access to research publications, including publicly-funded research.

The Royal Society is considering how to improve the sharing and disclosing of research data, both within the research community and beyond.

Alan Langlands is chairing a task force to advise on improving the accessibility of data within Government and its agencies, which will advise on data linkage, conditions of access and data quality. This will report during 2012.”

The Government will consider further steps in light of the findings and recommendations from these groups. Both the Finch Group and Royal Society studies have now reported, see

www.researchinfonet.org/publish/finch

and

www.royalsociety.org/policy/projects/science-public-enterprise

The Government are now considering their findings and recommendations.

The Government will be issuing a response to the Finch Group in consultation with relevant research funding bodies.

Trade Competitiveness

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent estimate he has made of the contribution to the economy of (a) competition and (b) the competition authorities. [113834]

Norman Lamb [holding answer 25 June 2012]: Competitive markets ensure that scarce economic resources are put to their most efficient use. Markets that work well provide strong incentives for firms to innovate, improve production methods and lower prices. This in turn results in consumer benefits through lower prices, greater choice, higher quality and improved service offering.

(a) The impact of well-functioning, competitive markets on the economy occurs through several channels. Firstly, effective competition acts as a disciplining mechanism for firms, incentivising firms to become more efficient. Secondly, competition results in the most innovative and productive firms thriving and gaining market share at the expense of those that are not so. Competition also has effects on the broader macro-economic indicators, resulting in lower inflation and higher foreign direct investment. Competitive markets also result in confident and well-informed consumers, who make decisions which best satisfy their requirements.

26 Jun 2012 : Column 243W

Notwithstanding these important effects, estimating the impact of competition on the economy is a difficult task given the intangible nature of the impacts.

(b) The OFT assesses the impact of its work on the economy on an annual basis, as part of its performance target of delivering benefits to consumers at least five times the cost of its operations to the taxpayer. The latest available report(1) found that the OFT delivered annual average consumer benefits of £326 million, resulting in a benefit to cost ratio of around 7:1, above the target agreed with the Treasury. The OFT estimated that the competition regime in the UK benefited consumers by almost £689 million in 2010-11.

(1) For the financial year ending March 2011. OFT (2011), 'Positive Impact 10/11: Consumer Benefits from the OFT's work'.

UK Membership of EU

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of jobs created in the UK as a direct result of the EU membership in each of the last five years. [113617]

Norman Lamb: There is no available estimate of the impact on the number of jobs created in the UK as a direct result of EU membership. These estimates would be difficult and, to some extent speculative, as they would require an assessment of the impact of EU membership on, among other things, trade in goods and services, foreign investments of European Union and non-European Union origins, financial and banking relations, inward and outward flows of migrants, etc.

Trade and investment with Europe is, nonetheless, very important to UK employment. BIS estimated that in 2006 3.5 million jobs were linked directly and indirectly to the UK's trade with the EU, representing around 12% of UK's work force. This is the most recent estimate available and no similar comparisons have been made over time.

Treasury

Community Banks

17. Guy Opperman: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he is taking to make it easier to set up local community banks. [113595]

Mr Hoban: The Government believe that it is important for consumers to be able to access an appropriate range of financial products and services.

Therefore it is essential that the regulatory regime facilitates new entrants to the banking market wherever possible. The Financial Services Authority and the Bank of England are conducting reviews of the prudential and conduct requirements for new entrants to the banking sector to ensure that the requirements are proportionate and do not pose excessive barriers to entry or expansion.

Tax Avoidance/Evasion

18. Simon Hughes: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he is taking to reduce tax avoidance and tax evasion. [113596]

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Mr Gauke: This Government are determined to tackle tax avoidance and evasion, to ensure that everyone pays their fair share of tax. Our reinvestment of over £900 million into HMRC demonstrates this and will bring in additional revenue of £7 billion a year by 2014-15.

We have announced immediate action to close down seven avoidance schemes in the past year and recently published our consultation on introducing a General Anti-Abuse Rule in 2013.

Economic Growth

19. Chris Williamson: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent estimate he has made of the level of economic growth in 2012. [113597]

Miss Chloe Smith: The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) is responsible for producing independent economic and fiscal forecasts. In its March Economic and fiscal outlook, the OBR forecast economic growth of 0.8% in 2012.

22. Damian Hinds: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent steps he has taken to encourage economic growth. [113600]

Miss Chloe Smith: The Government's top priority is to achieve strong, sustainable and balanced growth that is more evenly shared across the country and between industries, through:

sustained deficit reduction;

monetary activism; and

supply side reforms.

Eurozone Financial Crisis

20. David Rutley: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps the Government are taking to limit the effect on the UK of the financial crisis in the eurozone. [113598]

Mr Hoban: This Government have taken decisive action to cut the deficit and stimulate growth, helping insulate the UK from the worst of the euro crisis. It is because of that action that we have secured near record low bond yields to the benefit of businesses and families across the UK. We have also ensured that all UK banks have built their capital buffers in recent years, with the largest UK banks reporting a core tier 1 ratio of 10% or above. Furthermore we have also recently announced two new schemes worth tens of billions of pounds to boost lending during this period of uncertainty.

Air Passenger Duty

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer with reference to section 29 of the Coalition Agreement, when he plans to bring forward plans to switch the Air Passenger Duty to a per-plane basis rather than per-passenger; and if he will make a statement. [113695]

Miss Chloe Smith: As set out at Budget 2011, the Government will not introduce a per-plane duty at the present time, given concerns over the legality and feasibility of this approach. The Government are continuing to work with our international partners to build support for this approach. In the meantime, Budget 2012 set out air passenger duty rates for 2012-13 and 2013-14.

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Child Trust Fund

Mr Woodward: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer when he intends to consider the future of existing Child Trust Fund accounts; and whether such accounts will be converted into Junior Individual Savings Accounts. [113412]

Mr Hoban: With reference to the answer to the hon. Member for North Cornwall (Dan Rogerson) on 18 June 2012, the Government have no immediate plans to change the existing regulatory structure for tax advantaged savings accounts for children. We therefore have no plans at present to convert Child Trust Funds into Junior ISAs.

There are currently around 5.7 million Child Trust Fund accounts, with a total value of approximately £4.4 billion. The market continues to grow steadily and, so long as CTF account holders continue to exercise their right to switch accounts where appropriate, there will continue to be an impetus for providers to compete. We do not believe that the majority of the 5.7 million children with a Child Trust Fund would benefit from a change in rules at the present time.

As with all features of the tax system, the Government will keep under review whether or not action is necessary in the future.

European Stability Mechanism

Mr Cash: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer on what European treaty basis the European Council would be authorised to grant a banking licence to the European Stability Mechanism. [113661]

Mr Hoban [holding answer 25 June 2012]: The European Council does not grant banking licences. This is the role of the relevant national competent authorities. In the United Kingdom, the national competent authority is the FSA.