GCSE: Disadvantaged

Tristram Hunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the answer of 19 April 2012, Official Report, columns 537-40W, on GCSE: disadvantaged, how many year 11 pupils eligible for free school meals in each academy were entered for (a) a history GCSE, (b) a geography GCSE, (c) a modern foreign language GCSE, (d) a physics GCSE, (e) a chemistry GCSE, (f) a biology GCSE, (g) a science GCSE, (h) an English GCSE, (i) an English literature GCSE, (j) a mathematics GCSE, (k) an OCR national level 2 qualification in information and communications technology and (l) a diploma in digital application in 2010-11. [108185]

Mr Gibb: The requested information for disadvantaged pupils at the end of key stage 4 has been placed in the House Libraries.

Grove School Nottinghamshire

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 17 May 2012, Official Report, column 316W, on Grove School: Nottinghamshire, whether his announcement on the outcome of applications for the Priority School Building Programme will indicate (a) the schools which will receive funding, (b) the amount they will receive and (c) the date by which they will receive it. [110138]

Mr Gibb: We announced the schools that will benefit from the Priority School Building Programme on 24 May.

Schools that are in the programme are being contacted by staff at the Education Funding Agency (EFA), who are working with them to develop the proposals to rebuild the school or address their building condition needs. This work will include developing detailed cost estimates for the building work that is required at each school, which will form the basis of funding that will be provided by the Department when contracts are agreed.

The programme will be procured centrally and schools will be grouped together in contracts that are attractive to bidders and value for money for the public sector. The timing and value of projects is subject to the development work that the EFA is now doing with schools. The first projects will be advertised to bidders this autumn, with further projects being advertised when they are ready.

Higher Education: Admissions

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of school leavers (a) in Leicester South constituency and (b) nationally entered higher education in the last two years. [109694]

Mr Gibb: 45% of the 2005/06 GCSE entrants in Leicester South entered higher education by 2009/10. This proportion was the same for 2004/05 GCSE entrants who entered higher education by 2008/09. The national proportions were 35% for 2005/06 GCSE entrants and 33% for 2004/05 GCSE entrants.

The figures represent young people who were participating in higher education, regardless of level of study, in the 2008/09 or 2009/10 academic year, when this cohort would usually be academic age 19.

Home Education

Caroline Dinenage: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children were being home-schooled in (a) Hampshire and (b) England in the latest period for which figures are available. [108319]

Mr Gibb: The Department for Education does not hold information on the number of children being home-schooled in Hampshire or in England. In 2007, York Consulting published a report on the prevalence of home education in England. The report estimated that about 20,000 home-educated children were known to their local authority.

Home Education: Birmingham

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the number of children being home-schooled who were resident in Birmingham, Ladywood constituency in each of the last five years. [109126]

Mr Gibb: The Department for Education does not hold information on the number of children being home-schooled in Birmingham, Ladywood.

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Meetings

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education on what dates (a) he, (b) Ministers and (c) senior officials in his Department have met representatives of (i) the Institute for Public Policy Research, (ii) the Taxpayers' Alliance, (iii) the Institute of Economic Affairs, (iv) the Child Poverty Action Group, (v) ResPublica, (vi) the Centre for Social Justice and (vii) Policy Exchange; and if he will publish the minutes and agendas of these meetings. [108976]

Tim Loughton: A list of external meetings attended by the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), and the Department's other Ministers are published on the Department's website(1). A list of external meetings attended by the Permanent Secretary is also published on the website(2). We are unable to provide details of external meetings attended by other senior officials as this information can be gathered only at disproportionate cost.

Regarding minutes and agendas from the meetings detailed in the above-mentioned returns, it is not Government policy to publish these documents.

Please note that the published lists of external meetings include details of official departmental meetings. They do not include, for example, details of speaking engagements or informal gatherings. We are unable to provide such details as this information can be gathered only at disproportionate cost.

(1)http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation/transparency/b0065263/ministers-quarterly-returns

(2)http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation/transparency/meetings/a0075403/the-permanent-secretarys-meetings-with-external-organisations

Ministers' Private Offices

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the civil service grade is of each member of staff in his private ministerial office. [109213]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 24 May 2012]: There are nine civil servants in the Secretary of State's private office. This is made up as follows:

GradeNumber of staff

Executive Assistant

2

Executive Officer

2

Higher Executive Officer/HEOD

2

Grade 6

2

Senior Civil Service

1

Total

9

Official Visits: Israel

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the (a) venue, (b) purpose, (c) agenda items and (d) conclusions were of his meeting with Israeli Foreign Minister Liberman during his visit to London; and at whose initiative the meeting was sought. [109892]

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Tim Loughton: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), did not meet the Israeli Foreign Minister Liberman during his visit to London.

Departmental Administration Costs

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will publish a statement of his Department's expenditure in each of the last 36 months; and what steps his Department is taking to avoid an annual underspend. [109704]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education’s expenditure is published annually and available on the Treasury website as follows. The year from April 2011 to March 2012 is currently being audited by NAO and once the accounts have received an audit certificate and are signed they will be laid before Parliament and published.

Full accounts for previous years are available on the Accounting Schedule at the link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation/reports/a00390/anual0departmental-reports-accounts-and-spending-reviews

Monthly figures are available via the following link:

http://data.gov.uk

Planning, funding and control

The Department for Education currently has management accounting systems which enable it to monitor performance against budget and exercise effective control on a day to day basis. There is a system of planning including production of a corporate plan and an annual operating plan.

There are systems to ensure that there is a continual evaluation of results against key targets. These include financial and non-financial targets and cover both the quantity and quality of outputs, and the value for money that is being achieved. Targets are reset each year.

Further documentation is available regarding financial management.

Budgetary guidance

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/psr_bc_consolidated_budgeting.htm

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much was spent on the administration of his Department in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12. [109837]

Tim Loughton: The administration expenditure for the Department for the last three years is as follows:

£ million
 2009-10 Outturn2010-11 Outturn2011-12 Forecast

Administration

185,465

172,484

Restated

383,716

363,645

The figures for 2010-11 and 2011-12 were revised to reflect the reclassification of the Department's arm’s- length bodies.

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Private Education: Education Maintenance Allowance

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the answer of 25 April 2012, Official Report, column 932W, on private education, how many recipients of the education maintenance allowance were enrolled at independent special needs schools in academic year 2010-11. [109596]

Mr Gibb: In the academic year 2010/11, 2,269 recipients of the education maintenance allowance were enrolled in independent special schools funded by local authorities. Of these, 2,010 received the top rate of £30 a week.

Public Sector

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many new public sector mutuals were created or spun-off by his Department in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [108907]

Tim Loughton: The Department has not created or spun-off any public sector mutuals in 2010-11 or 2011-12.

Publications

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education to which newspapers, periodicals and trade profession publications his private Ministerial office subscribes on a (a) daily, (b) weekly, (c) monthly and (d) quarterly basis. [109212]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 24 May 2012]: The Secretary of State's private office subscribes to the following newspapers and periodicals:

The Wall Street Journal

The Financial Times

The Guardian

The Independent

The Daily Mail

The Daily Express

The Daily Mirror

The Sun

The Times

The Daily Telegraph

The Economist

New Statesman

The Spectator

Times Higher Education

Times Educational Supplement

London Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) circulars and (b) consultation documents were issued by his Department in each of the last two years. [109698]

Tim Loughton: The Department ceased issuing formal circulars in 2005. Information relevant to schools, children's services and work forces is now published on our website.

http://www.education.gov.uk/search/results?q=circulars

The Department issued 38 consultations online in 2010 and 36 consultations online in 2011.

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Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) circulars and (b) consultation documents were issued by his Department in each of the last two years. [110507]

Tim Loughton: The Department ceased issuing formal circulars in 2005. Information relevant to schools, children’s services and workforces is now published on our website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/search/results?q=circulars

The Department issued 38 consultations online in 2010 and 36 consultations online in 2011.

Pupil Exclusions: Offensive Weapons

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many pupils were permanently excluded from secondary schools in England for being in possession of a weapon (a) in total and (b) as a proportion of all exclusions in each of the last five years; [109765]

(2) how many pupils were permanently excluded from secondary schools in each local authority area for being in possession of a weapon (a) in total and (b) as a proportion of all exclusions in each of the last five years. [109766]

Mr Gibb: The Department does not specifically collect data on the number of pupils permanently excluded for being in possession of a weapon.

Information on the reason for exclusion is collected under the following categories:

physical assault against a pupil/adult; verbal abuse/threatening behaviour against a pupil/adult; bullying; racist abuse; sexual misconduct; drug and alcohol related; damage; theft; persistent disruptive behaviour; and other. Exclusions resulting from a pupil carrying an offensive weapon are recorded under the category ‘verbal abuse/threatening behaviour’ but cannot be separately identified.

The latest data on permanent exclusions by reason at national and local authority level were published in Tables 9 and 21, respectively, of the “Permanent and Fixed Period Exclusions from Schools in England” Statistical First Release on 28 July 2011 at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001016/index.shtml

Pupils: South East

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much additional funding his Department plans to make available to schools in (a) Dartford, (b) Kent and (c) the South East as a result of the pupil premium. [109503]

Mr Gibb: The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011 and allocations have so far been made for the 2011-12 financial year only. For 2011-12 the Pupil Premium funding was £488 per pupil in respect of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM), and for children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months and £200 per pupil for those whose parents are serving in the armed forces.

In 2012-13 the pupil premium amount in respect of pupils known to be eligible for FSM has risen from £488 to £600 per FSM pupil and will be extended to cover pupils who have been eligible for FSM at any point within the last six years. Allocations for the Pupil

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Premium in 2012-13 will not be confirmed until June, when the January 2012 pupil numbers are available centrally.

Based on 2011-12 data, over £125.4 million Pupil Premium funding would be available to the south east in 2012-13. This includes over £24.4 million for Kent county council, of which over £1.6 million would be available to schools in the Dartford constituency. Final allocations will not be known until June.

School Meals: Nutrition

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the answer of 17 January 2012, Official Report, column 801W, on free schools, what definition of healthy food his Department uses. [107738]

Sarah Teather: The definition the Department uses of healthy food is food that meets national school food standards.

Schools: Finance

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average per pupil unit of funding was for (a) primary and (b) secondary schools including the pupil premium in each of the last six academic years. [107065]

Mr Gibb: Funding per pupil, in real terms, for the 2005-06 to 2010-11 financial years was:

 Funding (£)

2005-06

4,500

2006-07

4,630

2007-08

4,830

2008-09

4,900

2009-10

5,020

2010-11

5,140

Notes: 1. This covers funding through the Dedicated Schools Grant, School Standards Grant, School Standards Grant (Personalisation) and Standards Fund. It excludes grants that are not allocated at local authority level. 2. Price Base:Real terms at 2010-11 prices, based on GDP deflators as at December 2011 3. These figures are for all funded pupils aged three to 19 as funded through the Dedicated Schools Grant. 4. Figures have been rounded to the nearest £10. 5. The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011 so is not included in these figures.

Schools: Inspections

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what consideration Ofsted inspectors give to different levels of funding for schools around the country when conducting school assessments. [108997]

Mr Gibb: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to my hon. Friend, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 22 May 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for response.

Under the current inspection framework, introduced in January 2012, Ofsted does not assess a school’s funding levels or sources of income. Inspectors make a judgement about the quality of education provided by the school, that is, its overall effectiveness. Any school that is judged to be inadequate by Ofsted is; by definition, not providing value for money. However, should inspectors

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identify significant mismanagement of resources in the course of their investigations this will be reflected in the judgement on leadership and management.

The draft inspection framework, which will be introduced from September 2012, retains the same principles with some important amendments. Inspectors will be required to assess the impact of the pupil premium, as part of Ofsted’s focus on the extent to which schools enable pupils to overcome barriers to learning and ensure that no group of pupils achieves less well than their peers. Ofsted will also give greater prominence to the role of governors in determining the effectiveness of leadership in, and management of, the school. As part of this evaluation inspectors will consider the steps taken by governors to ensure solvency and probity.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Nick Gibb MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Schools: Transport

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what guidelines his Department issues to local education authorities on spending funding for denominational transport subsidies allocated by his Department; [109745]

(2) whether his Department has given or plans to give any funding to Lancashire County Council for denominational transport subsidies in financial year 2011-12; and what the value was of any such funding; [109746]

(3) whether his Department has given or plans to give any funding to local education authorities for denominational transport subsidies in financial year 2011-12; [109747]

(4) whether his Department gave any funding to Lancashire County Council for denominational transport subsidies in financial year 2011-12; and what the value was of any such funding; [109748]

(5) whether his Department gave any funding to local education authorities for denominational transport subsidies in financial year 2010-11; [109749]

(6) whether his Department has allocated any funding to local education authorities for denominational transport subsidies; and on what basis the allocation of any such funding to each authority is decided. [110121]

Tim Loughton: The vast majority of funding for all home to school transport, including any elements to support transport to schools with a religious character, is provided to local authorities through a combination of Revenue Support Grant paid via the Department for Communities and Local Government and locally collected taxes. The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove) allocated £85 million to support local authorities in meeting their statutory duty in respect of extended rights to travel for 2011-12 and 2012-13. Lancashire received £1,486,500 in 2011-12 and £1,844,247 in 2012-13. It is for local authorities to decide how they use this funding, as we do not issue any guidance specifying how local authorities should exercise their discretion.

Senior Civil Servants: Redundancy

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many severance payments have been made to senior civil servants in each section of his Department since May 2010; and what the size was of each payment. [109611]

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Tim Loughton: The Department has made 13 early release payments to senior civil servants under the terms of the civil service compensation scheme. Fewer than five releases have been made in each directorate. The amounts paid are shown in the following table

AmountNumber of releases

0-49,999

Fewer than 5

50,000-99,999

Fewer than 5

100,000-149,999

Fewer than 5

150,000-199,999

Fewer than 5

200,000-249,999

Fewer than 5

250,000-299,999

0

300,000-349,999

0

350,000-399,999

0

400,000-449,999

Fewer than 5

Stakeholder Advocacy Group

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has received representations on the Civil Service Code of Conduct in relation to the Stakeholder Advocacy Group. [109999]

Tim Loughton: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove) has not received any representations on the Civil Service Code of Conduct in relation to the stakeholder and advocacy team.

Surveys

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what the level of satisfaction with senior civil servants and departmental leadership was in each section in his Department in the last staff survey; [109567]

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(2) which section of his Department incurred the lowest staff satisfaction levels in the most recent staff survey. [109568]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education takes part in the annual Civil Service People Survey. The most recent results available are from the People Survey carried out in October 2011.

Survey results do not provide Government Departments with a specific satisfaction level but an engagement index which measures how engaged our staff are with the Department in terms of: their work; their understanding of their organisation's objectives and purpose; their manager; experiences of learning and career development; inclusion and fair treatment; resources and workload; pay and benefits; and, leadership and managing change.

The top line of the following table provides the engagement index for each of the Department's main Directorates. The engagement index has been developed as a way of measuring how engaged civil servants are with the organisation they work for and is the headline measure of the survey. The engagement index is based on the respondents' level of agreement with the following five statements using a five point strongly agree to strongly disagree scale:

I feel proud when I tell others I am part of DFE

I would recommend DFE as a great place to work

I feel a strong personal attachment to DFE

DFE inspires me to do the best in my job

DFE motivates me to help it achieve its objectives.

Education Standards Directorate and Infrastructure and Funding Directorate both received a 1% lower score than the highest scoring Directorate. Their scores were however in line with the overall departmental engagement index. The table also shows the percentage of positive responses to questions relating to senior civil servants and the departmental leadership in DFE for each of the Directorates.

Percentage
 Civil serviceDFEChildren, Young People and Families DirectorateEducation Standards DirectorateInfrastructure and Funding Directorate

Engagement index

56

59

60

59

59

B41. Senior Civil Servants (SCS) in DFE are sufficiently visible

46

53

59

50

55

B42. I believe the actions of senior civil servants(SCS) are consistent with DFE's values

39

46

48

45

48.

B43. I believe that the DFE Board has a clear vision for the future of the DFE

39

43

44

42

43

B44. Overall, I have confidence in the decisions made by DFE's senior civil servants (SCS)

36

43

45

40

45

B55.I believe that senior civil servants (SCS) in DFE will take action on the results from this survey

39

45

45

43

48

F06. Decisions on development opportunities by SCS in my area are open and transparent and actively address the development needs for staff in underrepresented groups (DFE question only)

30

28

30

32

Teachers: Training

Paul Blomfield: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what budget he has allocated for teachers' professional development in 2012-13. [109386]

Mr Gibb: We do not prescribe how much of a school's budget should be used for teachers' professional development. Decisions relating to teachers' professional development rightly rest with schools, individual teachers and head teachers as they are in the best position to make judgments about relative spending priorities and requirements.

The Government's approach to teachers' professional development is based on research that shows that teachers

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learn best from other professionals through observing teaching, being observed, and receiving feedback from peers. To support this we are creating a national network of teaching schools on the model of teaching hospitals. In addition, we have launched a National Scholarship Fund for teachers to encourage more teachers to deepen their subject knowledge.

Teachers: Wales

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has received any requests from the Welsh Government for the National Assembly for Wales to have responsibility for determining teachers' pay and conditions in Wales in the event that UK-wide pay rates are ended. [109118]

Mr Gibb: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove) has not received any requests from the Welsh Government for it to have responsibility for determining the pay and conditions of teachers in Wales in the event that national pay rates in England and Wales are ended.

The Welsh Government has submitted evidence around the pay and conditions of teachers in Wales to the independent School Teachers’ Review Body (STRB) and advocates a national system of pay and conditions for teachers.

Truancy

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will assess the relative effects of different reasons for absence from school on levels of achievement at each key stage; and if he will make a statement. [109473]

Mr Gibb: The effect that poor attendance at school can have on a child's education can be permanent and damaging.

Pupil absence is categorised as either authorised or unauthorised. Authorised absence is absence with permission from a teacher or other authorised representative of the school. This includes instances of absences for which a satisfactory explanation has been provided (for example, illness). Unauthorised absence is absence without permission from a teacher or other authorised representative of the school. This includes all unexplained or unjustified

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absences. Arriving late for school, after the register has closed, is recorded as unauthorised absence.

A pupil is classified as a persistent absentee if they miss at least 15% of school sessions due to any combination of authorised and unauthorised absence.

In 2009/10, pupils who had never been classified as persistent absentees during key stage 2, were twice as likely to achieve level 4 or above in English and maths as pupils who were persistently absent for each of the four key stage 2 years (78.3% compared with 38.6%). Similarly, pupils who had not been persistently absent in both of their key stage 4 years, were almost four times more likely to achieve five or more A*-C grades at GCSE (including English and maths) as pupils who were persistent absentees in both key stage 4 years (60% compared with 16.3%).

Analysis of 2009/10 absence data shows the number, length and reason for absences were associated with lower pupil attainment. However this analysis did not take account of the characteristics of the absent pupils—their lower attainment could be explained by other characteristics (such as low prior attainment) rather than the reason for the absence itself.

At key stage 2(1), pupils with absences due to exclusion had the lowest attainment, followed by traveller absence, unauthorised family holidays, absences where no reason has been given and lateness (both are classified as unauthorised) followed by pupils who have been absent due to illness and medical or dental appointments. Then lastly absences due to religious observance, study leave and authorised family holidays had similar patterns of attainment.

At key stage 4(2), pupils with absences due to exclusion had the lowest attainment, followed by traveller absence, lateness, absences where no reason has been given and unauthorised family holidays, then authorised family holidays, followed by absences due to illness and medical or dental appointments. Pupils with small amounts of absence due to study leave have above average levels of attainment.

These findings were included in the publication 'A profile of pupil absence in England':

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/eOrderingDownload/DFE-RR171.pdf

(1) See charts 4.4 and 4.5 in ‘A profile of pupil absence in England’ at the above link.

(2) See Charts 4.11 and 4.12 in ‘A profile of pupil absence in England’ at the above link.