Parental Responsibility

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that people have fair access to their grandchildren, nieces, nephews or cousins following a bereavement or divorce. [91784]

Tim Loughton: The vast majority of families make their own arrangements to ensure that children keep in contact with their extended family following divorce or separation. Where families cannot reach their own agreements, family members may apply to the court for a child contact order.

There may be cases where it is appropriate for grandparents or other family members to assume some or all care responsibilities for children, for example following the death of a child's parents. Grandparents and other family members may, with the permission of the court, apply for a child residence order.

The Government will shortly publish its response to the Family Justice Review which considered, among other issues, how children can stay in contact with their grandparents and other family members following family separation or divorce.

Playgrounds: Hartlepool

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what funding his Department has allocated for provision of children's and young people's play areas in Hartlepool constituency in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [87784]

Sarah Teather: The Department has not allocated funding for provision of children's and young people's play areas to Hartlepool or any local area or authority in the financial years 2011-12 and 2012-13. The Department's play capital programme finished at the end of March 2011, as originally intended under the previous Government's Play Strategy.

The Government recognise how important it is that children have safe, local places to play, and the benefits these places bring to the wider community more generally. However, it is not for central Government to determine what play facilities are available in local areas, or to tell the experts in the play sector how to deliver play provision. Children, parents, play professionals and local communities best know what is most needed in their local areas.

30 Jan 2012 : Column 435W

The Government are moving control over local decisions and expenditure away from the centre, giving communities more control over developments in their neighbourhoods, and making it easier for volunteers and charities to get involved. This approach should provide the freedom and flexibility for local areas to meet their own priorities for spending, which may include play, and make the most of the resources available.

Pupil Premium

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many students have received pupil premium funding in North Swindon constituency since its introduction. [90821]

Sarah Teather: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011 and allocations have so far been made for the 2011-12 financial year. Pupil premium funding is provided in respect of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM), children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces. In the North Swindon constituency there were 2,140 pupils on the January 2011 school censuses recorded as known to be eligible for FSM or recorded as service children who have received the pupil premium to date. The total number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in the North Swindon constituency may be higher, but it is not possible to identify the number of pupils in each parliamentary constituency recorded as being in care or recorded in the alternative provision census as, in both cases, the returns are provided at local authority level rather than at establishment level.

School Visits

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether it is his Department's policy that when an official from his Department attends a governing body or sub-committee meeting at a school the local authority is informed in advance. [87060]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 19 December 2011]: We are keen to work in partnership with local authorities when officials from the Department visit schools and make every effort to notify the appropriate local authority in advance of a visit.

Schools: King James Bible

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much has been spent on storage for the King James Bible project; on what date the copies of the Bible in storage were printed; and where they are located. [92621]

Mr Gibb: To mark the 400th anniversary year of the publication of the King James Bible, the Department for Education is sending a facsimile copy to each state primary and secondary school in England. This will enable all pupils to understand its place in our nation's identity and history.

Printing will commence in the next few months, and therefore no storage costs have been incurred.

30 Jan 2012 : Column 436W

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will place in the Library a copy of each item of correspondence he has sent to companies seeking funding for the King James Bible project in the last 12 months. [92622]

Mr Gibb: To mark the 400th anniversary year of the publication of the King James Bible, the Department for Education is sending a facsimile copy to each state primary and secondary school in England. This will enable all pupils to understand its place in our nation's identity and history.

Ministers are in discussion with potential sponsors.

Schools: Capital Investment

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much of the £1.2 billion increase in spending on school buildings will be allocated to schools in (a) Ashfield constituency and (b) Nottinghamshire. [91591]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 24 January 2012]: As announced in the Chancellor's autumn statement, the Department for Education has been allocated an additional £600 million to support the provision of pupil places and £600 million to support the expansion of the free schools programme. Departmental officials are considering how best to allocate this funding and announcements on specific allocations will be made in due course.

Schools: Information and Communications Technology

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much maintained schools in England spent on IT (a) in total, (b) hardware, (c) software, (d) consultancy fees and (e) other expenditure in each of the last 10 years. [91352]

Mr Gibb: The Department does not collect expenditure on hardware, software and consultancy fees specifically, but through the Consistent Financial Reporting (CFR) data collection we can identify the amount spent on information and communication technology (ICT) resources which includes expenditure on computer hardware, educational software and cost of maintenance contracts for ICT used for teaching. The following table shows the expenditure for local authority maintained schools' respective levels of spend from 2002-03 to 2010-11.

Total spend across maintained schools in England (1,2) on ICT Learning Resource (3) and ICT Hardware/Software (4) : 2002-03 to 2009-10
  ICT learning resource ICT Hardware/Software

2002-03

291,237,598

67,070,792

2003-04

355,594,967

128,901,591

2004-05

437,877,822

190,095,786

2005-06

469,522,633

229,160,855

2006-07

444,576,221

214,318,573

2007-08

473,398,978

172,336,284

2008-09

460,299,919

186,264,035

2009-10

431,779,766

243,564,433

2010-11

441,373,065

187,280,693

30 Jan 2012 : Column 437W

(1) Figures contained in the table are taken from data supplied by maintained schools (nursery, primary, secondary and special), pupil referral units (PRUs) and LAs in the Consistent Financial Reporting (CFR) collection. The figures for 2010-11 may differ from those published in the CFR Statistical Release in December 2011 due to the inclusion of PRU figures, who supply figures on a voluntary basis. Traditionally questions of this kind have been answered using Section 251 Outturn information which is collected and verified by LAs on a similar academic year basis, and uses CFR data to feed into aggregate LA figures. For this request it was necessary to use the underlying school level CFR information as the amount of spend on ‘ICT Hardware/Software (CE04)’ that is collected in the CFR exercise is not part of the data that feeds into Section 251 Outturn reports. (2) The 2002-03 financial year was the first year of collection and figures in this format are not available previous to that year. There are known data issues with this year and figures should be used with caution. (3) Included in ‘ICT Learning Resource (E20)’ is spend on educational software, including site or other licences, hardware including keyboards, monitors, printers etc. used for teaching purposes, purchase, lease, hire or maintenance, contracts of ICT used for teaching, costs of Broadband, ISDN, ASDL or other dedicated phone lines, and ICT in schools revenue expenditure. Excluded from this field is spend on resources that are used for specific administration purposes (See CFR field E22), where a resource is used for curriculum and administration purposes, and where costs are material, costs or estimates of the split should be coded separately at the time of purchase, and ICT expenditure that is over the de minimis level (See CFR field CE04). (4) Included in ‘ICT Hardware/Software (CE04)’ is spend on e-learning credit expenditure, purchase of computer hardware and software where these are to be capitalised or are funded from capital grant, and ICT in schools capital expenditure. Excluded from this field is spend on costs of consultancy that can be identified individually, which should be allocated under the specific expenditure groups within expenditure (See CFR fields E27, E28), and costs of training for staff in the use of ICT systems (See CFR field E09).

The figures supplied cover spending on ICT learning resources (E20) and information and communication technology (CE04) as outlined in the Consistent Financial Reporting (CFR) guide and so include:

ICT learning resources

educational software, including site or other licences, etc., used for teaching purposes

hardware, including keyboards, monitors, printers etc., used for teaching purposes

purchase, lease, hire or maintenance contracts of ICT used for teaching

costs of broadband, ISDN, ASDL or other dedicated phone lines.

Information and communication technology

purchase of computer hardware and software where these are to be capitalised and are funded from capital grant.

Schools: Sanitation

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent representations he has received regarding the standard of school (a) toilet and (b) water facilities for pupils. [91664]

Mr Gibb: The Department is consulting on revised standards for school premises, which include regulations for toilet and washing facilities and for water supplies, including drinking water. This public consultation lasted 12 weeks and will conclude on the 26 January 2012.

30 Jan 2012 : Column 438W

By 23 January, over 80 responses had been received, but an analysis of these will not commence until the week commencing 30 January when all the responses have been processed. The intention is to publish the results of the consultation and the Department's response on the Department's website, in the spring. This will show data on the responses to the proposed standards for toilets and washing facilities and for water supplies, including a consolidation of the comments received about them.

Schools: Swindon

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in South Swindon constituency qualified for the pupil premium in the last year for which figures are available. [91140]

Sarah Teather: The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011 and allocations have so far been made for the 2011-12 financial year. Pupil premium funding is provided in respect of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM), children in care who have been continuously looked after for at least six months and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces. In the South Swindon constituency there were 2,210 pupils on the January 2011 school censuses recorded as known to be eligible for FSM or recorded as service children who qualified for the pupil premium. The total number of pupils eligible for the pupil premium in the South Swindon constituency may be higher, but it is not possible to identify the number of pupils in each parliamentary constituency recorded as being in care or recorded in the alternative provision census as, in both cases, the returns are provided at local authority level rather than at establishment level.

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in South Swindon constituency were excluded from school in each of the last 10 years. [91141]

Mr Gibb: Information for the years 2005/06 to 2009/10 is shown in the table.

Data on fixed period exclusions was collected for the first time in 2003/04 via the Termly Exclusions Survey, and both fixed period and permanent exclusions were collected via the School Census for the first time in 2005/06. Data has been provided for five years, covering the period 2005/06 to 2009/10. To provide data for any further years would incur disproportionate cost.

The latest information on exclusions at national and local authority level was published in the Statistical First Release “Permanent and Fixed Period Exclusions from Schools in England 2009/10”, available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001016/index.shtml

30 Jan 2012 : Column 439W

30 Jan 2012 : Column 440W

Maintained primary, state-funded secondary and special schools (1, 2, 3) , number and percentage of permanent exclusions and pupil enrolments with one or more fixed period exclusions (4, 5) , South Swindon parliamentary constituency, 2005/06 to 2009/10
  Permanent Exclusions (4)
  Primary (1) State-funded secondary (1, 2) Special (3) Maintained primary, state-funded secondary and special schools
  Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of the school population (6) Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of the school population (6) Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of the school population (6) Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of the school population (6)

2005/06(7)

0

0.00

6

0.10

0

0.00

10

0.04

2006/07

0

0.00

15

0.21

0

0.00

20

0.10

2007/08

(9)

(9)

24

0.34

0

0.00

30

0.16

2008/09

(9)

(9)

10

0.14

0

0.00

10

0.07

2009/10

(9)

(9)

8

0.12

0

0.00

10

0.06

  Pupil enrolments with one or more fixed period exclusions (5)
  Primary (1) State-funded secondary (1, 2) Special (3) Maintained primary, state-funded secondary and special schools
  Pupil enrolments with one or more fixed period exclusions (5) Percentage of the school population (6) Pupil enrolments with one or more fixed period exclusions (5) Percentage of the school population (6) Pupil enrolments with one or more fixed period exclusions (5) Percentage of the school population (6) Pupil enrolments with one or more fixed period exclusions (5) Percentage of the school population (6)

2005/06(7)

(8)

(8)

480

7.86

(8)

(8)

(8)

(8)

2006/07

23

0.28

495

6.83

(9)

(9)

520

3.35

2007/08

59

0.73

414

5.83

0

0.00

470

3.12

2008/09

29

0.36

347

4.96

0

0.00

380

2.50

2009/10

42

0.53

330

4.80

0

0.00

370

2.51

(1 )Includes middle schools as deemed. (2 )Includes city technology colleges and academies (including all-through academies). (3 )Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools. (4 )Permanent exclusion figures at constituency level are as reported by schools. Published figures at national and local authority level were adjusted following an exercise to check the total number of exclusions with local authorities. (5 )Pupils may be counted more than once if they moved schools during the year, or are registered at more than one school. (6 )The number of exclusions expressed as a percentage of the number (headcount) of pupils (excluding dually registered pupils) as at January each year. (7 )For the 2005/06 school year, only information on fixed period exclusions from secondary schools was available. (8 )Not available—no exclusions collected for schools of this type. (9 )Less than 5 or a percentage based on less than 5. Note: Totals may not appear to equal the sum of component parts because totals have been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: School Census

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in the South Swindon constituency have been placed in the category of school action plus in each of the last five years. [91143]

Mr Gibb: The available information on the number of pupils with special educational needs at school action plus in the South Swindon constituency, in the south-west and in England is shown in the following table.

All schools (1) : Number of pupils with special educational needs at school action plus (2) , January 2007- 11, England
  2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

England

418,160

447,465

472,810

503,050

500,155

South-west

33,135

34,815

36,685

39,185

40,060

South Swindon parliamentary constituency

730

787

792

787

785

(1) Includes nursery schools, middle schools as deemed, primary academies, secondary academies, city technology colleges, maintained and special schools and pupil referral units. Excludes general hospital schools and independent schools. (2) Includes pupils with sole or dual main registration.
Note: National and regional totals have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: Schools Census.

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in the South Swindon constituency have been in receipt of a statement of special educational needs in each of the last five years. [91144]

Mr Gibb: The available information on the number of pupils with statements of special educational needs in the South Swindon constituency, in the south-west and in England is shown in the following table.

All schools (1) : Pupils with statements of special educational needs (2) , as at January 2007-11, England
  2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

England

232,760

227,315

225,400

223,945

224,210

South-west

20,820

20,620

20,565

20,580

20,470

South Swindon

281

280

299

332

317

30 Jan 2012 : Column 441W

(1) Includes nursery schools, middle schools as deemed, primary academies, secondary academies, city technology colleges, maintained and special schools and pupil referral units. Excludes general hospital schools and independent schools. (2) Includes pupils with sole or dual main registration. Note: National and regional totals have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: Schools Census.

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in the South Swindon constituency have received A*-C grades in their (a) mathematics and (b) English GCSE in each of the last five years. [91145]

Mr Gibb: The information requested is given in the following table:

Numbers and percentages of pupils (1,2) at the end of key stage 4 achieving A*-C grades in English and mathematics GCSEs (3,4) in South Swindon constituency (5) , south-west region (6) and England (7) . Years: 2006-10. Coverage: England
Number and percentage of KS4 pupils achieving A*-C in 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10

English

         

South Swindon (number)

656

862

783

833

899

South Swindon (percentage)

55.6

60.0

57.2

61.1

68.1

           

South-west (number)

34,618

35,006

35,547

35,964

38,087

South-west (percentage)

59.6

60.4

61.7

63.5

66.9

           

England (number)

338,325

349,086

357,983

358,136

382,870

England (percentage)

57.1

58.3

60.1

62.1

66.5

           

Maths

         

South Swindon (number)

581

761

706

755

786

South Swindon (percentage)

49.2

53.0

51.5

55.4

59.5

           

South-west (number)

31,412

31,908

32,832

34,013

35,914

South-west (percentage)

54.1

55.0

57.0

60.1

63.1

           

England (number)

307,025

323,044

335,453

339,196

360,532

England (percentage)

51.8

54.0

56.3

58.8

62.6

(1) Figures do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas. (2) Figures include all maintained schools (including CTCs and academies). (3 )Full GCSEs only have been included (full GCSEs, double awards, accredited international certificates and their predecessor iGCSEs and AS levels). Figures from 2006-09 exclude iGCSEs, 2010 figures include accredited iGCSEs. (4) Including attempts and achievements by these pupils in previous academic years. (5) Parliamentary constituency figures are based on the postcode of the school. (6) Regional figures are based on the region of the local authority maintaining the school. (7) England figures are the sum of all local authority figures. Source: National Pupil Database

30 Jan 2012 : Column 442W

Sixth Form Education: Finance

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent representations he has received on changes to funding of sixth form education. [91609]

Mr Gibb: The Department has received 695 responses to its recent consultation on the 16-19 Funding Formula review. We are currently analysing these returns and plan to publish the outcomes from the consultation later in the spring.

Special Educational Needs

Angela Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what funding he plans to make available for children with special educational needs who will not be eligible for an Education, Health and Care Plan and are registered as School Action or School Action Plus. [90878]

Sarah Teather: Currently over £2 billion is delegated directly to schools to support children with SEN, with an additional £306 million allocated to schools to support individual pupils with statements. Our plans for changes to the statement system do not anticipate any changes to the total amounts available. We are, however, planning to ensure greater transparency about the support available for children with special educational needs with local authorities setting out a local offer of the support available in their area.

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what criteria were used to select the pathfinders to test the best ways of implementing the reforms in the Special Educational Needs Green Paper; what objectives he set for the pathfinders; and what mechanism the pathfinders will use to evaluate their effectiveness. [91927]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 26 January 2012 ]: The 20 special educational needs and disability pathfinders were selected according to the criteria published in the ‘Invitation to Tender’, which is available on the Department’s website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/sen/b00191706/send-green-paper-pathfinders

Criteria included engagement of children, young people and parents, partnership arrangements, capacity to innovate and role of the voluntary and community sector. All pathfinders are working within existing statutory frameworks towards the following common objectives:

to develop a new birth to 25 assessment process and a single plan which bring together the education, health and social care services on which children and young people who are disabled or have SEN rely;

to explore how the voluntary and community sector could explore access to specialist expertise and introduce more independence to the process; and

to ensure the full engagement of children, young people and their parents and families.

The Department has appointed SQW to carry out an independent evaluation of the pathfinder programme. The Mott MacDonald pathfinder support team is working with pathfinders to help them develop their plans for measuring outcomes for children and families locally.

30 Jan 2012 : Column 443W

Special Educational Needs: Children

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how he plans to provide special educational needs assessments for young people who develop needs in their teens. [91925]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 26 January 2012]: Local pathfinders involving local authorities and their health partners are testing the best ways of achieving the reforms set out in the Green Paper, ‘Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability’. Those reforms include plans for a single, integrated assessment process and Education, Health and Care Plan for children and young people from birth to 25 who would, under the current system have a statement of special educational needs or a learning difficulty assessment.

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on early intervention for children with special educational needs. [91926]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 26 January 2012]: A central theme of the recent Green Paper “Support and Aspiration: a new approach to special educational needs and disability” is to ensure that children’s support needs are recognised early and to enable professionals and parents to put the right help in place quickly, leading to the best possible outcomes for every child.

To ensure that teachers are well equipped to identify and meet young peoples’ needs, we have committed to sharpen the focus on special educational needs within the standards for qualified teacher status; increase the number of initial teacher training placements in special schools; and, provide for scholarships, continuing professional development and training opportunities in SEN, including in specific impairments. This should equip teachers with the skills and knowledge to improve achievement for children with SEN and disabilities.

The proposed revision to the statement of special educational needs, the new Education, Health and Care plan, will bring together the range of support that a child or young person needs from education, health or social care services, within one plan involving all relevant agencies as well as the child and family. This should streamline the assessment process and help to ensure that the right package of support can be put in place as soon as a child’s needs are identified.

In addition, there are a number of universal measures that will also be particularly beneficial to children with SEN. The revised Early Years Foundation Stage will include a new requirement for providing for earlier intervention for those children who need extra help, through the introduction of a progress check when children are age two.

Special Educational Needs: Children in Care

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many looked-after children with autism access education beyond the age of 16 in each English local authority. [92552]

30 Jan 2012 : Column 444W

Tim Loughton: Information on the number of looked after children with autism who access education beyond the age of 16 is not currently available. However the Department does collect information on the number of former care leavers now aged 19 but who were looked after when aged 16, who are in higher education. This information is published in table F1 of the Department's Statistical First Release, “Children Looked After by Local Authorities in England (including adoption and care leavers)—year ending 31 March 2011”. This publication can be found at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001026/index.shtml

Third Sector

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to measure progress on the implementation of policies supporting the big society initiative; and if he will make a statement. [91388]

Sarah Teather: Departmental business plans set out clear priorities across Government, including what we are putting in place to support the growth of big society, and we continue to report publicly on progress against these priorities at

http://transparency.number10.gov.uk/transparency/srp/

Within the Department for Education this includes reporting progress on initiatives such as Free Schools, Sure Start children's centres, and joint work with the Cabinet Office on the National Citizen Service, as well as work to reduce bureaucratic burdens and ensure more and better information is available to service users.

In addition to the routine monitoring of programmes to measure progress the Department for Education carries out evaluation of programmes. For example, we have commissioned a major evaluation of Sure Start children's centres and we are managing the evaluation of the National Citizen Service with Cabinet Office which will be published at

www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk

in due course. Other DFE evaluations are published at

www.education.gov.uk

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much funding (a) Academy of York, (b) Bolton Lads and Girls Clubs, (c) Changematters, (d) Connexions Cumbria, (e) Engage4Life, (f) Envision, (g) Fylde Coast YMCA, (h) Jewish Lads and Girls Brigade, (i) Lincolnshire and Rutland EBP, (j) New College Nottingham, (k) Petroc, (l) Safe in Tees Valley, (m) Salford Foundation, (n) Sefton (CVS), (o) The Challenge Network, (p) The National Youth Agency, (q) V, (r) Young Devon/NCS South West, (s) Your Consortium Ltd, (t) Catch 22, (u) Future Foundations, (v) Global Action Plan, (w) Groundwork, (x) Luton Culture, (y) Oxfordshire CC, (z) Partnership Network, (aa) Transitions Plus, (bb) Football League Trust and (cc) Young Lives have received from his Department to run National Citizen Service pilots in 2012; and if he will make a statement. [92514]

30 Jan 2012 : Column 445W

Tim Loughton: Funding for NCS pilots in 2012 is provided by the Cabinet Office and from a wide range of sources. 2012 pilot providers have secured funding from a range of sources in addition to the Cabinet Office investment that includes business donations, in-kind support from providers themselves, private philanthropic donations, local fundraising and small contributions from participants and their families. This Department has not provided funding to support 2012 pilots.

Work and Pensions

Access to Work Programme

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what guidance is given to Access to Work assessors and advisers on ensuring that (a) Access to Work processes are accessible to deaf blind people and (b) the support needs of deaf blind people are met through Access to Work. [91916]

Maria Miller: Access to Work advisers will have undergone disability awareness training to ensure that they are able to identify the communication needs of the customer. Assessors are contracted on the basis that their services are accessible to disabled people under the requirements of the Equalities Act.

Access to Work is a pan-disability programme which includes deaf blind customers. It provides practical advice and support to disabled people and their employers to help them overcome work related obstacles resulting from disability. Access to Work funds the support that is beyond the reasonable adjustments that employers make. It funds a variety of support for disabled people in employment, including support workers, travel to work, special aids and equipment and adaptations to equipment.

The Department is currently considering how to update the range of support it provides for disabled people in the light of the Sayce review recommendations and subsequent consultation.

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the average time elapsing between an initial application to Access to Work and the requested support being in place for (a) disabled and (b) deafblind people. [91943]

Maria Miller: The information requested is not routinely collected and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Child Poverty

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the effect of the implementation of the provisions of the Welfare Reform Bill on levels of child poverty in each of the five years following its implementation. [91985]

Maria Miller: A key component of the Welfare Reform Bill is universal credit. The impact assessment published in October 2011 estimates that, on reasonable assumptions, the combined impact of increased take-up and entitlements will lift around 900,000 individuals out of poverty,

30 Jan 2012 : Column 446W

including more than 350,000 children and around 550,000 working-age adults. The impact assessment also estimated that universal credit could reduce the number of workless households by as much as 300,000. Universal credit is expected to improve work incentives by allowing individuals to keep more of their income as they move into work, and by introducing a smoother and more transparent reduction of benefits when they increase their earnings.

Crisis Loans

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many applications for social fund crisis loans there have been in each month since June 2010; and if he will make a statement. [91976]

Steve Webb: The following table shows the number of crisis loan applications made each month since June 2010.

  Number of crisis loan applications

June 2010

300,650

July 2010

292,630

August 2010

283,950

September 2010

299,540

October 2010

267,980

November 2010

278,670

December 2010

240,770

January 2011

302,540

February 2011

288,400

March 2011

301,100

April 2011

207,990

May 2011

240,670

June 2011

230,760

July 2011

220,800

August 2011

221,300

September 2011

221,740

October 2011

197,400

November 2011

196,400

December 2011

170,620

Notes: 1. The information provided is management information. Our preference is to answer all parliamentary questions using Official/National Statistics but in this case we only have management information available. It is not quality assured to the same extent as Official/National Statistics and there are some issues with the data, for example, it does not include applications which were processed clerically and have not yet been entered on to the social fund computer system. 2. Figures are for applications received, not for the number of people who made an application as some people made more than one application 3. The number of applications received has been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: DWP Social Fund Policy, Budget and Management Information System.

Deloitte

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what contracts his Department has awarded to Deloitte since May 2010; and what the (a) net and (b) individual monetary value was of each such contract. [92444]

Chris Grayling: In 2008-09 the Department spent £72.8 million on business consultancy services. This figure reduced to £18.2 million in 2010-11. This represents

30 Jan 2012 : Column 447W

a total reduction of 76% compared to 2008-09 spending levels and we continue to drive value for money for the taxpayer. Spending has continued to fall during calendar year 2011 with the Department spending just £3.13 million on business consultancy.

Since May 2010 the following contracts have been awarded to Deloitte:

  £

CIT Organisation and Capability Transformation Options

1

Research into the Capacity of the Health Care Professional Market

48,670

Compensating People with Occupational Mesothelioma

25,616

Review of Transforming Letters Project

19,950

Digital Customer Total Experience Design

16,667

DWP Shared Services Delivery Model Options Appraisal

225,000

Total

335,904

Departmental Public Expenditure

Vernon Coaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the level of change in his Department’s spending on (a) pensioners, (b) families with children, (c) people with a disability and (d) all those living in Northern Ireland by 2015. [92416]

Maria Miller: These are devolved matters which are the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Minister for Social Development.

Disability: Allowances

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what support his Department makes available for people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and their families. [91900]

Maria Miller: Individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who are unable to work due to their condition are able to claim employment and support allowance. This benefit provides help to those capable of preparing for work to enable them to do so, as well as unconditional support to the most severely disabled.

Employment support to help disabled people, including those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, is provided through Jobcentre Plus and the Work programme. Individuals may also qualify for specialist support through Work Choice, which helps individuals to move into supported employment, as well as Access to Work which provides support to individuals and their employers to meet adjustments they may require in the workplace or to access a job.

Those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have extra costs due to their disability may also qualify for disability living allowance. Individuals with a caring responsibility, such as family members of an individual with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, may qualify for carers allowance.

30 Jan 2012 : Column 448W

Employment Schemes

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what information his Department collects on the number of (a) job interviews undertaken and (b) work placements allocated under the sector based work academy scheme. [92102]

Chris Grayling: Information on the number of claimants participating in the sector-based work academy scheme will be published later in the year.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if his Department will develop a costed contingency for replacing failed prime contractors in the Work programme; and if he will make a statement. [92103]

Chris Grayling: The Department has developed robust contingency arrangements to manage any prime contractor failure, with performance being actively monitored to ensure early warning of a provider facing difficulty.

There is at least one alternative contractor in each contract package area (CPA) and providers are required to provide full geographical coverage of each CPA so could quickly provide support to claimants of the other provider. In addition, as the Work programme was procured through the Framework for the Provision of Employment Related Support Services there are additional providers available at short notice. Therefore the Department expects that any necessary alternative arrangements would be implemented at minimal cost.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions from what date he expects to apply automatic checks on Work programme prime providers' claims for outcome payments. [92104]

Chris Grayling: The Department plans to introduce these checks from April 2012.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to the commitment in the Open Services White Paper on provision of user satisfaction data by public service providers, what plans he has for the publication of user satisfaction data in the Work programme. [92465]

Chris Grayling: Both the Jobcentre Plus and Pension, Disability and Carers Service surveys (which the Open Services White Paper refers to) are designed to elicit customer feedback on the services JCP or PDCS provides, not experiences of work programme provision. This information is used to inform continual improvement of services provided by JCP and PDCS.

The Department has commissioned an independent evaluation of the Work programme. This will include in-depth research with participants to understand their experiences of support and measure their progress into work. All the research will be published in the DWP research report series; the first report will be published later this year.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what maximum period is specified for the interval between contacts with a programme participant in contracts with Work programme providers. [92467]

30 Jan 2012 : Column 449W

Chris Grayling: The Department does not specify the contact intervals between participants and their Work programme provider.

Work programme providers are free to design support based on individual and local need and will be paid primarily for supporting claimants into employment and helping them stay there for longer than ever before. It is therefore in the interest of providers to ensure the frequency of contact is appropriate for the participant. On attachment to the Work programme, participants are given a summary of the service standards they can expect to receive as well as the complaints process if they are unhappy with the level of service and support the provider gives.

Employment Schemes: Disability

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he is taking to help disabled people into work. [92255]

Maria Miller: We are committed to ensuring that disabled people have the same employment opportunities and chances as everyone else to find and stay in work, regardless of their disability or benefit status.

As part of this commitment, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) is responsible for a range of specialist employment provision specifically aimed at disabled people whose needs cannot be met through other DWP mainstream provision, such as the Work programme:

Work Choice, launched in October 2010, provides tailored support to help disabled people who face the most complex barriers to employment find and stay in work (including self-employment) and ultimately help them progress into unsupported employment, where it is appropriate for the individual. Work Choice is voluntary and available regardless of any benefits being claimed.

Access to Work provides practical advice and support to disabled people and their employers to help them overcome work related obstacles resulting from disability. Access to Work funds the support that is beyond the reasonable adjustments that employers make. Access to Work supported 35,840 disabled people to keep or get employment during 2010/11.

Remploy Employment Services deliver employment support for disabled people, including through the Work Choice programme and Remploy Enterprise Businesses—a network of 54 factories across the UK, providing supported employment to disabled people.

Residential training, delivered through nine residential training colleges, provides vocational training to unemployed disabled adults. Support is not restricted to particular types of disability although some colleges focus support on particular groups, for example visually impaired and hearing impaired.

In December 2010, the Government asked for an independent review to look at DWP employment support available for disabled people, specifically Remploy, residential training colleges and the Access to Work programme. This was led by Liz Sayce, the chief executive of the disability organisation RADAR.

Liz Sayce published her report, ‘Getting in, staying in and getting on’, on 9 June 2011. The Government's response and a separate public consultation was launched on 11 July 2011. I welcome the central theme of the review, that resources for supporting disabled people into employment should be focused on disabled people themselves rather than on specific institutions.

30 Jan 2012 : Column 450W

The consultation closed on 17 October 2011 and the Government will publish a summary of responses received and a statement on future policy as soon as practicably possible.

Freedom of Information

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether his Department publishes on its website its response to each request it receives under the Freedom of Information Act 2000; whether the response is published in the same part of its website on each occasion; and what the average time taken is between responding to a request and the information being made available on the website. [92119]

Steve Webb: The Department for Work and Pensions does not publish its response to every request it receives under the Freedom of Information Act, not least because the volumes are too large and in any event many are quite routine.

However, the Department regularly publishes those responses where the information released is of wider public interest. Officials endeavour to publish such releases as soon as possible and they can be found at the following address:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/freedom%2Dof%2Dinformation/information%2Dreleased%2Dunder/

In addition, all the Department’s responses to the What Do They Know website are automatically published on that website. This constitutes around 20% of the Department’s freedom of information responses.

The What Do They Know website can be found at the following address:

http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/body/dwp

Funeral Payments

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many applications for grants to cover funeral costs there have been in each month since June 2010; and if he will make a statement. [91975]

Steve Webb: The following table shows the number of funeral payment claims made each month since June 2010.

  Number of funeral payment claims

June 2010

5,760

July 2010

5,400

August 2010

4,720

September 2010

5,470

October 2010

4,880

November 2010

6,140

December 2010

4,100

January 2011

6,900

February 2011

6,850

March 2011

7,470

April 2011

5,220

May 2011

6,100

June 2011

5,840

July 2011

5,330

August 2011

5,340

September 2011

5,850

30 Jan 2012 : Column 451W

October 2011

5,350

November 2011

5,730

December 2011

5,020

Notes: 1. The information provided is Management Information. Our preference is to answer all parliamentary questions using Official/National Statistics but in this case we only have Management Information available. It is not quality assured to the same extent as Official/National statistics and there are some issues with the data, for example, it does not include applications which were processed clerically and have not yet been entered on to the Social Fund Computer System. 2. The number of claims received has been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: DWP Social Fund Policy, Budget and Management Information System

Health and Safety Legislation Review

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the finding of the Löfstedt Review of Health and Safety Legislation that there is no case for radically altering current health and safety legislation. [92464]

Chris Grayling: Professor Löfstedt’s independent review of health and safety legislation found that the existing regulatory framework was broadly right but recommended revoking, amending or clarifying those regulations that place unnecessary burdens on business without contributing to a healthier and safer workplace.

The Government accepted Professor Löfstedt’s recommendations and are committed to their timely implementation to ensure the health and safety system is consistent, proportionate, and easy to understand. The Health and Safety Executive has launched a consultation on the revocation of the first seven statutory instruments that have been identified as obsolete or that have been overtaken by more recent regulations. The consultation, which closes on 12 March 2012, can be found on the HSE website at:

http://www.hse.gov.uk/consult/live.htm

Regular progress updates on the implementation of the Löfstedt recommendations will be published on the DWP website.

Members: Correspondence

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when he expects to reply to the letter from Mark Gilbert on the treatment of his wife Susan Gilbert in her employment by Sainsbury plc. [90880]

Chris Grayling: Mr Gilbert wrote to the Minister for Disabled People, my hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), on 10 August 2011. An official replied to Mr Gilbert on 19 August 2011 on behalf of the Minister.

Pensions Regulator

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he is taking to increase the efficiency of (a) the Pensions Regulator and (b) the Pensions Regulator complaints procedure. [92254]

30 Jan 2012 : Column 452W

Steve Webb: The Pensions Regulator was set up in April 2005 with a new proactive and risk-based regulatory approach, placing greater emphasis on identifying and tackling real risks to members' benefits. The delivery of the daily business is managed by the chief executive, reporting to the Board of the Pensions Regulator. There is an ongoing assessment of the regulator's performance at both ministerial and official level. Following a request from Ministers in line with DWPs other non-departmental public bodies the Pensions Regulator have submitted proposals to reduce their operating costs over the spending review period which will be achieved by a number of initiatives to increase efficiencies in the Pension's Regulator’s business while maintaining or improving standards of service delivery. The Pensions Regulator publishes a business plan annually and submits an annual report on all its activities to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, which is then laid before Parliament.

The Pensions Regulator recently reviewed its internal complaints process and concluded that it could be streamlined from a three stage to a two stage process. The first stage is an investigation and response by the Corporate Secretary and the second is a review by the Chair if the complainant remains dissatisfied.

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has asked the Pensions Regulator to make of the level of hidden charges associated with pension and savings funds; and if he will make a statement. [92327]

Steve Webb: I am strongly committed to clarity on costs and charges so there is increased trust in pension provision and scheme members do not incur unnecessary costs. In support of this, the Pensions Regulator encourages the industry to be open and transparent about charges so that people can make informed choices about their pension provision. The Regulator has challenged the pensions industry to develop a way to disclose charges so that employers and advisors can be clear about value when selecting a scheme. This is part of the wider approach, which aims to ensure that members of all workplace Defined Contribution schemes secure as good an outcome as possible.

Poverty: Northern Ireland

Vernon Coaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the number of (a) pensioners, (b) families and (c) children who will be living in poverty in Northern Ireland in 2015. [92413]

Maria Miller: These are devolved matters which are the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Minister for Social Development.

Social Fund

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many local authorities have committed themselves to setting up a replacement for his Department's social fund. [92076]

Steve Webb: Local authorities are not replacing the social fund. Payments for maternity, heating and funeral expenses will continue while some discretionary payments

30 Jan 2012 : Column 453W

will be replaced by better targeted local provision in England and help provided under arrangements made by the Scottish and Welsh Governments.

When funding is distributed it will be accompanied by a settlement letter setting out what funding is to be used for, its underlying principles and the outcome which should be achieved.

We are working closely with the local authorities and their representative organisations to support them in preparing to deliver the new local provision and I am unaware of any that is not committing to providing it.

Additionally, universal credit will provide a better service with payments on account, supporting many people in need of short and longer term credit facilities.

Social Fund: Liverpool

Mrs Ellman: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions for which aspects of the Social Fund he is planning to transfer responsibility to Liverpool city council. [92571]

Steve Webb: Liverpool city council will not become responsible for any elements of the Social Fund.

National payments for maternity, heating and funeral expenses will continue while some discretionary payments will be replaced by better targeted local provision through local authorities in England and arrangements made by the Scottish and Welsh Governments.

When the funding is distributed it will be accompanied by a settlement letter setting out what the funding is to be used for, its underlying principles and the outcome which should be achieved. It will say that the funding is to concentrate resources on those facing greatest difficulty in managing their income, and to enable a more flexible response to unavoidable need. The letter will make explicit that the funding is to provide a replacement provision for community care grants and general living expenses crisis loans.

We are working closely with local authorities and their representative organisations to support them in preparing to deliver the new local provision.

Additionally, universal credit will provide a better service of payments on account, supporting many people in need of short and longer term credit facilities.

Social Security Benefits

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what calculations his Department made in reaching its estimate that a working household would have to earn £35,000 per year for its net income to exceed the maximum payable under the proposed benefit cap and £50,000 per year if child benefit was excluded from the cap. [92466]

Chris Grayling: An employee earning £35,000 per annum, gross of income tax and national insurance contributions (NICs), would take home £26,000 per annum after deducting income tax and NICs. This calculation is based on the 2011-12 rates and thresholds for income tax and NICs, which can be found at the following URLs:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/incometax/index.htm

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/ni/index.htm

30 Jan 2012 : Column 454W

If child benefit was excluded, then the gross earnings of someone in work would need to be much higher in order to have the equivalent net income from work as someone on benefits. The exact equivalent in gross earnings would depend on the number of children in the family. For example, a family with four children would receive nearly £30,000 in benefits which is the equivalent to £40,000 in earnings and a family with 10 children or more would receive over £33,000 in benefits which is the equivalent to gross earnings of towards £50,000 a year.

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will estimate the number of claimants who will be affected by the benefit cap in each parliamentary constituency. [92607]

Chris Grayling: The information is not available by parliamentary constituency.

Social Security Benefits: Greater London

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in (a) Bexleyheath and Crayford constituency, (b) the London borough of Bexley and (c) London received benefits in excess of the value of his proposed benefits cap in the latest period for which figures are available. [92513]

Chris Grayling: The information is not available by parliamentary constituency.

The number of households estimated to be affected in the London borough of Bexley is 300. The number of households estimated to be affected in all London boroughs is 35,600.

The figures relate to the financial year 2013-14 when the cap is due to be implemented, and are on the same basis as the impact assessment which was published on 23 January 2012.

The impact assessment assumes that the situation of these households will go unchanged, and they will not take any steps to either work enough hours to qualify for working tax credit, renegotiate their rent in situ, or find alternative accommodation. In all cases the Department is working to support households through this transition, using existing provision through Jobcentre Plus and the Work programme to move as many into work as possible.

Universal Credit

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the oral answer of 23 January 2012, Official Report, column 9, on universal credit, whether his Department expects to be able to access real-time PAYE information for all employers by the launch of universal credit in October 2013. [92105]

Chris Grayling: DWP is working closely with HMRC on the availability of RTI data. HMRC have plans in place to bring all employers under RTI by October 2013. HMRC assure us they are on track to meet this target.

30 Jan 2012 : Column 455W

Business, Innovation and Skills

Apprentices: West Midlands

Mr Robin Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many small and medium-sized businesses have taken on apprentices in (a) Worcester constituency, (b) Worcestershire and (c) the west midlands in the last year. [92160]

Mr Hayes: Information is not available on the size of the employer for apprentices below national level.

Small businesses are the cornerstone of our economy and high quality training opportunities like apprenticeships are key to supporting their growth and success. We recognise this and, in last November's Education and Skills Growth Review, we announced a range of measures to improve small and medium-sized enterprises' (SMEs) access to apprenticeships, including speeding up the process to advertise and recruit an apprentice; removing health and safety requirements that go beyond regulatory requirements; and enabling micro companies to build extra modules into apprenticeships.

The Government are aware that small businesses place great value on apprenticeships. Indeed, the National Employer Skills Survey suggests that SMEs employ proportionately more apprentices than larger employers.

Biotechnology

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent assessment he has made of opportunities arising from industrial biotechnology in the development of a low carbon economy. [91761]

Mr Willetts: The Government recognise that industrial biotechnology has an increasingly important role to play in growing a green economy.

The Industrial Biotechnology Leadership Forum (IBLF) works across the research community, through our innovation centres including the Technology Strategy Board and our newly established Catapult centres to realise the potential for industrial biotechnology among UK businesses.

Through the IBLF, the Department seeks to ensure that the UK will become a leading centre of competence in fine and speciality chemicals delivered via IB processes, and that there will be an increased uptake of biocatalysis and fermentation in the existing UK chemical industry.

Business: Government Assistance

Mr Davidson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many businesses in Glasgow South West constituency have received support from his Department since 2010. [91673]

Mr Prisk: The total number of enterprises that have received assistance from BIS schemes is not available. However, where information is held at a constituency level on the number of such businesses supported by BIS, this is set out in the following table:

30 Jan 2012 : Column 456W

Product Glasgow South West Comment

Access to finance

14 companies of £1.75 million

Drawn down loans post 2010 for Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme. In Scotland for the same period there were 567 loans of £82.56 million.

Knowledge Transfer Partnerships

One company supported

Collaborative R&D

Three companies supported

Trade services support

16 companies

These were services offered by UKTI in calendar year 2011.

For other schemes such as BIS's Knowledge Transfer Networks, information is only available at a national level and not at constituency level.

Business: Scotland

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many Government-owned empty or under-utilised buildings in Scotland will be made available to small businesses; and where such buildings are located. [92616]

Mr Prisk: Enterprise policy is a devolved responsibility. The announcement by the Prime Minister on making Government-owned empty or under-utilised buildings available to small business in the first instance pertains to property in England. However, the Government will be speaking to all of the devolved Administrations to explore the possibilities of extending this initiative across the whole of the UK.

Community Investment Tax Relief

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 24 January 2012, Official Report, column 173W, on community development tax relief, what the names of the community development finance institutions are; if he will publish details of their financial holdings; and what level of tax relief each has benefited from since their accreditation. [92508]

Mr Prisk: Currently there are 24 community development finance institutions (CDFIs) accredited under community investment tax relief (CITR). The names of the accredited organisations are as follows:

Aston Reinvestment Trust (ART)

BIG Issue Invest Limited

Black Country Reinvestment Society (BCRS)

Bristol Enterprise Development Fund

Bristol Together

Business Finance Solutions

London Business Loans

CDFA Progress Fund

Charity Bank

Co-operative and Community Finance

Coventry and Warwickshire Reinvestment Trust

Cumbria Asset Reinvestment Trust

First Enterprise Business Agency

30 Jan 2012 : Column 457W

Fredericks Foundation

Foundation East

London Rebuilding Society (LRS)

Hull Business Development Fund

London Development Agency

Northern Pinetree Trust

Saltend Community Development Company Ltd

Social Investment Scotland

The Social Enterprise Loan Fund (TSELF)

Street North East

Triodos Bank

The accredited CDFIs are independent financial institutions. BIS do not hold details of their financial holdings.

Investors in CDFIs receive a tax relief for their investments (the CDFIs themselves do not receive the relief). Currently around £84 million of investment has been raised under CITR since 2002. BIS do not publish details of CITR raised by individual CDFIs. As CITR may be only one method a CDFI uses to raise capital, this may create a false impression of their financial health.

Company Accounts

Bob Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will take steps to exempt micro-entities from the requirement to file accounts. [92217]

Mr Davey: The Government are committed to reducing the burdens faced by all businesses, and small businesses in particular, as part of our aim to make the UK the best place in Europe to start, finance and grow a business. We have achieved agreement from EU Ministers to exempt micro-businesses from certain EU accounting rules and expect a directive introducing these exemptions to be agreed shortly. We will seek to introduce these flexibilities into the UK's regulations at the earliest opportunity and so greatly reduce the requirement for micro-entities to publish and file accounts.

Construction Industry

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent discussions he has had with the construction industry on (a) skills and training and (b) the role of national agreements in maintaining levels of skills in the construction industry. [92419]

Mr Prisk: As the Minister for business and enterprise I have regular discussions with the construction industry on skills and training. In October 2011 I met with the chairman of Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) and chief executive officer of Construction Skills to discuss apprenticeships. A further meeting with Construction Skills is scheduled for February 2012.

Employers and employees are best placed to assess skills and training needs in national agreements.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what construction industry-related visits he has undertaken since his appointment; and if he will make a statement. [92420]

30 Jan 2012 : Column 458W

Mr Prisk: As the Minister of State for Business and Enterprise, I regularly visit a wide range of organisations including those in the construction sector.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will assess the level of skill retention in the construction sector. [92421]

Mr Prisk: The UK Commission for Employment and Skills has produced a National Skills Audit report (Skills for Jobs: Today and Tomorrow) that provides detailed intelligence about the operation and structure of the labour market, including assessments of specific sectors such as construction. In addition Labour Market Intelligence reports are produced by Construction Skills through the Construction Skills Network (CSN). CSN is a unique method of establishing the future skills and training requirements of the UK construction industry and provides a consensus view of the current and future skills training needs.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will meet representatives from construction industry trade unions to discuss the effects of recent changes in training requirements by some employers; and if he will make a statement. [92422]

Mr Prisk: There is trade union representation on the boards of the sector skills councils, which discuss changes to training and skills requirements for each industry. Discussions on specific changes by some employers to training requirements in the construction industry should first be addressed by the trade unions to the Construction Skillsboard. Ministers do meet with trade union representatives from the sector. In December 2011 the Minister for Further Education, Skills and Lifelong Learning, my hon. Friend the Member for South Holland and The Deepings (Mr Hayes), met with Unite to discuss new national agreements for construction workers.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent assessment he has made of future prospects for the construction industry. [92423]

Mr Prisk: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills does not forecast trends in construction output. We do monitor estimates of future growth that are produced by others, particularly Experian and the Construction Products Association (CPA).

In its latest forecast, the CPA forecasts that the construction sector will contract by 5.2% in 2012. The sector is expected to return to growth in 2013 (0.4%) before accelerating to 3.8% in 2014 and 4.6% in 2015.

Experian's winter forecast is that output will fall by 5.6% this year. Recovery is forecast in 2013 (1.1%), with growth strengthening to 4.7% in 2014. Experian do not produce forecasts beyond 2014.

Construction Skills Network (CSN) use Experian forecasts to look at implications for skills/employment. CSN's most recent report, published in January 2012, predicts that construction employment will decline in 2012 and 2013, but will start growing again in 2014 to reach just under 2.6 million by 2016.

30 Jan 2012 : Column 459W

Copyright: Education

Jim Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what (a) economic advice and (b) other evidence he took account of before publication of his Department's impact assessment BIS0317 on 2 December 2011 entitled Extending Copyright Exceptions for Educational Use. [91677]

Mr Davey: Impact assessment BIS0317 was prepared with the advice of Government economists, using publicly available data. It is an initial assessment of potential costs and benefits of different policy options. We hope that interested parties will respond to the Government's copyright consultation, which runs from 14 December to 21 March 2012, and invite them to submit economic evidence to help inform our final impact assessment. The consultation and the accompanying initial impact assessments are available in the Libraries of the House and on the website of the Intellectual Property Office.

Jim Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what organisations and individuals were consulted before publication of his Department's impact assessment BIS0317 on 2 December 2011 entitled Extending Copyright Exceptions for Educational Use. [91678]

Mr Davey: Impact assessment BIS0317 was prepared using publicly available data, including evidence provided to the Intellectual Property Office by interested parties. An initial impact assessment such as this provides a starting point for consultation and discussion with stakeholders by setting out the potential impacts on different groups arising from the options under consideration. The Government's copyright consultation, which runs from 14 December to 21 March 2012, will provide an opportunity for interested organisations and individuals to contribute evidence and data to help inform more robust assessment and analysis of the options under consideration.

Jim Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what information is held by the Intellectual Property Office regarding blanket licences offered by the Educational Licensing Agency to local authorities for the purposes of licensing schools in their area; and how licence fees monies are used for the benefit of performers and other rights owners. [91679]

Mr Davey: The Intellectual Property Office holds no such information. The collecting societies which offer such licences are privately run commercial entities, and are not subject to direct Government regulation in the discharge of these functions. The uses to which collected monies are put are a matter for the societies concerned, and their members.

Deloitte

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what contracts his Department has awarded to Deloitte since May 2010; and what the (a) net and (b) individual monetary value was of each such contract. [92442]

30 Jan 2012 : Column 460W

Mr Davey: Central records show that the Department has made 27 payments to Deloitte since May 2010 totalling a net value of £3,252,322.77.

Further information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Correspondence

Mr Donohoe: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the cost to the public purse was of (a) posting his Department's letter on England's National Apprenticeship Week to hon. Members representing seats in Scotland and (b) printing those letters; and if he will make a statement. [92685]

Mr Hayes: Letters on England's National Apprenticeship Week were taken to the House of Commons and distributed to all hon. Members. This incurred minimal cost.

The cost of printing letters for the 59 Scottish Members was 19 pence.

Education: Ex-servicemen

Hazel Blears: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the likely cost to his Department of tuition fees incurred by service leavers in cases where fees exceed the sums provided by the Enhanced Learning Credits scheme in (a) 2011-12, (b) 2012-13, (c) 2013-14 and (d) 2014-15. [92559]

Mr Willetts: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills expects to provide funding to the scheme of around £700,000 in 2011-12, and around £3.3 million in 2012-13. The Department is meeting in full the additional cost to the scheme of the increase in tuition fees in September 2012, and this accounts for the rise in costs in 2012-13.

The Department's contribution to the scheme for 2013-14 and 2014-15 is still to be determined.

Exports

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which countries ranked the highest in the 20% rise in UK exports of manufactured goods to non-EU markets. [90972]

Mr Prisk: The table shows that UK exports of goods to non-EU markets increased by £20 billion (20%) between 2009 and 2010, as referred to in the question.

The countries to see the largest increase in UK exports between 2009 and 2010 were the USA (up £3.9 billion or 12%), China (up £2.1 billion or 41%), Switzerland (up £1.3 billion or 35%), Russia (up £1.2 billion or 51%), and India (up £1.1 billion or 37%).

More recent data also shows that UK exports of goods in January to November 2011 (the latest available) increased by £15 billion (14%) on January to November 2010.

The countries to see the largest increase in UK exports between January to November 2010 and January to November 2011 were India (up £1.4 billion or 40%),

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China (up £1.4 billion or 21%), Russia (up £1.2 billion or 39%), USA (up £1.2 billion or 3%), and Australia (up £0.9 billion or 32%).

The table shows that apart from a dip in 2009, non-EU exports of goods have generally increased in value over recent years. Almost half of all UK goods exports are to non-EU markets.

Data for the calendar year 2011 will be published by HMRC in February 2012.

UK exports of goods with the EU and non-EU, 2005-10
  EU Non-EU
  £ billion Percentage change £ billion Percentage change

2005

121

91

2006

153

26

92

1

2007

127

-17

93

2

2008

141

11

108

16

2009

124

-12

101

-6

2010

142

14

121

20

Note: Figures for the EU do not include MTIC or late response estimates. Source: HMRC, Overseas Trade Statistics

Further Education

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of adults in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland who will complete Access to Higher Education courses in each of the next 10 years. [90600]

Mr Willetts: Education and training is a devolved matter and we are not responsible for Access to HE courses undertaken elsewhere in the United Kingdom.

Estimates of the number of adult learners in further education colleges and training organisations in England are made for those periods for which the available level of funding is known. The Skills Investment Statement 2011-14, published in December 2011, sets out indicative learner numbers and learners provision mix up to and including the 2013/14 academic year. This is available at the following link:

http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/further-education-skills/docs/s/11-1374-skills-investment-statement-2011-2014

These illustrative numbers are not broken down by course type, as colleges and training organisations have the freedom to provide courses which respond to demand from individuals and employers.

Internships

Hazel Blears: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the average duration is of placements classified as internships advertised on the Graduate Talent Pool website hosted by his Department. [91681]

Mr Willetts: Of the vacancies advertised on the Graduate Talent Pool website on 23 January 2011, 94% specified the length of the internships. 77% of these specified a period of between four and six months, 11.5% a period of two to three months, 9.7% a period of seven to 12 months, and 1.3% less than a month.

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Hazel Blears: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the average wage is paid by jobs advertised on the Graduate Talent Pool website hosted by his Department. [91683]

Mr Willetts: This Department does not hold this information. The actual rate of remuneration is agreed between the graduate intern and employer. The Government are clear that those who are entitled to the minimum wage should receive it, and the Graduate Talent Pool website directs employers to comprehensive information about their obligation to comply with national minimum wage legislation.

Hazel Blears: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of internships advertised on the Graduate Talent Pool website hosted by his Department are unpaid. [91684]

Mr Willetts: During December 2011, 2,259 internships vacancies were advertised on the Graduate Talent Pool. Of these, just under a quarter (or 600) were unpaid. More than 500 of these unpaid vacancies were from charitable organisations.

Hazel Blears: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the unpaid internships scheme advertised on the Graduate Talent Pool website hosted by his Department. [91685]

Mr Willetts: We want to make as many opportunities as possible available to talented young people from all backgrounds and avoid closing down potentially valuable options, for example where the intern is acting as a volunteer. For this reason we do not rule out unpaid internships on the Graduate Talent Pool, but guidance on the website and the vacancy quality assurance process together ensure that no employer is left in any doubt about his or her obligation to comply with national minimum wage legislation.

Groceries Code Adjudicator

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent representations he has received on the introduction of a groceries code adjudicator; and if he will make a statement. [92659]

Mr Davey: I have received letters from a wide range of individual companies, industry bodies and campaigning groups on the introduction of a Groceries Code Adjudicator, as well as Members from both Houses. Additionally, I and my officials have met a range of key stakeholders including the British Retail Consortium, the Federation for Small Businesses, the Food and Drink Federation and the National Farmers' Union.

High Street Review

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what consideration the Independent Review of the High Street gave to the merits of referring the matter of the level of competition between supermarkets and small independent retailers to the Competition Commission. [91793]

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Mr Davey: The Independent Review of the High Street by Mary Portas considered a wide range of issues facing high streets and town centres. The published report contained those issues which Ms Portas considered most important. The report made 28 recommendations, to which the Government intend to respond to in the spring. However, she made no recommendations regarding the independent competition authorities, or Government intervention in the retail market.

Insolvency

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 12 January 2012, Official Report, column 410W, on insolvency, when statistics of personal insolvencies including bankruptcies, individual voluntary arrangements and debt relief orders in each parliamentary constituency for 2010 will be published. [92641]

Mr Davey: Official statistics for individual constituencies are not published by the Insolvency Service but are available upon request following publication of the higher level figures.

The Insolvency Service publishes individual insolvencies broken down by Government office region, county, unitary authority and county district within England and Wales. The most recent published information, to 2009, is available at:

http://www.insolvencydirect.bis.gov.uk/otherinformation/statistics/regionalstatisticsmenu.htm

Similar figures for 2010 and 2011 will be published in the first half of 2012. It is not yet possible to provide the precise date for publication of this information, but it will be announced on the Insolvency Service website four weeks prior to publication.

One North East

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the gross value-added economic output generated by regional economic investment by One North East in each of the last five years. [92630]

Mr Prisk: We do not have direct information on the increase in gross value added generated by regional economic investment by One North East (ONE).

However, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers estimates, on average each pound spent by the Regional Development Agencies led to £4.5 worth of gross value-added. Between 2006 and 2010 ONE spent around £1.2 billion, which would suggest around £5.5 billion worth of gross value-added.

Postgraduate Education

Shabana Mahmood: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to support organisations to promote the economic and social value of postgraduate education in the UK. [92198]

Mr Willetts: With funding from the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills, the Research Councils support around 19,000 doctoral students and the Higher

30 Jan 2012 : Column 464W

Education Funding Council for England provides support for the costs incurred by higher education institutions in supervising postgraduate research students.

Over 60% of the 4,500 Research Council doctoral graduates produced each year will move from higher education, taking their skills into the wider economy. The Research Councils seek to ensure that this supply of highly trained people meets the need for specialist postgraduate research skills in a wide range of employment sectors. For example, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council provide funding for industrial doctorate centres. Students at these centres undertake a PhD level research project while spending about 75% of their time working directly with a company.