Design Services

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department has spent on design in respect of (a) logos, (b) buildings, (c) advertising, (d) stationery and (e) campaigns in the last year for which figures are available. [80204]

Tim Loughton: To get information on how much this Department has spent on design for the areas mentioned above could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

On logos and branding campaigns, I refer you to my answer of 20 July 2010, Official Report, column 261W, which details the breakdown of costs associated with the cost of rebranding the Department when it was established in May 2010. Since then, corporate design in areas (a) to (e) has been developed in-house at no additional cost. This includes the design of simple logos for our new Executive agencies, which will be used for building signage, recruitment advertising, stationery and campaigns.

Children’s Services: Grants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much funding from his Department (a) Barnardos, (b) the British Association for Adoption and Fostering and (c) the British Science Association (i) received in 2010-11 and (ii) will receive in 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [83100]

Tim Loughton: [holding answer 25 November 2011]: The Voluntary and Community Sector is key to the development and delivery of services for children, young people and families. This Department funds a number of voluntary sector organisations, both directly and indirectly through local authorities and schools.

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1079W

Based on the information available in the Department's finance system the funding made available to the named organisations in financial year 2010-11 is given in the following table, together with the estimate of funding for financial year 2011-12.

£

2010-11 ( Funding in financial year ) 2011-12 ( Estimated funding )

Barnardos

235,045

1,927,979

British Association for Adoption and Fostering

1,318,173

1,332,020

British Science Association

581,289

250,000

Telephone Services

Stephen Lloyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department has allocated to each telephone helpline funded by his Department in 2011-12; what the purpose is of each such helpline; and how many calls each helpline received in each of the last five years. [77713]

Tim Loughton: The following table shows funding and calls for a number of telephone helplines which the Department has responsibility for. There may be other helplines which the Department has funded in recent years (e.g. temporary helplines) which are not included here. The funding and call numbers shown may be calculated using different criteria and are therefore not comparable.

Name of helpline Calls per year Funding for 2011-12 (£)

National DfE telephone inquiry line

2007-08: 144,269

206,701

 

2008-09: 113,575

 
 

2009-10: 103,196

 
 

2010-11: 87,583

 
 

2011-12 (April to October): 46,947

 
     

Contact A Family telephone helpline

2007-08: n/k

394,445

 

2008-09: 8,968

 
 

2009-10: 8,226

 
 

2010-11: 10,070

 
 

2011-12 (April to October): 6,212

 
     

Coram Children's Legal Centre telephone helpline

2007-08: 6,694

314,242

 

2008-09: 6,092

 
 

2009-10: 9,007

 
 

2010-11: 11,296

 
 

2011-12 (April to October): 6,948

 
     

Family Rights Group telephone helpline

2007-08: 5,009

273,455

 

2008-09: 3,309

 
 

2009-10: 4,695

 

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1080W

 

2010-11: 5,848

 
 

2011-12 (April to October): 3,276

 
     

Family Lives (formerly Parentline Plus)

2007-08: 121,623

1,112,094

 

2008-09: 66,123

 
 

2009-10: 66,474

 
     

Telephone Helpline

2010-11: 61,169

 
 

2011-12 (April to October): 28,368

 
     

Gingerbread telephone helpline

2007-08: 9,569

282,181

 

2008-09: 5,182

 
 

2009-10: 5,677

 
 

2010-11: 7,762

 
 

2011-12 (April to October): 6,212

 
     

Young Minds telephone helpline

2007-08: 2,319

358,217

 

2008-09: 3,282

 
 

2009-10: 5,920

 
 

2010-11: 6,282

 
 

2011-12 (April to October): 3,528

 
     

Advisory Centre for Education telephone helpline

2007-08: 18,296

(1)219,843

 

2008-09: 7,296

 
 

2009-10: 10,875

 
 

2010-11: 11,813

 
 

2011-12 (April to September): 4,555

 
(1) April to September 2011 only

Education: Disadvantaged

Michael Dugher: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of the effect of his proposals for education reforms on people experiencing social exclusion. [81934]

Mr Gibb: We expect that the reforms set out in the White Paper ‘The Importance of Teaching’ will ensure that our education system compares with the best in the world. The reforms will create a system in which schools are better able to raise standards and to narrow the attainment gap between rich and poor. We are clear that every child, regardless of their gender, race, disability or socio-economic background, must have the opportunity to reach their full potential.

Our policy to invigorate the school system with autonomous academies and free schools can be seen bearing fruit in the above-average results of the earliest sponsored academies, and in new admissions policy which encourages academies and free schools to prioritise those in receipt of pupil premium.

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1081W

A full impact assessment and an equalities impact assessment were published together with the White Paper and are available in the House Libraries.

Education: Finance

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what progress he has made in ensuring a more even distribution and allocation of funds for education services across the UK. [81979]

Mr Gibb: We recognise that the school funding system needs reform. Currently, schools facing similar challenges can receive very different levels of funding, for no reason other than historical decisions and an out of date assessment of need. Two schools with the same needs should receive a similar level of funding.

In July we published the second phase of consultation on school funding reform, ‘A consultation on school funding: Proposals for a fairer system’. This consultation gave options and proposals for a fairer funding system that is easier for everyone to understand. We want schools to be funded on a much fairer and more transparent basis, and with schools receiving funding based on an up to date assessment of needs. The consultation closed on 11 October 2011. We will consider carefully the responses to the consultation before deciding how to proceed most appropriately towards a fairer and more transparent funding system.

Education: Pay Systems

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has for consultation with service users as part of payment by results pilots. [82629]

Sarah Teather: We have, in conjunction with the Children's Improvement Board, identified 26 trial areas that are developing payment by results approaches for children's centres in their areas.

I expect all payment by results trials to put arrangements in place to consult service users. One of the criteria used in choosing the trial areas was a commitment to engaging key stakeholders, including parents and communities, in the process.

Employment: Young People

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he considered changing the curriculum to ensure the practical application of core subjects is taught for the purposes of increasing the employability of young people. [83702]

Mr Gibb: We aim to reform the national curriculum so that it properly reflects the body of essential knowledge in key subjects, leaving teachers greater flexibility to use their professional judgment to design wider school curricula that best meet the needs of their pupils. Teachers will be able to use this increased flexibility to teach pupils the practical application of both the core and other national curriculum subjects to help increase their employability. We will be announcing our initial proposals for the national curriculum next year, following which there will be full public consultation before final decisions are made.

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1082W

English Baccalaureate

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of the proportion of the statutory 25 hour school week which will be taken up by subjects that count towards the English baccalaureate. [82887]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 25 November 2011]:There are no statutory requirements around the minimum weekly hours which pupils should be taught. The lengths of pupils' morning and afternoon sessions are determined by schools. Maintained schools and non-maintained special schools have to carry out 360 sessions (190 days) per academic year.

Schools decide on the timetabling of their teaching, and their approach to the proportion of teaching time allocated to subjects within the English baccalaureate will vary. The English baccalaureate consists of five subject areas and pupils will take six or seven GCSEs to achieve it; the average number of GCSE (or equivalent) entries per pupil is 11.4.

Further Education: Finance

Mr Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to provide funding for further education colleges for pupils aged 16 to 18. [82360]

Mr Gibb: Further Education (FE) colleges received their funding allocations for the 2011/12 academic year at the end of March 2011. Indicative funding for FE colleges in the 2012-13 financial year will be set out in the YPLA's 16-19 Funding Statement, which will be published before Christmas this year. In line with the above timetable, final allocations for individual colleges for the 2012/13 academic year will be sent before the end of March 2012.

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what funding bodies sponsored by his Department provide support for skills for post 16-year-olds in Birmingham; what the overall funding is for each such organisation in Birmingham or the West Midlands for each of the next five years; and what the national budget is for each organisation for each of the next five years. [82764]

Mr Gibb: The relevant bodies providing funding to support 16 to 19 education and training nationally, including Birmingham and the West Midlands, are the Young People’s Learning Agency (YPLA—a non-departmental public body (NDPB) sponsored by the Department) and the Skills Funding Agency (an NDPB housing the National Apprenticeship Service (NAS), which provides Department for Education funding to support 16 to 18 apprenticeships and is sponsored by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills).

The national budget for the YPLA in 2011-12, including pre-16 academies, is over £12.2 billion, as detailed in the Grant Letter issued by the Department on 6 September 2011 and available on the YPLA website. £48.4 million of this relates to administration funding for the organisation itself. The total budget for 2012-13 and beyond for the Education Funding Agency, which replaces the YPLA in April 2012, has yet to be decided. Details on the indicative funding for 16 to 19 participation in education

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1083W

and training beyond 2011-12 (including 16 to 18 apprenticeships) will be provided in the YPLA’s “16-19 Funding Statement” before Christmas. It is not possible to split out regional funding/budgets because the majority of funding is allocated directly to 16 to 19 providers rather than via regional bodies.

The answer to the right hon. Gentleman’s question tabled to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills of 29 November 2011, Official Report, columns 856-57W, gives detail in relation to the Skills Funding Agency, which predominantly supports and provides funding for adult (19+) education and training. The Skills Funding Agency budget highlighted in that reply does not include £799 million of Department for Education funding provided to the agency for 16 to 18 apprenticeships participation nationally, as detailed in the YPLA’s “16-19 Funding Statement” published in December 2010 and available at:

http://readingroom.lsc.gov.uk/YPLA/16-19_Funding_Statement.pdf

As with the YPLA, and as set out in the answer of 29 November 2011, Official Report, columns 856-57W, it is not possible to split out the Skills Funding Agency’s budget on a regional basis.

Mayors: Powers

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the Government's consultation on mayoral powers, entitled What can a mayor do for your city? A consultation, and the Open Public Services White Paper, what assessment he has made of powers of his Department which could be devolved to elected mayors. [82586]

Sarah Teather: As the consultation paper makes clear, we are proposing to look to cities themselves to come forward with proposals for decentralising services and powers to the city mayor.

Music: Education

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the number of music (a) teachers and (b) lessons in primary and secondary schools in England in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12. [82615]

Mr Gibb: The information requested is not collected centrally for primary schools and is not available in the format requested for secondary schools.

There were 7,500 music teachers in service in publicly funded schools in England in November 2010. This data is taken from our wider subject level table about information for the number of teachers teaching curriculum subjects in all publicly funded secondary schools in November 2010 is provided in table 13 of the Statistical First Release ‘School Workforce in England, November 2010’. This is available at the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00196713/school-workforce-sfr

The average number of hours taught in music in a typical week to pupils in all publicly funded secondary schools in England was 92,700. Information for the average number of hours taught in a typical week to

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1084W

pupils in all publicly funded secondary schools by curriculum subjects is available in table 12 of the publication.

Information for the curriculum taught by teachers in secondary schools was not collected in 2009-10. Figures for 2011-12 from the November 2011 School Workforce Census are expected to become available in summer 2012.

The School Workforce Census was collected in full for the first time in November 2010. Previously qualifications and curriculum information was collected in the occasional sample survey ‘Secondary Schools Curriculum and Staffing Survey (SSCSS)’. This was last undertaken in 2007. The National Foundation for Education Research (NFER) carried out the research on behalf of the Department. The project gathered information from local authority maintained secondary schools for the qualifications of their teachers and the curriculum they delivered. The results of the survey are available from the following link:

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/standard/publicationDetail/Page1/DCSF-RR026

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what steps he is taking to ensure that the number of children studying music in primary and secondary schools does not fall; [82859]

(2) what steps he is taking to ensure that all children have the chance to (a) learn to play a musical instrument, (b) learn to read music and (c) receive a sound music education. [82861]

Mr Gibb: We published a National Plan for Music Education on 25 November, which puts the needs of the pupil at the heart of a new approach to music education. The Government are fully committed to high quality music education and this plan will ensure that every child should have opportunities to learn to play a musical instrument, learn to sing, have opportunities to play in ensembles and have access to musical progression routes regardless of where they live and their family circumstances.

The plan reinforces the existing curriculum requirement for pupils to read music notation through which pupils are taught notation in a range of musical styles, genres and traditions. This plan will make it easier for parents and schools to support children and young people to take part in music both in and out of school.

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that enough music teachers are available so that every child has the chance to learn a musical instrument in school. [82860]

Mr Gibb: Specialist music teachers, together with primary classroom teachers, play a vital role in the quality of music education that children receive. The National Plan for Music Education has a number of specific proposals to improve the quality of music teaching These include a new add-on module to boost new teachers' skills and confidence in teaching music, and to improve their capacity to network within music education hubs.

In addition, I believe that the plan itself, and the role that new music education hubs will play, will in themselves be a significant stimulus to music education that will encourage more people to teach music in and beyond schools. The plan makes clear that a potential role for

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1085W

music education hubs is to offer continuing profession development to school staff, particularly in supporting schools to deliver music in the curriculum.

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he intends to publish a national plan for music education. [82862]

Mr Gibb: We published a National Plan for Music Education on 25 November, which will reform how music education is funded and delivered. The plan was placed in the House of Commons Library and can be found on the Department for Education's website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/publications/standard/AllPublications/Page1/DFE-00086-2011

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what funding his Department has allocated for music education in England in (a) 2009-10 and (b) 2010-11. [82944]

Mr Gibb: The table shows Department for Education funding for music education in England in 2009-10 and 2010-11.

Our new National Plan for Music Education, published on 25 November, sets out future funding allocations and a new funding mechanism from 2012-13.

£

2009-10 2010-11

Music Manifesto Development Director

20,000

20,000

Music grants

200,000

160,000

Music Manifesto Website

80,000

30,000

Music Participation director

100,000

100,000

Music partnership projects

1,000,000

405,000

Year of Music

500,000

300,000

Federation of music services—MSEP work

450,000

350,000

Federation of music services—MIF

30,000

20,250

In Harmony

822,000

1,000,000

Singing money

10,000,000

10,000,000

Music standards fund

82,580,000

82,562,467

Music CPD KS2

(1)29,100,000

1,100,000

Music and Dance Scheme

(1)

31,500,000

(1) Indicates a brace.

Physics: Teachers

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what budget his Department has allocated for the partnership with the Institute of Physics on the teaching of physics; and what proportion such funding represents of the overall funding for the partnership. [83471]

Mr Gibb: The Department's implementation plan for the initial teacher training (ITT) strategy ‘Training our next generation of outstanding teachers’, published on 8 November 2011, announced the partnership with the Institute of Physics to provide up to 100 scholarships of £20,000 to help attract more of the best graduates into physics teaching. The Department will fund the payment of £20,000 to those who are awarded the scholarships. The Institute of Physics will cover the costs of administrating the award of the scholarships. The Institute

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1086W

of Physics is also working with the Department to provide support to schools to increase take up of A level physics for which a total of £3,900,000 funding has been allocated over the period 2011-14.

Pupils: Assessments

Chris Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many errors were made in (a) GCSE and (b) A-level examination papers in each year since 2000. [83472]

Mr Gibb: Responsibility for the independent regulation of examinations and qualifications (including GCSEs and A Levels) lies with Ofqual. Comparable figures for uncorrected errors in live examination papers are only available from 2006. The number of errors recorded in (a) GCSE and (b) A level examination papers in England is given in the following table.


Recorded GCSE exam errors Recorded A Level exam errors Total

2006

1

0

1

2007

0

1

1

2008

2

1

3

2009

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

2011

4

7

11

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Derek Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in England were eligible for the pupil premium in the 2011-12 school year. [81523]

Mr Gibb: Since April 2011, a pupil premium has been provided on the basis of children who are known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM), children who are in care and have been continuously looked after for six months and a service premium for children whose parents are serving in the armed forces. In most cases the premiums are allocated down to schools and for 2011-12 are set at £488 per pupil for FSM and looked after children and £200 per pupil for the service child premium. Based on returns from the January 2011 school census, 1,217,560 children were known to be eligible for FSM, 40,560 are eligible for the looked after child element of the premium and 45,070 children are eligible for the service child premium in 2011-12. Full details of the allocations of the pupil premium can be found at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/financialmanagement/schoolsrevenuefunding/settlement2012pupilpremium/a0075963/pupil-premium-2011-12

School Leaving: Romford

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many students in Romford constituency left further education having completed A-levels or equivalent qualifications to enter full-time employment in 2005-06. [83140]

Mr Gibb: The Department does not hold the requested information.

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1087W

Schools

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many visits he has made to (a) academy secondary schools, (b) academy primary schools, (c) academy special schools, (d) free schools, (e) maintained secondary schools, (f) maintained primary schools and (g) maintained special schools since May 2010. [76608]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 24 October 2011]: Between May 2010 and 22 November, the Secretary of State for Education has visited the following types of schools:

(a) 14 secondary academies

(b) five primary academies

(c) no academy special schools

(d) two free schools

(e) 18 maintained secondary schools

(f) 11 maintained primary schools

(g) two maintained special schools

He has also visited three ‘all-through’ academies which offer primary and secondary provision, one independent school and two FE colleges.

Schools: Admissions

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the reasons are for his Department's response to the consultation on the revised School Admissions Code in respect of permitting only academies and free schools to give priority in their admission arrangements to children in receipt of pupil premium; and what account he took of representations made by (a) local authorities, (b) local representative groups, (c) head teachers and teachers, (d) faith organisations, (e) appeals panels, members and clerks and (f) others in reaching that conclusion. [83572]

Mr Gibb: The Department consulted extensively from 27 May until 19 August and received 1,337 responses from local authorities, local representative groups, head teachers, faith organisations, appeals panel members and parents. A response to the consultation and revised Schools Admissions and Appeals Codes was published on 2 November, which took account of the views expressed during the consultation. As set out in the departmental response, there was a mixed response to the question on giving academies and free schools freedom to give greater priority to children in receipt of pupil premium in their local admission arrangements. The Department proposed this change to the School Admissions Code as part of its overall policy to break the link between poor pupil attainment and low family income.

Schools: Bullying

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what plans he has to increase resources for organisations that work to return severely bullied students to mainstream institutions; [82886]

(2) what plans he has to decrease the number of self-absenting pupils who take prolonged school leave due to severe bullying; [83512]

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1088W

(3) what estimate he has made of the number of secondary school children who returned to mainstream institutions after taking prolonged absences due to bullying in each of the last five years. [83513]

Mr Gibb [holding answers 25 and 28 November 2011]: Decisions about the approaches used to tackle bullying and support the victims of bullying are best taken locally, by schools and local authorities, and these activities should be funded principally from the Dedicated Schools Grant. Where a child is unable to attend school and is not being home educated, local authorities are required to provide suitable education at school or in alternative provision, the aim of which is usually to return the child to school. This can include education for children who are severely bullied. The Secretary of State for Education has asked Charlie Taylor, his expert adviser on behaviour, to conduct a review of how to improve the quality of alternative provision. The Department does not collect data on absences as a result of bullying.

Schools: Closures

Dan Rogerson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools closed in each year between 1997 and 2010. [82524]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 29 November 2011]: The following table sets out the numbers of maintained mainstream schools that have closed in each year since 2000. Reliable information prior to 2000 is not available. The table only shows figures for those schools closed and which have not been replaced. It excludes any technical closures, i.e. those schools that as a result of a change of status, character or a merger with another school are technically closed and then are reopened.


School closures

2000

13

2001

26

2002

31

2003

36

2004

54

2005

39

2006

41

2007

45

2008

50

2009

31

2010

28

Total

394

Schools: Rural Areas

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of funding for schools in rural areas; and if he will make a statement. [82160]

Mr Gibb: The Government have made clear their intention to reform the school funding system. The current funding system is based on historical expenditure and an out of date assessment of need. Our recent consultation on reforming the school funding system looked carefully at how rural schools should be supported.

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1089W

The Department for Education is considering responses to the consultation and discussing options with interested parties, including those who represent rural areas, before we decide how to proceed. We aim to consult on more detailed proposals in the spring.

Secondary Education

Graham Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what procedure secondary schools seeking to provide 16 to 19 education should follow. [82702]

Mr Gibb: Local authorities and governing bodies of all maintained secondary schools can propose to alter the upper age range of a school to add a sixth form. To do so they would be required to follow the five stage statutory process outlined in statutory guidance of consultation, publication, representation, decision and implementation. The guidance can be found on the Department's website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/schoolorganisation/a0075166/other-changes-to-a-school-and-expansions

Academies can also expand their age range to include a sixth form. They are required to consult locally and submit a business case to the YPLA (Young Peoples Learning Agency). Ministers will then judge each case on its merit taking account of the advice from the YPLA.

Secondary Education: Finance

Mr MacShane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the Institute for Fiscal Studies report on trends in education and schools spending for secondary schools; and if he will make a statement. [83095]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 25 November 2011]: Despite having to take some tough decisions to reduce the

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1090W

deficit, the schools' budget is increasing by £3.6 billion in cash over the next four years. This protects per pupil funding levels in cash and includes the pupil premium.

We also increased free early education for all three and four year olds and extended it to disadvantaged two year olds.

Sixth-form Education: North-east England

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many people aged 16 to 18 from (a) Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency, (b) Middlesbrough Borough, (c) Redcar and Cleveland Borough, (d) Teesside and (e) the North East were enrolled in (i) sixth form colleges and (ii) school sixth forms to start courses in each academic year since 2008-09; [83575]

(2) how many people aged 16 to 18 from (a) Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland constituency, (b) Middlesbrough Borough, (c) Redcar and Cleveland Borough, (d) Teesside and (e) the North East were enrolled in further education colleges to start courses in each academic year since 2008-09. [83576]

Tim Loughton: Data on participation in education post-16 are published in a Department for Education (DfE) Statistical First Release (SFR) entitled “Participation in Education, Training and Employment by 16-18 Year Olds in England”.

Information on participation is not available at constituency or borough level. The following tables show the numbers and proportions of the cohort of young people of academic age 16-17 in the north east region and its constituent local authorities participating full-time in maintained schools or academies, sixth form colleges or colleges of further education. As the figures exclude participation in independent schools, part-time education and work-based learning they do not reflect all participation in education of 16-17 year olds.

Table 1: Number of 16-17 (1) year olds participating full-time in education by institution type
  End 2008 (numbers) End 2009 (numbers)

Maintained school or academy Sixth form college Other FE Maintained school or academy Sixth form college Other FE

North East

17,400

5,000

23,300

18,100

5,100

23,800

Hartlepool

300

700

700

300

700

700

Middlesbrough

500

700

1,500

500

600

1,500

Redcar and Cleveland

200

1,100

1,500

300

1,100

1,500

Stockton-on-Tees

600

1,100

2,000

700

1,100

2,100

Darlington

200

800

800

200

900

800

Durham

3,700

600

4,700

3,800

700

4,900

Gateshead

1,800

0

1,500

1,900

0

1,400

Newcastle upon Tyne

2,600

0

1,500

2,700

0

1,600

North Tyneside

1,800

0

1,600

2,000

0

1,500

Northumberland

3,800

0

1,600

3,900

0

1,800

South Tyneside

500

0

2,200

600

0

2,200

Sunderland

1,200

0

3,800

1,300

0

3,800

(1) The age of a learner is measured at the beginning of the academic year, 31 August. Notes. 1. Participation figures for 18-year olds are not available disaggregated by local authority. 2. ‘Other FE’ includes all learners in General FE, tertiary and specialist colleges (e.g. agriculture colleges) and FE provision funded by the YPLA delivered in higher education institutions.

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1091W

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1092W

Table 2: Proportion of 16-17 (1) year olds participating full-time in education by institution type
  End 2008 (Percentage of cohort in LA) End 2009 (Percentage of cohort in LA)

Maintained school or academy Sixth form college Other FE Maintained school or academy Sixth form college Other FE

North East

25

7

34

27

8

36

Hartlepool

12

27

25

14

28

29

Middlesbrough

12

17

39

14

16

39

Redcar and Cleveland

4

28

37

7

29

39

Stockton-on-Tees

12

20

36

12

20

40

Darlington

9

31

28

9

36

30

Durham

28

5

35

29

5

38

Gateshead

36

0

30

38

0

29

Newcastle upon Tyne

39

0

23

42

0

25

North Tyneside

37

0

32

42

0

32

Northumberland

47

0

20

50

0

23

South Tyneside

13

0

53

15

0

56

Sunderland

16

0

50

17

0

51

(1) The age of a learner is measured at the beginning of the academic year, 31 August. Notes: 1. Participation figures for 18-year olds are not available disaggregated by local authority. 2. ‘Other FE’ includes all learners in General FE, tertiary and specialist colleges (e.g. agriculture colleges) and FE provision funded by the YPLA delivered in higher education Institutions.

Sixth-form Colleges: Finance

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what representations he has received on planned reductions in future funding for school sixth forms; and if he will make a statement. [83522]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 28 November 2011]: We have received many representations about funding for 16 to 19-year-olds in school sixth forms from a wide audience of interested parties, including letters from students, parents, schools and colleges, as well as from representative organisations.

In 2011-12, the total funding for 16 to 19-year-olds will be over £7.5 billion, a record level. It means we can look forward to full participation in education and training among 16 and 17-year-olds by 2015. However, we have had to make unit cost savings by bringing school sixth form funding in line with colleges and reducing the requirement for the “Curriculum 2000” entitlement activity.

We are managing these changes carefully and that is why transitional protection is in place this year to ensure that no sixth form, school or college, sees a funding reduction of more than 3% per student. Transitional protection in some form will continue to apply throughout the spending review period to help all school sixth forms adapt to the financial constraints the sector faces.

Special Educational Needs

Dr Poulter: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that small rural schools have access to special educational needs services. [82604]

Sarah Teather: Rural schools may face particular challenges in supporting pupils with special educational needs and disabilities, particularly in responding to ‘low incidence’ needs. However, the statutory duties on schools and local authorities are clear.

The local authority has an overall duty to secure sufficient schools for providing primary and secondary education in their area and must have particular regard to securing special educational provision for children who have special educational needs (SEN).

Schools are able to collaborate with each other and with the local authority in order to meet their own duties in relation to SEN and to improve the support available to pupils. This will be particularly important for smaller schools.

The Achievement for All (AfA) programme has been very successful at raising attainment and aspirations of children and young people with SEN or a disability. Schools with fewer than 500 pupils, including rural schools, can join together to make it easier to participate in the AfA programme. This would allow smaller schools to share the costs of participation.

Similarly, the current SEN and disability pathfinder programme is testing out the Government's reforms through 20 pathfinders in a range of areas across the country, including rural settings. The learning will be used to inform any future reforms.

Special Educational Needs: Young People

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will bring forward proposals to make it mandatory for local authorities to carry out learning-difficulty assessments for young people with disabilities or learning difficulties before they switch to post-16 providers; and if he will make a statement. [82892]

Mr Gibb: Local authorities already have a statutory duty to ensure learning difficulty assessments take place for all young people who had a statement of special educational need at school if they are moving from school into post 16 education or training. This provision was made under the Education Act 1996 (as amended by the ASCL Act) and section 139A of the Learning and Skills Act 2000.

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1093W

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if his Department will take steps to ensure that learning-difficulty assessments carried out by local authorities for students with disabilities or learning difficulties intending to progress to further education are (a) conducted in an efficient manner, (b) completed and (c) form a reliable basis on which to plan support or an appropriate programme of learning; and if he will make a statement. [82893]

Mr Gibb: Local authorities have a statutory duty to ensure learning difficulty assessments take place for all young people who had a statement of special educational need at school if they are moving from school into post 16 education or training. In exercising its functions under this section an authority must have regard to statutory guidance issued by the Secretary of State for Education.

The statutory guidance makes it clear that those undertaking learning difficulty assessments should have the relevant expertise and a professional responsibility to deliver high quality and consistent assessments.

Teachers: Finance

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what monitoring mechanisms he has put in place to assess the uptake of teacher release funding. [83679]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 29 November 2011]: We have removed from schools the burden of having to fill in long, time-consuming and cumbersome sport survey returns, which was a requirement of the previous Government. Instead, the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport will introduce a much lighter-touch system of measurement, focusing specifically on schools' participation in competitive sport as part of the School Games. In addition, there will be an independent impact study of the School Games which will sample trends in schools' participation. The details of these are currently being developed, including the extent to which they assess the release of PE teachers.

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education for what reasons teacher release funding did not reach schools until September 2011. [83680]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 29 November 2011]:The first payment of physical education (PE) teacher release funding was paid to schools, on schedule, at the end of September 2011. The funding is for the academic year 2011/12, which started in September 2011.

Teachers: Pensions

Iain Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the National Audit Office report entitled The impact of the 2007-08 changes to public service pensions published in December 2010, whether updated statistical evidence is available on the affordability of the Teachers' Pension Scheme. [83855]

Mr Gibb: The Independent Public Sector Services Commission chaired by Lord Hutton considered current and future costs of public sector pension scheme and

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1094W

concluded the need to review future affordability and sustainability of all public sector schemes.

Scheme valuations are normally undertaken every three or four years to establish the cost of meeting the scheme's pension commitments.

The most recent valuation for the Teachers’ Pension Scheme has not been completed because the Government suspended valuations of public service schemes following the interim findings of the Independent Public Sector Services Commission.

A valuation of the Teachers’ Pension Scheme will be completed in the future following scheme reforms.

Teachers: Retirement

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the proportion of the teacher population which is likely to retire in the next 10 years. [78259]

Mr Gibb: In November 2010 there were 104,800 full-time equivalent teachers (excluding occasional teachers) aged 50 or over in service in publicly funded schools in England and therefore within 10 years of the normal age of retirement for those teachers who were in pensionable service prior to 1 January 2007. Those teachers who entered pensionable service for the first time on or after 1 January 2007 have a normal age of retirement of 65. This figure represents 24% of the total number of teachers in service. In November 2010 there were 48,100 full-time equivalent regular teachers aged between 45 and 49 in service in publicly funded schools in England and therefore within 10 years of the minimum retirement age of 55 at which point they are eligible for early retirement, with a reduction for early payment.

These figures are based on school work force data supplied to the November 2010 School Workforce Census.

Unemployment: Young People

Mr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many young people aged between 16 and 19 were not in education, employment or training in each quarter of (a) 2008 and (b) 2009. [83645]

Tim Loughton: Estimates of the number and proportion of young people aged 16 to 18 who were not in education, employment or training (NEET) are published in the statistical first release (SFR) ‘Participation in Education, Training and Employment by 16-18 year olds in England’. This publication contains the Department's best estimate of the NEET rate and is published annually in June:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001011/index.shtml

Quarterly data on the number and proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds NEET in England are published in the statistical release (SR) ‘NEET Quarterly Brief’. The most recent version was released on 24 November 2011, and includes statistics for every calendar quarter between Quarter 3 2006 and Quarter 3 2011 in the main document, with an additional time-series extending back to Quarter 2 2000 published as “additional Information”. Both are available at the following web-link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/STR/d001040/index.shtml

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1095W

Young People: Disability

Stephen Lloyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) if he will bring forward legislative proposals in the next parliamentary Session to provide young disabled people with a legal right to a package of support up to the age of 25; [82306]

(2) whether he will bring forward legislative proposals on special educational needs to include a right to educational support up to the age of 25 for all young people with (a) autism and (b) other disabilities. [82430]

Sarah Teather: We are committed to developing a radically different system to support better life outcomes for young people with learning difficulties or disabilities, including those with autism. We want disabled young people to have access to choice and opportunity at al stages of their education, with a range of supported pathways into employment and independent living.

The special educational needs and disability Green Paper—“Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability”—sets out our ambitions for young people with learning difficulties and disabilities. One of its central proposals is to introduce a single assessment process and new 'Education, Health and Care Plan' for young people with special educational needs, up to the age of 25, which will bring together the support on which children and their families rely across education, health and social care.

These proposals have been the subject of extended consultation. We are considering the responses and will be publishing a report by the end of the year with our progress and the next steps. We will consider legislative changes as we develop these proposals further.

Young People: Unemployment

David Mowat: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many people aged between 16 and 18 were not in education, employment or training in Warrington South constituency in each academic year since 1997. [82349]

Tim Loughton: The official national estimates of the number and proportion of young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) in England are published by the Department in a Statistical First Release (SFR) each June. However, these data cannot be disaggregated to parliamentary constituency level because they are in part based on sample data for employment.

We can estimate the number and proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds NEET at a sub-national level using data collected by local authorities, but the figures are not available at parliamentary constituency level.

The figures for 16 to 18-year-olds who were NEET in each year between 2005-06 and 2010-11, for the Warrington local authority, are shown in the following table; statistics prior to 2005-06 are not available. Note that due to methodological differences, estimates for young people NEET based on local authority data tend to be lower than the official estimates for NEET in the SFR.

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1096W

Number and proportion of 16 to 18-year-olds NEET (actual age)
  Average number NEET in the three months November to January (% of 16-18 year cohort in brackets)

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Warrington

460 (7.3%)

450 (7.0%)

370 (5.8%)

460 (7.2%)

360 (5.6%)

330 (5.3%)

Notes: 1. Figures for 19-year-olds are not available. 2. Figures rounded to the nearest 10. Source: CCIS

Youth Services: Per Capita Costs

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the per capita expenditure was on provision of activities for young people by each local authority in 2011-12. [82656]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 24 November 2011]: Section 251 financial returns showing outturn spend in 2011-12 will be published in January 2013. The amounts individual local authorities have budgeted to spend on services for young people in 2011-12 may be found in the following table:

Local authority planned spend on services for young people in England 2011-12 (1,2,3) . Figures taken from s251 Budget 2011-12 statements
£


Total services for young people Total services for young people per capita spend

201

City of London

549,243

1,229

202

Camden

9,242,120

585

203

Greenwich

6,822,240

386

204

Hackney

9,964,290

652

205

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,640,196

164

206

Islington

5,625,988

460

207

Kensington and Chelsea

5,225,070

477

208

Lambeth

6,348,865

385

209

Lewisham

7,447,636

387

210

Southwark

8,552,349

462

211

Tower Hamlets

10,532,639

647

212

Wandsworth

7,599,030

537

213

Westminster

3,452,150

242

301

Barking and Dagenham

1,475,810

91

302

Barnet

3,499,823

127

303

Bexley

4,065,000

199

304

Brent

5,801,081

319

305

Bromley

2,352,375

93

306

Croydon

7,616,964

256

307

Ealing

3,853,295

176

308

Enfield

5,733,687

233

309

Haringey

2,515,689

166

310

Harrow

3,937,377

210

311

Havering

4,373,038

208

312

Hillingdon

5,078,010

221

313

Hounslow

3,301,080

198

314

Kingston-upon-Thames

2,636,558

198

315

Merton

3,064,949

220

316

Newham

6,558,360

320

317

Redbridge

857,306

36

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1097W

318

Richmond-upon-Thames

3,093,527

226

319

Sutton

2,116,950

128

320

Waltham Forest

2,996,039

170

330

Birmingham

13,097,206

134

331

Coventry

5,659,066

195

332

Dudley

5,120,640

192

333

Sandwell

7,205,200

283

334

Solihull

4,291,907

229

335

Walsall

6,827,567

294

336

Wolverhampton

6,527,090

319

340

Knowsley

2,532,194

183

341

Liverpool

10,583,634

276

342

St Helens

4,314,034

273

343

Sefton

5,302,800

222

344

Wirral

7,773,100

294

350

Bolton

7,489,700

315

351

Bury

2,068,569

129

352

Manchester

4,618,110

112

353

Oldham

6,308,432

308

354

Rochdale

4,297,783

229

355

Salford

5,037,543

268

356

Stockport

5,171,610

219

357

Tameside

4,350,600

230

358

Trafford

4,644,040

265

359

Wigan

6,236,617

238

370

Barnsley

6,605,295

330

371

Doncaster

6,585,850

264

372

Rotherham

2,929,711

131

373

Sheffield

7,670,180

157

380

Bradford

12,423,999

262

381

Calderdale

5,556,593

318

382

Kirklees

9,380,376

255

383

Leeds

16,267,660

236

384

Wakefield

7,593,560

274

390

Gateshead

3,497,245

223

391

Newcastle upon Tyne

4,730,203

184

392

North Tyneside

3,035,080

197

393

South Tyneside

4,621,136

355

394

Sunderland

5,954,874

249

420

Isles of Scilly

148,996

861

800

Bath and NE Somerset

2,159,916

128

801

City of Bristol

8,344,076

247

802

North Somerset

2,221,305

133

803

South Gloucestershire

4,171,000

178

805

Hartlepool

2,483,993

297

806

Middlesbrough

4,820,580

371

807

Redcar and Cleveland

3,225,878

274

808

Stockton-on-Tees

4,954,813

284

810

City of Kingston-upon-Hull

5,532,312

234

811

East Riding of Yorkshire

5,475,770

191

812

North East Lincolnshire

4,386,100

307

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1098W

813

North Lincolnshire

1,708,457

125

815

North Yorkshire

9,863,343

191

816

York

3,096,030

182

821

Luton

3,367,538

196

822

Bedford Borough

2,081,468

146

823

Central Bedfordshire

2,075,808

97

825

Buckinghamshire

4,572,444

105

826

Milton Keynes

4,448,126

215

830

Derbyshire

14,126,101

219

831

Derby

3,754,487

176

835

Dorset

7,633,300

219

836

Poole

2,130,538

185

837

Bournemouth

3,201,000

239

840

Durham

5,500,630

124

841

Darlington

1,965,762

237

845

East Sussex

6,579,034

152

846

Brighton and Hove

4,082,472

205

850

Hampshire

12,297,900

111

851

Portsmouth

2,693,300

153

852

Southampton

3,741,025

175

855

Leicestershire

7,925,337

138

856

Leicester City

7,660,482

280

857

Rutland

803,600

171

860

Staffordshire

12,383,905

176

861

Stoke

2,534,390

126

865

Wiltshire

6,112,847

148

866

Swindon

2,892,765

177

867

Bracknell Forest

2,195,434

207

868

Windsor and Maidenhead

1,831,660

138

869

West Berkshire

2,896,242

202

870

Reading

2,754,281

218

871

Slough

3,383,396

335

872

Wokingham

1,952,450

130

873

Cambridgeshire

7,664,419

144

874

City of Peterborough

2,781,022

191

876

Halton

4,422,754

426

877

Warrington

1,300,115

78

878

Devon

10,021,370

157

879

City of Plymouth

5,883,090

257

880

Torbay

2,566,290

240

881

Essex

16,419,878

136

882

Southend

2,461,680

185

883

Thurrock

2,105,543

151

884

Herefordshire

2,297,091

156

885

Worcestershire

9,076,864

195

886

Kent

23,670,035

185

887

Medway

4,408,055

188

888

Lancashire

19,504,030

187

889

Blackburn and Darwen

3,003,200

207

890

Blackpool

1,993,664

163

891

Nottinghamshire

15,721,828

241

892

City of Nottingham

7,258,232

259

893

Shropshire

4,152,350

162

894

Telford and Wrekin

2,882,827

188

1 Dec 2011 : Column 1099W

895

Cheshire East

3,001,712

100

896

Cheshire West and Chester

3,029,769

108

908

Cornwall

11,441,998

259

909

Cumbria

7,777,000

186

916

Gloucestershire

9,166,388

177

919

Hertfordshire

18,789,563

200

921

Isle of Wight

3,435,814

296

925

Lincolnshire

11,931,437

198

926

Norfolk

4,777,147

69

928

Northamptonshire

6,884,136

116

929

Northumberland

5,602,335

228

931

Oxfordshire

8,794,470

151

933

Somerset

6,959,665

147

935

Suffolk

12,468,944

206

936

Surrey

15,311,824

163

937

Warwickshire

9,185,880

203

938

West Sussex

8,811,512

132

 

England

883,372,160

200

       
 

Minimum per capita

36

 

Maximum per capita

1,229

(1) Data are as reported by LAs in their s251 Budget returns. (2) Total services for young people includes spend on universal services for young people (including youth work, positive activities, Connexions and information, advice and guidance), targeted services for young people (including youth work, positive activities and information, advice and guidance), substance misuse services (Drugs, Alcohol, and Volatile substances), teenage pregnancy services, discretionary awards and student support. (3) Population data used to calculate per capita spend are as at 1 January 2012 (projected), and includes all 13 to 19-year-olds inclusive, as at previous 31 August. Estimates are derived from Office for National Statistics (ONS) mid-year population estimates (to 2010) and mid-2008 based sub-national population projections and internal DfE modelling for 2011 onwards.