Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft

Mr Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what savings he expects to arise as a result of changing from the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) VTOL to the JSF carrier variant. [70287]

Peter Luff [holding answer 7 September 2011]: We expect savings to arise from the lower than anticipated unit price acquisition costs, and lower than anticipated through-life support costs, of the Joint Strike Fighter carrier variant compared with the short take off vertical landing variant. The precise value of these savings remains subject to further work.

Mr Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department has secured source code access to the Joint Strike Fighter for non-operational UK-based upgrades or developments. [70288]

Peter Luff [holding answer 7 September 2011]: Through life capability developments and upgrades for the Joint Strike Fighter will be managed collaboratively, for which the necessary agreements are in place.

8 Sep 2011 : Column 778W

Mr Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what unit price he has agreed for the Joint Strike Fighter carrier variant; [70289]

(2) how many Joint Strike Fighter carrier variants he has ordered. [70290]

Peter Luff [holding answer 7 September 2011]: We have yet to make final decisions on the overall number of Joint Strike Fighter carrier variant aircraft we intend to order and will not do so before the next planned Strategic Defence and Security Review. The costs of the Joint Strike Fighter carrier variant will be determined at its main investment decision point. Publishing any details prior to this point would prejudice the commercial interests of the Ministry of Defence.

Strategic Defence and Security Review

Mike Crockart: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) pursuant to the oral statement of 18 July 2011, Official Report, column 644W, on defence transformation, what assessment his Department made of the likely effects of its proposed changes on local communities; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the results of this assessment; [70241]

(2) what assessment has been made of the effect on local (a) schools and (b) services of any interval between the relocation of military personnel and their families from Redford and Dreghorn Barracks in 2014-15 and the opening of the new barracks in Kirknewton. [70399]

Mr Robathan: The comprehensive planning work needed to assess the impact of the announcements made on 18 July 2011 is now under way, including engaging and working with the Scottish Government, the local councils and other relevant bodies and agencies.

Work is also under way to plan the timing and sequencing of the Army moves. Once we have finalised these plans we will, working with the respective local councils and other interested bodies, make assessments of any effect on schools and local services. We have a shared interest in managing local issues, such as school and local services, as effectively as we can for the benefit of both the local community and for our own personnel.

I will be happy to place copies of these assessments in the Library of the House at the appropriate moment.

Education

Academies

Barry Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for Education who will identify academy schools at risk of (a) educational and (b) financial failure; and who will be responsible for ensuring such a school's governing body takes adequate measures for improvement. [68000]

Mr Gibb: Officials from the Department and the Young People’s Learning Agency work together to ensure that academies at risk of educational or financial failure take action to achieve rapid and sustained improvement. Ministers are considering the best way to monitor academies' performance in the future, including the role to be played by the new Education Funding Agency (EFA).

8 Sep 2011 : Column 779W

Assessments: Standards

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department has taken to ensure consistency of academic standards among examination boards. [70232]

Mr Gibb: The independent regulator of qualifications, Ofqual, has a statutory responsibility for protecting exam standards. I have therefore asked them to respond directly to my hon. Friend. A copy of Ofqual's reply will be placed in the House Libraries.

Children in Care

Toby Perkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many looked after children were the

8 Sep 2011 : Column 780W

subject of special guardianship in each local authority in England in each year since 2000; and how many such special guardianship arrangements broke down in each local authority in each year since 2000. [68230]

Tim Loughton: Information on the number of looked after children who ceased to be looked after as a result of a special guardianship order is shown in the following table. The table shows information for each local authority for the years ending 31 March 2006 to 2010.

Information is not available between 2000 and 2005 as special guardianship orders were introduced on 30 December 2005. The figures shown for year ending 31 March 2006 therefore only account for the period 30 December 2005 to 31 March 2006.

Information on the number of special guardianship arrangements that have broken down is not collected centrally by the Department.

Children who ceased to be looked after during the year ending 31 March by local authority, as a result of a Special Guardianship order being granted (1, 2, 3) , years ending 31 March 2006 to 2010, coverage: England
Numbers

2006 (4) 2007 2008 2009 2010

England

70

750

1,130

1,230

1,260

           

North East

10

50

70

80

70

Darlington

0

(5)

(5)

10

10

Durham

(5)

5

15

10

10

Gateshead

0

0

0

(5)

(5)

Hartlepool

0

0

10

15

5

Middlesbrough

0

(5)

0

(5)

(5)

Newcastle Upon Tyne

0

5

(5)

10

10

North Tyneside

0

(5)

(5)

10

(5)

Northumberland

0

5

15

(5)

5

Redcar and Cleveland

0

(5)

0

(5)

(5)

South Tyneside

(5)

5

(5)

(5)

5

Stockton-On-Tees

0

5

5

(5)

(5)

Sunderland

0

5

10

10

10

           

North West

10

130

220

230

250

Blackburn with Darwen

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

5

Blackpool

0

(5)

5

(5)

(5)

Bolton

(5)

(5)

15

15

10

Bury

(5)

5

10

10

20

Cheshire

0

10

(5)

(5)

(6)

Cheshire East

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(5)

Cheshire West & Chester

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

5

Cumbria

(5)

10

15

10

15

Halton

0

0

5

(5)

0

Knowsley

0

(5)

10

10

5

Lancashire

(5)

10

25

40

20

Liverpool

0

15

25

10

10

Manchester

0

10

25

35

45

Oldham

0

(5)

10

10

(5)

Rochdale

(5)

(5)

(5)

5

10

Salford

0

(5)

5

15

20

Sefton

(5)

10

5

(5)

5

St Helens

0

(5)

10

(5)

10

Stockport

0

0

5

(5)

(5)

Tameside

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Trafford

0

0

(5)

5

(5)

Warrington

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Wigan

0

10

10

20

20

Wirral

0

15

25

15

25

8 Sep 2011 : Column 781W

8 Sep 2011 : Column 782W

Yorkshire and The Humber

10

50

80

100

120

Barnsley

0

0

10

10

(5)

Bradford

0

(5)

(5)

0

(5)

Calderdale

(5)

5

(5)

(5)

(5)

Doncaster

0

10

10

(5)

15

East Riding of Yorkshire

0

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

0

(5)

0

5

(5)

Kirklees

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Leeds

(5)

25

35

30

25

North East Lincolnshire

(5)

0

0

0

(5)

North Lincolnshire

0

(5)

(5)

10

5

North Yorkshire

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

20

Rotherham

0

0

(5)

(5)

10

Sheffield

0

0

5

15

10

Wakefield

(5)

0

(5)

10

(5)

York

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

5

           

East Midlands

0

30

60

60

70

Derby

0

(5)

10

5

(5)

Derbyshire

0

(5)

5

(5)

(5)

Leicester

0

(5)

5

5

15

Leicestershire

0

10

10

10

5

Lincolnshire

0

(5)

(5)

10

10

Northamptonshire

0

10

10

15

(5)

Nottingham

0

(5)

15

5

20

Nottinghamshire

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Rutland

0

0

(5)

(5)

0

           

West Midlands

(5)

80

90

100

110

Birmingham

(5)

10

25

30

30

Coventry

0

10

(5)

(5)

(5)

Dudley

0

0

(5)

0

(5)

Herefordshire

0

(5)

5

0

(5)

Sandwell

0

20

(5)

(5)

10

Shropshire

0

0

0

0

0

Solihull

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Staffordshire

0

20

20

20

10

Stoke-On-Trent

(5)

10

(5)

15

20

Telford and Wrekin

0

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

Walsall

0

0

(5)

5

(5)

Warwickshire

(5)

(5)

10

10

10

Wolverhampton

0

0

(5)

(5)

5

Worcestershire

0

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

           

East of England

(5)

50

100

110

110

Bedfordshire

0

5

15

(5)

(6)

Bedford Borough

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(5)

Central Bedfordshire

(6)

(6)

(6)

(6)

(5)

Cambridgeshire

0

(5)

5

5

15

Essex

0

10

20

25

25

Hertfordshire

0

15

10

10

20

Luton

0

(5)

5

10

10

Norfolk

0

0

(5)

10

5

Peterborough

0

5

10

5

5

Southend-on-Sea

0

0

0

10

(5)

Suffolk

(5)

10

20

10

10

Thurrock

0

0

5

15

10

8 Sep 2011 : Column 783W

8 Sep 2011 : Column 784W

London

30

170

270

300

270

Inner London

10

100

170

I8O

150

Camden

5

10

20

10

15

City of London

0

0

0

0

0

Hackney

0

10

20

10

10

Hammersmith and Fulham

(5)

10

25

20

15

Haringey

0

5

20

10

15

Islington

0

10

5

25

0

Kensington and Chelsea

0

0

5

10

(5)

Lambeth

(5)

(5)

10

30

20

Lewisham

0

10

10

10

(5)

Newham

0

10

10

10

20

Southwark

(5)

10

10

25

15

Tower Hamlets

0

15

15

10

10

Wandsworth

0

5

10

5

25

Westminster

0

(5)

15

(5)

(5)

           

Outer London

10

70

90

120

110

Barking and Dagenham

0

(5)

15

(5)

10

Barnet

(5)

(5)

(5)

5

5

Bexley

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Brent

(5)

(5)

10

15

10

Bromley

0

(5)

(5)

10

(5)

Croydon

0

5

(5)

(5)

10

Ealing

0

(5)

10

15

15

Enfield

0

(5)

0

(5)

(5)

Greenwich

(5)

10

10

20

15

Harrow

0

0

(5)

5

(5)

Havering

0

(5)

(5)

5

5

Hillingdon

0

(5)

(5)

5

0

Hounslow

(5)

10

10

15

5

Kingston Upon Thames

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Merton

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

5

Redbridge

0

(5)

0

(5)

(5)

Richmond Upon Thames

0

0

0

(5)

(5)

Sutton

0

(5)

10

(5)

0

Waltham Forest

0

(5)

10

(5)

5

           

South East

10

130

180

170

170

Bracknell Forest

0

(5)

0

(5)

0

Brighton and Hove

(5)

5

10

5

10

Buckinghamshire

(5)

(5)

10

(5)

(5)

East Sussex

0

(5)

10

5

10

Hampshire

(5)

20

30

25

25

Isle of Wight

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

5

Kent

0

25

30

20

20

Medway Towns

0

5

15

10

10

Milton Keynes

(5)

10

(5)

5

5

Oxfordshire

0

5

15

15

15

Portsmouth

0

(5)

0

15

5

Reading

0

10

5

10

(5)

Slough

0

5

(5)

(5)

(5)

Southampton

0

(5)

0

0

0

Surrey

(5)

5

35

25

25

West Berkshire

0

(5)

0

(5)

0

West Sussex

(5)

10

10

10

25

Windsor and Maidenhead

0

(5)

0

5

(5)

Wokingham

0

(5)

0

(5)

0

           

8 Sep 2011 : Column 785W

8 Sep 2011 : Column 786W

South West

(5)

60

60

90

100

Bath and North East Somerset

0

5

(5)

(5)

(5)

Bournemoulh

(5)

(5)

(5)

5

0

Bristol, City of

0

10

10

10

20

Cornwall

0

10

10

10

15

Devon

(5)

10

10

20

25

Dorset

0

(5)

0

5

(5)

Gloucestershire

0

5

5

0

10

Isles Of Scilly

0

0

0

0

0

North Somerset

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Plymouth

0

10

(5)

10

10

Poole

0

0

(5)

(5)

0

Somerset

0

(5)

(5)

10

(5)

South Gloucestershire

0

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

Swindon

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Torbay

0

0

0

0

5

Wiltshire

0

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(1 )Source: SSDA903 return on children looked after. (2 )Only the last occasion on which a child ceased to be looked after in the year has been counted. (3 )Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short term placements. (4 )Special Guardianship orders were introduced on 30 December 2005. Consequently figures for year ending 31 March 2006 only account for the last three months of the data collection year. (5 )Figures not shown in order to protect confidentiality. (6 )Not applicable. Note: To ensure that no individual can be identified from statistical tables, we use conventions for the rounding and suppression of very small numbers. National and regions level figures have been rounded to the nearest 10. Numbers at local authority level have been rounded to the nearest five . Source: SSDA 903

GCE A-level: Mathematics

Stephen Lloyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of pupils achieving A-level grades of AAB or higher achieved one of those grades in (a) mathematics and (b) a science in the latest period for which figures are available. [69124]

Mr Gibb: The information for 2010 A-level achievements is in the following table:


Number/Percentage

Number of students taking A levels

267,345

Number of students achieving A-level grades of AAB or higher

54,390

Percentage of students achieving A-level grades of AAB or higher

20.3

Number of students achieving A-level grades of AAB or higher who achieved one of those grades in mathematics

25,864

Percentage of students achieving A-level grades of AAB or higher who achieved one of those grades in mathematics

47.6

Number of students achieving A-level grades of AAB or higher who achieved one of those grades in science

25,765

Percentage of students achieving A-level grades of AAB or higher who achieved one of those grades in science

47.4

Notes: 1. Students get counted once at their highest grade in each subject category. 2. Science includes biology, chemistry, physics and other sciences, i.e. science single award, electronics, environmental sciences, geology and science in society. 3. The figures in this answer are derived from the final data collected in April 2011 for the 2010 Performance tables.

GCSE

Tristram Hunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what proportion of Year 11 pupils were entered for a (a) GCSE in (i) history, (ii) geography, (iii) a modern foreign language, (iv) physics, (v) chemistry, (vi) biology, (vii) science, (viii) English, (ix) English literature and (x) mathematics, (b) OCR National Level 2 in ICT and (c) a diploma in digital applications at each academy in academic year 2009-10; [69282]

(2) what proportion of Year 11 pupils eligible for free school meals were entered for a (a) GCSE in (i) history, (ii) geography, (iii) a modern foreign language, (iv) physics, (v) chemistry, (vi) biology, (vii) Science, (viii) English, (ix) English literature and (x) mathematics, (b) OCR National Level 2 in ICT and (c) a diploma in digital applications at each academy in academic year 2009-10; [69283]

(3) what proportion of Year 11 academy pupils were entered for a (a) GCSE in (i) history, (ii) geography, (iii) a modern foreign language, (iv) physics, (v) chemistry, (vi) biology, (vii) science, (viii) English, (ix) English literature and (x) mathematics, (b) OCR National Level 2 in ICT and (c) a diploma in digital applications in academic year 2009-10; [69289]

(4) what proportion of Year 11 academy pupils who were eligible for free school meals were entered for a (a) GCSE in (i) history, (ii) geography, (iii) a modern foreign language, (iv) physics, (v) chemistry, (vi) biology, (vii) science, (viii) English, (ix) English literature and (x) mathematic, (b) OCR National Level 2 in ICT and (c) a diploma in digital applications in academic year 2009-10; [69290]

8 Sep 2011 : Column 787W

(5) what proportion of key stage four exam entries by students who were eligible for free school meals were in (a) academic non-applied GCSEs, (b) applied GCSEs and (c) other qualifications equivalent to A* to C GCSEs for each school with academy status in academic year 2009-10; [69284]

(6) what proportion of key stage four exam entries were in (a) academic non-applied GCSEs, (b) applied GCSEs and (c) other qualifications equivalent to A* to C GCSEs for each school with academy status in academic year 2009-10; [69285]

(7) what proportion of exam entries that achieved GCSE grades A* to C or the equivalent were in (a) academic non-applied GCSEs, (b) applied GCSEs and (c) other qualifications equivalent to A* to C GCSEs in each academy school in academic year 2009-10; [69286]

(8) what proportion of exam entries by pupils who were eligible for free school meals and who achieved GCSE grades A* to C or the equivalent at each school with academy status were in (a) academic non-applied GCSEs, (b) applied GCSEs and (c) other qualifications equivalent to A* to C GCSEs in academic year 2009-10; [69287]

(9) what proportion of key stage 4 examination entries for pupils eligible for free school meals consisted of academic non-applied GCSEs in each academy in academic year 2009-10; [69292]

(10) what proportion of year 11 academy pupils achieved at least (a) five A* to C GCSEs, not including any other qualification judged to be equivalent and (b) five A* to C GCSEs including English and mathematics but not including any other qualification judged equivalent to GSCEs in each academy in academic year 2009-10; and what proportion of pupils were entitled to free school meals in each such case. [69288]

Mr Gibb: The information requested has been placed in the House Libraries.

Tristram Hunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of key stage 4 exam entries consisted of academic non-applied GCSEs in each school that has been replaced by an academy in the last year of each such school's existence; and what the name is of each academy that has replaced a school. [69291]

8 Sep 2011 : Column 788W

Mr Gibb: The information requested can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Schools: Reading

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools in (a) Reading West constituency and (b) Reading achieved a rating of (i) outstanding, (ii) good, (iii) satisfactory and (iv) inadequate in their Ofsted inspection in each of the last five years. [70802]

Mr Gibb: This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Miriam Rosen, has written to my hon. Friend and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Miriam Rosen, dated 6 September 2011:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

Since 2005, maintained school inspections have been carried out under section 5 of the Education Act 2005. Ofsted records all judgments made by inspectors in section 5 inspections, including the judgement for overall effectiveness of the school.

Maintained schools inspected under section 5 include nursery, primary, secondary (including academies and city technology colleges), special schools and pupil referral units.

Tables A to F show the number of maintained schools judged to be outstanding, good, satisfactory and inadequate for overall effectiveness at their section 5 inspection during each academic year between 2005/06 and the end of the spring term 2010/11 inclusive in the Reading West Constituency, Reading local authority and England as a whole.

Statistics covering the outcomes of all inspections carried out in each academic year since 2005/06 can be found at:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/advanced-resources-search/results/%2A/all/all/any/200/any?solrsort=im_search_date_mktime%20desc

The most recent official statistics release covering the outcomes of maintained school inspections carried out during the autumn and spring terms 2010/11 were released on 15 June 2011 and can be accessed at the same link. Outcomes of inspections carried out during the full academic year 2010/11 are due to be published in November 2011.

In September 2009 Ofsted implemented a policy of more proportionate inspection using risk assessment and deliberately set out to inspect a greater proportion of previously satisfactory or inadequate schools and a smaller proportion of previously good or outstanding schools. This led to a skew in the sample of schools inspected and means that comparisons between years should be treated with caution as some differences are due to the different sample of schools inspected during the different periods.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Nick Gibb MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the Library of both Houses.

Tables A t o F: Overall effectiveness judg ments for schools inspected under section 5 in the Reading West constituency (1) , Reading local authority (2) and England in each academic year since 2005/06 (number of schools)
Table A
      Overall effectiveness
Academic year Area Total inspections Outstanding Good Satisfactory Inadequate

2005/06

Reading West constituency

12

2

7

1

2

 

Reading local authority

15

3

5

5

2

 

England

6,128

648

2,933

2,063

484

8 Sep 2011 : Column 789W

8 Sep 2011 : Column 790W

Table B
      Overall effectiveness
Academic year Area Total inspections Outstanding Good Satisfactory Inadequate

2006/07

Reading West constituency

14

0

5

7

2

 

Reading local authority

19

1

6

10

2

 

England

8,323

1,150

3,899

2,810

464

Table C
      Overall effectiveness
Academic year Area Total inspections Outstanding Good Satisfactory Inadequate

2007/08

Reading West constituency

15

2

5

7

1

 

Reading local authority

19

2

7

8

2

 

England

7,866

1,146

3,838

2,507

375

Table D
      Overall effectiveness
Academic year Area Total inspections Outstanding Good Satisfactory Inadequate

2008/09

Reading West constituency

16

4

8

3

1

 

Reading local authority

18

6

7

5

0

 

England

7,065

1,327

3,512

1,955

271

Table E
      Overall effectiveness
Academic year Area Total inspections Outstanding Good Satisfactory Inadequate

2009/10

Reading West constituency

13

1

4

6

2

 

Reading local authority

18

2

5

10

1

 

England

6,171

782

2,631

2,281

477

Table F
      Overall effectiveness
Academic year Area Total inspections Outstanding Good Satisfactory Inadequate

2010/11 (autumn and spring terms only)

Reading West constituency

7

3

2

2

0

 

Reading local authority

10

3

4

3

0

 

England

4,062

408

1,805

1,592

257

(1) Reading West constituency falls across two local authorities: Reading and West Berkshire. (2) Reading local authority encompasses parts of the constituencies of Reading East and Reading West.

Teachers: Pensions

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the level of employers' contribution for academy school pension funds will be the same as that for other schools; and if he will make a statement. [68805]

Mr Gibb: Academies pay the same level of employers' contribution for teachers, to the Teachers' Pension Scheme, as all other employers within the scheme. The employer contribution rate is currently 14.1%.

Academies are required to offer Local Government Pension Scheme (LGPS) membership to all non-teaching staff. The scheme's framework is set out in the LGPS regulations. It is administered by different local pension funds and so employer contributions can vary. However, the LGPS regulations state “pension authorities should have regard to the desirability of maintaining as nearly constant a common rate across employers as possible”.

Treasury

Air Force: Military Bases

Thomas Docherty: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer on what occasions (a) he, (b) Ministers in his Department, (c) political advisers and (d) civil servants have discussed the future of RAF bases within the context of the Defence Transformation review. [70283]

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Danny Alexander [holding answer 7 September 2011]: Treasury Ministers, political advisers and officials have discussions with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such discussions.

Banks: EU Action

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the European Commission's proposed Capital Requirements Directive; and if he will make a statement. [69730]

Mr Hoban: On 20 July 2011, the European Commission adopted proposals on prudential requirements for credit institutions and investment firms, which will replace the current Capital Requirements Directive with a regulation and a directive. The first is the draft regulation on prudential requirements and the second is the draft directive on the access to the activity of credit institutions and the prudential supervision of credit institutions and investment firms. I refer the hon. Member to my Explanatory Memorandum on the Commission's proposals, which has been deposited today, of which copies will be available in the Library.

Child Tax Credit

Mrs Main: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer pursuant to the answer of 14 July 2011, Official Report, column 461W, on habitual residence, what level of child tax credit is available in each other EU member state; whether the child tax credit helpline makes language provision for claimants calling from other EU member states; what plans he has to record tax credits paid to non-UK residents; what estimate he has made of the amount of child tax credit overpaid to non-UK residents; what mechanism is in place for recovering such overpaid child tax credits once the recipients have returned to their home country; and how much has been reclaimed in overpaid child tax credit from non-UK residents following their return to their home country. [69160]

Justine Greening: Information about the level of child tax credit payable in respect of children resident in other member states is available only at disproportionate cost. This is because the rate of award will vary from case to case depending on the income of claimants, whether child tax credit is payable at the appropriate UK rate or as part of a UK family benefit supplement in those cases where entitlement to family benefit arises in more than one member state; for example, where the parents are working and insured in two different member states.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) encourages customers to ask a member of the family or trusted friend to provide help with interpretation where appropriate, but HMRC Contact Centres offer language/interpretation services if customers need assistance. Further details about these services can be found online at:

www.hmrc.gov.uk/contactus/particular-needs.htm#4

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HM Revenue and Customs maintains a database that records the number of ongoing child benefit awards under EC Regulations. The database is currently being updated to provide comparable data about child tax credit awards.

The EC Social Security Coordinating Regulations 883/2004 and 987/2009 contain cross-border recovery provisions which allow for one EEA member state to recover overpayments on behalf of another member state, either from arrears of benefit, deduction from ongoing payment of benefit or by instalments if benefit is not in payment. The regulations also provide for enforcement action to be taken through the courts of the country in which the person is now residing, subject to the domestic rules in force in that country. However, information about the amount of child tax credit overpaid to, or recovered from, non-UK residents could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Equitable Life Assurance Society: Compensation

Dr Julian Lewis: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish a timetable for the commencement of compensation payments to those categories of Equitable Life policy holders who have not yet begun to receive compensation, together with an indication of the size of the payments to be made; and if he will make a statement. [70707]

Mr Hoban: Payments began on the 30 June, and hundreds of payments have been made to date. Payment volumes will continue to be ramped up over the coming months as the scheme's complex payment processes are refined further.

Payments will be made in accordance with the profile set out at the spending review settlement—with £1 billion allocated to the scheme in the first three years of this spending review—and the Independent Commission on Equitable Life Payments' recommendations on the prioritisation of payments.

Stephen Gilbert: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what payments he has made to Equitable Life policy holders; and what further payments he plans to make in 2011. [70730]

Mr Hoban: Payments began on 30 June, and hundreds of payments have been made to date. Payment volumes will continue to be ramped up over the coming months as the scheme's complex payment processes are refined further.

Payments will be made in accordance with the prioritisation criteria set out in the scheme rules, available at:

http://equitablelifepaymentscheme.independent.gov.uk/resources/elps_main_doc_final.htm

Eurostar: Sterling

Bob Russell: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will seek an explanation from the operator of Eurostar on the reasons for its refusal to accept British currency from customers seeking to purchase refreshments on its services. [70919]

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Mr Hoban: It would not be appropriate for Government to comment on a corporate policy decision. Eurostar has announced that, in response to customer feedback, restrictions of the use of sterling cash will not be taken forward.

Excise Duties: Wines

Mel Stride: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he has any plans to introduce a sliding scale on rates in excise duty for wine production similar to that for beer production. [69412]

Justine Greening: There are no plans to introduce a sliding scale on rates for wine duty which are similar to that for beer. The Chancellor keeps all taxes under review as part of the Budget process.

Members: Correspondence

Mr Baron: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay of 26 May 2011 regarding his constituent Mr Simon Licence. [70734]

Justine Greening: The hon. Member's letter regarding his constituent Mr Simon Licence, has been transferred to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

National Insurance Contributions: Northern Ireland

Sammy Wilson: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) how many businesses in Northern Ireland have participated in the national insurance contribution holiday since September 2010; [69425]

(2) how many businesses in East Antrim constituency have participated in the national insurance contribution holiday since September 2010. [69426]

Mr Gauke: As of 15 August, HMRC has received 246 successful applications from businesses in Northern Ireland and 10 successful applications from businesses in East Antrim constituency.

Renewable Energy: Developing Countries

Jim McGovern: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he is taking to work with the International Monetary Fund to promote renewable energy in developing countries. [69844]

Mr Hoban: The Chancellor of the Exchequer, my right hon. Friend the Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne), and his officials have regular discussions with the International Monetary Fund on a range of issues. The role of the IMF is to promote international monetary co-operation and exchange rate stability, facilitate the balanced growth of international trade, and provide resources to help members in balance of payments difficulties or to assist with poverty reduction.

Given the potential adverse effects of continuing with non-renewable sources of energy—both economically and environmentally—the IMF has an interest in ensuring that developing countries take a sustainable approach to these issues as part of their broader economic strategy.

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More broadly, the UK is working to encourage the development of renewable energy technologies through the World Bank and other multilateral development banks.

Tax Evasion: Criminal Proceedings

Mr Meacher: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many prosecutions for tax evasion of (a) companies and (b) individuals there have been in each year since 1990; and how many convictions led to (i) imprisonment and (ii) fines in excess of (A) £10,000, (B) £100,000 and (C) £1,000,000 in each category in each such year. [70377]

Mr Gauke: The majority of tax evasion cases are dealt with using cost-effective civil settlement procedures.

A breakdown of prosecutions for tax evasion between individuals and those related to companies or organised criminal attacks is available only at disproportionate cost.

Details of the total numbers of cases prosecuted for income tax, corporation tax, VAT, excise and other tax offences are set out in the following table for the available years. Cases may relate to one or a number of persons.


Cases

2006-07

389

2007-08

416

2008-09

340

2009-10

237

2010-11

385

Details of sentences are not held centrally and are available only at disproportionate cost.

HMRC is not the prosecuting authority. Cases are referred to, but prosecutions are undertaken by the relevant independent prosecuting authorities. Working in partnership with those authorities, HMRC expects to deliver significant year on year increases in prosecutions as part of the reinvestment package announced in the 2010 spending review.

VAT: Golf

Bob Russell: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will amend the Value Added Tax regulations so that charges levied on golf clubs operated by proprietors are the same as those levied on non-profit making clubs; and if he will make a statement. [70918]

Mr Hoban: The Principal VAT directive, which governs the application of VAT in the European Union, requires member states to apply a VAT exemption to certain activities in the public interest, including supplies of sporting services by non-profit making organisations. Subscription fees charged by non-profit-making golf clubs are therefore exempt from VAT. The exemption does not extend to subscription fees received by proprietary (profit-making) clubs nor is there any scope to extend it in this way.

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Business, Innovation and Skills

Business Links: Manpower

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many Business Link advisers were working in (a) each region and (b) each parliamentary constituency in May 2010. [67852]

Mr Prisk: The information requested is as follows:

(a) The regional development agencies who manage the Business Link regional service in England have reported the following levels of Business Link advisers were working in each region at end March 2010 as follows:

Number of Business Link advisers (FTE)
Region Position at end March 2010

East of England

112

East midlands

93

London

51

North-east

138

North-west

225

South-east

199

South-west

130

West midlands

261

Yorkshire and Humber

223

Total

1,432


(b) The Regional Development Agencies do not hold the information requested at a parliamentary constituency level.

Business Links: Training

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what (a) training and (b) professional development has been provided to Business Link advisers; and how these have been accredited. [67478]

Mr Prisk: The nine regional Business Link advisory services in England have supported their Business Link advisers through formal training to gain accreditation against a National Occupational Standard (e.g. SFEDI Business Link Broker standard). In addition, where their role involves offering specialist advice (e.g. finance, innovation, skills), they are further supported to achieve relevant professional qualifications or accreditation of competence.

Business: Government Assistance

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many hours each business mentor is expected to provide (a) per week and (b) per month to the Business Mentoring Scheme. [67477]

Mr Prisk: No requirements have been set to dictate or to restrict the number of hours each business mentor is expected to provide. The general rule of principle—and a Small Firms Enterprise Development Initiative (the sector skills body for enterprise and enterprise support) recommendation—is that a volunteer mentor should have no more than three mentoring relationships at any one time. However, this can vary according to the policy

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of the mentoring organisation, the type of mentoring being offered, the geography involved and the needs of the small business. Ultimately, the frequency of contact will be agreed between mentor and mentee. Full-time or professional mentors will be able to take on more mentees as time permits.

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what training (a) has been and (b) will be provided to business mentors under the Business Mentoring Scheme; and how this training has been or will be accredited. [67479]

Mr Prisk: The type of training for individual mentors will be a matter for the mentoring organisation to which they belong and vary according to the operating model of the organisation, the type of mentoring being delivered and the experience of the mentor. The majority of mentoring organisations train their mentors, and SFEDI—a key provider of enterprise training—offers a range of the mentoring courses. Indeed all bank mentors go through one of SFEDI's enterprise mentoring courses.

All of the organisations available via mentorsme.org have been assessed by the British Banker's Association to ensure that they meet certain quality standards, including a programme of training and development of mentors and having a robust process for identifying and matching mentees.

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what information he plans to collect on the (a) number and (b) size of businesses taking up advice through the Business Mentoring Scheme; and when he plans to publish this information. [67480]

Mr Prisk: Mentorsme.co.uk, Britain's first online mentoring gateway, was launched on 4 July and provides a single point of access for those seeking mentoring and those seeking to be mentors, covering the whole of the UK.

Since the launch there have been over 21,303 visits and 123,000 page views. Plans for the monitoring and evaluation of the portal are currently being agreed with the British Bankers Association.

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what process will be followed to appoint mentors under the Business Mentoring Scheme. [67792]

Mr Prisk: People can become mentors by joining an established mentoring organisation such as those now available on mentorsme.co.uk. The site currently includes approximately 40 mentoring organisations providing access to around 10,000 mentors. All of these organisations have signed up to a uniform minimum standard developed by organisations across the sector. Mentoring organisations are invited to register their interest in becoming part of the mentoring network via the website:

http://www.mentorsme.co.uk/about

and must complete a questionnaire which allows them to be screened to ensure they meet certain quality standards.

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The site also allows business professionals to offer their services as a business mentor via the mentoring organisations listed. All of these organisations will have their own quality assurance processes and recruitment processes for potential mentors.