20 July 2011 : Column 1031W

GCSE: History

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education in how many mainstream secondary schools no pupil obtained grade C or above at history GCSE in 2010; and how many mainstream secondary schools did not enter any pupils for a history GCSE in 2010. [65364]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 19 July 2011]: Of the 3,881 mainstream secondary schools with pupils at the end of Key Stage 4, 159 had no pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 entered for GCSE history in 2010.

There were no schools that entered pupils for a GCSE in history and had no pupils achieve a grade A*

20 July 2011 : Column 1032W

to C; therefore in 159 mainstream secondary schools no pupils achieved a grade A* to C in GCSE history in 2010.

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils were entered for history GCSE in (a) comprehensive schools, (b) selective maintained schools and (c) independent schools in 2010; and how many and what proportion of pupils entered for history GCSE in (i) comprehensive schools, (ii) selective maintained schools and (iii) independent schools obtained a grade C or above in 2010. [65366]

Mr Gibb: [holding answer 19 July 2011]: The requested information is given in the following table:

  Number of pupils at the end of key stage 4 in 2010 Pupils entered for History GCSE in 2010 Pupils entered for History GCSE who obtained a grade C or above in 2010

Number Number Percentage Number Percentage

Comprehensive schools

520,914

155,982

30

101,897

65

Selective maintained schools

22,607

12,389

55

11,827

95

Independent schools

49,932

23,798

48

22,297

94

Notes: 1. Pupils are at the end of Key Stage 4. 2. The data used to answer this question are derived from the 2010 School and College Performance tables.

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils in mainstream maintained secondary schools were entered for history GCSE in each local authority area in 2010. [65387]

Mr Gibb: The requested information is shown in the following table.

GCSE history entries in all mainstream maintained schools by local authority, 2010
    Pupils who were entered for GCSE history in 2010
Local authority Number of pupils on roll in the local authority at the end of key stage 4 Number Percentage

North East

28,849

7,848

27.2

Darlington

1,142

247

21.6

Durham

5,351

1,358

25.4

Gateshead

2,084

624

29.9

Hartlepool

1,224

405

33.1

Middlesbrough

1,644

402

24.5

Newcastle upon Tyne

2,484

484

19.5

North Tyneside

2,090

758

36.3

Northumberland

3,544

981

27.7

Redcar and Cleveland

1,926

564

29.3

South Tyneside

1,715

416

24.3

Stockton-on-Tees

2,266

738

32.6

Sunderland

3,379

871

25.8

       

North West

80,462

22,850

28.4

Blackburn with Darwen

1,725

491

28.5

Blackpool

1,575

398

25.3

Bolton

3,499

930

26.6

Bury

2,216

640

28.9

Cheshire East

3,922

1,390

35.4

Cheshire West and Chester

3,938

1,183

30.0

Cumbria

6,064

2,070

34.1

Halton

1,498

414

27.6

Knowsley

1,601

269

16.8

Lancashire

13,218

3,782

28.6

Liverpool

4,989

1,479

29.6

Manchester

4,415

919

20.8

Oldham

2,977

671

22.5

Rochdale

2,520

692

27.5

Salford

2,140

564

26.4

Sefton

3,293

922

28.0

St Helens

1,983

409

20.6

Stockport

2,973

798

26.8

Tameside

2,881

635

22.0

Trafford

2,825

1,029

36.4

Warrington

2,489

976

39.2

Wigan

3,810

911

23.9

Wirral

3,911

1,278

32.7

       

Yorkshire and Humber

59,396

16,984

28.6

Barnsley

2,547

703

27.6

Bradford

5,783

1,244

21.5

Calderdale

2,593

884

34.1

20 July 2011 : Column 1033W

Doncaster

3,551

1,024

28.8

East Riding of Yorkshire

3,940

1,532

38.9

Kingston upon Hull, City of

2,739

603

22.0

Kirklees

4,534

1,259

27.8

Leeds

8,063

2,472

30.7

North East Lincolnshire

1,979

441

22.3

North Lincolnshire

2,009

448

22.3

North Yorkshire

6,862

2,436

35.5

Rotherham

3,588

838

23.4

Sheffield

5,514

1,539

27.9

Wakefield

3,954

944

23.9

York

1,740

617

35.5

       

East Midlands

51,064

14,615

28.6

Derby

2,839

626

22.1

Derbyshire

8,694

2,622

30.2

Leicester

3,457

782

22.6

Leicestershire

7,380

1,587

21.5

Lincolnshire

8,508

2,751

32.3

Northamptonshire

7,871

2,472

31.4

Nottingham

2,711

610

22.5

Nottinghamshire

9,112

2,930

32.2

Rutland

492

235

47.8

       

West Midlands

63,495

19,198

30.2

Birmingham

11,984

3,538

29.5

Coventry

3,545

818

23.1

Dudley

3,883

1,210

31.2

Herefordshire

1,898

746

39.3

Sandwell

3,521

767

21.8

Shropshire

3,256

1,052

32.3

Solihull

3,039

886

29.2

Staffordshire

9,569

3,253

34.0

Stoke-on-Trent

2,538

661

26.0

Telford and Wrekin

2,091

620

29.7

Walsall

3,548

900

25.4

Warwickshire

6,013

2,175

36.2

Wolverhampton

2,671

637

23.8

Worcestershire

5,939

1,935

32.6

       

East of England

64,657

22,728

35.2

Bedford

1,803

449

24.9

Bedfordshire, Central

2,930

1,002

34.2

Cambridgeshire

5,977

2,363

39.5

Essex

15,991

5,279

33.0

Hertfordshire

12,805

4,988

39.0

Luton

2,357

786

33.3

20 July 2011 : Column 1034W

Norfolk

8,962

3,170

35.4

Peterborough

2,214

751

33.9

Southend-on-Sea

2,179

734

33.7

Suffolk

7,666

2,752

35.9

Thurrock

1,773

454

25.6

       

London

73,063

23,397

32.0

Inner London

22,556

6,125

27.2

Camden

1,470

472

32.1

Hackney

1,286

346

26.9

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,006

442

43.9

Haringey

2,105

524

24.9

Islington

1,382

359

26.0

Kensington and Chelsea

548

217

39.6

Lambeth

1,550

418

27.0

Lewisham

2,123

674

31.7

Newham

3,330

519

15.6

Southwark

2,269

669

29.5

Tower Hamlets

2,393

480

20.1

Wandsworth

1,754

555

31.6

Westminster

1,340

450

33.6

Outer London

50,507

17,272

34.2

Barking and Dagenham

2,108

587

27.8

Barnet

3,355

1,376

41.0

Bexley

3,213

1,309

40.7

Brent

2,803

733

26.2

Bromley

3,358

1,252

37.3

Croydon

3,631

1,084

29.9

Ealing

2,802

931

33.2

Enfield

3,583

1,280

35.7

Greenwich

2,261

643

28.4

Harrow

2,138

733

34.3

Havering

3,057

1,102

36.0

Hillingdon

2,990

829

27.7

Hounslow

2,611

982

37.6

Kingston upon Thames

1,433

536

37.4

Merton

1,533

427

27.9

Redbridge

3,174

1,090

34.3

Richmond upon Thames

1,317

598

45.4

Sutton

2,610

1,044

40.0

Waltham Forest

2,530

736

29.1

       

South East

89,266

30,413

34.1

Bracknell Forest

1,087

513

47.2

Brighton and Hove

2,299

658

28.6

Buckinghamshire

5,619

2,208

39.3

East Sussex

5,311

1,556

29.3

20 July 2011 : Column 1035W

Hampshire

13,937

4,961

35.6

Isle of Wight

1,522

526

34.6

Kent

16,490

5,095

30.9

Medway

3,368

955

28.4

Milton Keynes

2,694

734

27.2

Oxfordshire

6,284

2,411

38.4

Portsmouth

1,867

598

32.0

Reading

972

372

38.3

Slough

1,545

455

29.4

Southampton

2,058

528

25.7

Surrey

10,529

3,649

34.7

West Berkshire

1,965

814

41.4

West Sussex

8,393

2,988

35.6

Windsor and Maidenhead

1,511

594

39.3

Wokingham

1,815

798

44.0

       

South West

56,070

17,746

31.6

Bath and North East Somerset

2,211

760

34.4

Bournemouth

1,743

439

25.2

Bristol, City of

2,924

653

22.3

Cornwall

5,851

1,644

28.1

Devon

7,621

2,120

27.8

Dorset

4,328

1,481

34.2

Gloucestershire

6,867

2,381

34.7

Isles of Scilly

22

4

18.2

North Somerset

2,250

808

35.9

Plymouth

2,934

843

28.7

Poole

1,659

642

38.7

Somerset

5,674

2,098

37.0

South Gloucestershire

3,159

1,025

32.4

Swindon

2,170

686

31.6

Torbay

1,493

517

34.6

Wiltshire

5,164

1,645

31.9

Total: England

566,322

175,779

31.0

Notes: 1. The figures are for pupils at the end of key stage 4. 2. The figures cover all mainstream maintained schools, including academies and city technology colleges. 3. The figures are derived from data collected for the performance tables.

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils obtained a grade C or above in history GCSE in each local authority area in 2010. [65388]

Mr Gibb: The requested information is shown in the following table.

20 July 2011 : Column 1036W

GCSE History achievements in all maintained schools by local authority, 2010
Local authority Number of pupils who were entered for GCSE History in 2010 Number of pupils who achieved a grade C or above in GCSE History in 2010 Percentage of pupils who were entered for, and achieved a grade C or above in GCSE History in 2010

North East

7,873

5,067

64.4

Darlington

247

158

64.0

Durham

1,373

893

65.0

Gateshead

627

417

66.5

Hartlepool

405

250

61.7

Middlesbrough

402

236

58.7

Newcastle upon Tyne

484

332

68.6

North Tyneside

758

490

64.6

Northumberland

981

678

69.1

Redcar and Cleveland

564

389

69.0

South Tyneside

419

255

60.9

Stockton-on-Tees

738

440

59.6

Sunderland

875

529

60.5

       

North West

22,863

15,176

66.4

Blackburn with Darwen

491

274

55.8

Blackpool

398

208

52.3

Bolton

930

597

64.2

Bury

640

456

71.3

Cheshire East

1,390

1,027

73.9

Cheshire West and Chester

1,190

796

66.9

Cumbria

2,070

1,384

66.9

Halton

414

276

66.7

Knowsley

269

134

49.8

Lancashire

3,783

2,608

68.9

Liverpool

1,479

930

62.9

Manchester

919

484

52.7

Oldham

671

399

59.5

Rochdale

692

398

57.5

Salford

568

309

54.4

Sefton

922

628

68.1

St Helens

409

261

63.8

Stockport

798

561

70.3

Tameside

635

368

58.0

Trafford

1,029

865

84.1

Warrington

976

695

71.2

Wigan

911

600

65.9

Wirral

1,279

918

71.8

       

Yorkshire and Humber

16,992

10,830

63.7

Barnsley

703

368

52.3

Bradford

1,244

759

61.0

Calderdale

884

593

67.1

Doncaster

1,024

545

53.2

East Riding of Yorkshire

1,532

964

62.9

20 July 2011 : Column 1037W

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

603

288

47.8

Kirklees

1,259

768

61.0

Leeds

2,479

1,654

66.7

North East Lincolnshire

441

293

66.4

North Lincolnshire

448

261

58.3

North Yorkshire

2,437

1,819

74.6

Rotherham

838

572

68.3

Sheffield

1,539

947

61.5

Wakefield

944

586

62.1

York

617

413

66.9

       

East Midlands

14,624

9,372

64.1

Derby

626

445

71.1

Derbyshire

2,622

1,744

66.5

Leicester

782

500

63.9

Leicestershire

1,587

958

60.4

Lincolnshire

2,760

1,890

68.5

Northamptonshire

2,472

1,497

60.6

Nottingham

610

355

58.2

Nottinghamshire

2,930

1,824

62.3

Rutland

235

159

67.7

       

West Midlands

19,217

12,321

64.1

Birmingham

3,549

2,406

67.8

Coventry

818

526

64.3

Dudley

1,210

720

59.5

Herefordshire

746

499

66.9

Sandwell

767

421

54.9

Shropshire

1,052

699

66.4

Solihull

886

618

69.8

Staffordshire

3,254

1,988

61.1

Stoke-on-Trent

661

368

55.7

Telford and Wrekin

620

393

63.4

Walsall

900

568

63.1

Warwickshire

2,182

1,382

63.3

Wolverhampton

637

389

61.1

Worcestershire

1,935

1,344

69.5

       

East of England

22,741

15,254

67.1

Bedford

449

288

64.1

Bedfordshire, Central

1,002

617

61.6

Cambridgeshire

2,363

1,724

73.0

Essex

5,283

3,389

64.1

Hertfordshire

4,994

3,757

75.2

Luton

786

441

56.1

20 July 2011 : Column 1038W

Norfolk

3,172

2,020

63.7

Peterborough

751

458

61.0

Southend-on-Sea

735

589

80.1

Suffolk

2,752

1,676

60.9

Thurrock

454

295

65.0

       

London

23,405

16,129

68.9

Inner London

6,126

3,976

64.9

Camden

472

322

68.2

Hackney

346

246

71.1

Hammersmith and Fulham

442

359

81.2

Haringey

524

378

72.1

Islington

359

182

50.7

Kensington and Chelsea

217

182

83.9

Lambeth

418

258

61.7

Lewisham

674

389

57.7

Newham

519

320

61.7

Southwark

669

383

57.2

Tower Hamlets

480

281

58.5

Wandsworth

556

364

65.5

Westminster

450

312

69.3

       

Outer London

17,279

12,153

70.3

Barking and Dagenham

587

353

60.1

Barnet

1,376

1,050

76.3

Bexley

1,309

863

65.9

Brent

733

522

71.2

Bromley

1,253

952

76.0

Croydon

1,084

704

64.9

Ealing

931

619

66.5

Enfield

1,280

874

68.3

Greenwich

643

405

63.0

Harrow

733

516

70.4

Havering

1,102

771

70.0

Hillingdon

829

541

65.3

Hounslow

982

699

71.2

Kingston upon Thames

536

436

81.3

Merton

427

266

62.3

Redbridge

1,090

819

75.1

Richmond upon Thames

598

428

71.6

Sutton

1,044

887

85.0

Waltham Forest

742

448

60.4

       

South East

30,439

20,970

68.9

Bracknell Forest

513

339

66.1

20 July 2011 : Column 1039W

Brighton and Hove

658

455

69.1

Buckinghamshire

2,208

1,714

77.6

East Sussex

1,558

1,085

69.6

Hampshire

4,977

3,444

69.2

Isle of Wight

526

285

54.2

Kent

5,095

3,599

70.6

Medway

955

587

61.5

Milton Keynes

736

448

60.9

Oxfordshire

2,411

1,625

67.4

Portsmouth

598

329

55.0

Reading

372

236

63.4

Slough

455

324

71.2

Southampton

528

307

58.1

Surrey

3,649

2,639

72.3

West Berkshire

814

606

74.4

West Sussex

2,994

1,966

65.7

Windsor and Maidenhead

594

395

66.5

Wokingham

798

587

73.6

       

South West

17,756

11,991

67.5

Bath and North East Somerset

761

547

71.9

Bournemouth

439

313

71.3

Bristol, City of

654

415

63.5

Cornwall

1,644

1,041

63.3

Devon

2,120

1,371

64.7

20 July 2011 : Column 1040W

Dorset

1,481

1,077

72.7

Gloucestershire

2,381

1,799

75.6

Isles of Scilly

4

3

75.0

North Somerset

808

510

63.1

Plymouth

843

545

64.7

Poole

642

429

66.8

Somerset

2,098

1,347

64.2

South Gloucestershire

1,025

631

61.6

Swindon

686

398

58.0

Torbay

517

412

79.7

Wiltshire

1,653

1,153

69.8

       

Total—England

175,910

117,110

66.6

Notes: 1. The figures are for pupils at the end of Key Stage 4. 2. The figures cover all maintained schools, including Academies and city technology colleges. 3. The figures are derived from data collected for the Performance tables.

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils were entered for GCSE history examination in (a) mainstream comprehensive schools, (b) selective schools and (c) independent schools in each year since 1997; and how many and what proportion of such pupils achieved a grade C and above in each such year. [65834]

Mr Gibb: The requested information is shown in the following tables.

School type
  Number of pupils (1) entered for GCSE (2) history Percentage of pupils (1) entered for GCSE (2) history

Comprehensive Selective Independent (3) Comprehensive Selective Independent (3)

1997

169,298

10,922

20,984

36.3

53.7

50.1

1998

153,001

10,042

20,490

32.0

50.3

47.0

1999

153,505

10,320

19,851

31.8

50.8

46.4

2000

153,670

10,746

20,168

31.9

53.2

47.2

2001

156,816

11,338

20,891

31.3

54.1

47.5

2002

155,211

11,433

21,269

30.8

53.8

48.2

2003

155,847

11,431

21,317

30.2

52.7

48.1

2004

164,188

12,145

22,252

30.8

54.6

47.4

2005

164,298

12,327

23,619

31.2

55.3

50.5

2006

164,606

12,549

23,930

30.8

55.8

49.1

2007

161,001

11,865

23,951

29.8

52.8

49.9

2008

160,362

12,147

23,694

29.9

53.8

49.5

2009

155,381

11,914

23,229

29.9

53.2

48.0

2010

155,982

12,389

23,798

29.9

54.8

47.7

20 July 2011 : Column 1041W

20 July 2011 : Column 1042W

School type
  Number of pupils (1) who achieved grade A*-C in GCSE history Percentage of pupils (1) who were entered for, and achieved grade A*-C in GCSE history

Comprehensive Selective Independent (3) Comprehensive Selective Independent (3)

1997

86,345

10,005

19,349

51.0

91.6

92.2

1998

81,168

9,528

19,043

. 53.1

94.9

92.9

1999

85,265

9,800

18,602

55.5

95.0

93.7

2000

86,869

10,292

18,914

56.5

95.8

93.8

2001

88,122

10,853

19,504

56.2

95.7

93.4

2002

88,617

. 10,852

19,995

57.1

94.9

94.0

2003

91,133

10,932

20,070

58.5

95.6

94.2

2004

97,154

11,692

21,012

59.2

96.3

94.4

2005

98,761

11,762

22,172

60.1

95.4

93.9

2006

100,031

11,927

22,391

60.8

95.0

93.6

2007

99,823

11,357

22,496

62.0

95.7

93.9

2008

100,935

11,597

22,191

62.9

95.5

93.7

2009

99,697

11,457

21,679

64.2

96.2

93.3

2010

101,897

11,827

22,297

65.4

95.4

93.7

(1) For the years 1997-2004,15-year-old pupils are counted. For the years 2005-10, pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 are counted. (2) Only full GCSE courses have been counted. (3) Pupils at independent special schools are also counted. Note: The figures for this answer have been derived from the data collected for the secondary school performance tables.

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many mainstream comprehensive schools entered (a) no pupils, (b) fewer than 5% of pupils, (c) fewer than 10% of pupils and (d) fewer than 25% of pupils for GCSE history examinations in 2010. [65835] [Official Report, 15 September 2011, Vol. 532, c. 11MC.]

Mr Gibb: 2,734 schools have been identified as being mainstream comprehensive.

All of these schools entered pupils for GCSE history

17 had fewer than 5% of pupils entered for GCSE history

139 had fewer than 10% entered for GCSE history

1,031 schools had fewer than 25% of pupils entered for GCSE history in 2010.

Ministerial Meetings

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what (a) meetings and (b) other engagements (i) Ministers and (ii) special advisers in his Department attended which were also attended by (A) representatives, (B) journalists and (C) other employees of (1) News International and its subsidiary organisations including newspapers, (2) News Corporation and its subsidiary organisations and (3) BSkyB since 12 May 2010. [66063]

Tim Loughton: As has been the practice of previous Administrations, information relating to internal meetings, discussions and advice is not normally disclosed. I refer the right hon. Member to the Prime Minister’s statement to the House on 13 July 2011, Official Report, columns 311-14.

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department is taking to increase sexual awareness among pupils in schools. [67037]

Mr Gibb: The Government believe that it is important for pupils to have access to high-quality, age-appropriate sex and relationships education (SRE). Schools have a clear role in reinforcing the information that young people receive from parents and in providing them with a safe and supportive environment in which to develop the knowledge they need to make wise and informed choices. SRE is compulsory in secondary schools, and primary schools may also choose to provide it. All schools must have an agreed policy on sex education.

In the Schools White Paper, “The Importance of Teaching”, we announced our intention to conduct an internal review of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education, including SRE, so that we can determine how to support schools to improve the quality of teaching in this often sensitive and challenging area. We are still considering the scope and process of the review, but we will say more about this shortly.

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department and its associated public bodies have spent on the provision of sex and relationship education in each year since 2001. [67746]

Sarah Teather: The Department does not collect this information centrally.

Play Facilities

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what plans he has for the future of the Play Strategy issued by his Department's predecessor in 2008; [66078]

(2) what steps he is taking to ensure adequate provision of play facilities (a) in urban and deprived areas and (b) elsewhere; [66120]

(3) what assessment he has made of the adequacy of provision of play facilities in each local authority area. [66121]

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Sarah Teather: The Government recognise how important it is that children have safe, free local places to play, and the benefits these places bring to the wider community more generally. However, it is not for central Government to determine what play facilities are available in local areas, or to tell the experts in the play sector how to deliver play provision. Children, parents, play professionals and local communities best know what is most needed in their local areas.

The play capital programme finished at the end of March 2011, as originally intended under the previous Government's Play Strategy. This Government are giving councils more freedom over how they spend their money, giving communities more control over developments in their neighbourhoods, and making it easier for volunteers and charities to get involved. This should provide the opportunities for committed people and local groups to continue to influence play provision in their areas, leaving responsibility for play provision where it belongs: with local areas and their communities.