29 Jun 2011 : Column 865W

Health

Aortic Aneurysm: Screening

Neil Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps his Department has taken to encourage NHS trusts to apply to take part in the NHS Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programme; [62409]

(2) what provision the NHS has made for screening of men aged over 65 for abdominal aortic aneurysms. [62410]

Mr Simon Burns: Since its announcement in 2008, the Department has funded the implementation of the NHS Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programme and remains committed to ensuring it is fully implemented across England by the end of March 2013.

“The Operating Framework for the NHS in England 2011-12” sets out expectations for the NHS to support Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening. Specifically it states that primary care trusts are expected to:

continue screening for programmes that are currently operational;

implement screening as planned for the 2011-12 phases; and

develop a robust implementation plan for 2012-13, ensuring surgery providers fulfil the requirements for implementation of screening.

Following the review of evidence by the UK National Screening Committee, it concluded that screening should be offered routinely to 65-year-old men, although men over 65 could self refer into the programme. All local programmes are accepting self referrals from men over 65 and a large number of these have been screened following successful local publicity initiatives supported by the national programme.

Baby Care Units: Finance

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much funding he plans to provide to existing neonatal networks in (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15. [62372]

Anne Milton: Funding for neonatal networks is not set centrally by the Department It is for the national health service to determine how best to allocate funding, including funding for neonatal services.

Departmental Billing

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many invoices received by his Department have been paid (a) on time and (b) late in each month since May 2010; and what the monetary value is of the invoices paid late. [62484]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department paid 204,519 invoices in the period from 1 May 2010 to 31 May 2011. Of these, 1,070 (0.52%) were paid later than the contracted 30 days. The total value of invoices paid late in the period was £44.8 million.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 866W

General Practitioners: Greater London

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many GPs there are per head of population in (a) Bexley, (b) Greenwich, (c) Bromley and (d) West Kent primary care trust area. [62430]

Mr Simon Burns: Data for the four primary care trusts (PCTs) as requested, as at 30 September 2010, are shown in the following table. This excludes retainers and registrars.


All general practitioners (GPs) (excluding retainers and registrars) headcount (1) All GPs (excluding retainers and registrars) headcount per 100,000 population

Bexley Care Trust

118

52.2

Bromley PCT

215

69.3

Greenwich Teaching PCT

157

69.4

West Kent PCT

415

61.1

(1) The new headcount methodology for 2010 data is not fully comparable with previous years data due to improvements that make it a more stringent count of absolute staff numbers. Further information on the headcount methodology is available in the Census publication. Headcount totals are unlikely to equal the sum of components. Notes: 1. Data as at 30 September 2010. 2. GP per head of population figures have been calculated using Office for National Statistics resident population estimates. Data Quality: The NHS Information Centre for health and social care seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Sources: 1. The NHS Information Centre for health and social care General and Personal Medical Services Statistics 2. Office for National Statistics, 2009 Final Mid-Year Population Estimates (2001 census based), Adjusted May 2010 to reflect revisions to migration methodology

Hampshire and Sussex

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) which sites his Department and its sponsored bodies own within the boundaries of (a) Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council, (b) East Hampshire District Council, (c) Eastleigh Borough Council, (d) Fareham Borough Council, (e) Gosport Borough Council, (f) Hart District Council and (g) Havant Borough Council; [62315]

(2) which sites his Department and its sponsored bodies own within the boundaries of (a) New Forest District Council, (b) Rushmoor Borough Council, (c) Test Valley Borough Council, (d) Winchester City Council, (e) Portsmouth City Council, (f) Southampton City Council and (g) Isle of Wight Council; [62316]

(3) which sites his Department and its sponsored bodies own within the boundaries of (a) Adur District Council, (b) Arun District Council, (c) Chichester

29 Jun 2011 : Column 867W

District Council,

(d)

Crawley Borough Council,

(e)

Horsham District Council,

(f)

Mid Sussex District Council and

(g)

Worthing Borough Council. [62317]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department or its sponsored bodies are the freehold owners of properties in the council areas are as follows:

Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council:

St Michael's Hospice, Aldermaston Road, Basingstoke

New Forest District Council:

Land at Michigan Way, Totton

Southampton City Council:

Southampton Blood Centre, Coxford Road, Southampton

The Department or its sponsored bodies do not own properties in the other council areas referred to.

Health and Social Care Bill

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what legislative precedents he considered to inform his decision to propose the recommittal of certain parts of the Health and Social Care Bill to the Public Bill Committee. [62323]

Mr Simon Burns: Parliament agreed to a partial recommittal of the Health and Social Care Bill. I refer the hon. Member to my speech of 21 June 2011, Official Report, column 198.

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he held with the Prime Minister on the proposed recommittal of some of the clauses of the Health and Social Care Bill to the Public Bill Committee prior to the Bill’s recommittal. [62518]

Mr Simon Burns: The Secretary of State for Health meets with the Prime Minister on a regular basis to discuss a range of issues.

Health Services: Greater London

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will estimate the number of health care professionals who will (a) retire, (b) take voluntary redundancy and (c) lose their jobs in (i) London, (ii) the London Borough of Newham and (iii) West Ham constituency in the next 12 months. [62374]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not collected centrally. The hon. Member may wish to approach the organisations concerned for the information requested.

Health Services: Learning Disability

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the effects of the introduction of GP consortia on services for those with learning disabilities. [62708]

Paul Burstow: The Health and Social Care Bill 2011 Impact Assessment summarises the benefits of handing commissioning responsibility to clinical commissioning groups. General practitioners (GPs) see 800,000 people a day/300 million people a year and play a pivotal role in helping to coordinate national health service care. The GP role is particularly prominent for people with

29 Jun 2011 : Column 868W

learning disabilities, and in helping patients to access wider or more specialised NHS services through the thousands of referral decisions they make on a daily basis.

Home Care Services: Older People

Mr Swayne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to respond to the Equality and Human Rights Commission report on care for people aged over 65 in England; and if he will make a statement. [62340]

Paul Burstow: There can be no place for poor quality care in care services. Dignity and respect are the cornerstones of good quality care.

We welcome the interim findings of the Equality and Human Rights Commission report on home care. We will respond to the final report when it is published in November this year. This report and others will help drive up standards in care and expose bad practice.

We will publish a White Paper setting out the Government's plans for reforming social care—this will include measures designed to improve the quality of care and support services.

Maternity Services

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the role of midwife-led birthing centres; and if he will make a statement. [62417]

Anne Milton: Midwife-led birthing centres provide care for women assessed as being at low risk of complications. The Department has commissioned the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit to undertake a research study, entitled ‘Birthplace’, which will compare the outcomes of births planned at home, in different types of midwifery unit, and in hospital units with obstetric services. This is a three-year study, with a report expected in autumn 2011.

Maternity Services: High Peak

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will take steps to ensure that the engagement and consultation on the future of the Corbar Birthing Unit in High Peak will be (a) open to and (b) responsive to the views submitted by the local community; [62416]

(2) how many mothers were transferred from the Corbar Birthing Unit in High Peak to other hospitals due to complications during birth in each of the last five years. [62419]

Anne Milton: The information requested on how many mothers were transferred from the Corbar Birthing Unit in High Peak to other hospitals due to complications during birth in each of the last five years is not collected by the Department.

While consultation on national health service reconfiguration is a matter for the local NHS, the Secretary of State for Health has outlined new strengthened criteria he expects decisions on NHS service changes to meet. All service reconfiguration proposals must:

29 Jun 2011 : Column 869W

demonstrate support from general practitioner commissioners;

ensure arrangements for public and patient engagement, including local authorities, should be further strengthened;

ensure greater clarity about the clinical evidence base underpinning proposals; and

take into account the need to develop and support patient choice.

Mental Health Services

Mr Buckland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the effects of cognitive behavioural therapy on the underlying causes of anxiety and depression in children and adults. [62525]

Paul Burstow: The Department's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funding a range of research on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for anxiety and depression in children and adults. For example, the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme is funding a £2.6 million trial of brief psychodynamic psychotherapy, CBT and treatment as usual in adolescents with moderate to severe depression attending routine child and adolescent mental health clinics.

Mental Health Services: Greater London

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will estimate the change in funding in real terms for mental health services in (a) London, (b) the London borough of Newham and (c) West Ham constituency in the next four years; [62373]

(2) how much funding was allocated to mental health services in (a) London, (b) the London borough of Newham and (c) West Ham constituency in the last four years. [62376]

Paul Burstow: This information is not held centrally.

It is currently for primary care trusts to commission services to meet the health care needs of their local populations, taking account of local and national priorities. PCTs recurrent revenue allocations are not broken down by service or policy area.

The hon. Member may, therefore, wish to contact the chief executive of Newham PCT for further information about PCT funding for local mental health services.

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many mental health professionals were employed by the NHS in (a) London, (b) the London borough of Newham and (c) West Ham constituency in the last four years. [62375]

Mr Simon Burns: Information is not collected in the format requested.

The following table provides the numbers of medical staff within the psychiatry specialty group and non-medical qualified nursing and scientific, therapeutic and technical staff within psychiatry areas of work in the London Strategic Health Authority area, Newham University Hospital National Health Service Trust and Newham Primary Care Trust (PCT) for each of the last four years.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 870W

Hospital and Community Health Services medical staff within the psychiatry specialty group and non-medical qualified nursing and scientific, therapeutic and technical staff within psychiatry areas of work in England, London Strategic Health Authority area and organisations in West Ham constituency—as at 30 September each year
Headcount


2007 2008 2009 2010 (1)

England

Medical staff in the psychiatry group of specialties

9,554

9,739

9,934

9,731

 

Qualified nursing staff(2)

56,117

56,310

55,851

54,145

 

Qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical staff(3)

8,452

8,889

9,848

10,195

           

London

Medical staff in the psychiatry group of specialties

2,329

2,348

2,408

2,377

 

Qualified nursing staff(2)

10,631

10,576

10,012

9,667

 

Qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical staff(3)

2,485

2,639

3,033

3,096

           

Newham University Hospital NHS Trust

Medical staff in the psychiatry group of specialties

1

2

1

2

 

Qualified nursing staff(2)

1

1

0

0

 

Qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical staff(3)

0

0

0

0

           

Newham PCT

Medical staff in the psychiatry group of specialties

0

0

0

0

 

Qualified nursing staff(2)

6

7

7

4

 

Qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical staff(3)

40

35

36

29

29 Jun 2011 : Column 871W

(1) The new headcount methodology for 2010 data is not fully comparable with previous years data due to improvements that make it a more stringent count of absolute staff numbers. Headcount totals are unlikely to equal the sum of components. Further information on the headcount methodology is available in the census publication at the following address: www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/010_Workforce/nhsstaff0010/Census_Bulletin_March_2011_Final.pdf (2) Community Psychiatry, Other Psychiatry, Community Learning Disabilities, Other Learning Disabilities qualified nursing staff. (3) Clinical psychology, Psycho-therapy qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical staff. Data Quality: The national health service information centre for health and social care seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect or missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality. Where changes impact on figures already published, this is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Sources: 1. The National Health Service Information Centre for health and social care Medical and Dental Workforce Census 2. The National Health Service Information Centre for health and social care Non-Medical Workforce Census

Monitor

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he plans to publish details of the future role of Monitor. [62390]

Mr Simon Burns: On 23 June 2011 the Government tabled proposed amendments to the Health and Social Care Bill in relation to the future role of Monitor. This followed the Government’s response to the Future Forum report. There will be opportunity for further debate and scrutiny of Monitor’s role during the Public Bill Committee.

NHS Future Forum

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what process he followed to appoint the independent members of the NHS Future Forum. [62324]

Mr Simon Burns: In order to take full advantage of the natural break in the passage of the Health and Social Care Bill, the Government assembled an independent advisory panel—the NHS Future Forum—at pace.

The guiding principle for appointments to the NHS Future Forum was to ensure that, while not designed to be a representative body, its membership included a wide range of different voices from and around the national health service.

While members brought their own professional expertise, their task was to engage with staff, patients, communities and organisations from across the NHS, to reflect on that engagement and to make recommendations for improvements to the legislation where necessary.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) time, (b) date and (c) location was of each event attended by (i) Ministers and (ii) members of the NHS Future Forum as part of the NHS listening exercise. [62852]

Mr Simon Burns: As part of the listening exercise, the ministerial team, along with members of the NHS Future Forum, have attended 252 listening events, to

29 Jun 2011 : Column 872W

listen to views of the public, staff and patients. In addition to these events, Ministers and Future Forum members will have listened to many other individuals through their own networks and through informal conversations; we do not however have records of all such engagements.

A copy of the NHS listening exercise table of events has been placed in the Library.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to his contribution of 14 June 2011, Official Report, column 646, on NHS Future Forum, whether the principles and rules for co-operation and competition include the preferred provider model. [62871]

Mr Simon Burns: The Principles and Rules for Co-operation and Competition (PRCC) were revised in July 2010 to make clear the Government's commitment to any qualified provider. Principle five of the PRCC sets out that:

“commissioners and providers should promote patient choice, including—where appropriate—choice of Any Willing Provider and ensure that patients have accurate, reliable and accessible information to exercise more choice and control over their health care.”

NHS: Conditions of Employment

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent representations he has received on the potential effects of his planned reforms of the NHS on the (a) pay and (b) terms and conditions of NHS staff. [62278]

Mr Simon Burns: Since 1 January 2011 there have been five parliamentary questions relating to the potential effects of the planned reforms on the pay or terms and conditions of national health service staff.

We are not able to say how many items of correspondence we have received as the Department does not index correspondence at a level to allow this. Departmental records show that, since 1 January 2011, we have received over 3,500 items of correspondence about the modernisation of the NHS. This figure represents correspondence received by the Department's central correspondence team only.

The Department is also working in partnership with NHS employers and trade unions to develop a HR Framework to support the implementation of the reforms.

NHS: Future Forum

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will estimate the monetary value of office space and facilities made available by his Department to the NHS Future Forum and its staff between 4 April and 14 June 2011; [62824]

(2) what estimate he has made of the monetary value of support provided by staff of his Department to the NHS Future Forum; [62825]

(3) what the costs were of (a) room hire and (b) catering in respect of his Department's NHS listening events; [62827]

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(4) pursuant to his contribution of 14 June 2011, Official Report, column 657, on NHS Future Forum, under what budget headings the costs of the NHS listening exercise were incurred. [62845]

Mr Simon Burns: The costs of the NHS listening exercise were recorded under the budget headings of event related cost, printing and expenses.

The office space and facilities provided for the NHS Future Forum and its support staff by the Department was from within existing office space and facilities available in the Department and added no additional cost to the public purse.

The secretariat support for the NHS Future Forum provided was from within existing Department staffing levels and added no additional cost to the public purse.

Up until 23 June 2011, the costs of room hire and catering in respect of NHS Future Forum events during the NHS listening exercise for which the Department has been invoiced, are £27,248.63. The Department was not invoiced separately for room hire and catering in relation to these events.

NHS: Innovation

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he takes to (a) promote and (b) fund innovation in the NHS. [62429]

Mr Simon Burns: The national health service has a proud history when it comes to innovation and is recognised as a leader in the development of innovative techniques and technologies—stretching back across its 63-year history. However, whilst the NHS is recognised as a world leader at invention, the spread of those innovations within the NHS has often been too slow, and sometimes even the best of them fail to achieve widespread use.

As United Kingdom public services face a tougher financial climate, innovation has a vital role to play to continue improving the quality of care for patients, and support the NHS as a major investor and wealth creator in the UK.

This is why in the plan for growth we announced that the NHS chief executive would review how the adoption and diffusion of innovations could be accelerated across the NHS. Working in consultation with industry, academia and other interested parties the NHS chief executive will produce a report in November 2011 that will inform the strategic approach to innovation in the modernised NHS.

However, there is already a substantial amount of work underway to create conditions for innovation to flourish, including Regional Innovation Funds for innovation in front line staff, Innovative Technology Adoption Procurement programme to encourage NHS-wide adoption of high impact innovative medical technologies, and NHS innovation challenge prizes to reward ideas that tackle big health and social care challenges now and in the future.

We also know that adoption is dependent on a culture that embraces innovation. The coalition’s modernisation agenda will encourage an NHS that is more agile, more dynamic, more open to ideas and better at adopting new technologies.

Subject to legislation, the NHS Commissioning Board will have new legal duties to promote research and

29 Jun 2011 : Column 874W

innovation in the NHS. This will enable the NHS to fulfil its role in delivering better healthcare outcomes and to act as an engine for economic growth. It will achieve this by supporting development and adoption of new healthcare or health service related technologies, techniques and processes, whilst providing a market for the new products and services and supporting business, especially small to medium enterprises, to deliver this.

The Government have also committed an additional £10 million over the next two financial years to small business research initiative to address healthcare challenges, making it easier for firms, and small firms in particular, to access the NHS.

However, we need to go further and faster if we are to effectively address significant challenges facing health and social care—now and in the future. Innovation is an essential tool in helping address the challenges of an ageing population, chronic disease, health inequalities and rising public expectations—especially when resources are constrained.

NHS: Labour Mobility

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many staff who have been made redundant by primary care trusts have been re-employed within the NHS (a) directly and (b) on a temporary or contract basis in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [62521]

Mr Simon Burns: The estimated number of staff who have been made redundant by primary care trusts between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2010 and have been re-employed within the NHS on a permanent basis is 40 and on a fixed term basis is 20.

These estimates are based on data extracted from the Electronic Staff Record Data Warehouse and therefore do not include staff who may have been re-employed by general practices, or Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust or Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.

NHS: Manpower

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the potential effect of his planned reforms to the NHS on the number of staff employed by the NHS in each of the next five years; and if he will make a statement. [62234]

Mr Simon Burns: The information requested is not currently available.

As part of the 2011-12 operating planning process, the Department is collecting plans and projections on the Hospital and Community Health Services workforce which include the forecast pay bill up to March 2015 from strategic health authorities. This information will be published in the summer.

NHS: Reorganisation

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what consultation he held on NHS reform prior to the publication of the White Paper Equity and excellence: Liberating the NHS; and if he will make a statement. [62322]

29 Jun 2011 : Column 875W

Mr Simon Burns: As set out in the Government's Code of Practice on Consultation, published by the previous administration in July 2008, consultation by the Government should take place when there is clarity about what is being proposed. The Government therefore held a three-month consultation on the White Paper as soon as the White Paper was published in July last year.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what travel and subsistence costs were incurred by (a) Future Forum members and (b) officials supporting the Future Forum in relation to the NHS listening exercise; [62826]

(2) what arrangements he put in place for payment of members of the NHS Future Forum; and whether these arrangements included payment of locum costs for clinical staff. [62846]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department did not put in place arrangements to pay members of the NHS Future Forum, who volunteered their time to support the NHS Listening Exercise. However, the Department put in place arrangements so that members of the NHS Future Forum could claim travel and subsistence relating to their attendance at events during the NHS Listening Exercise.

With prior agreement, NHS Future Forum members were also able to claim costs of locum cover where this was necessary to enable their attendance at Forum meetings.

In addition, the Department made arrangements to compensate the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations, a registered charity, for loaning their chief executive, Sir Stephen Bubb, for the period the NHS Listening Exercise so that Sir Stephen was able to act as chair for the Forum's workstream on choice and competition.

To date (up until 23 June 2011) the expenses and locum fees invoiced by the 45 members of the NHS Future Forum, which were incurred during the eight-week period of the NHS Listening Exercise, are £12,937.00; the breakdown of which is £9,794.70 for expenses and £3,142.30 for locum costs. The entitlements to claim were in line with the departmental standard rates and the sums have been met from the Department's allocated budget.

Travel and subsistence costs for staff supporting the NHS Future Forum were in line with the departmental standard rates and were met by the Department's existing staffing budget.

Organs: Donors

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people have registered for organ donation using driving licence application forms since the introduction of that facility. [62396]

Anne Milton: The information is provided in the following table.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 876W

Number of people in the United Kingdom on the Organ Donor Register as at 23 June 2011 by source of registration
Source class Number of registrations Percentage of total

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency

8,744,996

48.3

General practitioner registration

4,162,359

23.0

Boots

1,251,952

6.9

Online

606,659

3.4

Leaflet

1,070,710

5.9

Organ donor line

80,792

0.4

Other

2,188,054

12.1

Total

18,105,522

 
Source: NHS Blood and Transplant

Patients: Safety

Mr George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 21 June 2011, Official Report, columns 262-3W, on NHS Trusts, which of the NHS trusts subject to the national review of costs associated with private finance initiative schemes have raised patient safety concerns related to their financial situation with (a) the strategic health authority and (b) his Department. [62505]

Mr Simon Burns: Work on the tripartite formal agreements between all the remaining national health service trusts, strategic health authorities and the Department has not yet been completed. When these have been finalised and the agreement has been signed by all parties, they will be published locally. Each agreement will identify the issues each national health service trust faces and the actions that will establish them as sustainable providers of high quality health care. This will include those who are part of the current review of the issues associated with private finance initiative schemes.

More generally, there will be no ‘lowering of the bar’ in respect of standards required by Monitor to achieve foundation trust status, particularly in the way that quality of care is considered during the application process.

Primary Care Trusts: Expenditure

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department has (a) spent to date and (b) allocated for future expenditure for (i) redundancy payments, (ii) pay in lieu of notice and (iii) additional payments to pension schemes for staff from primary care trusts. [62520]

Mr Simon Burns: Audited 2010-11 data on primary care trust (PCT) redundancy payments is not yet available. Figures will be available once the NHS (England) Summarised Accounts are audited, signed and laid before Parliament in late July.

The Impact Assessments (IA) published alongside the Health and Social Care Bill in January 2011, copies of which have already been placed in the Library, estimated the costs of modernising the NHS and reducing administration costs. This included the redundancy costs associated with reducing the size of the workforce. The redundancy cost estimates include redundancy payments, pay in lieu of notice and payments to pension schemes.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 877W

The cost estimate associated with these redundancies was in the range of £772 million to £1,288 million in PCTs and strategic health authorities (SHAs).

There is no central money set aside for redundancy costs in PCTs and SHAs. The Operating Framework for the NHS in England 2011-12 requires PCTs to hold 2% of their revenue allocation to support the costs of change, including the redundancy costs associated with modernising the NHS. This equates to £1,600 million in 2011-12 and, potentially, a similar sum in 2012-13. Not all of this resource will be required for redundancy costs.

Psychotherapy

Jim Fitzpatrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what consultation the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence had with psychotherapy professionals in developing its guidelines on psychotherapy; [62288]

(2) what consultation with professional organisations in the field of psychotherapy the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence undertook when developing its guidelines on psychotherapy. [62289]

Paul Burstow: This is a matter for the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as an independent body. I have asked the chief executive of NICE to write to the right hon. Member with this information. A copy of that letter will be placed in the Library.

Radiotherapy

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many cancer networks include at least one radiotherapy centre that offers intensity-modulated radiotherapy; [62365]

(2) what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of breast cancer patients suitable for treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy; [62366]

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what estimate he has made of the proportion of commissioners who have developed local plans to ensure the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy where appropriate, as set out in the NHS Operating Framework 2011-12; [62516]

(2) with reference to Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer, what progress his Department has made in developing a tariff for (a) radiotherapy and (b) intensity-modulated radiation therapy; and when he expects to set those tariffs; [62517]

(3) pursuant to the answer of 25 October 2010, Official Report, column 127W, on radiotherapy, what recent progress the National Radiotherapy Dataset project team has made on improving the collection of data on intensity-modulated radiotherapy provision. [62519]

Paul Burstow: Expert opinion has suggested that 30% of breast cancer patients would benefit from a simple form of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). A trial is underway to establish the evidence base for the use of IMRT to treat breast cancer.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 878W

“The Operating Framework for the NHS in England 2011-12” sets out that to improve outcomes from radiotherapy treatment for cancer patients, commissioners should develop local plans to ensure that access rates to radiotherapy and the use of advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as IMRT, are appropriate for their populations. The National Cancer Action Team has been working with providers to support the development of IMRT services and, at this time, 20 of the 28 cancer networks have at least one provider offering IMRT.

It is anticipated that national currencies for radiotherapy and IMRT will be introduced for contracting in April 2012, with prices agreed locally. Feedback from the service on the use of these currencies will inform decisions on when it would be appropriate to introduce a mandatory national tariff, which is likely to be no earlier than 2013-14.

The Radiotherapy Clinical Information Group will publish a report on the first full year of radiotherapy data collection shortly. This will show the progress made on the collection of IMRT data as part of the National Radiotherapy Dataset.

International Development

Departmental Offices

Mr Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the total is of (a) staffing and (b) other costs of his Department's offices in (i) Belgium, (ii) Italy, (iii) France, (iv) Switzerland and (v) the US in each of the last five years. [62413]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) does not maintain its own offices in Belgium, Italy, France, Switzerland or the United States. However, there is a small number of DFID staff working in these countries to represent UK interests and promote the Government's international development priorities in a number of international organisations. These include a range of United Nations agencies (Italy, France, Switzerland and the US), the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (France), the European Union (Belgium), the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (Switzerland), and the Global Fund to fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Switzerland).

The following table sets out the costs of this representation in 2009-10 and 2010-11. Current reporting systems do not provide consistent financial information for financial years prior to 2009-10.

    £000
Year Country Total staffing costs (1) Total other costs (2) Total running costs

2009-10

Belgium

419

27

446

 

Italy

176

393

569

 

France

219

551

770

 

Switzerland

200

0

200

 

United States

80

128

208

         

2010-11

Belgium

227

39

266

 

Italy

161

250

411

29 Jun 2011 : Column 879W

 

France

196

221

417

 

Switzerland

134

0

134

 

United States

170

130

300

(1) Staffing costs include salaries and allowances to DFID staff. (2) Other costs include contributions to office running costs and payments to locally employed staff.

Developing Countries: Health Services

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will increase the proportion of official development assistance that is allocated as budget support in order to assist developing countries in covering (a) health workers' salaries and (b) other recurrent costs of their healthcare systems. [62367]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: We do not have a central process to determine the amount of aid to allocate through different aid modalities. We make decisions based on each country context.

The Bilateral and Multilateral Aid Reviews, of March 2011, presented an ambitious re-orientation of Britain's development assistance: from focusing on inputs to focusing on results and value for money.

Country Offices in their Operational Plans (2011-12 to 2014-15) have presented how they will achieve development results to change the lives of the poor.

We will provide budget support when we assess that it can achieve better results and value for money than other ways of delivering aid. The Department for International Development (DFID) estimates that around 25% of its aid to health is spent on human resources for health.

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to support developing countries which are expanding and strengthening their health workforce (a) under the Millennium Development Goals and (b) as part of the Global Strategy for Women and Children's Health. [62368]

Mr O'Brien: The UK Government fully recognise the central importance of health workers in accelerating progress towards our health goals, and are strongly committed to strengthening health systems, and to supporting health workers as part of this. The Department for International Development (DFID) estimates that around 25% of its aid to health supports human resources for health.

We will continue to help countries to develop their own healthcare systems in a way that suits their needs and contexts, including support to country efforts to build and maintain health worker capacity.

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to ensure equitable access to health services for the poorest women and their children in (a) developing countries and (b) rural areas of developing countries. [62394]

29 Jun 2011 : Column 880W

Mr O'Brien: The Department for International Development (DFID) is ensuring equitable access to health services by improving the coverage and quality of health services, especially in rural areas. In particular, we are investing heavily in services which will improve maternal health outcomes and tackle malaria.

To make sure these services reach the poorest women and their children, we are also helping remove the barriers that stop these vulnerable groups from accessing care. For example, over the last year DFID has supported the launch of free health care for pregnant women and children in Sierra Leone. As a result, the number of children under five receiving health care has tripled and the number of maternity emergencies treated in health units has increased by 150%.

Developing Countries: Malnutrition

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to reduce the number of children under the age of five in developing countries who die in conditions where undernutrition is a major contributory factor. [62393]

Mr O'Brien: UK support over the next four years will stop 10 million more children going hungry in countries with a high burden of malnutrition in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. A growing portfolio of nutrition-related programmes will focus on reaching pregnant women and children under the age of five. Programmes include treatment for severe acutely malnourished children, and prevention, for example by providing support for breastfeeding and nutrition supplements. Other programmes address the underlying causes of undernutrition, such as lack of access to food, via cash transfer and agriculture programmes. A research programme will address evidence gaps on the most cost-effective solutions.

The UK wants an effective international response to tackle undernutrition and is active in the Scaling Up Nutrition initiative (SUN). SUN supports countries to develop their own comprehensive nutrition programmes aimed at tackling undernutrition in the first “1000 days” from conception to child's second birthday.

Education

Academies

Oliver Heald: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to fund the refurbishment and rebuilding of academies; and if he will make a statement. [60750]

Mr Gibb: There are a number of Academies that have had capital funding approved for new or refurbished buildings through the Building Schools for the Future programme. Projects of this nature, which started under the previous Government and are now confirmed, will continue to completion.

Priority is being given to meeting urgent building condition needs and the basic need for new pupil places because of local demographic changes. An £85 million Academies Capital Maintenance Fund is available for the purposes of addressing urgent building condition

29 Jun 2011 : Column 881W

needs. The first round of applications to the fund closed on 27 May 2011. Partnerships for Schools is currently assessing these applications and will notify Academies of the outcome by the end of June.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education ordered a comprehensive review of all the Department's capital programmes last year, which reported on 8 April 2011. The Department's response to the review, which is planned for later this year, will inform how we provide capital funding to Academies in future years, including any for new buildings and refurbishment projects.

Academies: Sheffield

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the contribution of the Minister of State of 16 June 2011, Official Report, column 938, on academies (funding), which schools in the city of Sheffield area will become academies under his proposals. [61350]

Mr Gibb: On 16 June 2011, Official Report, column 938, during the debate on academy funding, I referred to the announcement by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education to extend the academies programme to underperforming primary schools, particularly the 200 worst-performing primary schools in England. The Department does not intend to publish a list of these schools.

Adoption

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many placement orders have ended before adoption has been granted in each year since 2004-05. [61695]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 23 June 2011]: The number of children whose placement orders ended before an adoption order was granted is shown in table 1, along with the number of children who ceased to be looked after while subject to a placement order other than those who were adopted. Placement orders were introduced in December 2005; therefore the first full year for which this information is available is the year ending 31 March 2007.

In addition to the children whose placement orders ended before an adoption order was granted, there were 190 children in the year ending 31 March 2010 who were no longer placed for adoption but continued to be looked after under a placement order.

Information on the number of children no longer placed for adoption was available for the first time in 2010.

Table 1: Children looked after whose placement orders ceased during the year ending 31 March (1,2,3,4) years ending 31 March 2007 to 2010, coverage: England
Numbers

2007 2008 2009 2010

Children whose placement order ceased and continued to be looked after under a different legal status

10

40

60

80

29 Jun 2011 : Column 882W

Children who ceased to be looked after while subject to a placement order, other than those who were adopted(5)

10

20

40

20

(1) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short term placements. (2) Historical data may differ from older publications. This is mainly due to the implementation of amendments and corrections sent by some local authorities after the publication date of previous materials. (3) All figures have been rounded to the nearest 10. (4) Placement orders were introduced in December 2005 and replaced Freeing orders which unlike placement orders cannot be rescinded. (5) This includes children who ceased to be looked after for the following reasons: died, care taken over by another local authority in the UK, returned home to live with parents, residence order granted, special guardianship order granted, moved into independent living arrangement or ceased to be looked after for any other unspecified reason. Source: SSDA 903

Business: Education

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will estimate the proportion of young people who participated in enterprise awareness activities in schools in each year since 2005. [61093]

Mr Gibb: The Department does not collect this information.

An independent evaluation of the Enterprise Education programme was published in July 2010.

CAFCASS: Manpower

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many people of each (a) grade and (b) responsibility were employed by the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service in 2010; [62669]

(2) how many staff (a) joined and (b) left the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (CAFCASS) in each CAFCASS region in 2010. [62670]

Tim Loughton: These questions relate to operational matters for which CAFCASS is responsible. CAFCASS's chief executive, Anthony Douglas, has written to the right hon. Member to address the issues raised. A copy of his letter has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Anthony Douglas, dated 28 June 2011:

I am writing to you in response to the two Parliamentary Questions that you tabled recently:

PQ62669—Mr Elfyn Llwyd (Dwyfor Meirionnydd): To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people of each (a) grade and (b) responsibility were employed by Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Services in 2010.

Cafcass does not employ people on a grade basis; the table below breaks down employees by responsibility as at 31 December 2010.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 883W

Grade Head c ount 31 December 2010

Business Support such as Office Managers and administrators

313

Cleaners

7

Family Court Advisors

1,110

Bank FCAs and Sessional Workers who work on a case by case basis

170

Heads of Service

32

Senior Managers

22

Service Managers

137

Specialist Staff with specialist skills such as Finance, HR, etc.

139

Family Support Workers

94

Total

2,024

PQ 62670—Mr Elfyn Llwyd (Dwyfor Meirionnydd): To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff (a) joined and (b) left Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Services (CAFCASS) in each CAFCASS region in 2010.

Starters and leavers by region January to December 2010
Region Starters Leavers

North

44

109

Central

79

102

South

99

104

National Office

32

34

Total

254

349

Departmental Written Questions

Stella Creasy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education to what proportion of parliamentary questions for written answer his Department has responded (a) on the date for answer, (b) less than five days after the date for answer, (c) between five and 10 days after the date for answer and (d) more than 10 days after the date for answer in each month since May 2010. [61763]

Tim Loughton: The Department aims to answer named day questions on the date specified by the Member and ordinary questions within five sitting days. Where it is not possible to provide a full answer within the usual deadline, the Department believes it will usually be preferable to provide a full answer a few days late than to provide an incomplete answer.

The management information on PQ performance is recorded to capture PQs that have been answered within the deadline; answered between six and 10 days of the deadline; and 10 days after the deadline. Therefore this table combines the answers to parts (b) and (c) of the question.

Ordinary written PQs
Percentage

Met parliamentary deadline Less then five days and five to 10 days after the date for answer 10 days or longer after the p arliamentary deadline

May 2010

25

61

14

June 2010

2

35

63

July 2010

1

31

68

August 2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

September 2010

2

6

92

29 Jun 2011 : Column 884W

October 2010

5

20

75

November 2010

7

13

87

December 2010

0

6

94

January 2011

1

16

83

February 2011

1

2

97

March 2011

12

51

37

April 2011

66

24

9

May 2011

24

58

18

Named day PQs
Percentage

Met parliamentary deadline Less then five days and five to 10 days after the date for answer 10 days or longer after the p arliamentary deadline

May 2010

34

44

22

June 2010

18

44

38

July 2010

8

21

70

August 2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

September 2010

11

9

80

October 2010

6

6

78

November 2010

9

25

66

December 2010

4

11

85

January 2011

2

25

73

February 2011

6

3

90

March 2011

18

60

21

April 2011

33

45

22

May 2011

26

45

29

These figures are drawn from the Department's PQ tracking system. The figures have been drawn from the Department's database which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Education Maintenance Allowance

Nadhim Zahawi: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many young people received more than £1,000 in education maintenance allowance in 2009-10. [60533]

Mr Gibb: This is a matter for the Young People’s Learning Agency (YPLA) who operate the education maintenance allowance for the Department for Education. Peter Lauener, the YPLA’s chief executive, has written to the hon. Member for Stratford on Avon with the information requested.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 885W

Letter from Peter Lauener dated 21 June 2011:

I am writing in response to your Parliamentary Question that asked;

“How many young people received more than £1,000 of education maintenance allowance in 2009-10.”

The number of young people who received weekly payments during the 2009-2010 academic year totalling more than £1000 was 153,798. Including bonus payments the figure was 296,802.

English Baccalaureate

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will monitor the (a) effect on the number of schools offering full course GCSE Religious Education and (b) other effects of his proposed arrangements for the humanities element of the English baccalaureate. [61448]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 22 June 2011]: We do not currently collect systematic data on detailed subject option choices offered by schools or the choices pupils make on their GCSE subjects. However, the Department has work under way to assess whether and how the English baccalaureate has influenced the GCSE choices made in schools from September 2011. We will use this, together with a range of other information sources, to inform future policy development.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 886W

Free School Meals

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average cost per meal was of free school meals in each local authority in each of the last five years. [61021]

Mr Gibb: This information is not collected by the Department. However, the School Food Trust publishes information annually on meal prices in primary, secondary and special schools. This information for 2009-10 can be found in Table 10 of the “Fifth annual survey of take up of school lunches in England” report, available at:

http://www.schoolfoodtrust.org.uk/school-cooks-caterers/reports/fifth-annual-survey-of-take-up-of-school-meals-in-england

The survey does not specifically ask for free school meal prices, but the Trust advises that the price of a paid-for school meal can be used to indicate the value of a free school meal.

Free School Meals: Kent

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils were eligible for free school meals in (a) Kent and (b) Dartford constituency in the latest period for which figures are available. [61941]

Mr Gibb: The information requested is shown in the table.

State-funded primary and secondary schools (1, 2, 3) and special schools (4) : Free school meal eligibility (5, 6) . As at January 2011. In Kent local authority and Dartford parliamentary constituency
  State-funded primary schools (1, 2) State-funded secondary schools (1, 3) Special schools (4)

Number on roll (5) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming for free school meals (5, 6) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming for free school meals (5, 6) Number on roll (5) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming for free school meals (5, 6) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming for free school meals (5, 6) Number on roll (5) Number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming for free school meals (5, 6) Percentage known to be eligible for and claiming for free school meals (5, 6)

Kent local authority

106,298

16,217

15.3

81,714

9,435

11.5

2,763

872

31.6

Dartford parliamentary constituency

8,304

1,111

13.4

6,800

596

8.8

293

82

28.0

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes primary academies. (3) Includes city technology colleges and secondary academies. (4) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools, excludes general hospital schools. (5) Includes sole and dual (main) registrations. (6) Pupils known to be eligible for and claiming for free school meals who have full-time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils Source: School Census

The latest information, for January 2011, on free school meal eligibility and other school and pupil information can be found at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001012/index.shtml

Further Education: Barnsley

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will take steps to increase access to further education for 16 to 18-year-olds in Barnsley. [60421]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 21 June 2011]:The Government have already taken steps to enable more 16 to 18-year-olds to access further education and training. In Barnsley, the majority of 16 and 17-year-olds are already participating in education and work based education or training: 79% at the end of 2009.

The process of offering 16 and 17-year-olds a suitable place in education or training by the end of September, which has been known as the ‘September Guarantee', will continue. In Barnsley 97.8% of 16 and 17-year-olds received such an offer in 2010.

We are funding more education and training places than ever before, which is a very high priority as we prepare for raising the participation age to 17 in 2013 and 18 by 2015. In total we will be funding over 1.3 million places in schools, colleges and other providers and a further 230,000 apprenticeship places during the 2011/12 academic year. This is sufficient to provide a place in

29 Jun 2011 : Column 887W

education or training for every young person who wants one. In Barnsley, 16-18 school and further education providers have been allocated funding to support 267 more student places in 2011/12 than this year.

From September 2011, those young people who are facing genuine financial barriers to participation in education or training post 16 will be able to apply for financial support from the new £180 million 16-19 Bursary Fund.

Local authorities will retain their statutory duty to encourage, enable or assist young people's participation in education or training. Using funding from the new Early Intervention Grant, they will be able to intervene early with those who are at risk of disengagement and provide the tailored support that young people in their area need to engage.

Primary Education: Yorkshire and the Humber

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many primary schools in (a) North East Lincolnshire, (b) North Lincolnshire and (c) Hull were below the Government's primary minimum floor standard in each of the last five years. [61423]

Mr Gibb: The numbers of schools below the Government's primary minimum floor standards in each of the last five years are:


2010 2009 2008 2007 2006

(a) North East Lincolnshire

5

9

15

14

14

(b) North Lincolnshire

4

8

7

10

10

(c) Kingston upon Hull

9

11

18

23

26

The primary floor standard combines measures of attainment and progression and was introduced in November 2010. The 2010 floor standard has been applied to previous years, including attainment and progression for 2009 and 2010 and attainment only for the previous three years as progression data are not available.

Religion: Education

Caroline Nokes: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of excluding religious education (RE) from the English baccalaureate on the number of students studying full course RE at GCSE level. [61288]

Mr Gibb: We do not currently collect systematic data on the choices pupils make on their GCSE subjects. However, the Department has work under way to assess whether and how the English baccalaureate has influenced the GCSE offer made in schools from September 2011. We will use this, together with a range of other information sources, to inform future policy development.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 888W

Schools: Admissions

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many representations he has received from local authorities in support of the abolition of admissions forums to date. [60834]

Mr Gibb: We have had a number of discussions at official level, which highlighted the very mixed view on the effectiveness of admissions forum. Some have said they are very useful and always quorate, other local authorities have found the forums to be costly and unproductive. As was made clear during the Commons stages of the Education Bill, we are not proposing the abolition of admission forums. Instead, clause 34 of the Education Bill would remove the mandate on every local authority to set up an admissions forum, leaving the local authority and their communities to decide what groups are most appropriate for their circumstances. This does not reduce parental voice in the admission system. Parents will still have the right to be consulted on admission arrangements, to object to any they consider are not compliant with the code, and they retain the right to appeal against a decision not to offer them a place at one of their preferred schools.

Schools: Assessments

Mr Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether he plans to provide unique pupil numbers on future releases of school examinations data; [58817]

(2) what steps he plans to take to promote more do-it-yourself league tables of educational performance. [58818]

Mr Gibb: We want to make it easier for parents and the public to hold schools to account, giving them access to more information about every school and how it performs, to make a positive impact on the choices that parents make. An important element of this will be the provision of information in a way that allows parents to ask the questions that are most important to them.

From January 2012, the tables will include the publication of a wider range of KS4 indicators than ever before and increasing amounts of data released from the National Pupil Database. To allow a greater level of interrogation and to enable alternative league tables to be produced, further work is being undertaken to ensure that the release of the data required for such a purpose is compliant with the Data Protection Act. The release of unique pupil numbers is not required to facilitate the production of alternative league tables and the Department has no plans to release publicly personal and identifiable data including unique pupil numbers alongside examinations and test data.

Schools: Catering

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) free schools and (b) academies do not have catering facilities. [59973]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 27 June 2011]: The majority of the free schools hoping to open in September 2011 will have catering facilities. Information on catering facilities at academies is not held centrally.

29 Jun 2011 : Column 889W

Schools: Standards

Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) state schools, (b) independent schools and (c) faith schools have been placed in special measures by Ofsted in each of the last five years; and how many have been closed for reasons of poor performance in each such year. [61809]

Mr Gibb: Data from 2005/06 to 2009/10 on state and faith schools which have been placed in special measures and those that have closed has been placed in the House Libraries.

Independent schools are not subject to special measures. Instead, the Department takes regulatory action against schools where there is evidence that a school is not meeting the Independent School Standards.

Schools: Vocational Guidance

Lilian Greenwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent assessment he has made of the capability of local authorities to fulfil their statutory duties to provide careers guidance to pupils in schools and sixth form colleges. [58922]

Mr Hayes [holding answer 10 June 2011]: The Department for Education has not conducted any formal assessment of the capability of local authorities to fulfil their statutory duties to provide careers guidance to pupils in schools and sixth form colleges. They are funded through the Early Intervention Grant to support young people's participation, including their transitional responsibility for careers guidance in advance of new arrangements coming into effect in 2012. It is for local authorities to decide how they should make arrangements for supporting young people's participation, taking into account the needs of their local communities.

Lilian Greenwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has for the allocation of funding for the schools element of the all-age careers service; and if he will make a statement. [59173]

Mr Hayes [holding answer 10 June 2011]: The level of the Dedicated Schools Grant and Pupil Premium in 2011-12 has been announced. There are no amounts within these totals ring fenced or separately identified for any purpose; it will be for schools to determine how they use their resources, including for securing access to careers guidance.

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether face-to-face professional careers guidance is to be guaranteed prior to the introduction of the National Careers Service. [61320]

29 Jun 2011 : Column 890W

Mr Gibb: Local authorities retain their responsibility to enable, encourage and assist young people's participation in education or training, including through the provision of careers guidance. It is for local authorities to determine how best to do so, taking into account local priorities and the needs and circumstances of young people in their area. The Early Intervention Grant will support local authorities' transitional responsibilities for careers guidance until the new arrangements are in place.

The Department for Education website sets out the Government's expectations of local authorities and schools in relation to careers guidance over the next 18 months, through to 2012. This will allow them to make their own transitional arrangements.

http://www.education.gov.uk/16to19/careersguidance/a0064052/the-role-of-schools-and-local-authorities-in-careers-guidance

Vocational Guidance

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what discussions he has had with professional careers advisers about the proposed careers summit. [58542]

Mr Hayes: Numerous discussions have taken place with careers professionals about the careers summit through the direct involvement of their representative bodies, including the National Connexions Network and the Local Authority Reference Group, in planning for the event. Plans are well advanced for the event, which is scheduled to take place in July, and invitations will be issued shortly.

Lilian Greenwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the ability of the all-age careers service to provide statistical information on the education, employment and training outcomes of young people aged 16 to 19 years. [59172]

Mr Hayes [holding answer 10 June 2011]: The all-age careers service will not be responsible for providing statistical information on the education, employment and training outcomes of young people aged 16 to 18 years. Local authorities have—and will retain—responsibility for enabling, encouraging and assisting young people’s participation in education and training, including maintaining effective records and reporting on the activities of young people in their area.

Lilian Greenwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many qualified careers advisers were employed in the careers service (a) in Nottinghamshire and (b) nationally in each of the last two years. [59174]

Mr Hayes [holding answer 10 June 2011]: The Department for Education does not hold information on the number of advisers employed by local services.