Non specific crime
£
  3 year funding :
Organisation sought approved

Luton All Women’s Centre

133,404

133,404

The Streetlife Trust

107,251

107,251

Rubicon Cares

84,831

84,831

Greater Manchester High Sheriff’s Police Trust

71,500

71,500

Safe!

54,031

54,031

The Angelou Centre

166,624

166,624

15 Jun 2011 : Column 854W

Galop

112,630

112,630

Victim Support (Lewisham)

98,909

98,909

Victim Support (Sussex)

120,000

120,000

Robbery and burglary
£
  3 year funding :
Organisation sought approved

Bedfordshire Police Partnership Trust

289,552

75,000

Fresh Horizons

381,476

75,000

Cambridgeshire Police Shrievalty Trust

139,376

75,000

West Herts Against Crime

266,055

75,000

Norfolk PACT

129,796

75,000

Road traffic crime
£
  3 year funding :
Organisation sought approved

Aftermath Support

83,683

83,683

Brake (Literature)

124,725

124,725

Brake (Helpline)

203,166

203,166

Road Victims Trust

167,244

167,244

RoadPeace

242,825

242,825

Sexual violence
£
  3 year funding :
Organisation sought approved

Women’s Support Network

87,278

87,278

Rotherham Women’s Counselling Service

149,118

149,118

Survivors UK

192,184

192,184

The Birchall Trust

90,783

90,783

South Essex Rape and Incest Crisis Centre

140,472

140,472

Safe and Sound Derby

242,484

242,484

Rape and Sexual Abuse Support Centre (Cheshire and Merseyside)

110,998

110,998

Twelve’s Company

213,145

213,145

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC)

523,575

523,575

Rape and Sexual Abuse Counselling Centre (Darlington and County Durham)

109,409

109,409

First Step

110,959

110,959

The Green House (Bristol)

72,626

72,626

Safeline (Warwick)

176,106

176,106

Incest and Sexual Abuse Survivors

325,196

175,128

Karma Nirvana

272,101

265,977

Kinergy

155,755

155,755

Rugby RoSA

211,386

211,386

Worcestershire Rape and Sexual Abuse Support Centre

137,228

137,228

Eva Women’s Aid

135,088

135,088

Rape and Sexual Abuse Helpline

85,151

85,151

Crisis Point

277,499

142,499

Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre (Liverpool)

124,303

109,303

15 Jun 2011 : Column 855W

Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre (Sefton)

160,154

160,154

Safety Net Advice and Support Centre

92,378

92,378

Coventry Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre

295,793

295,793

Axis Counselling

147,178

141,532

Derbyshire Rape Crisis

172,635

172,635

Sexual and Domestic Abuse and Rape Advice Centre (Burton and District)

199,635

160,583

Respond

166,943

166,943

Rape Crisis (Wycombe, Chiltern and South Buckinghamshire)

112,943

112,943

Nottingham Rape Crisis Centre

141,828

141,828

Southampton Rape Crisis and Sexual Abuse Counselling Service

149,619

149,619

Unsuccessful a pplications

Details of unsuccessful applications are provided in the following tables.

Antisocial behaviour
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

Preston and South Ribble (North) Street Pastors

36,000

Britannia Economical Support Trust

250,000

Halton Housing Trust

549,501

Involve Northwest

205,802

Integritas Advocacy

48,666

Preston Community Network

95,242

Advance Housing and Support

331,500

Big Ideas Trust

129,000

African Refugee Women 'Nzoto Ya Nkolo'

90,000

Volunteer Centre Blackpool Wyre and Fylde

125,906

Developing Initiatives for Support in the Community

217,669

Swansea Council for Voluntary Services

232,500

Victim Support

2,669,954

Victim Support

120,494

Rights and Equalities Newham

153,000

Domestic violence
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

Cymdeithas Tai Eryri

241,908

Chorley and South Ribble Council for Voluntary Services

49,063

North Liverpool Citizen’s Advice Bureau

59,732

Victim Support

120,000

Relate Coventry

77,309

Public Help Desk

115,992

Plymouth Citizen’s Advice Bureau

213,272

Dacorum Women’s Aid

180,192

Women’s Centre

110,115

Innovative Vision Organisation

93,600

The Church of England Children’s Society

141,519

South Tyneside Council for Voluntary Service

60,000

15 Jun 2011 : Column 856W

Leeway Domestic Violence and Abuse Services (Suffolk)

107,380

Hate crime
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

Hart Gable

126,405

Disability Equality (NW) Ltd

276,675

Preston and Western Lancashire Racial Equality Council

178,980

Race Equality Sandwell

67,940

Somerset Race Equality Council

190,920

Victim First

214,131

The Monitoring Group

512,263

Preston Muslim Forum

74,125

Race Equality First

90,510

Oldham Race Equality Partnership

274,746

Plymouth and Devon Racial Equality Council

250,265

London Action Trust

361,000

Gay Advice Darlington

108,657

Birmingham Race Action Monitoring Unit (BRAMU)

156,000

Inclusion North

167,145

Furness Multicultural Community Forum

83,550

Tendring and Colchester Minority Ethnic Partnership

193,775

Disability Cornwall

146,555

Pukar Disability Resource Centre

111,527

South East Wales Racial Equality Council

371,893

Platform 51

243,343

Disability Action Waltham Forest

398,395

Norwich and Norfolk Racial Equality Council

350,000

Torfaen People's First

134,675

Manchester Sudanese Tree Development Community

79,300

Warwickshire Race Equality Partnership

137,800

British Afghan Women's Society

45,000

Sahara Project Preston

127,749

Peterborough Racial Equality Council

164,324

Specialist Mediation in Lancashire East

114,840

Victim Support

1,289,250

Dare to Care

299,610

WECIL ltd

321,138

Step Forward (Tower Hamlets)

189,335

Anthony Walker Foundation

0

Gender Identity Research and Education Society

60,160

VOICE UK and Victim Support

610,439

Homicide
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

National Victims' Association

108,761

Mothers Against Murder and Aggression (MAMAA)

278,909

Support After Murder and Manslaughter (National)

460,583

Lucie Blackman Trust

231,900

Support After Murder and Manslaughter (Merseyside)

94,400

15 Jun 2011 : Column 857W

Through Unity

116,215

Non-specific crime
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

New Horizons Counselling Service

140,000

Liberty from Addiction

85,118

The Relationship Centre

111,064

Peterborough Citizen's Advice Bureau

155,094

London Irish Women's Centre

141,393

Catch22

247,500

North Wales Women's Centre

103,884

Breckfield and North Everton Neighbourhood Council

342,240

Remedi

692,015

Bournemouth People First

157,051

Women's Enterprising Breakthrough

379,509

Southwark Law centre

148,685

Women's Enterprising Breakthrough

205,460

South Liverpool Regeneration

127,160

Horton Housing

720,709

Gwent Bobby Van Trust

194,220

Church of England Children's Society

735,566

No Limits (Southampton)

161,508

Southwark Neighbour Dispute Mediation Scheme

215,128

Mentor Achieve Leam Support

60,000

New Choices for Youth

213,194

Bridge Chapel Centre

46,800

Compass

90,000

Human Relations Network

83,700

Platform 51

243,813

Cobalt Housing Association

500,000

Charlton Athletic Community Trust

165,320

Amber Training Advisory Support Service

321,000

Consortico

238,864

Network for Surviving Stalking

71,810

Road traffic
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

Support and Care After Road Death and Injury

80,000

Robbery and burglary
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

CASAC Leeds

2,483,500

Victim Support

600,000

Wigan Citizen's Advice Service

160,420

Victim Support

859,938

Sexual violence
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

Walsall Street Teams

93,424

AIM Project

198,500

CIS'ters

150,000

Survivors Manchester

201,422

15 Jun 2011 : Column 858W

Nottingham Women's Counselling Service

131,000

Child Victims of Crime

36,240

SALT South West

48,052

Womankind, Bristol Women's Therapy Centre

140,104

Survivors Helping Each Other

137,691

The Nia Project (East London)

110,968

Manchester Rape Crisis

114,473

The Lantern Project

104,700

Survive (Survivors of Sexual Abuse in North Yorkshire)

62,620

Survivors (Hull and East Riding)

240,420

Barnardos (Wales)

727,932

Rape and Sexual Abuse Support Centre (Guildford)

100,776

The NIA Project - Haringey

129,668

West Mercia Rape and Sexual Abuse Support Centre

178,040

Supportline

37,000

The Margaret Jackson Trust

100,121

MOSAC

129,423

Southall Black Sisters

151,614

SEREN

121,979

Coalition for the Removal of Pimping (CROP)

262,519

New Pathways

255,717

Mothers4Mothers

371,160

Sheffield Rape and Sexual Abuse Counselling Service

154,417

Birmingham Rape and Sexual Violence Project

419,626

New Pathways

129,576

GROW

263,123

New Pathways

52,106

Doncaster Rape and Sexual Abuse Counselling Service

136,837

Aurora Health Foundation

128,280

Brighton Women's Centre

161,663

Someone Cares

94,215

Revival Support Services

176,389

One25

197,100

Eaves Housing for Women

124,711

Blackpool Advocacy

160,500

Barnardos

1,305,254

Rotunda Ltd

151,076

Rape and Sexual Abuse Support Centre (Croydon)

135,000

The Survivors Trust

117,915

Savana

141,862

Women's Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre (Cornwall)

121,000

Sexual Abuse and Incest Line (SAIL)

84,544

Rape Crisis (Wycombe, Chiltern and South Buckinghamshire)

112,844

Respond

112,425

One in Four

284,891

West Cumbria Rape Crisis

120,568

East Kent Rape Line

119,601

The Foxton Centre

53,330

Clinic for Boundaries Studies (Professional Boundaries)

92,833

Family Matters

256,291

15 Jun 2011 : Column 859W

Violent crime
£
Organisation 3 year funding sought

Barnardo's (Liverpool)

428,332

Safe n Sound Youth Project

344,742

Victim Support

155,000

Education

Child Protection Review

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the cost of implementing the recommendations of the Munro Report. [59823]

Tim Loughton: The final report of Professor Munro's review of child protection reflects months of careful work and extensive consultation. Her recommendations are wide-ranging. It is important that we consider carefully, with professionals themselves, how best to respond in order to bring about the sustainable, long-term reform needed.

I have therefore established an implementation working group with key individuals from the social work profession, local government, health, police, justice, education and the voluntary sector. This group met for the first time on 25 May and will work with us to develop a response to Professor Munro's report by the summer, informed by their collective expertise and by the experience from the local authorities which are trialling more flexible approaches.

In developing our response, we will consider the costs of options for implementation as well as the benefits to be secured through, for example, reductions in unnecessary bureaucracy and regulation.

The Government have already announced that the Children's Workforce Development Council has been remitted to spend a minimum of £43.9 million on the Social Work Improvement Fund in this financial year. This is an increase on the £23 million distributed through the Social Work Improvement Fund in 2010-11.

Children: Day Care

Steve Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much each local authority allows in flexible free entitlement grants to attend day care nurseries in 2011-12. [58185]

Sarah Teather: Local authorities, in consultation with their Schools Forums, decide how best to distribute 3-16 funding across their locality. This includes setting funding rates to providers of free early education, including day care nurseries. Local authorities are required to report on financial expenditure through section 251 returns. Data on individual local authority spend for 2011-12 are not yet available, but will be published later in the year.

Children: Protection

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effects on the effectiveness of child protection of reductions in support from the public purse for the voluntary sector. [59829]

15 Jun 2011 : Column 860W

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education has not made its own assessment. However I am pleased that as part of the Department's Voluntary and Community Sector grant announced on 25 February, the Department is awarding around £10 million over the two years 2011-12 and 2012-13 to help 17 voluntary organisations tackle the child protection and safeguarding needs of children and young people. This grant is one of a range of funding streams from the Department to the voluntary sector, including a new grant agreement announced on 15 February 2011 to support NSPCC with £11.2 million between 2011-15 for continued investment in ChildLine and the NSPCC HelpLine.

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effects on the effectiveness of child protection of reductions in local authority budgets. [59830]

Tim Loughton: It is for local authorities to determine the allocation of their resources and I am sure that in doing so they will be taking into account both their statutory responsibilities and the needs of the most vulnerable children and young people. The Department for Education has not made its own assessment, but I am aware of the research that has been carried out by other organisations. I am pleased that this research suggests that in making difficult decisions, most local authorities are taking steps to protect the most vulnerable children.

Children's Centres

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether community schools may use Sure Start Children's Centres to assist in the delivery of the curriculum. [58762]

Mr Gibb: Community schools may use Sure Start Children's Centres to assist in the delivery of the curriculum. The Government are keen for schools and others to use their professional judgment to decide how to deliver the curriculum to meet the needs of their pupils.

Children's centres play a valuable role in making integrated services available for young children and their families, particularly for those in greatest need. The Government want to retain a network of children's centres and are giving local authorities and schools greater flexibility to enable them to design services which meet the needs of local communities.

Classroom Assistants: Pay

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what guidance his Department has provided to schools on the payment of salary increases to teaching assistants earning less than £21,000 per annum; [59610]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of state schools which have not paid salary increases to the teaching assistants and technicians earning below £21,000 in 2011-12. [59609]

Mr Gibb: No such assessment has been made centrally. Central Government do not have a role in determining salary, or salary increases for school support staff, including teaching assistants and technicians nor have

15 Jun 2011 : Column 861W

they provided guidance to schools in respect of the payment of salary increases for any school support staff.

Matters related to school support staff pay are decided locally by the local authority for community and voluntary controlled schools and the governing body for foundation and voluntary-aided schools. Salaries of school support staff in academies are a matter for individual institutions.

Crown Relocations

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many contracts his Department holds with Crown Relocations; and what the (a) purpose and (b) monetary value of each such contract is. [58646]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education does not hold any current contracts for Crown Relocations.

Departmental Public Appointments

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he plans to publish the relevant financial and non-financial interests of members of his Department's independent review panels; and if he will make a statement. [58527]

Tim Loughton: The Department does not collect this information. The appointment of members to the Department's independent review panels is based on their professional expertise. Before making the appointment, Ministers would consider the suitability of an appointee particularly where there may be a conflict of interest or if the appointment may have an adverse impact on the review.

Any remuneration given to appointed panel members for their roles on independent reviews is available on the Department's website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/inthenews

English Baccalaureate: GCSE

Mr Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the potential change in takeup of GCSE and A-level courses in each subject attributable to the introduction of the English Baccalaureate. [58816]

Mr Gibb: The effect of the English Baccalaureate will depend on decisions taken by individual schools and pupils. It is one of a number of measures to ensure that pupils are given the chance to take the qualifications that will best help them progress to further education and employment.

15 Jun 2011 : Column 862W

The Government do not require schools to provide them with detailed information on pupils' GCSE choices. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that the English Baccalaureate measure is having a positive effect, with more schools making the combination of subjects open to more pupils. There are a range of information sources, from exam entries to workforce information, which will help us judge the impact of the English Baccalaureate. We will make full use of these in keeping the policy under review.

G4S

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many contracts his Department holds with G4S; and what the (a) purpose and (b) monetary value of each such contract is. [58678]

Tim Loughton: The Department for Education does not hold any current contracts with G4S.

GCSE

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what number and percentage of children (a) receiving and (b) not receiving free school meals attained five grade A*-C GCSEs, including English and mathematics, excluding equivalents, in each local authority area in each year since 2001. [53964]

Mr Gibb: The data requested for each year since 2004/05 have been placed in the House Libraries.

It is not possible to provide figures for 2000/01 to 2003/04. The National Pupil Database only exists from 2002/03 onwards, and for 2002/03 and 2003/04 information on whether a pupil achieved 5 A*-C grades including English and mathematics was not recorded in a readily accessible form. Generating that information can be produced only at disproportionate cost.

GCSE: Reading Berkshire

Mr Rob Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many pupils in each (a) school and (b) local authority ward in Reading achieved five A*-C grades at GCSE including English and mathematics in each year since 1997; [59648]

(2) how many pupils in each (a) school and (b) local authority ward in Reading achieved five A* to C grades at GCSE in each year since 1997. [59709]

Mr Gibb: The information requested for the years 2005/06 to 2009/10 is shown in the following tables. Figures for previous years back to 1996/97 can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Achievements at GCSE and equivalent for pupils (1,2) at the end of key stage 4 by ward (3) in Reading local authority— Years: 2005/06 to 2009/10—Coverage: Maintained schools (including Academies and CTCs) (4)


Total number of pupils at the end of KS4 Number of pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades Number of pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades including English and maths GCSEs

Church ward

2005/06

129

64

55

 

2006/07

109

49

42

15 Jun 2011 : Column 863W

15 Jun 2011 : Column 864W

 

2007/08

126

67

61

 

2008/09

131

62

48

 

2009/10

127

98

57

         

Katesgrove ward

2005/06

115

95

95

 

2006/07

103

93

93

 

2007/08

97

97

97

 

2008/09

95

(5)

(5)

 

2009/10

92

92

92

         

Norcot ward

2005/06

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

2006/07

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

2007/08

10

0

0

 

2008/09

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

2009/10

n/a

n/a

n/a

         

Redlands ward

2005/06

133

124

124

 

2006/07

132

125

125

 

2007/08

136

123

123

 

2008/09

138

124

124

 

2009/10

132

123

123

         

Southcote ward

2005/06

406

188

118

 

2006/07

439

229

139

 

2007/08

367

229

131

 

2008/09

335

232

118

 

2009/10

305

249

120

         

Thames ward

2005/06

164

79

74

 

2006/07

189

105

86

 

2007/08

183

99

93

 

2008/09

180

124

109

 

2009/10

225

146

117

         

Tilehurst ward

2005/06

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

2006/07

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

2007/08

n/a

n/a

n/a

 

2008/09

(5)

(5)

(5)

 

2009/10

(5)

(5)

(5)

         

Whitley ward

2005/06

78

25

11

 

2006/07

60

18

4

 

2007/08

72

34

17

 

2008/09

78

43

14

 

2009/10

100

58

28

n/a = Not applicable. (1) Pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each academic year. (2) In 2010 iGCSEs, accredited at time of publication, have been counted as GCSE equivalents and also as English and mathematics GCSEs. (3) Census Area Statistics (CAS) wards were created for 2001 Census outputs. The Department reports using the CAS Wards because they allow us to report ward level data on a consistent geographic basis. One of the weaknesses associated with reporting data using administrative wards is that the boundaries for administrative wards can change on a frequent basis. This makes it difficult to compare data at ward level over time. (4) School figures include all schools, whilst ward figures include maintained schools (including CTCs and academies) only. For this reason, data for some schools is not included in the ward table, and also pupil numbers in schools do not always sum up to the total number of pupils in the ward. (5) Figures not shown in order to protect confidentiality. Source: National Pupil Database (final data)

15 Jun 2011 : Column 865W

15 Jun 2011 : Column 866W

Achievements at GCSE and equivalent for pupils (1, 2 ) at the end of key stage 4 by school in Reading local authority— Years: 2005/06 to 2009/10—Coverage: All schools (3)



Total number of pupils at the end of KS4 Number of pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades Number of pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades including English and maths GCSEs

Bulmershe and Whitegates ward

SWAAY School

2005/06

4

(4)

(4)

   

2006/07

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2007/08

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2008/09

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2009/10

n/a

n/a

n/a

           

Caversham ward

Hemdean House School

2005/06

8

(4)

(4)

   

2006/07

19

18

16

   

2007/08

11

10

10

   

2008/09

12

9

9

   

2009/10

10

(4)

(4)

           

Church ward

Leighton Park School

2005/06

80

76

68

   

2006/07

81

77

70

   

2007/08

94

92

87

   

2008/09

79

75

72

   

2009/10

71

68

64

           
 

Reading Girls' School

2005/06

129

64

55

   

2006/07

109

49

42

   

2007/08

127

67

61

   

2008/09

131

62

48

   

2009/10

128

98

57

           

Katesgrove ward

Kendrick Girls' Grammar School

2005/06

95

95

95

   

2006/07

94

93

93

   

2007/08

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2008/09

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2009/10

n/a

n/a

n/a

           
 

Kendrick School

2005/06

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2006/07

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2007/08

97

97

97

   

2008/09

95

94

94

   

2009/10

92

92

92

           

Redlands ward

Phoenix College

2005/06

9

(4)

(4)

   

2006/07

7

(4)

(4)

   

2007/08

13

0

0

   

2008/09

14

0

0

   

2009/10

9

(4)

(4)

           
 

Reading School

2005/06

124

124

124

   

2006/07

125

125

125

   

2007/08

123

123

123

   

2008/09

124

124

124

   

2009/10

123

123

123

           
 

St Joseph's Convent School

2005/06

35

34

31

   

2006/07

36

35

35

   

2007/08

29

27

26

   

2008/09

18

25

25

15 Jun 2011 : Column 867W

15 Jun 2011 : Column 868W

   

2009/10

n/a

n/a

n/a

           
 

St Joseph's College

2005/06

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2006/07

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2007/08

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2008/09

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2009/10

33

33

32

           
 

The Abbey School Reading

2005/06

100

100

100

   

2006/07

104

104

104

   

2007/08

105

105

105

   

2008/09

97

96

96

   

2009/10

109

109

109

           

Southcote ward

Blessed Hugh Faringdon Catholic School

2005/06

143

75

54

   

2006/07

149

68

44

   

2007/08

140

71

47

   

2008/09

136

83

46

   

2009/10

127

102

43

           
 

The Elvian School

2005/06

25

18

18

   

2006/07

20

17

2

   

2007/08

30

19

17

   

2008/09

21

18

15

   

2009/10

n/a

n/a

n/a

           
 

Prospect College

2005/06

263

113

64

   

2006/07

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2007/08

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2008/09

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2009/10

n/a

n/a

n/a

           
 

Prospect School

2005/06

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2006/07

292

161

95

   

2007/08

230

158

84

   

2008/09

201

149

72

   

2009/10

181

147

77

           

Thames ward

Highdown School and Sixth Form Centre

2005/06

163

79

74

   

2006/07

189

105

86

   

2007/08

183

99

93

   

2008/09

180

124

109

   

2009/10

225

146

117

           
 

Queen Anne's School

2005/06

65

65

63

   

2006/07

54

52

9

   

2007/08

51

51

0

   

2008/09

35

36

0

   

2009/10

53

51

0

           

Tilehurst ward

The Avenue School

2005/06

20

0

0

   

2006/07

9

(4)

(4)

15 Jun 2011 : Column 869W

15 Jun 2011 : Column 870W

   

2007/08

10

(4)

(4)

   

2008/09

(4)

(4)

(4)

   

2009/10

(4)

(4)

(4)

           

Whitley ward

John Madejski Academy

2005/06

n/a

n/a

n/a

   

2006/07

60

18

4

   

2007/08

73

34

17

   

2008/09

78

43

14

   

2009/10

100

58

28

n/a = Not applicable. (1) Pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each academic year. (2) In 2010 iGCSEs, accredited at time of publication, have been counted as GCSE equivalents and also as English and mathematics GCSEs. 3. School figures include all schools, whilst ward figures include maintained schools (including CTCs and academies) only. For this reason, data for some schools is not included in the ward table, and also pupil numbers in schools do not always sum up to the total number of pupils in the ward. (4) Figures not shown in order to protect confidentiality. Source: School and College Performance Tables (final data)

Home Education

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many hours per week of home tuition was provided on average to pupils under alternative provision in each local authority area in the latest period for which figures are available. [58582]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 9 June 2011]:The Department for Education does not collect data on this issue. It is for local authorities to determine whether a pupil should have home tuition and, if so, the number of hours that is appropriate for that pupil. Department for Education guidance sets out that pupils who cannot attend school because of ill-health should receive a minimum of five hours home tuition each week but that they should be offered as many hours as they can cope with, up to full-time education.

We have taken measures to commence section 3A of the Children, Schools and Families Act 2010 from September 2011. This section re-defined the section 19 duty, to the effect that the education should be full-time for all pupils in alternative provision, unless there are reasons which relate to the physical or mental health of the child which would mean that this would not be in the child's best interests. Until now, only permanently excluded pupils have had an entitlement to full-time provision.

IBM

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many contracts his Department holds with IBM; and what the (a) purpose and (b) monetary value of each such contract is. [58692]

Tim Loughton: The Department does not hold a current contract with IBM but it did make a payment of £97,563 to them in this financial year for a licence agreement to use their software for the majority of the Department's analytical requirements.

Primary Education: Admissions

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what powers the governors of a state primary school have to increase the intake of that school; and if he will make a statement. [58289]

Mr Gibb: Whether the governors of a maintained school have the power to increase its intake will depend on the category of the school concerned. School admission arrangements are set and applied locally by the relevant admission authority. For community and voluntary controlled schools the admission authority is usually the local authority (LA), for foundation and voluntary aided schools it is the governing body and for Academies it is the Academy Trust.

Under the Code currently in force, all schools must have a published admission number (PAN) for each ‘relevant age group’ in which pupils are, or would normally be, admitted to the school. The PAN forms part of the admission arrangements for the school and, as such, must be consulted on with their local community. Admission authorities of maintained schools must set admission numbers with regard to the capacity assessment for the school. Once an admission number has been set by the admission authority, maintained schools should not admit children above the PAN without the agreement of the local authority.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education launched a 12 week consultation on 27 May 2011 on a revised Schools Admission and Appeals Codes. As part of that consultation, we intend to make it easier for all schools, particularly those that are popular with parents, to increase their PAN, and thereby offer more places to parents.

Research

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 24 May 2011, Official Report, columns 628-32W, on research, whom he has consulted on the decision to reduce funding for (a) the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England, (b) the National Evaluation of Sure Start

15 Jun 2011 : Column 871W

Impact Study and

(c)

the Understanding Society programme. [58313]

Mr Gibb: The Department engages in an analytical planning process that involves consultation with a range of interested parties in the wider research and academic communities. Prioritising funding for longitudinal data collections is included in that process and each of the studies highlighted will have been considered in this process.

The Longitudinal Study of Young People in England

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) was consulted about the Department's decision to stop funding the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. The Department made the decision because the age of the cohort (now 20 to 21 years old) takes it outside the remit of the Department. Discussions are continuing with the ESRC about maintaining contact with the cohort in the longer term and adding more information via data linkage.

The National Evaluation of Sure Start Impact Study

Funding for the National Evaluation of Sure Start (NESS) Impact Study has not been reduced. The existing contract was intended to support the completion of assessments of the children at seven years old. The Department has decided not to continue the study beyond this survey of children at seven years of age, as it was designed to look at the impact of the former Sure Start Local Programmes. The current Sure Start Children's Centre model is different from the earlier programmes and the Department is continuing to fund the new Evaluation of Children's Centres in England (ECCE).

Understanding Society

The Department felt that it was important to support the initial development of Understanding Society. However, there had been a commitment that this funding would be ongoing.

Schools: Admissions

Fiona Bruce: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will assess the merits of extending the exception in paragraph 2.44 of the Schools Admission Code to include ministers of religion. [59405]

Mr Gibb: Paragraph 2.44 of the School Admissions Code requires school admission authorities to treat the children of UK service personnel and other Crown servants posted overseas as being resident in their area as soon as they have proof of posting. This is to ensure that such children do not suffer any disadvantage in the admissions system as a result of their frequent mobility. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education launched a 12 week consultation that will run until 19 August, and we will consider any evidence submitted through that consultation as to the merits of extending the exception to include ministers of religion.

Schools: Hearing Impairment

Nicky Morgan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the level of provision of video relay services in schools for the hearing impaired. [58822]

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Sarah Teather: The Department for Education has not made an assessment of the level of provision of video relay services in special schools for pupils with hearing impairments. It is for individual schools to decide whether video relay service, or other assistive technologies and forms of support, might be the most appropriate means for facilitating communication and learning in the classroom for individual pupils.

Nicky Morgan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the number of deaf pupils in schools in England. [58824]

Sarah Teather: The available information is shown in the following table.

This includes pupils with a hearing impairment ranging from those with a mild hearing loss to those who are profoundly deaf. It is not possible to differentiate between types of hearing impairment.

Maintained nursery, maintained primary, state-funded secondary and special schools and pupil referral units (1, 2, 3) —Number of pupils whose type o f special educational needs (SEN) is hearing impairment (4, 5, 6) —As at January 2010 in England
  Number of pupils with hearing impairment (4, 5, 6)

School Action Plus Statement of SEN Total

Primary SEN type

9,145

6,440

15,585

Secondary SEN type

1,725

1,820

3,545

Total

10,865

8,260

19,125

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes city technology colleges and academies. (3) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools. (4) Includes solely registered pupils. In pupil referral units, includes pupils registered with other providers and further education colleges. (5) Pupils at School Action Plus and those with a statement of SEN provided information on their primary need and, if appropriate, secondary need. (6) Includes pupils with a hearing impairment ranging from those with a mild hearing loss to those who are profoundly deaf. It is not possible to differentiate between types of hearing impairment. Notes: 1. Pupil numbers have been rounded to the nearest 5. 2. There may be discrepancies between the sum of constituent parts and their totals. Source: School Census

Schools: Work Experience

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) state schools and (b) academies have operated work experience programmes for whole year groups in each of the last three years. [58833]

Mr Gibb: These data are not collected centrally or locally.

However, the Education Business Partnership services annual data return does provide information on type and duration of work experience placements for young people. In academic year 2009/10, the latest year for which data are available, some 527,000 pupils undertook around 532,000 work experience placements (the figures indicating that some pupils undertook more than one placement).

15 Jun 2011 : Column 873W

The majority of placements were for Year 10 students (78.4%) with Year 11 students accounting for 17.1% of placements and 4.5% of placements being for post-16 students. Over half (55%) of students undertook work experience placements lasting 10 days or more.

Teachers: Arts

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) music, (b) art and (c) drama teachers were working in schools in the academic year (i) 2009-10 and (ii) 2010-11; and how many he expects to be working in schools in 2011-12. [58502]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 9 June 2011]: Information on the qualifications and deployment of teachers in the secondary sector was collected in the annual School Workforce Census, which took place in November 2010 for the first time. The number of teachers reported to be teaching music, drama and art in November 2010 is given in the table.

Number (headcount) of music, art and drama teachers (1) in all publicly funded secondary schools— Position in November 2010—Coverage: England
Subject Headcount of in-service teachers Of these, teachers holding a relevant (2) post A-level qualification

Music

7,500

6,500

Drama

11,100

5,500

Art and Design

13,200

11,400

Base: 158,004 teachers to years seven-13 (unweighted headcount). (1) Teachers were counted once against each subject that they were teaching, regardless of the amount of time they spend teaching the subject. (2) A full list of what was deemed as a 'relevant' qualification subject for each curriculum subject taught can be found on the School Workforce Statistical First Release website here. Note: 1. Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 100. Source: School Workforce Census

In previous years information on the deployment of teachers was collected via the Secondary Schools Curriculum and Staffing Survey (SSCSS), an occasional survey most recently run in 1992, 1996, 2002 and 2007. However, due to low sample sizes and variations in the methodology used to collect information in each of the SSCSS surveys, the numbers of teachers between years are not directly comparable.

The number of teachers that schools employ in future years will, as now, be a matter for them to decide, according to local needs and subject to statutory requirements on class sizes where appropriate. For funding purposes, the Department has produced overall estimates of teaching posts in state schools and academies in England.

The Government do not produce estimates of the future numbers of teaching posts in particular subjects. Estimates of the proportion of teachers working in secondary schools who will be qualified in different subjects are however produced as part of the Department for Education's teacher supply and demand modelling process.

Estimates for the future number of specialist music teachers in state funded secondary schools indicate that there will be a decrease of around 100 by 2011/12. A similar decrease is expected in the number of specialist

15 Jun 2011 : Column 874W

art teachers. This is in line with a decreasing requirement for secondary teachers as a result of the ongoing decline in secondary pupil numbers.

Separate forecasts have not been made for drama teachers. For the purposes of teacher supply modelling, English and drama are treated as one subject category.

Health

Action on Smoking and Health: Finance

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether funding allocated to Action on Smoking and Health by his Department may be used for lobbying purposes by that body. [59718]

Anne Milton: Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) has received funding from the Department in the past, through the Department's ‘Section 64 General Scheme of Grants to voluntary and Community Organisations’. ASH received these grants specifically to carry out defined projects.

None of this funding was, or could be used, for lobbying purposes.

Art Therapy

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many art therapists were engaged to work in NHS hospitals in each of the last three years; and what estimate he has made of the number of such therapists engaged to work in hospitals in each of the next three years. [59566]

Mr Simon Burns: It is not possible to split the NHS Information Centre Workforce Census figures between hospital and non-hospital based staff. The following table gives the number of qualified art, music, and drama therapists employed in NHS trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs) in the years requested, as it is not possible to isolate art therapy staff from this group.

National Health Service Hospital and Community Health Services: qualified art, music, drama therapy staff employed in England by organisation type as at 30 September 2010
Headcount

2008 2009 2010

All qualified art/music/drama therapy staff

758

737

691

Primary care trusts

107

89

80

Trusts

651

648

616

Notes: 1. It is not possible to split Workforce Census figures between hospital and non-hospital based staff. It is generally assumed that those staff based in NHS Trusts are engaged in more hospital based work. 2. It is not possible to isolate art therapy staff from the art, music, drama therapy area of work. 2010 headcount totals are unlikely to equal the sum of components. 3. Staff may work in both a PCT and a trust, therefore they will be counted once in a trust and once in a PCT, however for the headcount figure for England they will only be counted once. 4. The new headcount methodology for 2010 data is not fully comparable with previous years data due to improvements that make it a more stringent count of absolute staff numbers. Further information on the headcount methodology is available in the Census publication at: www.ic.nhs.uk/webfiles/publications/010_Workforce/nhsstaff0010/Census_Bulletin_March_2011_Final.pdf. Source: The NHS Information Centre for health and social care 2010 Non-Medical Workforce Census.

15 Jun 2011 : Column 875W

It is for local NHS organisations, with their knowledge of the health needs of their local populations to employ the staff required that best meets those needs in future years.