Prosecutions: Landlords

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many prosecutions there were of landlords for an offence under the Housing Act 2004 in (a) 2008, (b) 2009, (c) 2010 and (d) the latest period for which figures are available; [57502]

(2) how many prosecutions there were of landlords for an offence under the Protection from Eviction Act 1977 in (a) 2008, (b) 2009, (c) 2010 and (d) the latest period for which figures are available. [57503]

Mr Blunt: The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts in England and Wales for offences under the Housing Act 2004 and the Protection from Eviction Act 1977, from 2008 to 2010 (latest available) can be viewed in the following table.

The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database contains information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales. Other than where specified in a statute statistical information available centrally does not include the circumstances of each case. It is not possible to separately identify those specific cases where the defendant was the landlord.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 164W

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts for offences under the Housing Act 2004 and the Protection from Eviction Act 1977, England and Wales, 2008-10 (1, 2)
Number proceeded against
Statute 2008 (3) 2009 2010

Housing Act 2004

193

234

355

Protection from Eviction Act 1977

34

49

37

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Rape

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many persons convicted of offences of rape were released from custodial sentences before the end of the sentence handed down in each of the last 10 years. [57532]

Mr Blunt: The following table shows the number of prisoners serving determinate sentences for rape who were released from prison in each of the last 10 years. They were all released from custody before the end of their sentence as all offenders serving a determinate sentence serve part of their sentence in custody and part on licence in the community.

If the sentence was imposed under the provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (for offences committed on or after 4 April 2005) the first half of the sentence is served in custody and the second half is served on release on licence in the community.

If the sentence was imposed under the provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 and is four years or longer, release is determined on the basis of risk by the Parole Board between the halfway and two-thirds point of the sentence. The offender is on licence from the point at which he is released until the three-quarter point of sentence and then at risk for the final quarter. If a 1991 Act sentence is less than four years, the offender will be released at the half way point, on licence to three quarter point and then at risk for the final quarter.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Determinate discharges for offences of rape in England and Wales, 2001-10
  Number

2001

490

2002

532

2003

517

2004

553

2005

572

2006

515

2007

609

7 Jun 2011 : Column 165W

2008

656

2009

623

2010

763

Note: These figures have been drawn from administrative systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Rape: Convictions

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of rape cases ended in a conviction in the latest period for which figures are available. [57299]

Mr Blunt: The proportion of findings of guilt based on the number of proceedings for offences of rape in 2009 (latest available) was 36%. This is based on 997 findings of guilt from 2,796 defendants proceeded against for rape of a male or rape of a female.

Court proceedings data for 2010 are planned for publication on 26 May.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (1) convictions there were for offences of rape in each of the last 10 years; and in how many such cases the defendant was (a) found guilty by a jury, (b)

7 Jun 2011 : Column 166W

pleaded guilty during the trial and

(c)

pleaded guilty upon being charged; [57582]

(2) persons convicted of offences of rape in each of the last 10 years were sentenced to (a) non-custodial sentences and (b) custodial sentences of (i) less than one year, (ii) between one and two years, (iii) between two and three years, (iv) between three and four years, (v) between four and five years, (vi) between five and six years, (vii) between six and seven years, (viii) between seven and eight years, (ix) between eight and nine years, (x) between nine and 10 years, (xi) between 10 and 11 years, (xii) between 11 and 12 years, (xiii) between 12 and 15 years, (xiv) between 15 and 20 years and (xv) over 20 years. [57534]

Mr Blunt: Table 1 shows the number of defendants found guilty at the Crown court of rape, by type of plea, England and Wales, 2000 to 2010 (latest available). It is not possible to identify at which stage of criminal proceedings the defendant pleaded guilty.

Table 2 shows the number of defendants found guilty at all courts, sentenced to immediate custody, sentence length break down and the average custodial sentence length for offences of rape, England and Wales, 2000 to 2010 (latest available).

Table 1: Number of defendants found guilty at the crown court and by plea for rape offences, England and Wales, 2000 - 10 (1, 2, 3, 4)

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Total found guilty

593

569

651

671

748

787

854

860

913

984

1,037

Total sentenced

596

571

655

673

751

795

863

872

919

999

1,058

Defendants pleading guilty

215

214

258

259

310

361

395

387

406

445

466

Defendants pleading not guilty and found guilty)

378

356

393

412

438

426

459

475

507

541

571

Plea not recorded and found guilty

3

1

4

2

3

8

9

10

6

13

21

(1 )The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2 )Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3 )Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. (4 )The sentenced column may exceed those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.
Table 2: Defendants found guilty at all courts, sentence length break down and the average custodial sentence length for offences of rape, England and Wales, 2000 - 10

Total found guilty Total sentenced (4) Other non-custodial sentences Total Immediate custody Up to 1 year 1 year up to 2 years 2 years up to 3 years 3 years up to 4 years 4 years up to 5 years 5 years up to 6 years

2000

598

596

23

573

4

1

15

33

53

67

2001

572

571

19

552

9

9

10

34

48

65

2002

655

655

23

632

8

10

10

30

60

76

2003

673

673

19

654

3

3

19

29

56

83

2004

751

751

32

719

11

6

19

49

63

82

2005

796

795

48

747

8

17

20

49

55

102

2006

863

863

59

804

6

13

20

45

56

96

2007

873

872

51

821

2

14

23

39

50

85

2008(3)

922

919

54

865

3

8

27

36

76

82

2009

997

999

58

941

4

6

23

38

70

107

2010

1058

1058

74

984

1

4

24

60

73

86

7 Jun 2011 : Column 167W

7 Jun 2011 : Column 168W


6 years up to 7 years 7 years up to 8 years 8 years up to 9 years 9 years up to 10 years 10 years up to 11 years 11 years up to 12 years 12 years up to 15 years 15 years up to 20 years Over 20 years Indeterminate public protection sentence Average custodial sentence length (months) (5)

2000

78

73

65

35

57

8

28

6

50

83.2

2001

78

68

48

39

39

6

31

8

60

81.1

2002

94

76

57

42

66

9

42

4

48

83.7

2003

85

70

94

46

54

11

36

12

53

86.4

2004

78

68

103

44

63

10

44

16

63

84.4

2005

84

66

105

42

60

14

43

8

59

15

81.7

2006

77

70

78

37

49

12

27

15

72

131

81.1

2007

88

68

81

38

41

14

36

25

46

171

85.4

2008(3)

72

70

70

47

55

20

69

31

35

164

90.3

2009

82

69

83

46

56

26

87

61

20

163

95.7

2010

89

51

99

55

62

19

102

61

18

180

97.2

(1 )The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. (4) The sentenced column may exceed those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. (5 )Average custodial sentence excludes life and indeterminate sentences. Note: Information drawn from court systems may be different from the information recorded on the Police National Computer Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Rape: Sentencing

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average length of a prison sentence served for convicted rapists who entered a guilty plea was in the latest period for which figures are available. [57300]

Mr Blunt: In 2009 the average determinate custodial sentence length for offenders convicted of rape was 83 months for those who entered a guilty plea at the Crown court and 105 months for those who entered a not guilty plea at the Crown court.

If the sentence was imposed under the provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (for offences committed on or after 4 April 2005) the first half of the sentence is served in custody and the second half is served on release on licence in the community.

If the sentence was imposed under the provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 and is four years or longer, release is determined on the basis of risk by the Parole Board between the halfway and two-thirds point of the sentence. The offender is on licence from the point at which he is released until the three quarter point of sentence and then at risk for the final quarter. If a 1991 Act sentence is less than four years, the offender will be released at the half way point, on licence to three quarter point and then at risk for the final quarter.

Recall to Custody

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many individuals in England and Wales released from custody on licence following (a) a determinate sentence and (b) a life sentence and subsequently recalled following a breach are not currently in custody. [58149]

Mr Blunt: As of 31 March 2011, there were 954 offenders released on licence subsequently recalled and not returned to custody. 930 of these offenders were originally sentenced to determinate sentences and 24 were sentenced to indeterminate sentences. Indeterminate sentences include mandatory, discretionary and automatic life sentences, as well as HMP, IPP and DPP sentences.

Statistics on licence recalls and returns to custody are published quarterly in the Offender Management Statistics quarterly bulletin on the Ministry of Justice website:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/statistics-and-data/prisons-and-probation/oms-quartlery.htm

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many warrants for recall to custody were issued in England and Wales in 2010 in respect of persons originally given (a) a life sentence and (b) a determinate sentence. [58150]

Mr Blunt: During 2010, 15,424 offenders were released on licence and subsequently recalled to custody. 15,299 of these offenders were originally given determinate sentences and 125 were given indeterminate sentences. Indeterminate sentences include mandatory, discretionary and automatic life sentences, as well as HMP, IPP and DPP sentences.

Statistics on licence recalls and returns to custody are published quarterly in the Offender Management Statistics quarterly bulletin on the Ministry of Justice website:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/statistics-and-data/prisons-and-probation/oms-quartlery.htm

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 169W

Reoffenders

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many persons convicted of an offence of rape in each of the last five years committed after release from prison (a) another offence of rape, (b) another sexual offence, (c) another violent offence and (d) any other offence (i) within one month, (ii) between one and two months, (iii) between two and three months, (iv) between three and six months, (v) between six and nine months, (vi) between nine and 12 months, (vii) between 12 and 18 months, (viii) between 18 and 24 months, (ix) between two and three years, (x) between three and four years and (xi) between four and five years of (A) release from prison, (B) the end of any prison release conditions and (C) the end of the sentence originally handed down. [57531]

7 Jun 2011 : Column 170W

Mr Blunt: The following table provides information on the number of adult offenders released from prison in the first quarter of each year after serving a sentence for rape, who went on to commit a re-offence(1) in the following 12 months by re-offence type and time to re-offence.

The latest reconviction data provided are based on offences committed within one year of an offender being released from prison. Therefore data regarding offences committed after the 12-month period cannot be provided.

The original sentence handed down and data regarding release conditions are not held in the re-convictions dataset therefore these data cannot be provided.

For more detail on how reoffending is measured please see the Ministry of Justice website:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/reoffendingofadults.htm

Number of offenders discharged from prison following a conviction for rape in the 1st quarter of the last five years, who went on to be convicted of a re-offence (1) , b y re-offence type and time to re-offence
      Time to re-offence from release from prison to re-offence date
Re-offence type Cohort year Distinct number of offenders (2) 0 to 1 month More than 1 month to 2 months More than 2 months to 3 months More than 3 months to 6 months More than 6 months to 9 months More than 9 months to 12 months

Rape

Q1 2005

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Q1 2006

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Q1 2007

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Q1 2008

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Q1 2009

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

                 

Sexual(3)

Q1 2005

4

1

0

0

0

2

1

 

Q1 2006

4

1

0

0

1

1

1

 

Q1 2007

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

 

Q1 2008

3

0

0

0

0

2

1

 

Q1 2009

4

1

0

0

2

0

1

                 

Violence

Q1 2005

2

0

0

0

2

0

0

 

Q1 2006

2

0

0

0

0

1

1

 

Q1 2007

4

0

0

0

2

1

2

 

Q1 2008

3

0

0

0

0

1

3

 

Q1 2009

2

0

0

0

0

1

1

                 

Other re-offences (excluding rape, sexual and violence)

Q1 2005

8

1

2

0

3

4

1

 

Q1 2006

7

0

1

1

2

0

4

 

Q1 2007

7

1

1

0

3

2

3

 

Q1 2008

9

0

1

0

3

2

3

 

Q1 2009

7

0

1

0

3

1

3

(1) A re-offence is defined here as an offender being convicted at court for an offence committed within a 12-month follow-up period and is convicted either within the follow up period or a further six-month waiting period. (2) Rows may not sum to the distinct number of offenders as an offender may commit more than one offence. (3) Includes sexual (including rape) and sexual (child) offences.

Sentencing

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice on how many occasions a sentence (a) at and (b) below the minimum tariff for an offence was handed down in (i) the Crown court and (ii) magistrates courts in the last 12 months for which figures are available; and what proportion of sentences given in each type of court each figure represents. [57402]

Mr Blunt: The only minimum sentences provided for in the sentencing framework are seven years for a third Class A drug trafficking offence under section 111 of the Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000, three years for a third time domestic burglary under

7 Jun 2011 : Column 171W

section 111 of the 2000 Act, and five years for unauthorised possession of certain firearms (three years if the offender is aged under 18) and the Criminal Justice Act 2003, unless the courts find exceptional circumstances or that it would be unjust to impose the sentence in an individual case. In addition, there is the mandatory life sentence for murder under the Offences Against the Persons Act 1861.

For information please see the following tables from Sentencing Statistics 2009, supplementary tables 2b and 2c.

Table 2b: Persons sentenced under the Powers of Criminal Cou rts (Sentencing) Act 2000, 2000-0 9 , England and Wales
Number of persons
  Section 109 Section 110 Section 111

Life for second serious offence Minimum 7 years for third class A drug trafficking offence Minimum 3 years for third domestic burglary

2000

57

2

7 Jun 2011 : Column 172W

2001

51

1

6

2002

44

2

2003

48

3

13

2004

47

4

46

2005

(1)43

3

89

2006

(1)16

7

229

2007

(1)5

11

398

2008

(1)2

25

520

2009

(1)2

33

639

(1 )Section 109 was replaced on 4 April 2005 by sentences of imprisonment for public protection. Figures therefore relate to offences committed prior to that date.
Table 2c : Persons sentenced for firearms offences liable for mandatory minimum custodial sentence as prescribed by the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (1) , 2003 - 09 , England and Wales
Number of persons
Age of offender
(2) 2003 (2) 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

16 to 17-year-olds

Total sentenced

52

49

32

15

15

20

19

 

Total immediate custody

8

10

9

8

5

18

18

 

Received mandatory minimum —at least 3 years(3)

5

4

5

1

13

13

 

% of offenders sentenced receiving mandatory minimum

10.2

12.5

33.3

6.7

65.0

68.4

 

ACSL(6)

11.0

25.0

26.0

29.8

22.4

35.8

32.2

                 

18 years and above

Total sentenced

834

688

353

265

249

340

360

 

Total immediate custody

206

241

233

204

203

288

298

 

Received mandatory minimum—at least 5 years(4)

34

76

142

136

141

220

208

 

% of offenders sentenced receiving mandatory minimum

(5)4.1

11.0

40.2

51.3

56.6

64.7

57.8

 

ACSL(6)

28.1

35.9

48.1

52.4

54.1

57.1

55.8

(1) Offences under Firearms Act 1968 of: Possessing or distributing prohibited weapons or ammunition, or Possessing or distributing firearm disguised as other object. (2) The mandatory is only applicable for offences that occurred on or after 26 January 2004. (3) Mandatory minimum for persons aged 16 or 17 at time of offence and for offences taking place after 26 January 2004 is three years. Not all of those in this age bracket would have been eligible for the mandatory minimum as they may have been under 16 at the time of the offence; it is the age at the point of sentence that is recorded on courts proceedings database. (4) Mandatory minimum for persons aged over 18 at time of offence and for offences taking place after 26 January 2004 is five years. Not all of those in this age bracket would have been eligible for the mandatory minimum as they may have been under 18 at the time of the offence; it is the age at the point of sentence that is recorded on courts proceedings database. (5) The mandatory minimum did not apply to anyone sentenced in 2003, these figures have been supplied for comparative purposes only. (6) Average custodial sentence length excludes life/indeterminate sentences.

Social Security Benefits: Appeals

Anas Sarwar: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average time taken was from submission of an appeal against a failed (a) employment and support allowance and (b) disability living allowance claim to its decision in the latest period for which figures are available. [57680]

Mr Djanogly: The following table shows the average time taken from submission of an appeal to the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) until a decision is issued by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) for employment and support allowance and disability living allowance appeals.

The information covers 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011, the latest period for which figures are available.

Average waiting times for employment support allowance and disability living allowance appeals, 2010-11
  Average time in weeks from:

Submission to DWP to receipt at HMCTS (1) Receipt at HMCTS to issue of decision

Employment support allowance

7.99

19.38

Disability living allowance

7.37

24.43

(1) The data regarding the time from when an appeal is submitted to the DWP until it is received by HMCTS is taken from HMCTS database and relies on the date of submission provided by DWP.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 173W

The Tribunals Service’s target in 2010-11 was to issue a final decision for 75% of social security and child support (SSCS) appeals within 16 weeks of receipt from the DWP. Performance below target has resulted from an unexpectedly high level of appeals. In response, the Tribunals Service (and now HMCTS) has significantly increased its capacity and, nationally, 36% more SSCS appeals were cleared in 2010-11 compared to 2009-10. Further capacity increases are in hand.

Youth Custody

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what assessment he has made of recent trends in the number of 18 to 20 year-olds in custody; [57288]

(2) what his policy is on placing young adult offenders in custody within the secure prison estate; [57290]

(3) pursuant to his answer of 14 February 2011, Official Report, column 589W, on young offenders, what the (a) capacity and (b) occupancy rate was of each young offender institution holding 18 to 20 year old offenders in each month of the last three years; [57291]

(4) what proportion of young adult offenders in custody have been held in designated youth offender institutions in each month of each year since 2005. [57327]

Mr Blunt: Table 1 shows the number of 18 to 20-year-olds in custody each month since January 2008. The trend has been of a steady decline since August 2009.

Young adults sentenced to detention in a young offender institution are detained in young offender institutions (YOIs) as required by section 98 of the Powers of the Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000. These are normally self contained but in some instances are situated within an adult prison with which they share the majority of their facilities. Whatever the location, young adults detained in YOIs have separate sleeping accommodation and are always managed in accordance with the YOI rules.

We are committed to retaining specific provision within the secure estate for young adult offenders. Our “Breaking the Cycle” Green Paper sets out a broad reform agenda to drive improved results for all offenders in the secure estate, including young adults.

Table 2 shows the population, operational capacity and occupancy rate of establishments whose predominant function was a Young Offender Institution (excluding those YOIs where places are commissioned exclusively by the Youth Justice Board) in England and Wales on the last day in each month in each of the past three years.

In reference to the answer I provided to question 39586 on 14 February 2011, Official Report, column 590W, it has come to light that the population and operational capacity figures were incorrect in that they did not include data for YOI Hindley for June 2008 and that the data used related to the last Friday of the June, rather than, as stated, the last day of the month. This has been amended and the correct information is set out in Table 3.

Between 2005 and the present, all young adult offenders sentenced to detention in a young offender institution

7 Jun 2011 : Column 174W

have been detained in designated young offender institutions (YOIs), as required by section 98 of the Powers of the Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000.

Tables 1, 2 and 3 have been placed in the Library.

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average cost of the young offender institution estate per young offender has been in each year since 2005. [57317]

Mr Blunt: The average cost of keeping a person in a young offender institution (YOI) for the year 2005-06 to 2009-10 is detailed in the following table.

All YOIs, age 15 to 21, average
£

Direct establishment cost per prisoner Overall cost per prisoner

2009-10

36,928

53,198

2008-09

36,532

52,783

2007-08

34,896

49,419

2006-07

33,406

2005-06

35,865

Figures for 2010-11 are not yet available as the accounts on which these are calculated have not yet been audited.

For the year 2007-08 to 2009-10, the data includes private and public sector prisons, for prior years, 2006-07 and 2005-06, the data is for only public sector prisons.

The direct establishment cost includes expenditure met locally at each establishment, as published in the annual report and accounts of Her Majesty’s Prison Service or for 2008-09 and 2009-10 in an addendum to the NOMS Agency annual report and accounts.

In addition, an overall cost also including expenditure met at regional and national level, is shown for the year 2007-08 to 2009-10.

The overall average cost comprises the direct local establishment costs of public and private prisons, increased by an apportionment of relevant costs borne centrally and in the regions by NOMS. This involves some estimation. The figures do not include the cost of prisoners held in police or court cells under Operation Safeguard, or expenditure met by other Government Departments (e.g. Health and Education). Prisoner escort service costs are included. Expenditure recharged to the Youth Justice Board in respect of young people is included. Any expenditure met directly by the Youth Justice Board is not included.

The costs represent the cost per prisoner at each establishment where the majority use at the end of each year was a YOI. There is no adjustment for prisons holding prisoners of more than one category. The costs cover YOI establishments for age 15 to 21 years.

Due to changes in scope and accounting treatment over this period, the figures are not necessarily directly comparable. Figures are subject to rounding.

Transport

Airlines

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent assessment he has made of the effects of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme on the competitiveness of airlines. [57865]

7 Jun 2011 : Column 175W

Mrs Villiers: The impact assessments of The Aviation Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme (Amendment) Regulations 2011, The Aviation Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme Regulations 2010 and The Aviation Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Scheme Regulations 2009 include assessments of the impact of these regulations on competition between aircraft operators.

These documents are available on the internet at the following addresses and are available in the Libraries of the House.

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2011/765/pdfs/uksiem_20110765_en.pdf

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010/1996/pdfs/uksiem_20101996_en.pdf

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/2301/pdfs/uksiem_20092301_en.pdf


Aviation: Air Pollution

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps his Department has taken to mitigate the local environmental effects of aviation; and what assessment he has made of the environmental effects of aviation on communities in the Midlands. [55463]

Mrs Villiers [holding answer 17 May 2011]: The local environmental impact of aircraft operations is a key priority for Government. That is why we have cancelled plans for a third runway at Heathrow and will not support proposals for additional runways at Gatwick and Stansted.

Aviation must be able to grow to support the future prosperity of the UK but this has to be within the context of delivering environmental goals and protecting the quality of life of local communities. We are therefore currently consulting on principles that might underpin a sustainable framework for aviation. This consultation, which has a particular focus on the local environmental impacts, provides a key opportunity for all those affected by these impacts to contribute to the debate and offer views on the future direction of policy.

Outside Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted airports where statutory noise control measures apply, airports (including those situated in the Midlands) have been encouraged to engage constructively with local communities through Joint Consultative Committees in developing and implementing noise control measures, appropriate to local circumstances which can vary considerably from airport to airport. Over 51 airports are statutorily required to provide consultative facilities. The Government have issued guidance to assist airports and Joint Consultative Committees in developing effective local consultation.

Birmingham and East Midlands airports, in common with other major airports in England, have been required to produce strategic Noise Action Plans for consideration for formal adoption under the European Environmental Noise Directive. These plans are currently being reviewed and a decision on formal adoption will be made shortly.

Aviation: Russia

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress he has made on his Department's response to the European Commission ruling that the UK must amend its bilateral air service agreements with Russia; and if he will make a statement. [56023]

7 Jun 2011 : Column 176W

Mrs Villiers: The European Commission wrote to the UK Government in January, expressing the view that the UK's international air services agreements with the Russian Federation were inconsistent with its obligations under the treaties governing the European Union. The Commission invited the Government to submit its views in accordance with Article 258 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

The Government responded to the Commission in March pointing out certain misunderstandings in the Commission's assertions. In particular it was pointed out that there is no restriction on which airlines may be designated by the UK to operate under the agreement, whether on grounds of nationality or otherwise. The Government also questioned other assertions in the Commission's letter and concluded that the UK has satisfied its obligations under European law.

While acknowledging the desirability of modernising the current air services arrangements with Russia, the Government did not consider that the revocation of the bilateral Air Services Agreement would be a proportionate response.

Aviation: Security

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress has been made on his proposals to reform aviation security regulation. [56113]

Mrs Villiers: Officials have developed initial proposals for an outcome focused risk based approach to aviation security regulation. As set out in the updated Department for Transport Business Plan, published on 13 May, we have launched a pre-consultation call for evidence with industry stakeholders and will begin formal consultation on the proposals in September.

Aviation: Snow and Ice

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) whether his Department plans to issue guidance to airport operators on the effects on the environment of extended use of de-icing products in periods of severe weather; [56019]

(2) whether he has assessed the effects on the environment of extended use of de-icing products on airport runways during severe weather since December 2010. [56020]

Mrs Villiers: Airport operators must comply with all relevant environmental regulations in respect of the use, interception and appropriate disposal of the different types of chemical de-icer products used on airport ground surfaces. Environmental regulations are put in place by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and enforced by the Environment Agency.

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has assessed the feasibility of producing airline performance information during severe weather conditions as recommended in the Independent Review of Winter Resilience; and whether he has discussed such a proposal with the Civil Aviation Authority. [56118]

7 Jun 2011 : Column 177W

Mrs Villiers: The Civil Aviation Authority has undertaken market research to identify the information air passengers find most valuable. This covers a range of service quality measures, including airline punctuality. It will publish the results in the summer.

Biofuels

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport from which organisations his Department has received representations on its bioenergy strategy since May 2010; and if he will make a statement. [55406]

Norman Baker [holding answer 17 May 2011]: Department for Transport Ministers meet regularly with key UK and European organisations where they discuss a range of transport issues including Government policy on the strategic use of biofuels. The Secretary of State and I have met with ExxonMobil, Shell, Greenergy, The Renewable Energy Association, British Sugar, Neste Oil, The Carbon Trust, The National Non Food Crops Centre, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Greenpeace, World Wide Fund for Nature, the Canadian high commission, ministerial colleagues in other Departments, other European countries, and Members of the European Parliament.

The Department is currently consulting on proposals to amend the Renewable Transport Fuels Obligation. The consultation period will run until 2 June 2011. Consultation documents can be found on the Department for Transport website.

Convention on International Civil Aviation

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what his policy is on reform of the Chicago Convention on Civil Aviation of 1947; and what recent discussions he has had on any such reform. [57312]

Mrs Villiers: The UK believes that there is value in exploring how the Chicago convention could be reformed. The UK has, in the past, supported moves to amend the Chicago convention. However the 2007 ICAO Assembly and subsequent meetings of the ICAO Council decided not to initiate any action on this issue.

Since there is currently no international consensus on reforming the Chicago convention, the UK will continue to work through ICAO to achieve our objectives in alternative ways. In this regard, the UK has participated in ICAO meetings to ensure we influence discussions on a wide range of policies affecting international civil aviation.

Departmental Billing

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many invoices his Department received in respect of goods or services supplied by tier 1 suppliers between 1 May 2010 and 1 April 2011; and how many of those invoices were not paid within the period of time specified in the Government's Fair Payment guidance. [55858]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport does not keep separate records for payment performance to construction industry suppliers, and the cost of preparing such information could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

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Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what mechanism his Department has established to ensure its payments are passed through the supply chain to each Tier in accordance with the last date for payment defined in the Government's Fair Payment guidance. [55881]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport ensures that its contracts include a clause requiring its suppliers to pay promptly any sub-contractors they employ. Furthermore, any sub-contractors who are not being paid within the 30 day period may raise their concern with the Department by sending an email to:

[email protected]

providing the title and reference number of the contract and the nature of their complaint. Should this not be resolved to the supplier's satisfaction, this can be escalated to the Office of Government Commerce Supplier Feedback Service.

Departmental Buildings

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the (a) name and (b) address is of each building owned by his Department; and what the estimated monetary value is of each such building. [53802]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport is a federated organisation comprising DFT (Central), the headquarters functions responsible mainly for policy issues, and seven executive agencies responsible for the delivery of various services.

The estate comprises over 1,000 freehold and leasehold buildings and includes offices, hangars, driving test centres, depots, vehicle weighbridges and coastguard rescue stations.

Information on buildings, including valuations, is not centrally recorded. Producing the information requested for such a diverse estate could be achieved only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental CCTV

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many CCTV cameras are installed in and around his Department's premises; and how much such cameras (a) cost to install and (b) cost to operate in the latest period for which figures are available. [56840]

Norman Baker: I regret that the requested information is not centrally recorded and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Redundancy

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what criteria were used to determine whether Department for Transport Central staff in pay bands 6 and 7 would be made surplus; what the cut-off score below which staff were deemed surplus was; and if he will make a statement. [56490]

Norman Baker: As part of the re-structuring of the Department all staff were required to complete a self assessment form. The criteria used for assessment were

7 Jun 2011 : Column 179W

competencies, performance and professional expertise. Staff were considered for all posts in the new structure and were only displaced if the moderation panel assessment determined that they were not suitable for the available roles. The assessment of individuals was a relative assessment based on the criteria and the requirements of the available roles rather than a fixed ‘cut off point’.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many compulsory redundancy notices have been issued to Department for Transport Central (DfT(C)) staff since May 2010; how many such notices he expects to be issued to DfT(C) staff in each year to April 2015; and what steps he is taking to avoid compulsory redundancies among staff in his Department. [56491]

Norman Baker: Department for Transport Central (DfT(C)) has not issued any compulsory redundancy notices since May 2010 and the Department is working to avoid compulsory redundancies.

DfT(C) has established a redeployment and career advice centre for staff who have been unsuccessful in obtaining a position in the restructured Department. This centre is looking to assist staff in finding suitable alternative work and to give information in order that they can understand potential job and career options. In addition, staff who have been unsuccessful in securing a position are able to apply to leave the Department under a voluntary exit scheme.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many posts there were in each pay bargaining unit in his Department on 1 April (a) 2010 and (b) 2011; and what he expects the equivalent figure to be on 1 April in each year to 2015. [56492]

Norman Baker: Information on posts is not available for all pay bargaining units because management of posts is through local delegation and is monitored by paybill and full-time equivalents (FTE). These details are available in the Department’s annual report and resource accounts available from the website at:

www.dft.gov.uk

The information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what recent discussions he has had with trade union representatives on the redundancy process for central Department staff; [56493]

(2) what steps he has taken to reach an agreement with trade unions on the redundancy selection process used for Department of Transport Central staff. [56494]

Norman Baker: If the Department for Transport Central were to run a redundancy process, full consultation with the trade unions side would take place in accordance with the Cabinet Office protocols.

All consultation with the departmental trade unions in respect of the recent selection process has been undertaken by the Department’s officials. Consultation on the change programme began in May 2010 and is still ongoing.

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John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what equality checks were in place to ensure that no bias occurred in the selection process when Department of Transport Central staff in pay bands 6 and 7 were deemed surplus; and what his policy is on equality in redundancy selection processes within his Department. [56495]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport carried out equality checks prior to each stage of the selection and allocation process. These took the form of staff in post and equality data analysis, by pay band, for each directorate group.

The Department will pay ‘due regard’ to equality, as required in the Equality Act 2010 and the single equality duty, if it were to proceed with redundancy processes in the future.

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether an equality impact assessment was conducted before the job design process for Department for Transport central staff was completed. [56496]

Norman Baker: An equality impact assessment (EQIA) screening on the design principles was completed in July 2010 and an initial impact assessment in October 2010 before the completion of the final design, in accordance with our usual processes. The Department for Transport (DFT) Central pay band 1 to 7 Design Process Equality Impact Assessment Report, containing details of the impact assessments, will be published shortly on the DFT website.

Departmental Research

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what (a) longitudinal and (b) other (i) research and (ii) collection of data his Department has (A) initiated, (B) terminated and (C) amended in the last 12 months; and what such research and data collection exercises undertaken by the Department have not been amended in that period. [56762]

Norman Baker: A list of longitudinal and non-longitudinal research and data collection that has been initiated, terminated and/or amended by the Department in the last 12 months is provided in the following table.

Research initiated, amended or terminated in past 12 months
Title Initiated (I), amended (A), terminated (T)

Value of Prevented Fatalities and Injuries—Phase 1

I

Advanced Biofuels: the potential for a UK industry

I

Scenarios for the cost-effective deployment of biofuel in the UK road transport sector in 2020

I

Amendments to the UK Renewable Energy Directive Art 19(2) report on emissions from cultivation of biofuels feedstocks in the UK

I

Child media consumption research

I

Christmas 2010 THINK! road safety drink drive campaign: post-activity tracking research

I

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Annual survey of attitudes to THINK! campaign, road safety and driving behaviour

I

Post campaign tracking research for the THINK! road safety ‘Tales of the road’ campaign, for Children aged 6-11

I

Evaluation of the 'Code of Everand' road safety online game, for children aged 9-12

I

Evaluation of THINK! road safety education resources for early years and upper primary children

I

High Speed 2 Rail Omnibus Survey (Pre consultation)

I

Station usage and demand forecasting at newly-opened railway lines and stations

I

Peak spreading fares study

I

Network Modelling Framework Script Development

I

Strategic Fares Model Updating 2

I

Responsiveness of rail demand

I

Comparing rail forecasting approaches

I

Implementing the "revisiting the elasticity-based framework" study

I

Van CO2 Database Matching Project

I

GB Van CO2 Database

I

Freight route choice using GPS data

I

Omnibus survey of public attitudes to bus travel

I

Omnibus survey of public attitudes to climate change and travel choices

I

Marginal Abatement Cost Curve Project

I

Market Maturity and Econometrics

I

Aviation Health Studies

I

Train Operating Company Cost Model

A

Emissions Model

A

Evidence Review of the Economics of Shipping and UK Ports

A

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Shipping Services

A

Value of Travel Time Savings (VTTS) study—Phase 1

T

National Transport Model Version 4 Commissioning—Phase 4

T

Validation of the NTM using ASHE

T

Funding of the Transport Research Centre

T

Airport Development—Appraisal of Sustainability Scoping Document

T

The following list contains information on ongoing data collection exercises not amended in that period. Ongoing and completed research that has not been amended in the last 12 months is available on the Department's Research Management Database

http://www.dft.gov.uk/rmd/

Ongoing statistics/data collection

National Travel Survey

Roadside survey of registration marks

Carriageway work done

Skidding resistance

Survey of PSV bus and coach operators

Survey of light rail operators

Survey of bus reliability

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Bus fares survey

Bus and light rail punctuality survey

Concessionary fares survey

Taxi survey

Blue Badge survey

Survey of civil parking enforcement

Manual and automatic traffic counts

R199b road lengths survey

National rail travel survey

International road haulage survey

Continuing survey of road goods transport

Reported Road Casualties (STATS19)

Breath alcohol screening tests in England and Wales

Seatbelt wearing rates and mobile phone use by drivers in England

Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) of fatalities from reported road accidents

Passenger counts data

Continuing survey of road goods transport

International road haulage survey

CAA surveys

Domestic waterborne freight survey

Roll-on/roll-off goods vehicles survey

Sea passenger survey

Maritime Statistics Data System

Port employment and accident rates survey 2009-10

Departmental Travel

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much his Department has spent on ministerial travel by (a) ministerial car, (b) train, (c) bus, (d) commercial aircraft and (e) private aircraft since May 2010. [50217]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport has spent £155,617 on ministerial travel by ministerial car since May 2010. £7,958 has been spent on ministerial travel by train. Information regarding expenditure on bus journeys is not held in the format requested and can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Details of all overseas travel is published on line and can be found at

http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/ministers/transparency/

Section 10 of the Ministerial Code provides guidance on travel for Ministers and makes clear that Ministers must ensure that they always make efficient and cost-effective travel arrangements.

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much each executive agency of his Department has spent on travel by (a) private hire vehicles, (b) trains, (c) buses, (d) commercial aircraft and (e) private aircraft since May 2010. [56070]

Norman Baker: The available information for each of the Department's agencies is included in the following table. Blank fields indicate that the information is not held centrally in the format requested, and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

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£
Agency Private hire vehicles Rail Buses Commercial air Private air

Highways Agency

567,964

1,301,494

3,751

36,075

0

Driving Standards Agency

435,175

Vehicle Certification Agency

0

Vehicle and Operator Services Agency

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

(1)418,953

161,740

(1)

878,484

0

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency

270,331

255,663

79,029

0

Government Car and Despatch Agency

(1) MCA does not account for private hire vehicles, buses and taxis separately. The figure given for private hire vehicles includes all three modes.

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much has been spent on travel in respect of (a) each of his Department's executive agencies and (b) the chief executive of each such agency since May 2010. [56182]

Norman Baker: The information for each of the Department's agencies is included in the following table. Blank fields indicate that the information is not held centrally in the format requested, and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Agency Total travel (£) Chief executive travel (£)

Highways Agency

2,523,641

4,109

Driving Standards Agency

3,191,805

1,502

Vehicle Certification Agency

1,085,782

(1)29,616

Vehicle and Operator Services Agency

6,400

Maritime and Coastguard Agency

1,812,447

1,350

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency

605,024

4,541

Government Car and Despatch Agency

(2)201,000

(1) Some of the cost for the VCA chief executive will have been incurred for GCDA, as they shared chief executive between May and October 2010. The figures are higher than for other agencies as VCA has overseas offices. (2) The figure for GCDA includes subsistence, as the agency does not account for travel and subsistence separately.

Electric Vehicles

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress has been made on delivering the second round of funding to successful bidders to the Plugged-In Places pilot scheme for electric vehicles. [56028]

Norman Baker: We announced five successful second round Plugged-In Places pilot schemes in December 2010, for Northern Ireland, Central Scotland, Greater Manchester, the Midlands and the East of England. These projects will be receiving match funding to install recharging infrastructure throughout financial years 2011-12 and 2012-13. The new projects are testing a diverse range of technologies and operating models and will

7 Jun 2011 : Column 184W

help to inform the wider roll out of infrastructure across the country. We have been working closely with the new projects to ensure they learn from the experiences of first round projects. They will move from detailed planning to implementation throughout the coming year, with the East of England project the first to have installed charge points so far.

Exports: Livestock

Laura Sandys: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what powers are available to local authorities to prevent live animal exports from open ports. [57914]

Mike Penning: Local authorities have no specific powers to prevent live animal exports, and commercial ports (including municipal ports) are subject to a general open port duty. However, such exports must meet any applicable legal requirements about animal welfare during transport, animal health and animal identification.

Great Western Railway Line

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he plans to take to ensure value for money for passengers when negotiating the new Reading to Paddington rail franchise. [57023]

Mrs Villiers: In January 2011, the Government published the document setting out how it would let future rail franchises. The details of this can be found at:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/consultations/closed/2010-28/govresponse.pdf.

Great Western Railway: Franchises

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what discussions he has had with representatives of First Great Western on the future of the Great Western franchise beyond 2013. [56140]

Mrs Villiers: The Secretary of State and Department for Transport officials meet with franchised train operators and their owners regularly. These discussions have included First Great Western's expected decision in relation to the termination date of the franchise should it pass the franchise Continuation Review.

High Speed Two Railway Line

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether (a) (i) Ministers, (ii) officials and (iii) special advisers in his Department and (b) representatives of HS2 Ltd have discussed with (A) the Chinese Government, (B) a Chinese sovereign wealth fund and (C) any other Chinese organisation financing or participating in the construction, operation or maintenance of High Speed Two. [56934]

Mr Philip Hammond: No such discussions have taken place.

Highways Agency: Fees and Charges

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether (a) his Department and (b) the Highways Agency has carried out any feasibility studies on allowing the Highways Agency to charge the cost of event traffic management to event organisers. [56623]

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Mike Penning: The Highways Agency is currently undertaking a project to assess the feasibility and benefits of charging for event traffic management. The project is currently at outline business case stage.

Highways Agency: Fuels

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether (a) his Department and (b) the Highways Agency have carried out any feasibility studies on reducing the fuel costs of traffic officers through (i) the use of liquid petroleum gas and (ii) sharing of fuel depots with other contractors. [56622]

Mike Penning: For the traffic officer fleet the Highways Agency has carried out a feasibility study on the use of liquid petroleum gas but has ruled this out, as the cost to upgrade the current fleet would be prohibitive.

The Highways Agency has not carried out a feasibility study on the sharing of fuel depots with other contractors.

Level Crossings: Accidents

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many fatalities there have been on level crossings in the last five years. [55321]

Mrs Villiers: There have been 47 fatalities at level crossings in the last five years.

The latest data on annual level crossing fatalities can be found at:

http://www.rssb.co.uk/SiteCollectionDocuments/pdf/reports/Monthly%20Summary%20of%20Safety%20Performance% 20March%202011.pdf

Members: Correspondence

Amber Rudd: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Hastings and Rye of 24 March 2011 on behalf of a constituent Mr Rhoderick Powrie, ref: AR/JA/1530. [57435]

Mrs Villiers: I replied to the hon. Member for Hastings and Rye’s letter (ref: AR/JA/1530) on the 3 May 2011. The Department’s reference number for the reply is TV/010735/11.

Motor Vehicles: Testing

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether his Department has calculated the potential change in revenue for the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency which would arise from reducing the number of MoT tests a new vehicle would need to a test after four years and every two years thereafter. [56034]

Mike Penning: A small amount of the MOT test fee goes to the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency to cover its costs in administering the scheme. A review of the MOT scheme will consider the impacts to Vehicle and Operator Services Agency revenue of any changes to test frequency.

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Network Rail: Repairs and Maintenance

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) when he expects work on the drains under the West Coast main line in Euxton, Lancashire to be completed; [57682]

(2) for how long Euxton Lane, Lancashire has been closed due to drain failure on land owned by Network Rail; [57683]

(3) what steps Network Rail is taking to repair the drains under the West Coast main line in Euxton, Lancashire. [57684]

Mrs Villiers: The repair of drains under railway lines is an operational matter for Network Rail as the owner and operator of the national rail network. The hon. Member should contact Network Rail's chief executive at the following address for a response to his questions.

David Higgins

Chief Executive

Network Rail

Kings Place

90 York Way

London N1 9AG.