Trade Unions

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many staff of (a) his Department, (b) the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, (c) the Defence Storage and Distribution Agency, (d) the Defence Support Group, (e) the Defence Vetting Agency, (f) the Met Office, (g) the Ministry of Defence Police and Guarding Agency, (h) the People, Pay and Pensions Agency, (i) Service Children's Education, (j) the Service Personnel and Veterans Agency and (k) the UK Hydrographic Office are entitled to work (i) full-time as trade union representatives and (ii) part-time on trade union activities; how many such staff are paid more than £25,900 annually; and what the cost to the public purse of employing such staff on such duties was in the latest period for which figures are available. [56438]

Mr Robathan: In common with many major employers the Ministry of Defence (MOD) makes certain facilities available to civilian employees who are accredited representatives or members, but not paid officials of trade unions (TUs).

The information requested is provided in the following table. It is not possible to give a breakdown of numbers whose salaries are more than £25,900 annually.


Number of reps on 100% Number of reps on less than 100% Cost (£ million)

Department including: Defence Storage and Distribution Agency Defence Vetting Agency Ministry of Defence Police and Guarding Agency People, Pay and Pensions Agency Service Children's Education and Service Personnel and Veterans Agency

66

321

4.016

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory

1

35

0.282

Defence Support Group

2

73

0.323

Met Office

1

11

0.073

UK Hydrographic Office

0

25

0.091

The figures for Defence Storage and Distribution Agency, Defence Vetting Agency, MOD Police and Guarding Agency, People, Pay and Pensions Agency, Services Children's Education and Service Personnel and Veterans Agency cannot be broken down separately but are contained within the Department figure.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 29W

The figure for representatives on less than 100% includes individuals who may be on as low a figure as 1%—i.e. they attend a routine management meeting or a specific conference. Within the 321 figure shown against the Department, 151 of the individuals are on less than 10% facility time.

Women and Equalities

Departmental Legal Costs

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how much the Government Equalities Office paid in (a) damages, (b) claimant costs and (c) defendant costs in respect of all civil claims brought against it in which the claimant was successful or the Office settled in each year since its inception. [54628]

Lynne Featherstone: The Government Equalities Office would show such payments as special payments in its resource accounts. Figures for 2010-11 will be provided in the Government Equality Office's 2010-11 resource accounts to be published in July this year.

Government Equalities Office: Equality and Human Rights

Mr Raab: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how many employees of (a) the Government Equalities Office and (b) the Equality and Human Rights Commission earn an annual salary of over (A) £142,500, (B) £65,738 and (C) £25,900. [56247]

Lynne Featherstone [holding answer 18 May 2011]:The figures requested for permanent employees of the Government Equalities Office (GEO) and the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) are in the table. Additional salary data for these organisations will be made available shortly on www.data.gov.uk

  Organisation

GEO EHRC

Annual salary over £142,500

0

0

Annual salary over £65,738

10

15

Annual salary over £25,900

87

322

Homophobia: Transphobia

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities what steps Ministers in the Government Equalities Office took to mark International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia on 17 May 2011. [57500]

Lynne Featherstone: I delivered a video message of support on International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia on 17 May 2011, along with the Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, my hon. Friend the Member for Taunton Deane (Mr Browne). The messages are available on the Government Equalities Office and Foreign and Commonwealth Office websites and have been circulated to stakeholders.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 30W

Our messages reiterated the Government's commitment to advance lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality, both domestically and internationally, and set out the Government's programme of work in this field.

Wales

Charitable Donations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what steps she is taking to encourage charitable giving by Ministers in her Department. [57130]

Mr David Jones: All Government Ministers have pledged to undertake a ‘one day challenge’ with a charity or community group of their choice. This is a clear and public commitment by Ministers to give their time to help others. The pledge aims to inspire others to consider how they might be able to support their communities to benefit themselves, as well as their chosen organisations.

Departmental Equality

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what account she has taken of the effects of income inequality in the (a) formulation and (b) implementation of policy. [57149]

Mr David Jones: The Government are committed to addressing income disparity between different parts of the United Kingdom. It is, however, for individual Departments to undertake appropriate equality impact assessments for individual policies during development.

It is regrettable that so much of the pre-recession growth was focused on London and the South East leaving Wales with an average gross disposable household income per head of £13,484, 22% lower than the South East of England.

Measures such as our national insurance holiday for new businesses, and the creation of enterprise zones in areas of high growth potential have the potential to address this disparity.

The Wales Office will continue to work with other Government Departments and the Welsh Assembly Government to ensure Wales fully benefits from policies that encourage growth.

Departmental Research

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what (a) longitudinal and (b) other (i) research and (ii) collection of data her Department has (A) initiated, (B) terminated and (C) amended in the last 12 months; and what such research and data collection exercises undertaken by the Department have not been amended in that period. [56768]

Mr David Jones: Over the last 12 months the Department has initiated two pieces of research on the economic situation in Wales. Both pieces of research were delivered at no cost to the Department.

Wales

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many requests she received between 6 May and 20 May 2011 to meet members of the Welsh Government; and on what matters. [57468]

Mrs Gillan: No such representations have been received.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 31W

Scotland

Departmental Equality

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what account he has taken of the effects of income inequality in the (a) formulation and (b) implementation of policy. [57150]

David Mundell: The Scotland Office is responsible for the policy governing the devolution settlement in Scotland as provided for in the Scotland Act 1998. A regulatory impact assessment of the Scotland Bill currently before Parliament was undertaken prior to its introduction and is available on the Scotland Office website. Among other things it includes information on the likely costs, benefits and impact of the key proposals based on the available evidence.

Northern Ireland

Departmental Charitable Donations

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what steps he is taking to encourage charitable giving by Ministers in his Department. [57129]

Mr Paterson: While I am happy to encourage charitable giving, this is a matter of personal choice and I am content to leave such issues to the individual.

Attorney-General

Prosecutions: Rape

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Attorney-General how many successful prosecutions for rape there have been in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement. [57732]

The Solicitor-General: I am responding to this question using the records maintained by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS). The Ministry of Justice maintains separate data relating to rape prosecutions.

The CPS records show that the number of defendants successfully prosecuted for offences of rape in each of the last three years was as follows:


Number

2008-09

2,018

2009-10

2,270

2010-11

2,465

These figures represent the number of defendants prosecuted by the CPS for offences of rape whose case was completed in each of the last three years ending March.

Rape is defined by the CPS as any offence from the following list:

Rape: SI Sexual Offences Act 1956

Sexual intercourse with a girl under the age of 13: S5 Sexual Offences Act 1956

7 Jun 2011 : Column 32W

An attempt to commit one of the above offences under the Criminal Attempts Act 1981

Rape: SI Sexual Offences Act 2003

Rape of a child under 13: S5 Sexual Offences Act 2003

Sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder impeding choice: S30(3) Sexual Offences Act 2003

An attempt to commit one of the above offences under the Criminal Attempts Act 1981

Incitement or conspiracy to commit any of the above offences.

Where a case identified in CPS records as one of rape results in conviction on a lesser charge, the outcome of proceedings is still recorded as a conviction for rape.

Trade Unions

Mr Raab: To ask the Attorney-General how many staff of the Crown Prosecution Service were entitled to work (a) full-time as trade union representatives and (b) part-time on trade union activities in 2010-11; how many such staff were paid more than £25,900 annually; and what the cost to the public purse was of employing such staff on such duties. [58133]

The Solicitor-General: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave to his written question 56434 on 23 May 2011, Official Report, columns 376-77W.

Deputy Prime Minister

Electoral Systems

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister whether he plans to bring forward further proposals for changes to the electoral system for the House of Commons; and if he will make a statement. [57504]

Mr Harper: The coalition's programme for government set out the Government's intention to hold a referendum on whether to adopt the alternative vote for elections to the House of Commons. This commitment has been met with a referendum on the voting system on 5 May 2011. The Government have no plans to bring forward further such proposals in this Parliament.

Voting Rights: Prisoners

Priti Patel: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister whether he is preparing legislation or draft legislation on the extension of the franchise to prisoners; whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals on such an extension within the next six months; and if he will make a statement. [57547]

Mr Harper: The Government asked the European Court of Human Rights to reconsider its recent judgment on prisoner voting rights (known as “Greens and MT”) and were disappointed that the request was refused. The UK has six months from the date of the judgment becoming final to bring forward legislative proposals to amend the law on prisoner voting. The Government are considering the next steps.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 33W

Communities and Local Government

Departmental Equality

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what account he has taken of the effects of income inequality in the (a) formulation and (b) implementation of policy. [57155]

Robert Neill: My Department follows Government guidance as set out in HM Treasury's Green Book. This includes, where appropriate, assessing possible distributional impacts of policies.

Energy Performance Certificates

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether the moratorium on new regulation from April 2011 for businesses with fewer than 10 people applies to the proposed requirement for holiday lets to have energy performance certificates. [56942]

Andrew Stunell: The moratorium will not apply to the requirements in respect of holiday lets and energy performance certificates as this obligation flows from the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive. Regulations that implement European Union legislation are exempt from the moratorium.

Fire Services: Trade Unions

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many staff of each fire service are entitled to work (a) full-time as trade union representatives and (b) part-time on trade union activities; how many such staff are paid more than £25,900 per annum; and what the cost to the public purse of employing such staff was in the latest period for which figures are available. [56455]

Robert Neill: Fire and rescue authorities, in their role as employers, are responsible for the decisions about how to manage their work force, interact with local trade unions and ensure value for money for the taxpayer.

However, I am aware of the public and parliamentary concern expressed in recent weeks over trade union officials paid for from the public purse.

The coalition Government's transparency agenda will help ensure that cash payments to trade unions and the titles of staff posts in local government are open to public scrutiny.

At a time when all local authorities need to make sensible savings to help pay off the budget deficit, councillors will rightly wish to review the merits of (full-time) union officials funded by the taxpayer and the provision of the office facilities to trade unions.

Government Procurement Card

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the (a) date of purchase, (b) amount, (c) supplier and (d) level 3 or enhanced transaction entry was of each transaction undertaken by his Department using the Government Procurement Card in (i) 2008-09 and (ii) 2009-10. [57175]

7 Jun 2011 : Column 34W

Robert Neill: The details of GPC transactions for (i) 2008-09 and (ii) 2009-10 have been deposited in the Library of the House. This includes (a) date of purchase, (b) amount and (c)supplier; (d) level 3 or enhanced transaction details are not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Each transaction does have a merchant category which is a broad description of the type of goods purchased.

This disclosure illustrates the need for greater transparency and scrutiny of spending via the Government Procurement Card.

Homelessness

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what mechanism he plans to put in place to ensure that provision of services for homeless people remains a priority for local authorities under the provisions of the Localism Bill. [57717]

Grant Shapps: The reforms in the Localism Bill will assist councils in providing a robust safety net for the homeless. Local housing authorities will still be required to secure suitable accommodation for households who are eligible for assistance, homeless through no fault of their own and in 'priority need' (eg families that include a dependant child or pregnant woman and people who are vulnerable for some reason).

The proposed homelessness provisions in the Localism Bill provide local authorities with additional flexibility so that they can also bring the duty to an end with an offer of accommodation in the private rented sector without requiring the applicant's agreement.

We are putting additional protection in place for those provided with private rented accommodation ensuring the tenancy must be for a fixed term of at least 12 months and the homelessness duty will recur if the applicant becomes homeless again within two years through no fault of their own, regardless of whether they still have priority need.

We have maintained the level of investment in homelessness grant for local authorities and the voluntary sector, with provision of £400 million in total over the next four years. We have established a new cross-Government working group on homelessness, bringing together Ministers from eight Government Departments, working with Local Government Association as well as voluntary sector partners to address the complex and multiple causes of homelessness and rough sleeping.

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment the Cross-Departmental Homeless Working Group has made of the effects of the big society initiative on the provision of local services for homeless people [57719]

Grant Shapps: The most successful action to tackle homelessness is strongly rooted in local communities. The voluntary and community sector is instrumental at local level in tackling rough sleeping, often in direct response to local concerns about the visibility of the problem. The best local authority homelessness prevention services are shaped around local need. This is an example of the big society in action.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 35W

The Ministerial Working Group on Homelessness brings together eight Departments to address the complex causes and improve support for homeless people. The Ministerial Working Group is working with local government and voluntary sector partners to remove bureaucratic barriers, giving communities greater freedom to do what works best in their areas.

The Government have maintained the Homelessness Grant, investing £400 million over the next four years. £6.5 billion was allocated to Supporting People for the spending review period, with councils facing a less than 1% average cash reduction per year.

Housing: Construction

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many (a) private sector and (b) public sector housing starts there were in the Peterborough city council area in the first quarter of 2011. [57334]

Andrew Stunell: There were 205 private sector housing starts and nine public sector housing starts in the Peterborough city council area in the first quarter of 2011.

The sources for these figures are the P2 local authority house building return and data from the National House-Building Council (NHBC). These are collected as part of the production of the Department for Communities and Local Government's National Statistics on house building in England, which can be found at the following link:

http://www.communities.gov.uk/housing/housingresearch/housingstatistics/housingstatisticsby/housebuilding/

Landlords: Complaints

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what information his Department holds on the number of complaints about landlords made to local authorities in each of the last three years. [57583]

Andrew Stunell: This information is not held centrally.

Landlords: Prosecutions

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many prosecutions there were of landlords for an offence under the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985 in (a) 2008, (b) 2009, (c) 2010 and (d) the latest period for which figures are available. [57501]

Andrew Stunell: This information is not held by central Government.

Local Government

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what powers are available to police in relation to disorder in public galleries at council meetings open to the public. [52301]

James Brokenshire: I have been asked to reply.

The police have a number of powers that could be used in relation to disorder in public galleries at council meetings, including powers to prevent a breach of the peace, and powers in the Public Order Act 1986.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 36W

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many local authorities in England have responsibility for housing. [57595]

Andrew Stunell: All local housing authorities in England with a housing stock of 50 or more houses are required to keep a housing revenue account. There are currently 170 local authorities with active housing revenue accounts.

An authority with fewer than 50 dwellings is not required to maintain a separate record and these are not tracked in official statistics; in addition any dwelling that is tied to a particular job, such as wardens’ or keepers' cottages, is not included and may be provided by authorities that otherwise do not maintain housing stock.

Mayors: Birmingham

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of establishing arrangements for a shadow mayor in Birmingham; and what proportion of the cost will be funded through council tax payments in Birmingham; [57233]

(2) if he will refund the costs associated with the creation of a shadow mayor in Birmingham in the case where mayoral government arrangements are rejected in a referendum taking place after a period of mayoral government. [57235]

Robert Neill: As the Impact Assessment ‘Creating executive mayors in the 12 largest English cities’, published on 17 January 2011, explains, the cost to a local authority of moving to a shadow mayor is expected to be negligible.

The Under-Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, my hon. Friend the Member for Hazel Grove (Andrew Stunell), indicated to the House at Report stage of the Localism Bill that we would listen carefully to the points made on such issues as shadow mayors and we are now reflecting on what we have heard and intend to come back to these matters when the Bill is considered in the Other Place.

I do not believe such a move would change the overall administrative costs of the local authority.

Sheltered Housing

Neil Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what representations he has received on measures to enable residents in care villages or similarly-managed properties to hold management companies to account; and if he will make a statement. [57022]

Grant Shapps: We have received over 100 letters following a campaign led by the Campaign Against Residential Leasehold Exploitation (CarlEX) questioning the balance of rights between leaseholders and landlords.

Leaseholders have a number of rights which allow them to hold management companies and landlords to account. These include the ability to challenge the reasonableness of service charges and in some cases, subject to certain criteria, seek the appointment of a new manager at a Leasehold Valuation Tribunal, or take over management and employ their own agent.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 37W

We recognise that where problems arise over leaseholders' homes—especially about the actions of managing agents—these can cause real inconvenience and, in some cases, lead to significant distress. We are therefore actively thinking about the issue and do not rule out making other changes. We have also asked senior officials to meet as a priority with some representatives of the CarlEX campaign to hear more about the issues highlighted in the campaign.

Education

Arts: Education

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on the role of art as a subject in the (a) primary and (b) secondary curriculum. [57572]

Mr Gibb: We believe that the arts in general can play an important part in raising standards, changing attitudes towards education, improving behaviour and the quality of teaching. Decisions about the status of art and design as a national curriculum subject will be made as part of the review of the national curriculum. We have recently completed a call for evidence which attracted a very high number of responses across the range of national curriculum subjects. We will be considering those views, along with other evidence, before announcing our proposals early next year.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of demand for newly-qualified specialist art teachers in each of the next three academic years. [57650]

Mr Gibb: The number of teachers who schools employ in future years will, as now, be a matter for head teachers and governing bodies of schools to decide, according to local needs and subject to statutory requirements on class sizes where appropriate.

It is our intention to ensure that enough suitably qualified teachers are available to meet the needs of schools. The targets for recruitment to initial teacher training courses were calculated and issued on this basis.

The latest recruitment targets have been published in Table A3 at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000927/sfr11-2010ittv2.xls

This shows that in 2011/12 there will be around 320 secondary initial teacher training places specialising in art.

Recruitment targets beyond 2011/12 have not yet been made.

Children: Communication Skills

Paul Maynard: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the merits of developing commissioning guidance for head teachers on support for children with speech, language and communication needs. [56214]

Sarah Teather: The Inclusion Development Programme, which provides in-service training for serving teachers, includes a specific module on speech, language and

7 Jun 2011 : Column 38W

communication needs (SLCN). These materials were updated earlier this year and made widely available to local authorities and school through the distribution of DVD training packages.

On 9 March we published our Green Paper, ‘Support and Aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability’. The Green Paper proposes a package of reforms aimed to ensure children's needs (including SLCN) are identified early and that the right support is put in place to help all children make progress at school and reach their full potential. There is now a period of consultation on the Green Paper, which closes on 30 June. We will be considering all responses received during the consultation period in determining how we take our proposals forward.

Children: Hearing Impairment

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what financial support his Department (a) has provided in each of the last three years and (b) plans to provide in 2011-12 and 2012-13 for social care services available to deaf children and their families in Walsall. [56360]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 19 May 2011]: Funding data specifically for social care services available to deaf children and their families are not collected by the Department. However, the available information on the net expenditure planned by Walsall local authority on the provision of education for pupils with special educational needs in the last three years is shown in the following table:

P lanned (net) provision for pupils with SEN in Walsall

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Walsall

2,194,262

2,826,359

3,272,071

The Department is currently collecting the s251 Budget data for the 2011-12 financial year. The information will not be publicly available until later in the year when it will be published as Official Statistics.

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what financial support his Department (a) has provided in each of the last three years and (b) plans to provide in 2011-12 and 2012-13 for school transport services for children with special educational needs in Walsall. [56364]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 19 May 2011]: The information requested is not available. Home-to-school transport, including transport for children with special educational needs, is funded through a combination of Revenue Support Grant, paid by the Department for Communities and Local Government, and locally determined council tax.

The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), recently allocated £38 million for 2011-12 and £47 million for 2012-13 for extended rights to transport for pupils from low income families. Walsall local authority received an allocation of £30,504 and £37,846. Pupils with special educational needs will be eligible to free school travel if they meet the criteria of the extended rights duty.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 39W

Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Children Review

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he plans to publish the Bailey Report on the Commercialisation and Sexualisation of Childhood. [58166]

Sarah Teather: The report by Reg Bailey, following his independent review of the commercialisation and sexualisation of childhood, “Letting Children be Children”, was published as a Command Paper on 6 June. The Government’s response will be made to Parliament as a written ministerial statement today. Copies of the report have been placed in the House Libraries.

As requested, Mr Bailey has made a number of robust and challenging recommendations designed to address the problems of excessive commercialisation and premature sexualisation in childhood. Implementation of his recommendations, which have been directed to businesses, trade associations, regulators and Government, will reduce the pressure on children to grow up too fast. The Government have accepted all his recommendations. We will, as Mr Bailey also recommends, take stock of progress in 18 months time and consider what further measures may need to be taken to achieve the recommended outcomes.

Departmental Billing

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what mechanism his Department has established to ensure its payments are passed through the supply chain to each tier in accordance with the last date for payment defined in the Government's Fair Payment guidance. [55893]

Tim Loughton: The Department does not have any construction contracts and has not implemented any specific mechanisms to take account of the requirements of the Fair Payment guidance. However, for all contracts, the Department has implemented a prompt payment policy with a 10-day target for payment which is a shorter time scale than the 14 days recommended in the Fair Payment guidance. For the period between 1 May 2010 and 1 April 2011, 94% of invoices were paid within the 10 day target. The Department's contractual requirement is to pay invoices within 30 days and for the period mentioned above 99% were paid within that deadline.

A clause is included in all contracts requiring payment to be made of all sums due by a contractor to a sub-contractor within a specified period not exceeding 30 days from the receipt of a valid invoice.

Departmental Equality

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what account he has taken of the effects of income inequality in the (a) formulation and (b) implementation of policy. [57154]

Mr Gibb: The Government have made a clear commitment to improving the achievement and life chances of children from deprived backgrounds via a £7 billion Fairness Premium. This includes support for disadvantaged two year olds, a pupil premium to help poorer pupils and reforms to higher education.

7 Jun 2011 : Column 40W

We published our social mobility strategy on 5 April 2011. “Opening Doors, Breaking Barriers” focuses on inter-generational social mobility and; ensuring that everyone has a fair chance to succeed, regardless of their background. It aims to tackle inequality of opportunity at every stage of life with measures to improve social mobility from the foundation years to school, transition years and adulthood.

The Government also published their child poverty strategy on 5 April 2011. “Tackling the causes of disadvantage and transforming families' lives” sets out a new approach to tackling child poverty for this Parliament and up to 2020. At its core is strengthening families, encouraging responsibility, promoting work, guaranteeing fairness, and providing support to the most vulnerable.

The Pupil Premium was introduced from 1 April 2011 and is at the heart of the Government's school reform programme. It will enable pupils from low income families to receive the support they need to reach their full potential and to help schools reduce educational inequalities. Rising to £2.5 billion a year by 2014-15, the Pupil Premium is additional funding specifically designed to boost the attainment of poorer children.

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department spent on special advisers' travel by (a) Government car, (b) private hire car, (c) train, (d) bus, (e) commercial aircraft and (f) private aircraft since May 2010. [56102]

Tim Loughton: The information is as follows:

(a) Special advisers are not entitled to the use of a Government car. However, there are occasions when it is necessary to travel in one whilst accompanying a Minister on official business.

(b & c) The total travel costs (excluding overseas travel) for special advisers at the Department for Education since May 2010 is £2,393. Information detailing the separate cost of taxi and rail travel by special advisers can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

(d) Special advisers at the Department for Education have not travelled by bus whilst on official business.

(e) Special advisers at the Department for Education have travelled by commercial aircraft whilst on Government business with my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education. The overall costs of all ministerial overseas visits for 2010-11 will be published in due course.

(f) Special advisers at the Department for Education have not travelled by private aircraft whilst on official business.

The use of official cars and taxis by civil servants, including special advisers, is governed by the requirements of the Civil Service Management Code.

Departmental Public Appointments

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 16 March 2011, Official Report, columns 423-4W, on independent review panels, on what basis his Department decides whether to pursue a very light-touch process or a more formal application and selection process; and if he will make a statement. [57167]

Tim Loughton: The Department follows the principles and processes set out in the Commissioner for Public Appointments' code of practice

http://www.publicappointmentscommissioner.org/codeofpractice/

7 Jun 2011 : Column 41W

The code of practice does not require the Department to apply the full process set out in the code to posts that fall outside of the Commissioner's remit, and where this is the case a light touch process may be undertaken.

A more formal application and selection process would be undertaken where the post is remunerated.

Discretionary Learner Support Fund: Cornwall

Sarah Newton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much of the Discretionary Support Fund will be allocated to Cornwall. [57253]

Mr Gibb: We are finalising details of the allocations for the 16-19 Bursary Fund following the consultation on the new arrangements, which closed on 20 May. The Young People's Learning Agency will issue allocations to schools, colleges and training providers in June.

Education Maintenance Allowance

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effects of the withdrawal of education maintenance allowance on young people from (a) ethnic minorities and (b) lone parent families; and if he will make a statement. [56516]

Mr Gibb: The equality impact assessment for the ending of education maintenance allowance and the introduction of the 16-19 Bursary funding is available on the Department for Education website:

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/1/ema%20replacement%20scheme%20%20%20equality%20impact %20assessment.pdf

We will monitor and evaluate the impact of the introduction of the new fund, including with reference to levels of support by disability, ethnicity, gender and other characteristics.

Education: Children's Service

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what information his Department holds on the headcount of each local authority education and children's service; and under what categories such data are held. [56377]

Mr Gibb: The Department does not collect information on the overall number of staff employed by local authorities for the provision of education and children's services. However, information on the number of school staff is provided to the Department through the annual School Workforce Census (SWF) return.

The table provides the headcount of staff employed in local authority maintained schools and those staff employed centrally by local authorities who spend the majority of their time in schools, as of November 2010. Other staff who are employed centrally for the provision of education and other children's services are not included, except educational psychologists. The categories in the table may be disaggregated further into job roles where these have been provided.

Further information on the overall number of staff employed by local authorities in the education sector is

7 Jun 2011 : Column 42W

published by the Office for National Statistics. The Public Sector Employment Statistical Bulletin is available at the following link:

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/product.asp?vlnk=13615&Pos=&ColRank+1&Rank+422

Headcount of regular teachers, teaching assistants, support staff, auxiliary staff and educational psychologists in service in local authority maintained schools in each local authority, year: November 2010, coverage: England
Local authority Teachers (1) Teaching assistants (2) Support staff (3) Auxiliary staff (4) Educational Psychologists

Barking and Dagenham

2,170

1,090

670

1,580

n/a

Barnet

3,460

2,180

1,600

1,460

20

Barnsley

1,850

1,440

790

1,730

10

Bath and North East Somerset

1,660

1,060

630

790

n/a

Bedford Borough

1,730

1,090

760

1,070

10

Bexley

2,090

1,380

920

980

10

Birmingham

11,160

6,940

4,160

9,040

60

Blackburn with Darwen

1,580

1,420

1,210

480

10

Blackpool

1,250

850

840

410

10

Bolton

2,570

1,830

920

940

10

Bournemouth

1,250

840

450

620

10

Bracknell Forest

880

670

380

480

10

Bradford

5,150

4,270

2,110

2,570

n/a

Brent

2,680

1,430

880

970

10

Brighton and Hove

2,150

1,580

780

1,010

20

Bristol City of

2,850

1,740

1,310

1,260

n/a

Bromley

2,840

1,910

930

1,110

n/a

Buckinghamshire

5,510

3,240

1,820

1,980

30

Bury

1,640

1,330

450

750

10

Calderdale

2,100

1,520

870

1,230

10

Cambridgeshire

4,900

4,000

2,080

3,700

20

Camden

1,610

1,020

580

700

20

Central Bedfordshire

3,050

1,680

1,240

1,550

10

Cheshire East

3,080

1.930

880

1,900

10

Cheshire West and Chester

3,030

1,650

830

1,690

20

City of London

20

20

10

*

*

Cornwall

4,800

4,190

1,540

2,040

20

Coventry

3,250

1,790

1,330

2,120

10

Croydon

2,900

2,100

1,010

1,600

20

Cumbria

4,250

2,230

1,370

1,660

20

Darlington

830

570

270

380

10

Derby

2,000

1,560

680

1,020

*

Derbyshire

6,720

4,720

2,430

5,460

30

Devon

6,340

5,100

2,590

4,580

40

Doncaster

2,630

3,540

1,870

3,690

10

Dorset

3,700

2,640

1,260

1,840

20

Dudley

3,020

2,780

1,150

1,870

n/a

Durham

4,630

2,340

1,550

2,830

10

Ealing

2,840

1,550

990

1,390

20

East Riding of Yorkshire

2,970

2,270

1,210

1,870

10

East Sussex

4,140

3,280

1,680

2,180

20

Enfield

2,970

1,990

1,070

870

20

Essex

11,650

8,810

5,120

7,330

40

Gateshead

1,820

870

490

1,010

30

Gloucestershire

6,070

3,870

1,900

2,920

20

Greenwich

2,520

2,030

1,090

970

20

Hackney

1,620

1,130

640

810

20

Halton

1,140

630

360

920

10

7 Jun 2011 : Column 43W

Hammersmith and Fulham

1,230

610

510

290

10

Hampshire

10,810

6,980

3,670

5,990

70

Haringey

2,350

1,380

1,100

1,420

10

Harrow

2,030

1,280

790

1,170

10

Hartlepool

940

800

320

790

10

Havering

2,360

1,660

880

1,450

10

Herefordshire

1,350

1,070

460

710

10

Hertfordshire

12,560

7,080

4,660

5,150

60

Hillingdon

2,710

1,900

1,070

1,300

20

Hounslow

2,320

1,090

780

1,090

10

Isle of Wight

1,220

1,020

610

720

*

Isles of Scilly

40

30

10

20

n/a

Islington

1,470

990

720

600

20

Kensington and Chelsea

760

530

340

300

10

Kent

13,230

9,860

4,520

5,570

50

Kingston Upon Hull City of

2,150

1,860

680

930

n/a

Kingston upon Thames

1,590

850

660

580

n/a

Kirklees

3,980

2,550

1,440

2,910

20

Knowsley

1,410

1,080

500

400

10

Lambeth

2,170

1,550

760

470

20

Lancashire

10,770

9,580

5,610

4,200

50

Leeds

6,520

5,110

2,250

3,470

40

Leicester

3,050

2,430

1,090

1,890

20

Leicestershire

6,200

4,410

3,000

3,640

20

Lewisham

1,750

1,310

710

750

n/a

Lincolnshire

5,710

4,620

2,230

3,200

30

Liverpool

4,050

1,810

1,240

1,830

20

Luton

1,880

1,780

910

1,590

10

Manchester

3,990

2,630

2,490

2,360

20

Medway

2,140

1,720

870

1,080

20

Merton

1,390

920

630

540

10

Middlesbrough

1,080

900

670

470

n/a

Milton Keynes

2,630

2,020

1,010

1,450

20

Newcastle upon Tyne

2,350

1,280

780

1,810

20

Newham

3,100

2,220

1,120

1,890

10

Norfolk

6,780

6,140

2,450

4,480

n/a

North East Lincolnshire

960

1,030

380

820

10

North Lincolnshire

1,380

1,150

510

1,360

10

North Somerset

1,840

1,130

510

590

10

North Tyneside

2,000

800

600

1,240

10

North Yorkshire

4,840

3,130

2,070

4,310

30

Northamptonshire

6,360

5,410

3,230

3,210

30

Northumberland

3,570

1,750

830

1,960

20

Nottingham

2,160

1,660

710

1,030

n/a

Nottinghamshire

7,420

4,170

2,640

5,300

30

Oldham

2,210

1,780

670

900

10

Oxfordshire

5,820

4,650

2,220

2,690

20

Peterborough

1,520

1,460

600

1,120

10

Plymouth

2,360

2,030

1,030

1,570

20

Poole

1,130

780

540

640

n/a

7 Jun 2011 : Column 44W

Portsmouth

1,540

1,310

640

820

10

Reading

1,090

880

530

570

10

Redbridge

3,100

1,670

1,120

1,100

10

Redcar and Cleveland

1,360

950

520

1,140

10

Richmond upon Thames

1,130

690

450

240

10

Rochdale

1,940

1,760

650

1,350

10

Rotherham

2,560

2,030

940

990

10

Rutland

290

190

160

120

*

Salford

1,360

140

110

30

n/a

Sandwell

2,770

2,380

820

2,240

20

Sefton

2,710

1,810

940

1,030

n/a

Sheffield

4,380

2,950

1,580

2,060

20

Shropshire

2,980

2,500

910

2,400

n/a

Slough

1.570

1,030

710

560

10

Solihull

1,930

1,320

590

1,210

10

Somerset

4,320

4,080

1,830

2,700

30

South Gloucestershire

2,350

1,370

690

1,590

10

South Tyneside

1,050

550

380

1,010

10

Southampton

1,670

1,320

600

870

10

Southend-on-Sea

1,840

1,140

740

940

*

Southwark

1,630

1,570

590

920

20

St Helens

1,340

960

340

460

n/a

Staffordshire

7,660

4,810

3,050

6,640

30

Stockport

2,560

1,750

940

1,380

20

Stockton-on-Tees

1,710

1,130

420

1,360

10

Stoke-on-Trent

2,040

1,380

1,240

2,060

40

Suffolk

6,850

4,750

2,750

4,850

30

Sunderland

2,630

1,740

1,020

1,150

10

Surrey

9,160

7,160

3,920

4,480

50

Sutton

2,120

1,080

670

820

10

Swindon

1,770

1,560

660

1,070

40

Tameside

1,850

1,110

830

1,410

10

Telford and Wrekin

1,190

1,300

630

740

n/a

Thurrock

1,180

880

520

590

n/a

Torbay

1,180

860

520

640

10

Tower Hamlets

3,030

2,190

1,220

1,540

30

Trafford

2,030

990

590

710

10

Wakefield

2,840

2,320

1,270

2,490

n/a

Walsall

2,550

1,940

980

1,240

10

Waltham Forest

2,360

1,450

920

1,380

20

Wandsworth

2,220

1,750

920

650

20

Warrington

2,020

1,240

620

1,380

10

Warwickshire

5,010

3,400

1,610

3,660

20

West Berkshire

1,800

1,420

760

750

n/a

West Sussex

6,970

4,640

3,500

3,060

40

Westminster

1,210

720

350

340

10

Wigan

3,150

3,340

980

330

10

Wiltshire

4,240

3,100

1,720

1,990

30

Windsor and Maidenhead

1,300

940

650

640

n/a

Wirral

3,310

1,760

1,080

1,350

n/a

Wokingham

1,620

1,280

640

740

n/a

Wolverhampton

2,420

1,340

960

1,850

20

Worcestershire

5,270

4,400

1,850

2,990

*

York

1,450

780

380

390

10

7 Jun 2011 : Column 45W

England

470,230

333,140

181,610

261,550

n/a

n/a = Not available. * = Nil or negligible. (1) Includes full and part-time, qualified and unqualified teachers. (2) Includes higher level teaching assistants, nursery nurses, nursery assistants, literacy and numeracy support staff and any other non-teaching staff regularly employed to support teachers in the classroom, special needs support staff and minority ethnic pupil support staff. (3) Includes administrative staff (e.g. secretaries, bursars and other admin/clerical staff), technicians (e.g. laboratory assistants, design technology assistants, home economics and craft technicians and IT technicians), other support staff (e.g. matrons/nurses/medical staff, child care staff and other education support staff). (4) These staff are employed in posts that were not previously collected. Examples of staff included are those employed in catering and school maintenance. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Source: School Workforce Census

Educational Visits

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what (a) time-series data and (b) information his Department holds on the number of (i) school trips which have taken place and (ii) children who have participated in school trips. [56378]

Mr Gibb: The Department for Education neither collects such data nor makes related estimates.

First Aid: Curriculum

Justin Tomlinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 9 May 2011, Official Report, column 968W, on secondary education: first aid, whether his Department will bring forward proposals to include training of pupils in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the national curriculum; and if he will make a statement. [57917]

Mr Gibb: The non-statutory framework for personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education includes teaching young people to develop the skills to cope with emergency situations that require basic first aid procedures, including, at key stage 4 (age 15 to 16), resuscitation techniques.

The non-statutory elements of PSHE education are not covered by our review of the national curriculum. However, as signalled in the White Paper, we intend to conduct a separate, internal, review to determine how we can support schools to improve the quality of PSHE teaching, including giving teachers the flexibility to use their judgment about how best to deliver PSHE education. More details will be announced shortly.

Free School Meals

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what measures of deprivation his Department uses in its segmented analysis of achievement at school other than the proportion of children entitled to free school meals. [56386]

Mr Gibb: The Department for Education uses two indicators of deprivation in addition to free school meals. These are the Indices of Multiple Deprivation

7 Jun 2011 : Column 46W

(IMD) and the Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index (IDACI), which were produced by the Department for Communities and Local Government. The most recent version of the IMD was released by the Department for Communities and Local Government in December 2010.

IMD is a Lower-layer Super Output Area (LSOA) level measure of multiple deprivation and is made up of seven LSOA level domain indices. There are also two supplementary indices (Income Deprivation Affecting Children and Income Deprivation Affecting Older People). LSOAs in England are ranked from one to 32,482, where one is the most deprived.

With the introduction of the Pupil Premium, for pupils known to be eligible for free school meals and for looked after children, the measure of deprivation is being extended to include both these groups of pupils.

Free Schools

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 9 May 2011, Official Report, column 966W, on free schools, what school size or capacity has been specified in each application to establish a free school submitted to his Department to date. [55969]

Mr Gibb: The Department had received over 300 applications at the close of the initial application round in February 2011. The size of the proposed Free Schools varied substantially with the average number of pupil places being around 300.

Michael Fallon: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many free schools he expects to open in September 2011; how many applications are being processed; and how many further expressions of interest have been registered with his Department. [57224]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 24 May 2011]: To date, 32 proposals have been given approval to move to business case and plan stage and beyond, of which a number of schools will open in September 2011. The application process for proposed schools that hope to open in 2012 is now open. We expect to receive a large number of high quality applications.

GCE A-level

Elizabeth Truss: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many and what proportion of A-level students were entered for A-level (a) mathematics, (b) English literature, (c) further mathematics, (d) biological sciences, (e) physics, (f) chemistry, (g) geography, (h) history and (i) at least one modern foreign language in (i) modern schools and (ii) other further education sector colleges (A) nationally and (B) in each local education authority area in the last year for which figures are available; [57303]

(2) how many and what proportion of A-level students were entered for at least three A-levels from (a) mathematics, (b) English literature, (c) further mathematics, (d) biological sciences, (e) physics, (f) chemistry, (g) geography, (h) history and (i) a modern foreign language in (i) modern schools and (ii)

7 Jun 2011 : Column 47W

other further education sector colleges (A) nationally and (B) in each local education authority area in the last year for which figures are available. [57305]

(3) how many and what proportion of GCE A-level students were entered for GCE A-level in (a) accounting, (b) art and design, (c) business studies, (d) communication and culture, (e) dance, (f) design and technology, (g) drama/theatre studies, (h) electronics, (i) film studies, (j) home economics, (k) information and communication technology, (l) law, (m) media studies, (n) music technology, (o) sports studies, (p) travel and tourism and (q) environmental studies in (i) modern schools and (ii) other further education sector colleges (A) nationally and (B) in each local education authority area in the last year for which figures are available. [57304]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 24 May 2011]:The information requested has been placed in the House Libraries.

Grammar Schools

Michael Fallon: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many grammar schools have (a) applied for, (b) converted to and (c) registered an interest in applying for academy status since 2005. [57231]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 24 May 2011]: Since the Academies Act 2010 was passed, 116 grammar schools have applied to convert and 63 have converted to academy status. A list of all schools that have formally applied for academy status, as well as a list of academies that have opened in the academic year 2010/11, can be found on the DfE academies website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/academies/a0069811/schools-submitting-applications-and-academies-that-have-opened-in-201011

and this is updated monthly. The Department no longer publishes a list of mainstream schools that have expressed an interest in converting to academy status.