Higher Education: Access

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many representations he has received on his plans to improve access to university for those from disadvantaged backgrounds in each month since 1 January 2011; and if he will make a statement. [51568]

Mr Willetts: Our records show that the Department has received the following numbers of parliamentary questions and general correspondence that relate to improving access to university for those from disadvantaged backgrounds.


January February March

Parliamentary questions

9

15

53

Correspondence

5

3

13

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many meetings he has held with external bodies to discuss universities which have not met the access benchmarks agreed with the Office of Fair Access in each month since 1 January 2011; and if he will make a statement. [51570]

Mr Willetts: No meetings have been held with outside bodies to discuss access benchmarks.

Each year the Higher Education Statistics Agency publishes performance indicators and benchmarks in relation to access that have been developed by the UK HE sector.

Any institution wishing to charge above £6,000 from 2012 will have to have in place an access agreement approved by the director of Fair Access. In guidance issued by the director to the sector on 8 March he made clear that he expected all institutions to establish their own indicators and benchmarks as part of new access agreements.

Higher Education: Business

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many meetings his Department had with representatives of the business community to discuss the relationship between universities and business in each month of 2011. [51804]

Mr Willetts: All BIS Ministers and many of its officials are engaged in frequent meetings with representatives of the business community. The link between universities

26 Apr 2011 : Column 261W

and business often forms a regular part of such meetings, to discuss training, research, skills, innovation or enterprise issues.

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many meetings his Department had with senior university staff to discuss the relationship between universities and business in each month of 2011. [51805]

Mr Willetts: BIS meets regularly with a wide range of senior university staff and officials from across the HE sector, including HEFCE, UUK, GuildHE, UCAS and the UKCES. The relationship between universities and business often forms part of such meetings when discussing training, research, skills, innovation or enterprise issues.

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many meetings his Department had with senior staff of regional development agencies to discuss the relationship between universities and business in each month of 2011. [51806]

Mr Prisk: This Department did not have any meetings in 2011 with senior staff of regional development agencies (RDA) specifically to discuss the relationship between universities and business.

However in each of January and March 2011 BIS officials took part in the regular two-monthly meetings of the Regional Innovation Science and Technology Group (RIST). Membership of this group includes the RDA Innovation leads, BIS officials, and staff from TSB, RCUK and HEFCE. The meetings discuss a range of innovation issues. Collaboration at regional and local level between businesses and universities are an integral part of the agenda.

Higher Education: Finance

Stephen Lloyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether he will permit higher education courses currently delivered by further education colleges funded by a university to be funded directly by the Higher Education Funding Council for England in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13. [51881]

Mr Willetts: The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) is legally responsible for funding individual institutions. Ministers have no role in the process. Currently the council directly funds 124 of the 249 FE colleges in England. We are though seeking to encourage new providers, including FE colleges, into the system. When the new funding system is introduced in 2012/13 funding will follow the informed choices of students rather than direct grant. Where colleges and other providers are able to offer high quality programmes at a price which offers good value for money, we would wish to see them able to expand. We will consult after any proposals on this are announced in the forthcoming Higher Education White Paper.

Sustainable Growth

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to page 26 of the Investing in Skills for Sustainable Growth strategy, what the evidential basis is for the assumption that one

26 Apr 2011 : Column 262W

student place on the apprenticeships programme is equivalent to three Train to Gain places. [51483]

Mr Hayes: I will respond to the hon. Member as soon as possible.

The broad assumption that one student place on an apprenticeships programme is equivalent to three Train to Gain places derives from the following information.

The Skills Funding Agency Funding Guidance (see following) states that an apprenticeship takes on average twice the Guided Learning Hours of a Train to Gain place. In addition, apprenticeship courses include a number of additional elements, which together with provider uplifts as described in the Funding Guidance, result in apprenticeship student places being about three times the cost of Train to Gain places.

Courses can be fully funded by the Department or co-funded between the Department and the employer/learner.

The funding guidance for apprenticeships and Train to Gain can be found at the following addresses:

http://readingroom.lsc.gov.uk/SFA/ApprenticeshiFunding_Requirements_2010_11-v2_October.pdf

http://readingroom.skillsfundingagency.bis.gov.uk/sfa/ttg_funding_requirements_2010_11-v2_october.pdf

Neurology

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the potential effects of measures set out in The Plan for Growth on neuroscience research in the UK. [52486]

Mr Willetts: The Plan for Growth set out the Government’s plans to put the UK on a path to sustainable, long-term economic growth. For the health and life sciences sector, which includes neuroscience and other medical research and development, measures in the Plan for Growth include streamlining regulation and improving the cost effectiveness of clinical trials, forming new translational research partnerships and ensuring educators provide skilled individuals the sector needs to grow.

Neuroscience research will continue to be supported both by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), where strategically relevant, and by the Medical Research Council (MRC).

One North East

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will ensure that the expertise built up by specialists working in One North East is retained in the North East. [51503]

Mr Prisk: Where we have identified the need for continuing functions, arrangements are being put in place to ensure ONE staff are transferred so that expertise is retained in the north-east. We are also working with ONE to ensure their knowledge assets are managed effectively and that useful knowledge is transferred or made available to relevant bodies, including those in the north-east.

26 Apr 2011 : Column 263W

Post Office Services

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the potential to provide Government services through Post Office essentials branches. [51108]

Mr Davey: The Post Office Ltd is currently piloting Post Office Locals in some 60 locations across the UK, with plans to extend piloting activity this year.

Details of the precise Government services that will be offered through the final model will be a matter for the Post Office Ltd, using learning from current and future pilots. Recent research by Consumer Focus shows that over 95% of customer transactions by volume are already available in Post Office Local pilots—for example the collection of pensions and benefits.

Post Office Services

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills which Post Office financial services are not offered by a Post Office essentials service. [51101]

Mr Davey: Post Office Ltd is currently piloting Post Office Locals in some 60 locations across the UK, with plans to extend piloting activity this year.

Details of the precise financial services that will be offered through the final model will be a matter for Post Office Ltd, using learning from current and future pilots. Recent research by Consumer Focus shows that over 95% of total customer transactions by volume are already available in Post Office Local pilots—for example chip and pin cash deposits and withdrawals and postal orders.

Postal Services

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many (a) packets, (b) parcels and (c) large letters were posted in the UK in each of the last five years. [51111]

Mr Davey: There is no definitive source for this information. Royal Mail handles 68 million items of mail per day (small letters, large letters and parcels). The wider market for parcels has been fully deregulated since 1981 so is consequently difficult to measure. Postcomm valued the postal market at £11.4 billion in 2008.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will ensure that the minimum requirements of the universal service obligation under the provisions of the Postal Services Bill 2010 are maintained at current levels for a period of not less than five years. [52438]

Mr Davey: The Government are committed to securing the universal postal service for everyone in the UK. This objective is at the heart of the Postal Services Bill.

The minimum requirements of the universal service are clearly set out in the Bill, which also puts in place new and stronger protections around the level of the universal service than are currently the case.

26 Apr 2011 : Column 264W

The minimum requirements enshrined in the Bill are the same as we currently enjoy under existing legislation, with the addition of a free service for blind and partially sighted people. We have repeatedly confirmed that we have no intention of reducing these minimum requirements.

Postgraduate Education

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many representations he has received on the future of postgraduate (a) taught and (b) research degrees in each week since 1 January 2011; and if he will make a statement. [51567]

Mr Willetts: I and my ministerial colleagues regularly meet with stakeholders and receive letters on the future of postgraduate taught and research degrees. I have recently asked Professor Sir Adrian Smith to reconvene his Postgraduate Review Panel to look at the issue of taught postgraduate degrees.

The Government are committed to Britain being a world leading place to do research. This is why, despite enormous pressure on public spending, the overall level of funding for science and research programmes has been protected in cash terms within a ring-fenced budget.

Regional Development Agencies: Assets

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 4 April 2011, Official Report, column 692W, on regional development agencies: assets, on what dates the meetings (a) he and (b) his officials had with (i) the Department for Communities and Local Government and (ii) HM Treasury on the options for disposal of assets owned by regional development agencies took place. [52441]

Mr Prisk: Officials have had weekly and sometimes twice weekly, meetings with both the Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and HM Treasury (HMT) to discuss the regional development agencies’ proposals for disposing and transferring their assets and liabilities. The subject of asset disposal is also discussed at the fortnightly National Transition Board on which both DCLG and HMT are regular members.

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 4 April 2011, Official Report, column 692W, on regional development agencies: assets, on what dates and at what times he met (a) the chief executives and (b) staff of each regional development agency (RDA) on their proposals for the disposal of assets held by each RDA. [52442]

Mr Prisk: I, and my officials, have had eight meetings with the Chairs of the Regional Development Agencies (RDAs), discussing all related matters concerning the closure of the RDAs. The officials also have regular meetings with the chief executives and staff working on the closure of their RDAs. Three RDA chief executives sit as members of the National Transition Board. All matters concerning the transition to closure of the RDAs, including asset disposal, are discussed in the above.

26 Apr 2011 : Column 265W

Regional Development Agencies: Finance

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 23 March 2011, Official Report, column 1119W on regional development agencies: finance, whether he has identified assets which would potentially be suitable for transfer from regional development agencies to the Homes and Communities Agency. [51623]

Mr Prisk: Coalfields assets and liabilities will transfer to the Homes and Communities Agency. The disposal of other land and property assets, deemed not suitable for short-term market sale, is still being reviewed by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, the Department for Communities and Local Government and the regional development agencies.

Renewable Energy: Finance

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to paragraph 2.159 of The Plan for Growth, what assessment he has made of the likely effect of capping the impact of levy-funded support on energy bills on the availability of funding for small and medium scale renewables. [52020]

Justine Greening: I have been asked to reply.

HM Treasury has responsibility for setting the overall cap for DECC’s tax and spending through policies that entail levy-funded spending, balancing the support needed to meet the Government's energy objectives with the need to minimise energy bill increases for consumers.

DECC has responsibility for managing their levy-funded spending policies such that they remain within the cap. It is therefore for DECC to determine the split of funding between and within policies, including the availability of funding for the support of small and medium-scale renewables.


Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to paragraph 2.159 of The Plan for Growth, which levies are to be affected by the proposal on the impact of levy-funded support on energy bills. [52021]

Justine Greening: I have been asked to reply.

The new control framework for DECC levy-funded spending covers the Renewables Obligation, Feed-In Tariffs and Warm Home Discount, to help ensure that, they achieve their objectives cost effectively and affordably. These policies are classified as tax and spend for National Accounts purposes. They operate by placing an obligation on energy companies to provide support to certain activities or groups.


Research: Finance

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many representations he has received on the future of research funding in each month since 1 January 2011; and if he will make a statement. [51569]

26 Apr 2011 : Column 266W

Mr Willetts: The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills and I have received representations on the future of research funding. This Government recognise the importance of research funding to the UK. That is why this Government are committed to investment in science and research as a major driver of economic growth—with a flat-cash, ring-fenced settlement for science and research funding of £4.6 billion pa for 2011-15.

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what discussions he has had with (a) his EU counterparts and (b) other organisations on the setting of targets for the proportion of gross domestic product spent on research and development. [52436]

Mr Willetts: The Secretary of State has not had discussions with neither his EU counterparts nor other organisations on the setting of targets for the proportion of gross domestic product spent on research and development.

Science

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills when he plans to publish the long-term plan for science for 2016 onwards. [52480]

Mr Willetts: The coalition Government’s long-term vision for science was published alongside their plans for science funding up to 2011-15 in December 2010.

Science: Finance

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what criteria he used to determine that his plan for science funding was sufficiently long-term in nature. [52479]

Mr Willetts: Resource funding was protected with a flat-cash, ring-fenced settlement for 2011-15 providing long-term stability and certainty to the research base. Key capital projects have been funded including the UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation (UKCMRI), Diamond and the Birth Cohort Study. An additional investment announced in the budget of £100 million in science investment projects, including ISIS, the International Space Innovation Centre and national research campuses, will develop infrastructure at national research campuses. These investments will protect national capability, maintain international competitiveness and maximise the economic and social benefits of research over many years.

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 31 March 2011, Official Report, column 509, on science and research, what time period constitutes the long term in the context of his plans for science funding. [52483]

Mr Willetts: The coalition Government’s long-term vision for science was published alongside its plans for science funding up to 2011 to 2015 in December 2010.

26 Apr 2011 : Column 267W

Resource funding was protected with a flat-cash, ring-fenced settlement for 2011 to 2015 providing long-term stability and certainty to the research base. Key capital projects have been funded including the UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation (UKCMRI), Diamond and the Birth Cohort Study. An additional investment announced in the budget of £100 million in science investment projects, including ISIS, the International Space Innovation Centre and national research campuses, will develop infrastructure at national research campuses. These investments will protect national capability, maintain international competitiveness and maximise the economic and social benefits of research over many years.

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the international ranking of the UK for science funding measured (a) in absolute terms and (b) as a proportion of gross domestic product in each of the next five years; and what estimate he has made of the likely effects of public sector funding for science on private sector funding in each such year. [52492]

Mr Willetts: It is not possible to make an estimate for other countries as we do not have access to their funding plans for the next five years on a comparable basis to the UK. The OECD publish retrospective data on science funding by country.

The UK’s research base is world class: second in the world only to the USA for number of citations, and the most productive in the G8. The ring-fenced flat cash science and research funding together the £100 million additional capital investment announced in the Budget will protect national capability, maintain international competitiveness and maximise the economic and social benefits of research over many years.

Students: Finance

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many meetings his Department has had on the creation of a fund to allow the allocation of student places to for-profit institutions since his appointment. [51548]

Mr Willetts: The Department has not held meetings to discuss the creation of a fund to allow the allocation of student places to for-profit institutions. However, the Department is considering how student number controls might apply in the future regulatory system, including options for a fund to support expansion of those providers which best offer students high-quality programmes at a price that represents good value. We will consult after any proposals are announced in the forthcoming Higher Education White Paper.

Supermarkets

Alison McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what meetings he has had since September 2010 with representatives of (a) Tesco, (b) Sainsbury's, (c) Asda, (d) Morrisons and (e) trade associations of which these companies are members. [52210]

Mr Prisk: Since September 2010, my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has met with Tesco on 8 September 2010 and

26 Apr 2011 : Column 268W

attended the British Retail Consortium parliamentary reception on 2 November 2010, at which representatives of at least one of the companies referred to were present.

Technology

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) how much his Department has spent on the development of the East London Tech City to date; [51577]

(2) what recent assessment he has made of the development of the East London Tech City initiative; and if he will make a statement; [51578]

(3) what estimate he has made of the number of jobs attributable to the East London Tech City initiative; [51579]

(4) what financial incentives he plans to put in place to attract investment to the East London Tech City area; [51580]

(5) how many companies have notified his Department of a commitment to locate in the East London Tech City; [51607]

(6) what estimate he has made of the level of investment committed to businesses in the East London Tech City area subsequent to the announcement of the East London Tech City initiative. [51608]

Mr Prisk: The Shoreditch area of east London already hosts 200 high-tech companies. The initiative announced by the Prime Minister on 4 November 2010 is aimed at promoting the development of Tech City further as a world-leading tech cluster and, as a result, so far over a dozen leading companies and universities have committed to investing in Tech City.

I have made no recent assessment of the jobs attributable to this initiative, and the Department is not offering any financial incentives specific to Tech City. However, UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) has established the Tech City Investment Organisation (TCIO) to co-ordinate its efforts to promote east London's Tech City as a location for high-tech investments.

This will include engaging further with the above mentioned companies to turn their commitment into tangible investments, and engaging with a second wave of companies to do the same; putting together propositions for the best non-UK venture capital firms and business angels to encourage them to focus on deals in the UK and to expand their operations in the UK; and identifying experienced entrepreneurs and business people to take up roles as mentors or non-executive directors to help the development of early stage companies and beyond.

The TCIO is made up of four experienced entrepreneurs, four UKTI business specialists and four other UKTI officials. Project meetings are convened at No 10 on a weekly basis to review progress against TCIO's delivery plan.

Technology Strategy Board: Finance

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much funding has been allocated to the Technology Strategy Board for each of the next three years. [51268]

26 Apr 2011 : Column 269W

Mr Willetts: The Technology Strategy Board's budget for 2011/12 is £317 million, which includes funding for Technology and Innovation Centres and to deliver a national grant for research and development (R and D) scheme. We cannot be specific on future year allocations, but it will be of the order of £300 million pa resulting in support worth over £1 billion in business-led R and D over the spending review period.

Vocational Guidance

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Education on the sum that his Department plans to contribute to the new all-age careers service. [52030]

Mr Hayes: As Minister with responsibilities for careers services in both the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the Department for Education I have had regular discussions about the new careers service with my ministerial colleagues in both Departments. I hope to be able to confirm the level of funding for the careers service soon.

Education

Academies: Admissions

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what guidance his Department has issued to academies on their admissions policy. [51747]

Mr Gibb: Each Academy has a contract with the Secretary of State that sets out its admissions duties. Academies are required to have an admissions policy and arrangements which comply with admissions law, the School Admissions Code and the Admission Appeals Code.

When a new academy is established, officials will work with it in order to ensure its admission arrangements comply with the Code. Other than this, the guidance which the Department issues to academies is the same as that issued to maintained schools: the School Admissions Code and the Admissions Appeal Code.

Better Communication Action Plan

Nick Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the commissioning of services under the Better Communication Action Plan will include services for children requiring communication aids; and if he will make a statement. [51313]

Sarah Teather: The Department of Health recently published commissioning tools that were produced as part of the Better Communication Action Plan. In addition, the recently published ‘Green Paper, Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability—A consultation’, includes proposals to bring commissioning of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), which enables some children to communicate, within the scope of NHS commissioning. Subject to parliamentary approval, the commissioning of highly specialised services, including AAC, will become

26 Apr 2011 : Column 270W

a core responsibility of the NHS Commissioning Board. In the meantime, we will be supporting a new round of grants to organisations in this field in 2011-12.

Boarding Schools: Disabled

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many disabled children were living in a residential school or care home on the most recent date for which figures are available. [51723]

Tim Loughton: The number of looked after children who were recorded as being in need of services due to their disability and were living in a residential school or care home on the most recent date for which figures are available is shown in the following table.

Children looked after at 31 March owing to disability (1,2,3) ; year ending 31 March 2010, coverage: England

Number

All children looked after at 31 March owing to disability(3)

2,200

   

Residential schools

560

Care Homes(4)

700

Other placements(5)

900

(1) Numbers above 1,000 have been rounded to the nearest 100, otherwise to the nearest 10. (2) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short term placements. (3) Looked after children are only known to be disabled if this is reported as their primary reason for being looked after. Some children may have come into care for another reason, but also have a disability. (4) Care homes comprise of the following: Secure Units, Homes and hostels subject to Children’s Homes regulations, Residential care homes and NHS Trusts providing medical/nursing care. (5) Other placements where children with a disability were accommodated, include: Foster placements, Placed with parents, Placed for adoption, Living independently, Homes and hostels not subject to Children’s Homes regulations, Family centre or mother and baby unit, Young offenders institution or prison and Other placements (unspecified). Source: SSDA 903

Brighton and Hove

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many ring-fenced grants provided by his Department were available for Brighton and Hove city council to claim in (a) 2007-08, (b) 2008-09, (c) 2009-10 and (d) 2010-11; how much was available in such grants; how many such grants were made; and how much was awarded in such grants. [51843]

Mr Gibb: Tables giving details of the ring-fenced revenue grants allocated by the Department to Brighton and Hove city council for each year since 2007-08 are provided in the following tables. The tables include the type of grant and the amount awarded to the council in each year.

There were 39 ring-fenced revenue grants available to Brighton and Hove council in 2007-08, 33 in 2008-09; 36 in 2009-10; and 29 in 2010-11.

Ring-fenced grants to Brighton and Hove council—2007-08
Revenue Grant Allocations (£)

Dedicated Schools Grant

117,598,000

School Development Grant

6,525,016

General Sure Start Grant

4,567,367

26 Apr 2011 : Column 271W

School Standards Grant

4,442,458

School Standards Grant (Personalisation)

1,488,719

Targeted Support for Secondary Strategy

537,790

Targeted Support for Primary Strategy

529,746

14-19 Engagement Programme

435,000

Extended Schools

417,688

Music Services

330,580

Parenting Early Intervention Pilots

287,558

Budget Holding Lead Professional Pilot

275,000

Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant (EMAG)

274,569

Targeted School Meals Grant

196,663

Transition Information Sessions: Demonstration Projects

166,350

ContactPoint

166,054

Playing for Success (DfES grant only)

161,668

Youth Taskforce

150,000

Youth Opportunity Fund

140,880

Parenting in Areas delivering the Respect Programme

125,000

Flexible 14 to 19 Partnerships Funding

108,242

Devolved School Meals Grant

96,723

Music at Key Stage 2

94,247

Computers for Pupils: Recurrent

52,300

Parenting Practitioner Grant

50,000

School Intervention Grant

48,600

Additional Parenting Practitioner Grant

30,000

Choice Advisers

28,472

Regional School Travel Advisers

22,200

School Improvement Partners (SIPs)

20,730

Parenting Support Strategy Grant

16,546

General Duty on Sustainable Travel To School

16,236

Aiming Higher for Disabled Children

15,000

Targeted Improvement Grant

14,500

Extended Rights for Free Travel

14,163

Care Matters

14,000

Aimhigher: 2007/08 First two terms

14,000

Walking to School Initiatives

9,000

Aimhigher: 2006/07 Final Term

7,000

Transition Information Sessions: Capacity

1,878

Total

139,489,943

Ring-fenced grants to Brighton and Hove council—2008-09
Revenue Grant Allocations {£)

Dedicated Schools Grant

122,581,000

School Development Grant

6,643,750

Sure Start, Early Years and Child Care

5,484,683

School Standards Grant

4,536,210

26 Apr 2011 : Column 272W

School Standards Grant (Personalisation)

1,435,536

Secondary Strategy: Targeted Support

684,998

Primary Strategy: Targeted Support

670,278

Music

425,580

National Challenge

412,500

Targeted Mental Health in Schools

382,000

Parenting Support Strategy Grant

320,000

School Lunch Grant

316,267

Short Breaks (AHDC)

306,300

Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant

302,162

Extended Schools–Sustainability

283,020

KS4 Engagement Programme

272,100

Playing for Success (DCSF grant only)

160,000

ContactPoint

152,172

Entry 2 Learning Pilots

146,900

Youth Opportunity Fund

140,900

Family Intervention Projects

121,856

Consortia funding

120,000

Challenge and Support Funding

100,000

1-2-1 Tuition and Participation KS2 early roll-out

68,234

Youth Crime Action Plan Grant

65,000

Parenting Practitioner Grant

50,000

Diploma Grant

35,112

Teenage Parent Supported Housing

26,000

Friday and Saturday Night Activities Grant

25,000

Aimhigher: 2008/09 First Two Terms

17,500

Targeted Improvement Grant

12,000

Information System for Parents and Providers

11,000

Aimhigher: 2007/08 Final Term

7,000

Total

146,315,058

Ring-fenced grants to Brighton and Hove council—2009-10
Revenue Grant Allocations (£)

Dedicated Schools Grant

127,734,000

School Development Grant

6,998,534

Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare Grant

6,372,256

School Standards Grant

4,664,141

School Standards Grant (Personalisation)

1,483,839

Aiming High for Disabled Children (SSEYCG)

863,900

Targeted Support for Primary Strategy

830,127

Think Family Grant

819,299

Entry 2 Learning Pilots

719,703

1-2-1 Tuition

530,764

Extended Schools—Sustainability

522,536

National Challenge

456,050

Targeted Support for Secondary Strategy

435,060

Total Music Allocation

426,880

Ethnic Minority Achievement (EMAG)

336,082

Early Years: Extending and increasing flexibility of free entitlement for 3-4 year olds

332,375

School Lunch Grant

310,126

26 Apr 2011 : Column 273W

Targeted Mental Health in Schools

241,000

Teenage Parent Supported Housing

206,373

KS4 Engagement Programme

200,000

Consortia Support Grant

194,303

Youth Crime Action Plan Grant

169,680

Playing for Success (DCSF Grant)

160,000

ContactPoint

152,172

Youth Opportunity Fund

140,900

Extended Schools Subsidy

124,189

Diploma Formula Grant

78,681

Challenge and Support Funding

75,000

Targeted Improvement Grant

69,801

Community Service Programme Pilots

52,290

Fair Play Playbuilder

27,281

Tackling Alcohol Disorder Grant

20,000

Aimhigher; 2009/10 Second Term

13,166

14-19 Prospectus/CAP

11,333

Aimhigher: 2009/10 First Term

9,668

Aimhigher: 2008/09 Final Term

8,500

Total

155,790,009

Ring-fenced grants to Brighton and Hove council—2010-11
Revenue Grant Allocations (£)

Dedicated Schools Grant

131,594,000

Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare Grant

7,563,926

School Development Grant

7,063,581

School Standards Grant

4,671,519

School Standards Grant (Personalisation)

1,407,379

Early Years: extension of free entitlement

1,339,286

Primary Strategy: Targeted Support

1,311,648

1-2-1 Tuition

1,062,608

Aiming High for Disabled Children

894,730

Extended Schools–Sustainability

736,213

Extended Schools Subsidy

672,884

Secondary Strategy: Targeted Support

463,022

Music

428,287

Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant

349,715

National Challenge

313,000

School Lunch Grant

301,597

Playing for success (DfE grant only)

160,000

Targeted Mental Health in Schools

157,000

Foundation Learning at Key Stage 4

140,000

Local Delivery Support Grant

135,807

Diploma Formula Grant

91,373

ContactPoint

81,602

Youth Opportunity Fund

35,225

Targeted Improvement Grant

32,200

Aimhigher:2010/11 Second Term

18,399

14-19 Prospectus/CAP

11,333

Aimhigher: 2009/10 Final Term

11,166

Aimhigher: 2010/11 First Term

9,601

Total

161,057,101

26 Apr 2011 : Column 274W

Building Schools for the Future Programme: Leicester

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which schools in the City of Leicester have received or will receive funding under the Building Schools for the Future programme; and what the level of funding is in each case. [42176]

Mr Gibb: The following table sets out the schools in the City of Leicester that have received funding under the Building Schools for the Future programme, and the level of funding for each school:

£
School Conventional funding including for ICT PFI credits

Soar Valley College

1,907,000

35,299,000

Beaumont Leys School

15,221,000

Fullhurst Community College

12,372,000

Judgemeadow Community College

1,740,000

27,934,000

In his announcement about schools capital on 5 July 2011, Official Report, columns 47-50, the Secretary of State confirmed that he would “continue to look at the scope of savings in all” BSF projects that are continuing. Partnerships for Schools has been following up this commitment, working closely with local authorities on a case-by-case basis to identify efficiencies.

All of the following schools will go through final allocation, subject to approval of a final business case:

School

The City of Leicester College

Crown Hills Community College

New City Centre School

Rushey Mead School

Sir Jonathan North Community College'

The Lancaster School

Moat Community College

Babington Community Technology College

English Martyrs Catholic School

Hamilton Community College

St Paul’s Catholic School

New College Leicester

Fullhurst phase 2

Ash Field School

Ellesmere College

Keyham Lodge School

Millgate School

Nether Hall School

West Gate School

The Children’s Hospital School

Soar Valley Vocational Centre

Millgate Lodge Specialist Learning Centre

The Newry Specialist Learning Centre

Carisbrooke Specialist Learning Centre

Coleman Specialist Learning Centre

26 Apr 2011 : Column 275W

Children in Care

Mr Burley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has targets for the performance of local authorities in relation to the handling of children who are taken into care. [51764]

Tim Loughton: The Department does not set targets in relation to children in care. Local authorities must operate within the framework of legislation and statutory guidance. Local authorities cannot remove children from their parents' care (unless this is with the parents' consent) without first referring the matter to a court.

Children in Care: Applications

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many care applications were made in England and Wales (a) in each month of (i) 2009 and (ii) 2010 and (b) January and February 2011. [51774]

Mr Djanogly: I have been asked to reply.

The following table shows the number of children made subject to a care application, in all tiers of court in England and Wales, for each month in 2009 and 2010.


Number of care applications

January 2009

1,250

February 2009

1,360

March 2009

1,550

April 2009

1,380

May 2009

1,380

June 2009

1,650

July 2009

1,460

August 2009

1,270

September 2009

1,470

October 2009

1,410

November 2009

1,390

December 2009

1,520

January 2010

1,230

February 2010

1,380

March 2010

1,610

April 2010

1,200

May 2010

1,540

June 2010

1,300

July 2010

1,260

August 2010

1,580

September 2010

1,140

October 2010

1,490

November 2010

1,240

December 2010

1,060

Notes: 1. Figures relate to the number of children subject to each application. 2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: HMCS FamilyMan system and summary returns.

Comparisons between single months should be made with caution as the monthly figures are subject to more volatility than those covering longer time periods. Statistics on public law applications for England and Wales are published on a quarterly basis by the Ministry of Justice in the National Statistics publication “Court Statistics Quarterly”. Statistics for Q1 2011 are due to be published in the next edition on 30 June 2011, and will be available from the Ministry of Justice website at:

26 Apr 2011 : Column 276W

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/statistics-and-data/courts-and-sentencing/judicial-quarterly.htm

Children: Death

John Hemming: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children's deaths were recorded in an Ofsted significant incident report as resulting from suspected abuse and neglect in (a) 2008, (b) 2009 and (c) 2010. [50750]

Tim Loughton: This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 4 April 2011:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for response.

I refer you to my response dated 7 March 2011 to Parliamentary Question 044778:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children’s deaths were recorded in an Ofsted significant incident report as resulting from suspected (a) abuse and (b) neglect in (i) 2008, (ii) 2009 and (iii) 2010.”

In my response I explained that Ofsted does not hold ‘significant incident reports’. However, Ofsted receives serious incident notifications from local authorities.

Data on the number of children’s deaths owing to ‘abuse’ and ‘neglect’ in either serious incident notifications or serious childcare incident briefings for the period requested are not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

I provide more detail here to assist you. Serious incident notifications are made immediately after a serious incident, when it is not possible in the majority of cases to determine the exact cause of death or the possible contributory factors to the death. Such determination takes place at a later stage, as the result of post mortem or inquest processes. It would therefore be inappropriate for Ofsted staff to be asked to make judgements on these important issues in the light of information provided within the initial serious incident notifications.

For these reasons, Ofsted does not detail ‘cause of death’ on our database. In order to ascertain individual information about each serious incident, Ofsted staff would be required to investigate each serious incident notification by reading the initial information and forming a view based only on this information. Local authorities are not obliged to update the initial information to Ofsted. Any judgement about whether a death may have been as the result of abuse and/or neglect would therefore require too great a level of subjective judgement on the part of our staff, who are dependent on the depth of information known to, and submitted by, each local authority. Such a manual interrogation of any information held would also require a level of staff time which would, as stated above, incur disproportionate cost.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Tim Loughton MP, Minister for Children and Families, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Children's Services: Nottingham

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what discussions he has had with Nottinghamshire County Council in 2011 on the adequacy of its children’s services department in 2011; [51246]

(2) how many complaints his Department has received about children’s services in Nottinghamshire in each of the last three years. [51208]

Tim Loughton: I issued an Improvement Notice to Nottinghamshire county council following Ofsted’s inspection of their Safeguarding and Looked After

26 Apr 2011 : Column 277W

Children’s Services in March 2010, which found their services to be “inadequate”.

The Improvement Notice sets out the improvements the Council, with its partners, is required to make, and requires that the Council establish an independently chaired Improvement Board, to monitor progress and provide robust challenge. The chair of the Improvement Board provides regular reports to me on progress, and a representative from the Department sits on the Board.

An unannounced inspection of Contact, Referral and Assessment services in Nottinghamshire council took place in February 2011. I subsequently wrote to the leader of the council to acknowledge the findings of the inspection report and the improvement Ofsted found.

The current Improvement Notice stipulates there will be a formal review of progress in July 2011, at which point I will take a view as to what action, if any, is necessary to secure further improvement. I will of course take into account any representations about children’s services in Nottinghamshire and any complaints I have received by that point.

The specific information the hon. Member requests about complaints is not available in the format required and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Colchester Academy: Finance

Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he plans to announce his decision on capital funding for the Colchester Academy; and if he will make a statement. [22831]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 9 November 2010]:The Under-Secretary of State, my hon. Friend the Member for East Worthing and Shoreham (Tim Loughton) wrote to the hon. Member on 20 December 2010 to inform him of the capital allocation for the Colchester Academy.

Departmental Manpower

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what public sector job reduction targets have been set for his Department and its non-departmental public bodies for each of the next 24 months; and what steps he plans to take to meet such targets. [51529]

Tim Loughton: Since May 2010, the Education Family (the Department for Education (DfE) and its Arms Length Bodies (ALB), has reduced by over 1,000 people as a result of the recruitment freeze and the ALB reform programme. The total number of people that have left the Department and its Arms Length Bodies is set out in the table below:

Name Staff Numbers May 2010 Staff Numbers March 2011

Department for Education

2,622

2,605

British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (BECTA)

264

9

Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (CAFCASS)

2,098

1,997

Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC)

210

164

26 Apr 2011 : Column 278W

General Teaching Council for England (GTCE)

216

175

National College

367

326

Office of the Children's Commissioner (OCC)

26

27

Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual)

162

163

Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted)

1,945

1,615

Partnerships for Schools (PfS)

186

168

Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency (QCDA)

502

363

School Food Trust (SFT)

74

72

Training and Development Agency (TDA)

311

311

Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA)

561

534

TOTAL

9,544

8,529


Further detail on reduction targets for the next two years is still to be worked out, but the Department and its ALBs expect to make further reductions during the next two financial years as some ALBs close and Agencies open. The Department is also anticipating year on year headcount reductions during the rest of the spending review period in order to meet its target to reduce administrative spend by 33%.

The Department hopes the majority of these reductions will be made through natural wastage, but given the timescales for ALB reform, some reductions may have to be made through targeted voluntary early releases (which will be in line with the Civil Service Compensation Scheme).

Departmental Mobile Phones

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many officials in his Department are provided with mobile communication devices; and how much his Department spent on mobile telephones and related data services in the last year for which figures are available. [51417]

Tim Loughton: 1,037 officials are currently provided with mobile communication devices within the Department for Education to meet their business requirements. During the previous financial year, April 2010 to March 2011, the Department spent £25,363 on the procurement of mobile telephones and £314,708.32 on associated rental, usage and data services (all costs exclude VAT).

Departmental Vacancies

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the staff vacancy rate in his Department was in 2010-11; and what vacancy rate has been assumed in his Department's budget for 2011-12. [51391]

Tim Loughton: In 2010-11, the Department had a monthly vacancy rate of less than 1% of its average headcount of 2,588 and an annual turnover rate of 12.44%. The vast majority of its vacancies were filled internally, or by the redeployment of staff made surplus as a result of closing the Government Office Network.

26 Apr 2011 : Column 279W

The Department has not made any assumptions about either its vacancy or its turnover rate for 2011-12 but anticipate it will be broadly similar to 2010-11. The Department will continue to focus on the recruitment and redeployment challenges presented by our work to reduce the size of the Education Family Workforce (the Department and its arm’s length bodies) and the creation of its new agencies.

Early Intervention Grant: Newham

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what percentage change he proposes to the Early Intervention Grant allocation for the London Borough of Newham in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13. [44966]

Sarah Teather: The Early Intervention Grant (EIG) is a new un-ring-fenced and un-hypothecated funding stream to enable local authorities to act more strategically and target investment early, where it will have greatest impact. In challenging times the Government are freeing local authorities to focus on essential frontline services, and to invest in early intervention and prevention to produce long-term savings and better results for children, young people and families.

The London borough of Newham's final EIG allocation for 2011-12 is £22,503,392 which represents a cash reduction of 12.5% based upon the 2010-11 allocation of the predecessor grants. The indicative EIG allocation for 2012-13 is £22,911,985 which represents a 1.8% cash increase on the 2011-12 EIG allocation.

Education Maintenance Allowance

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 14 March 2011, Official Report, column 47W, on education maintenance allowance, what steps he plans to take to (a) monitor the effect of the replacement of education maintenance allowance with a targeted support payment and (b) evaluate any difference in effect between the two schemes. [51628]

Mr Gibb: Currently schools, colleges and training providers with an allocation of discretionary learner support funds are required to provide management information to the Young People's Learning Agency. We expect that this arrangement will continue for the 16-19 Bursary Fund, allowing us to monitor its introduction. In addition we are considering how best to evaluate the impact of the new arrangements.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the proportion of students in receipt of education maintenance allowance who will receive funding under the new bursary and discretionary payment system. [51082]

Mr Gibb: Around 315,000 young people currently in receipt of education maintenance allowance (EMA) will receive guaranteed support in 2011/12 as a result of the measures we announced on 28 March 2011. This represents around 90% of those currently in receipt of EMA who would have been expected to continue in education or training in 2011/12. Young people who are not covered by the transitional arrangements will be

26 Apr 2011 : Column 280W

able to apply for support from their school, college or training provider through the discretionary element of the 16-19 Bursary Fund.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether the funding allocated to (a) the continuation of education maintenance allowance for some students and (b) discretionary learner support is to be transferred from any other project or scheme in his Department. [51084]

Mr Gibb: We have always had money set aside within the Department for Education budget for 16-19 financial support. As part of the budget discussions we agreed a call on Treasury reserves for a minority of the funding to help with the new 16-19 Bursary Fund.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much funding he has allocated to the continuation of funding for the education maintenance allowance for those who commenced study in academic year 2010-11; and from which budget this funding was allocated. [51085]

Mr Gibb: We expect that the cost of making weekly payments of £20 to those young people who started post-16 study in 2010/11 and are currently in receipt of the maximum weekly EMA payment will be £113 million in 2011/12. We have always had money set aside within the Department for Education budget for 16-19 financial support. As part of the budget discussions we agreed a call on Treasury reserves for a minority of the funding to help with the new 16-19 Bursary Fund.

Education Maintenance Allowance: West Midlands

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many students (a) in England, (b) in the West Midlands, (c) in Dudley borough and (d) enrolled at Dudley college who started courses in the academic year 2010-11 received education maintenance allowance at a rate of (i) £30, (ii) £20 and (iii) less than £20 a week. [50801]

Mr Gibb: This is a matter for the Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA) who operate the education maintenance allowance for the Department for Education. Peter Lauener, the YPLA's chief executive, will write to the hon. Member for Dudley North with the information requested and a copy of his reply will be placed in the House Libraries.

Student Support Services

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether funding for discretionary learner support for 16 to 19 education will be allocated solely for the purposes of student support; and whether it may or will be used to support administration of the system. [51058]

Mr Gibb: The new 16-19 Bursary scheme will be less bureaucratic and better targeted than EMA. At least 95% of the fund will be used directly to support students. Schools, colleges and training providers will be allowed to use up to 5% of their allocation to meet the costs of administering the scheme.

26 Apr 2011 : Column 281W

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effects of reductions in funding on student support services in (a) further education colleges, (b) sixth forms and (c) schools. [51059]

Mr Gibb: One of our key priorities with 16-19 participation funding has been to support the most disadvantaged and less able young people as much as possible. We have been able to do this by increasing the amount given over to disadvantaged funding and additional learner support. By recycling some of the savings from the reduction to the entitlement we have been able to increase funding for the more disadvantaged and those needing additional support by £150 million. This, along with the additional funding we have also made available to support Foundation Learning, will ensure that funding is targeted where it is most needed.

On 28 March 2011 we announced a new £180 million 16-19 Bursary Fund, which will enable schools, colleges and training providers to target support towards those young people facing the greatest financial barriers to participation.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what cost-benefit analysis his Department has made of the merits of (a) a nationally administered and (b) a localised 16 to 19 student finance system. [51061]

Mr Gibb: The education maintenance allowance (EMA) was a nationally administered system of financial support for 16-19-year-olds. Evidence suggests that around 90% of young people receiving support would have participated anyway. The 16-19 Bursary Fund—a locally administered system—will focus resources more sharply on those who are facing the greatest financial barriers to participation, in order to achieve the same benefits at a lower cost to the taxpayer.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the cost to further education providers of administering a discretionary support fund for 16 to 19 learners. [51063]

Mr Gibb: Under arrangements for the new 16-19 Bursary Fund, schools, colleges and training providers will be able to use up to 5% of their allocation to meet the costs of administering the scheme.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether funding for discretionary learner support for 16-19 education will be ring-fenced. [51064]

Mr Gibb: Under current arrangements discretionary learner support funds are allocated as a discrete budget which can only be used for that purpose. We expect that to be the case for the new 16-19 Bursary Fund, which we announced on 28 March 2011. We are currently consulting on our proposals.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the statement of 28 March 2011, Official Report, column 53, on post-16 education funding, how many pupils in year 11 are eligible for free school meals in England; and how much funding will be required in discretionary funds in order to ensure that each student who was eligible for free school meals in year 11 could receive up to £800 in discretionary learner support for 16-19 education. [51081]

26 Apr 2011 : Column 282W

Mr Gibb: As at January 2010, there were 77,540 pupils in year 11 known to be eligible for free school meals in England. We expect there to be just over 74,500 young people in this ‘group’ starting post-16 courses for the first time in 2011/12. In total, we estimate that there will be just under 166,000 young people aged 16-19 in full-time education or training in 2011/12 who were eligible for free school meals in year 11.

If every young person who was eligible for free school meals in year 11 and has continued in full-time education or training post-16 were to receive a total of £800 in 2011/12 it would cost £132.8 million.

Once the cost of providing bursaries of £1,200 to the most vulnerable groups is taken into account, £165 million will be available to schools, colleges and training providers to award discretionary bursaries. This would be sufficient to provide a bursary of £800 to 15% of 16 to 19-year-olds in full-time education or training, more than covering those who were eligible for free school meals in year 11.

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether students in receipt of a 16-19 education bursary will be required to sign a learner agreement. [51340]

Mr Gibb: We expect that schools and colleges will make receipt of a bursary conditional on a student meeting expected standards, for example, of attendance, behaviour or standard of work. Schools and colleges have told us that the ability to set conditions is important for promoting a positive attitude to education.

Education: Finance

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much funding his Department holds in reserve; and for what purpose such funding is held. [51342]

Tim Loughton: At the beginning of financial year 2010-11 the department held £207 million of reserve funding which has been fully drawn down in the financial year.

The Department follows HM Treasury Consolidated Budgeting Guidance on allocating reserve funding which states:

“1.48 Departments are encouraged not to allocate their departmental expenditure limits (DEL) fully against their programmes at the start of a financial year but to hold some provision back to deal with unforeseen pressures that emerge subsequently, including their known contingent liabilities. This departmental unallocated provision (DUP) is published in Main Estimates and Supplementary Budgetary Information.”

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the oral answer to the hon. Member for Scunthorpe (Nic Dakin) of 28 March 2011, Official Report, column 59, on post-16 education funding, what estimate he has made of the number of further education colleges that have a canteen or catering facilities on site; and how many further education facilities he has visited since his appointment. [51349]

Mr Gibb: Information on the number of further education colleges that do not have kitchens or cafeterias on site is not held by the Department for Education or the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (the sponsoring Department for further education colleges).

26 Apr 2011 : Column 283W

Last month the Secretary of State for Education announced a new £180 million 16-19 Bursary Fund, which will enable schools, colleges and training providers to target support towards those young people facing the greatest financial barriers to participation. They can decide whether to provide subsidised meals in college or give young people a bursary that allows them to pay for food outside of college.

Since his appointment, the Secretary of State for Education has visited two further education colleges: Westminster Kingsway college on 3 March this year; and Goole college, which forms part of the Hull college group of colleges, on 1 April this year.

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what financial support his Department provided to school cadet forces in the (a) independent and (b) state sector in 2010-11; and what financial support he plans to allocate for 2011-12. [51364]

Mr Gibb: In 2010-11 £60,000 was paid to schools in the state sector by the Department to support a pilot project enabling young people in the state sector to access cadet provision through partnerships between independent and maintained schools. No financial support was provided to participating independent schools.

The pilot project has now ended and the Department for Education has no plans to provide funding in 2011-12. Future funding for cadet forces is a matter for the Ministry of Defence.

On 28 February 2011 the Secretary of State for Education announced that the Department for Education will provide £1.5 million for the charity SkillForce to train former members of the armed forces to become mentors for young people in schools across England.

Angela Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to his Statement of 28 March 2011, Official Report, column 51, on post-16 education funding, what plans he has to allow further education and sixth form colleges to access information on students enrolling in September 2011 who were in receipt of free meals whilst in compulsory schooling; and if he will make a statement. [51505]

Mr Gibb: Further education and sixth form colleges will be able to exercise their discretion to award 16-19 bursaries to young people—including young people who were in receipt of free school meals in year 11—in ways that best fit local needs and circumstances. We have no plans currently to establish a national system to make information on eligibility for free school meals available to further education and sixth form colleges. We are consulting on the details of the new arrangements and will work with the Association of Colleges and the Sixth Form Colleges Forum to consider how, at a local level, colleges could work with schools and local authorities to identify those students who might benefit from a bursary.

English Baccalaureate

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what consultation he has undertaken on his decision not to include religious education as a humanities subject in the English Baccalaureate. [51047]

26 Apr 2011 : Column 284W

Mr Gibb: Since announcing in December 2010 the subjects that would be reported as counting towards the English Baccalaureate in the 2010 performance tables, the Department has received a wide range of correspondence on the decision not to include religious studies GCSE. Ministers and departmental officials have held a number of meetings with interested parties.

The Government are currently considering the content of the English Baccalaureate for the purposes of the 2011 performance tables. We intend to publish information on all measures to be included in the 2011 performance tables in our annual statement of intent, which will be published at:

www.education.gov.uk/performancetables

Family Courts

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average caseload of family court practitioners instructed by his Department was on the most recent date for which figures are available; and what estimate he has made of the likely average caseload on 31 March 2012. [51775]

Tim Loughton: The Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (CAFCASS) is responsible for the management of family court practitioners and their caseloads. I have asked Anthony Douglas, CAFCASS's chief executive, to write to the right hon. Member for Dwyfor Meirionnydd with the information requested. A copy of Mr. Douglas's letter will be placed in the House Libraries.

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has any plans to introduce separate representation for children in care or family proceedings. [51777]

Tim Loughton: In care proceedings, children are represented both through a court appointed CAFCASS guardian, who represents the child's wishes and feelings to the court and provides independent social work advice to the court on the child's best interests, and by a solicitor appointed to represent the child's legal interests.

In private law cases, including contact and residence disputes, there is no automatic right to legal representation but, in that minority of cases where a court deems it appropriate to make a child party to the proceedings, there is provision for a child to be represented by a CAFCASS guardian.

The Government will consider changes needed across the whole of the family justice system once the Family Justice Review panel has issued its final report in the autumn. The panel's interim report is currently subject to consultation.

Free School Meals

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the free school meals pilots operating in (a) the London borough of Newham, (b) County Durham and (c) Wolverhampton; and if he will place in the Library a copy of each interim report produced on the pilots for his Department. [51283]

26 Apr 2011 : Column 285W

Mr Gibb: The Department makes regular assessments of the effectiveness of the free school meals pilots. The final evaluation report is due to be received by the Department on 31 March 2012. We shall publish the report within 12 weeks of its receipt. The aim of the evaluation is to measure the impact of the free school meals pilots in the London borough of Newham, County Durham and Wolverhampton.

Further Education: Catering

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has made an estimate of the number of (a) sixth form colleges and (b) further education colleges which do not have (i) kitchens and (ii) cafeterias. [51644]

Mr Gibb: Information on the number of sixth form colleges and further education colleges that do not have kitchens or cafeterias on site is not held by the Department for Education (the sponsoring department for sixth form colleges) or the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (the sponsoring department for further education colleges).

Further Education: Domestic Visits

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many further education college and sixth form cafeterias he has visited in 2011; [51316]


(2) which (a) sixth forms and (b) further education colleges he has visited in 2011. [51645]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 5 April 2011]: The Secretary of State for Education has visited seven school sixth forms and two further education colleges in 2011. The Department does not hold any record as to whether he visited their cafeterias. The institutions visited are as follows:

School Sixth Forms

Haberdashers Knights Aske's Academy

Twyford CoE High School

King Solomon Academy

Chellaston Academy

Altrincham Girls Grammar School

Goole High School

Pimlico Academy

Further Education Colleges

Westminster Kingsway College

Goole College

Education Maintenance Allowance

Ian Mearns: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many young people in further education received education maintenance allowance at the higher level in (a) Gateshead, (b) the North East and (c) England in each year from 2006 to 2010. [51588]

Mr Gibb: This is a matter for the Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA) who operate the education maintenance allowance for the Department for Education and manage the Capita contract. Peter Lauener, the YPLA's chief executive, has written to the hon. Member for Gateshead with the information requested and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

26 Apr 2011 : Column 286W

Letter from Peter Lauener, dated 7 April 2011:

I am writing in response to your Parliamentary Question that asked;

“How many young people in further education received education maintenance allowance at the higher level in (a) Gateshead, (b) the North East and (c) England in each year from 2006 to 2010.”

EMA take-up is defined as young people who have received one or more EMA payments in the academic year.

The numbers of young people who have received Education Maintenance Allowance at the higher level of £30 a week are shown in the table below.


2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10

Gateshead

1,670

1,921

2,132

2,533

North East

27,915

29,894

33,599

36,216

England

441,014

461,289

518,143

567,106

It is important to note that the above data may include duplicates as a result of learners changing their learning provider in-year.

EMA take-up data showing the number of young people who have received one or more EMA payments during 2004/05, 2005/06, 2006/07, 2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/10 are available on the YPLA website at the following address:

http://ema.ypla.gov.uk/resources/research/takeup/

Further Education: Finance

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the statement of 28 March 2011, Official Report, column 59, on post-16 education funding, whether (a) sixth form colleges and (b) further education colleges are eligible to receive funds from the sum for capital support announced in the 2011 Budget. [52395]

Mr Gibb: Through the Budget, the Chancellor has released £125 million of additional capital spending for England. Most of this is intended to ensure that we have a new generation of University Technical Colleges, which are new 14-19 institutions. Some of it will also support new Technical Academies, where the Department welcomes proposals for any age range, including 16-19. Colleges and other educational institutions may come forward with UTC or Technical Academy proposals. Details of how to apply can be found on the Department's website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools/technical/a0076307/technical-academies-and-university-technical-colleges

Further Education: Manpower

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what information his Department holds on the number of staff employed in student support in (a) further education colleges, (b) sixth form colleges and (c) schools in each of the last five years. [51344]

Mr Gibb: The following tables provide the full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants and support staff employed in further education colleges (FE), sixth form colleges and publicly funded schools in England in each year from 2004-05 to 2008-09 (FE and sixth form colleges) and 2006 to 2010 (publicly funded schools).

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Full-time equivalent number of teaching assistants and support staff in service in further education/sixth form colleges (1) and publicly funded schools. Years: FE and sixth form colleges (2004-05 to 2008-09) and publicly funded schools (January 2006 to 2010), coverage: England
Further education and 6 (th) form colleges

Support staff Other support staff (2) Total support staff

2008-09

25,220

59,950

85,170

2007-08

23,500

60,100

83,600

2006-07

20,740

57,880

78,620

2005-06

20,930

59,820

80,750

2004-05

20,600

60,260

80,860

Source: Staff Individualised Record (SIR) survey conducted by Lifelong Learning UK.
Publicly funded schools (3)

Teaching assistants (4) Support staff (5) Total support staff

2010

194,230

168,640

362,870

2009

183,700

162,210

345,920

2008

176,990

149,590

326,580

2007

163,800

144,390

308,190

2006

153,510

135,630

289,130

(1) Numbers based on full-time equivalent staff calculated on the number of contracts issued. (2) Includes senior and other managers, admin/clerical staff, assessors and verifiers, technical and service staff. (3) Publicly funded schools include local authority maintained schools, academies and city technology colleges. (4) Includes higher level teaching assistants, nursery nurses, nursery assistants, literacy and numeracy support staff and any other teaching staff regularly employed to support teachers in the classroom, special needs support staff and minority ethnic pupil support staff. (5) Includes secretaries, bursars, other admin/clerical staff, technicians (laboratory assistants, design technology assistants, home economics and craft technicians and IT technicians), matrons, nurses, medical staff, child care staff and other education support staff (librarians, welfare assistants and learning mentors). Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. Source: School Census

Further Education: Monitoring

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department plans to take to monitor participation in post-16 education by 16 to 19-year-olds in future academic years; and what plans he has to publish the results of such monitoring. [51643]

Mr Gibb: Data on participation in education post-16 currently are principally monitored and published through the Department for Education (DfE) Statistical First Release (SFR) entitled “Participation in Education, Training and Employment by 16-18 Year Olds in England”. This is an annual publication, typically released in the third or fourth week in June.

The SFR provides detailed statistics for 16, 17 and 18-year-olds both separately and aggregated to 16-18 on whether they are participating in education, and if so at what type of institution, what level and type of course or programme, and type of attendance (full time or part time). Additionally, for young people who are in employment, statistics are given for whether they are also participating in education and training, either independently or funded by their employer. These statistics are calculated on an academic age basis; this means that the SFR refers to three distinct cohorts of young people

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in their first, second and third year post compulsory schooling. For selected statistics a time series of participation in education and/or employment is available from 1985, updated each year, with the most recently published figures relating to the end of 2009.

Further, statistical tables are published in addition to the main SFR that disaggregate participation in education (but not employment) into the local authority of residence of the young person. These are available for 16 and 17-year-olds in a time series extending back to 1994. Most recently figures were published for end 2009, with further updates planned annually every second or third week in March.

Separately, the Department releases figures for the number of young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) at local authority level. The data are based on operational data currently collected by local authorities. The result of this data collection is the Client Caseload Information System (CCIS), which is used by local authorities to keep track of the participation of individual young people in their area. CCIS enables local authorities to assess whether the young person is currently in education, training or employment, and whether an offer of education and training has been made, or for young people who are NEET whether an appropriate intervention has been made.

The Department is committed to continue publishing participation data in the forms described above. The next release of the SFR showing the participation of 16-18-year-olds at the end of 2010 is planned for June 2011, with a disaggregation into local authority areas for 16 and 17-year-olds to follow in March 2012. Similarly, CCIS will continue to be the means by which local authorities collect and record offers of education and training for young people.

GCE A-level

Elizabeth Truss: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of GCE A-level students were entered for GCE A-level (a) chemistry, (b) geography, (c) French, (d) German and (e) Spanish in (i) comprehensive schools, (ii) selective schools, (iii) independent schools and (iv) sixth form colleges (A) nationally and (B) in each local education authority in the most recent period for which figures are available.[51114]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 5 April 2011]:The information requested has been placed in the House Libraries.