Percentage of pupils achieving A* -C grades in:
  At least two sciences (5) Either History or Geography
  2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 (6) 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 (6)

White

46.0

46.4

47.7

32.0

32.1

32.6

White British

46.1

46.5

47.9

32.0

32.2

32.7

Irish

52.

51.9

56.5

42.1

41.7

45.9

Traveller of Irish Heritage(7)

8.3

9.9

13.6

4.6

5.0

8.9

Gypsy/Roma(7)

6.6

6.8

6.4

4.1

4.7

3.4

Any Other White Background

42.7

42.6

43.3

30.4

29.5

29.4

Mixed

43.8

45.5

46.5

28.3

2S.2

29.8

White and Black Caribbean

35.4

36.8

36.0

20.1

21.5

21.1

White and Black African

43.3

44.8

45.8

28.0

28.1

23.0

White and Asian

53.9

56.5

56.7

38.2

40.3

39.4

Any Other Mixed Background

47.6

48.9

50.7

31.8

31.5

33.7

Asian

46.6

48.1

49.6

29.8

30.1

29.9

Indian

60.3

61.5

64.4

40.0

41.2

40.5

Pakistani

36.4

38.6

39.3

22.8

23.0

23.5

Bangladeshi

37.9

40.9

43.3

22.4

22.8

24.1

Any Other Asian Background

50.6

50.8

51.4

31.7

31.7

30.5

Black

35.1

37.3

37.9

20.9

21.9

22.0

Black Caribbean

31.8

32.4

32.6

17.0

17.5

17.8

Black African

37.8

40.9

41.6

23.9

25.1

25.0

Any Other Black Background

33.1

34.9

35.1

18.7

19.7

19.8

Chinese

69.0

69.7

70.9

46.3

45.1

46.5

Any Other Ethnic Group

40.8

41.5

43.4

25.1

25.0

24.8

Unclassified(8)

41.3

45.7

45.3

29.0

32.2

32.2

4 Apr 2011 : Column 703W

4 Apr 2011 : Column 704W

All pupils

45.5

46.1

47.4

31.2

31.5

31.8

(1) Number of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 in each academic year. (2) 2007/08 and 2008/09 figures are based on final data. 2009/10 figures are amended. (3) Highest grade achieved in English, English Studies or English Language. (4) Covers the following GCSE languages: French, German, Spanish, Danish, Dutch. Italian, Modem Greek, Portuguese, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Gujarali, Hindi, Japanese, Modern Hebrew, Panjabi, Polish, Russian, Turkish, Urdu, Persian. (5) The two sciences can be either: i. Double science GCSE or ii. GCSE Science (Core or Applied) plus GCSE Additional Science or Applied Additional Science or GCSE Land and Environment or iii. At least two of the following subjects: Physics GCSE, Chemistry GCSE and Biological Science GCSE. (6) In 2010 iGCSEs, accredited at time of publication, have been counted as GCSE equivalents and also as English and mathematics GCSEs. (7) Due to small numbers of pupils from those ethnic groups, small changes may not be significant and year-on-year comparisons should be treated with caution. (8) Includes pupils for whom ethnicity or first language was not obtained, refused or could not be determined. Source: National Pupil Database

Education Maintenance Allowance: Medway

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children received education maintenance allowance in the (a) Medway council and (b) Tonbridge and Malling borough council area in the latest period for which figures are available. [50045]

Mr Gibb: This is a matter for the Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA) who operate the education maintenance allowance for the Department for Education and manage the Capita contract. Peter Lauener, the YPLA's chief executive, has written to the hon. Member for Chatham and Aylesford with the information requested and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Peter Lauener, dated 30 March 2011:

I am writing in response to your Parliamentary Question PQ50045 that asked:

“How many children received education maintenance allowance in the (a) Medway Council and (b) Tonbridge and Malling Borough Council area in the latest period for which figures are available.”

Information on the number of young people who have received EMA is available for upper tier local authorities but not by constituency, local authority ward or council level.

EMA take-up is defined as young people who have received one or more EMA payments in the academic year.

The table below shows local authority take-up as at 28 February 2011.

  Take-up

Medway

3,213

Kent

15,270

EMA take-up data showing the number of young people who have received one or more EMA payments during 2004/05, 2005/06, 2006/07, 2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/10 is available on the YPLA website, at the following address:

http://ema.ypla.gov.uk/resources/research/takeup/

English Baccalaureate

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what consultation he undertook with schools prior to introducing the English Baccalaureate into performance tables. [34608]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 18 January 2011]: We announced our intention to introduce the English Baccalaureate in the Schools White Paper in November and invited schools to submit their comments by the end of the year. We have included the English Baccalaureate measure in the performance tables to make information about schools' performance more widely available in line with the coalition Government's commitment to improve transparency. Our aim is to provide parents with more information on schools and, in the process, stimulate debate on what schools should be teaching. We have not set any targets for the English Baccalaureate and are not using it as an accountability measure.

Free School Meals

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children received free school meals in each ward in the (a) Medway council and (b) Tonbridge and Malling borough council area in the latest period for which figures are available. [50043]

Mr Gibb: Information about the number of resident school pupils eligible for free school meals in each ward in Medway and Tonbridge and Malling is provided in the following table.

Number and percentage of resident pupils (1) eligible for free school meals (2) in each ward (3) in (a) Medway and (b) Tonbridge and Ma l ling in January 2010
  Resident pupils (1) eligible for free school meals (2)
  Number Percentage

Medway

5,030

13.4

Chatham Central

550

21.5

Cuxton and Halling

40

4.6

Gillingham North

660

24.9

Gillingham South

440

17.8

Hempstead and Wigmore

20

1.7

Lordswood and Capstone

160

11.8

Luton and Wayfield

440

20.4

Peninsula

160

8.5

Princes Park

230

13.4

Rainham Central

90

5.1

Rainham North

150

13.3

Rainham South

180

9.2

River

110

11.8

Rochester East

230

16.8

Rochester South and Horsted

110

6.2

Rochester West

140

12.8

Strood North

250

11.8

Strood Rural

180

8.6

Strood South

390

17.1

Twydall

290

15

Walderslade

150

10.6

4 Apr 2011 : Column 705W

Watling

100

7.2

     

Tonbridge and Malling

1,550

9.5

Aylesford

70

10

Blue Bell Hill and Walderslade

10

1.4

Borough Green and Long Mill

50

5.7

Burham, Eccles and Wouldham

60

9.8

Cage Green

50

8.4

Castle

20

3.2

Ditton

60

8.3

Downs

20

5.4

East Malling

210

26.5

East Peckham and Golden Green

30

6.7

Hadlow, Mereworth and West Peckham

90

16.2

Higham

70

7.5

Hildenborough

30

4.2

Ightham

10

2.2

Judd

60

8.4

Kings Hill

70

5

Larkfield North

30

5.7

Larkfield South

60

9.6

Medway

80

13.2

Snodland East

130

20

Snodland West

70

9.9

Trench

140

24.1

Vauxhall

60

9.1

Wateringbury

10

1.6

West Malling and Leybourne

40

5.9

Wrotham

40

17.3

(1) Includes full-time and part-time pupils, including boarders, who are sole or dual registrations, attending maintained nursery, primary, middle deemed primary, secondary and middle deemed secondary schools. City technology colleges, academies and all special schools. (2) Pupils eligible for free school meals who have full-time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils who have part-time attendance and are aged between five and 15. (3) Census area statistic (CAS) wards. Source: School Census (Final).

Free School Meals: Pendle Borough Council

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children received free school meals in each ward in the Pendle borough council area in the last year for which figures are available. [50967]

Mr Gibb: Information about the number of resident school pupils eligible for free school meals in each ward in Pendle is provided in the following table.

Number and percentage of resident pupils (1) eligible for free school meals (2) in each ward (3 ) in Pendle in January 2010
  Number of resident pupils (1 ) eligible for free school meals (2, 4) Percentage of resident pupils (1) eligible for free school meals (2)

Pendle

2,390

19.0

Barrowford

50

8.6

Blacko and Higherford

(5)

(5)

Boulsworth

30

5.0

Bradley

330

28.4

Brierfield

190

24.1

4 Apr 2011 : Column 706W

Clover Hill

200

25.5

Coates

90

11.6

Craven

70

10.9

Earby

100

12.6

Foulridge

10

4.5

Higham and Pendleside

(5)

(5)

Horsfield

140

23.2

Marsden

90

18.6

Old Laund Booth

10

4.6

Reedley

120

14.6

Southfield

240

26.6

Vivary Bridge

210

23.7

Walverden

150

22.0

Waterside

200

27.7

Whitefield

170

22.9

(1) Includes full time and part time pupils, including boarders, who are sole or dual registrations, attending maintained nursery, primary, middle deemed primary, secondary and middle deemed secondary schools, city technology colleges, academies and al special schools. (2) Pupils eligible for free school meals who have full time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils who have part time attendance and are aged between 5 and 15. (3) Census Area Statistic (CAS) Wards. (4) Numbers in this table have been rounded to the nearest 10. (5) Figures suppressed to protect confidentiality. Source: School Census (Final)

Further Education: Free School Meals

Angela Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to ensure 16 to 18-year-olds in full-time education in a further education or sixth form college have access to a free lunch. [37176]

Mr Gibb: Free school meals are currently available to pupils in a school sixth form, including those who are 19 or over, as long as they began their course of study before attaining the age of 18.

The Department has registered concern that similar funding is not available for pupils studying in further education or sixth form colleges but currently has no plans to extend free school meal eligibility.

GCSE

Mr Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children achieved five or more A* to C GCSEs in each year since 1997, where those GCSEs included (a) English language, (b) mathematics, (c) a modern foreign language, (d) history or geography and (e) a science; and if he will make a statement. [32388]

Mr Gibb: The information available is provided in the following table:

Children who achieved five or more A* to C GCSEs where those GCSEs included English language, mathematics, history or geography, a modern foreign language and a science, for the period 2007-10
  Number

2007

109,532

2008

105,310

2009

105,411

2010

106,108

4 Apr 2011 : Column 707W

Figures are based on pupils at the end of Key Stage 4.

2010 figures include only full and double award GCSEs and iGCSEs.

Further years can be provided only at disproportionate cost but we are committed to producing a time series for English Baccalaureate in the future. The figures above are not identical to the subjects included in the English Baccalaureate. The 2010 published data can be found at the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000985/index.shtml

For clarity, the composition of the subject groups comprised is as follows:

English

English

English language

Maths

Mathematics

Mathematics (FSMQ)

Maths (Mechanics)

Mathematics (Pure)

Maths (Discrete)

Mathematics (Applied)

Maths (Statistics)

Maths (Pure and applied)

Maths (Pure and decsn)

Maths (Pure and stats)

Stats and decsn. maths

Maths (Pure and mechs)

Maths (Further)

Additional maths

Mathematical stds.

Science

Biology

Biology: Human

Biology: Social

Biology: Human and Soc

Chemistry

Physics

Science (Core)

Science SA

Science: Additional

Sci: Dual Award A

Env and Land Science

Sci: Dual Award B

Science Double Awd

Sci: Double Awd B

Sci: Biol and Chem

Sci: Biol and Phys

Sci: Chem and Phys

Aeronautics

Sci: Agricultural

Sci: Agric and Hortic

Science: Applied

Science: Astronomy

Botany

Sci: Electronics

Sci: Environmental

Science: Geology

4 Apr 2011 : Column 708W

Sci: Horticulture

Science: Physical

Sci: Psychology

Robotics

Science: Rural

Science in Society

Sci for Public Und

Sci: Technology

Science: Zoology

Sci: Meteorology

Engineering Sci

Science: Other

Modern Foreign Language

Welsh language

Welsh (2nd language)

Welsh literature

Irish

Danish

Dutch

French

German

Italian

Modern Greek

Portuguese

Spanish

Arabic

Bengali

Chinese

Gujarati

Hindi

Japanese

Modern Hebrew

Panjabi

Polish

Russian

Turkish

Urdu

Persian

Czech

Swedish

Other languages

Source:

School and College Performance Tables.

GCSE: Free Schools Meals

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of children gained five or more A* to C grades at GCSE including English and mathematics in each year since GCSEs were introduced; and how many of those were (a) eligible and (b) ineligible for free school meals in each such year. [50737]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 1 April 2011]: The figures requested are given in the following table for 2005/06 to 2009/10.

4 Apr 2011 : Column 709W

4 Apr 2011 : Column 710W

Achievements at GCSE and equivalent for pupils (1) at the end of key stage 4 by free school meal eligibility, 2005/06 to 2009/10 (2, 3) , England, maintained schools (including academies and CTSs)
    All pupils FSM Non-FSM Unclassified (4)

2005/06

         

Number of eligible pupils(1)

 

594,134

78,087

514,516

1,531

Pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades including English and mathematics

Number

261,336

15,320

245,508

508

 

Percentage

44.0

19.6

47.7

33.2

2006/07

         

Number of eligible pupils(1)

 

600,659

76,566

521,826

2.267

Pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades including English and mathematics

Number

274,823

16,385

257,649

789

 

Percentage

45.8

21.4

49.4

34.8

2007/08

         

Number of eligible pupils(1)

 

598,102

74,760

522,304

1,038

Pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades including English and mathematics

Number

288,158

17,814

269,933

41

 

Percentage

48.2

23.8

51.7

39.6

2008/09

         

Number of eligible pupils(1)

 

578,840

74,419

504,377

44

Pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades including English and mathematics

Number

293,443

19,778

273,640

25

 

Percentage

50.7

26.6

54.3

56.8

2009/10

         

Number of eligible pupils(1)

 

578,275

77,408

500,811

56

Pupils achieving 5+ A*-C grades including English and mathematics

Number

316,941

23,937

292,985

19

 

Percentage

54.8

30.9

58.5

33.9

(1) Number of pupils at the end of key stage 4 in each academic year. (2) Figures for 2005/06 to 2008/09 are based on final data, 2009/10 figures are based on provisional data. (3) In 2010, iGCSEs, accredited at time of publication, have been counted as GCSE equivalents and also as English and mathematics GCSEs. (4) Includes pupils for whom free school meal eligibility could not be determined. Source: National Pupil Database.

“Five GCSEs including English and mathematics” was not recorded on the national pupil database before 2003/04. Figures for 2003/04 and 2004/05 could not be calculated without exceeding disproportionate costs.

History: Education

Mr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the conclusions and recommendations of the March 2011 Ofsted survey of history in schools in respect of the use in schools of set textbooks. [49940]

Mr Gibb: As part of our review of the national curriculum, which is under way, we will be considering ways in which we can stimulate the market to produce high quality text books and other resources to support the new curriculum. The Government believe, however, that teachers should be free to use their professional judgment when determining which resources they should use in the classroom to meet the needs of their pupils.

Members: Correspondence

Mr Baron: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay of 31 January and 21 February 2011 on his constituent Ms K. Evans. [49357]

Tim Loughton: [holding answer 28 March 2011]: The Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Schools (Lord Hill) replied to my hon. Friend on 29 March 2011.

Ofsted: Expenditure

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much Ofsted has spent on its learning and skills division in each of the last five years; and what proportion of that expenditure was on on-site inspections. [17915]

Mr Gibb: This is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to my hon. Friend and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 22 October 2010:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, for response.

Ofsted does not and has not had a learning and skills division. However, the table below sets out:

i) the total cost of learning and skills inspections (operational costs plus overheads) for the financial years 2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/2010;

ii) the overall operational cost of learning and skills inspections excluding overheads for the financial years 2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/2010. We are taking operational costs of inspections (direct and indirect costs) to equate here to ‘expenditure on site inspections’;

iii) the proportion of total costs that is operational cost.

4 Apr 2011 : Column 711W

Overall costs as defined above 2007/08 2008/09 2009/ 10

i) (£)

25,327,000

23,623,000

20,736,000

ii) (£)

19,048,000

16,952,000

14,210,000

iii) (%)

75.2

71.8

68.5

This covers inspection of further education colleges, sixth form colleges, work-based learning providers, teacher training providers, adult and community learning providers, next step adult information, advice and guidance providers, Department for Work and Pensions contracted employment providers, ‘learndirect’ provision and training and education provided by prisons and probation trusts.

Ofsted does not hold comparable data for the previous financial years 2005/06 and 2006/07 since this period preceded the merger between Ofsted and the Adult Learning Inspectorate which transferred the functions of inspecting adult learning, skills and employment to Ofsted from April 2007.

4 Apr 2011 : Column 712W

A copy of this reply has been sent to Nick Gibb MP, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Pupil Exclusions: Berkshire

Alok Sharma: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils were excluded permanently from schools in (a) Berkshire, (b) Reading and (c) Reading West constituency in each of the last five years. [49829]

Mr Gibb: The requested information is shown in the tables.

Berkshire was reorganised in 1998, so information has been provided for the six local authorities Berkshire was divided into.

Maintained primary, state-funded secondary and special schools (1, 2) , number of permanent exclusions (3, 4,) 2004/05 to 2008/09
  Maintained primary, state-funded secondary and special schools (1, 2, 5)
  2004/05 2005/06 2006/07
  Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of school population (6) Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of school population (6) Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of school population (6)

Bracknell Forest

40

0.28

30

0.19

30

0.17

Windsor and Maidenhead

30

0.17

20

0.10

40

0.20

West Berkshire

30

0.12

50

0.21

40

0.17

Reading

30

0.16

20

0.15

10

0.08

Slough

10

0.05

10

0.05

20

0.08

Wokingham

40

0.17

40

0.19

30

0.14

Reading West

30

0.16

20

0.16

20

0.12

  2007/08 2008/09
  Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of school population (6) Number of permanent exclusions Percentage of school population (6)

Bracknell Forest

30

0.19

30

0.18

Windsor and Maidenhead

20

0.10

20

0.10

West Berkshire

30

0.12

(7)

(7)

Reading

10

0.07

10

0.05

Slough

(7)

(7)

10

0.02

Wokingham

30

0.13

30

0.11

Reading West

20

0.12

10

0.04

(1 )Includes middle schools as deemed. (2 )Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools. (3 )Figures are as confirmed by local authorities as part of the data checking exercise. (4 )Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. (5 )Includes city technology colleges and academies (including all-through academies). (6 )The number of permanent exclusions expressed as a percentage of the number (headcount) of pupils (excluding dually registered pupils). (7 )Less than 5, or a percentage based on less than 5. Source: School Census

Schools

Derek Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many written communications his Department has sent to (a) local education authorities and (b) schools since 1 June 2010. [50454]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 1 April 2011]: The Department’s primary method of written communication to schools and local authorities is by official e-mail. Since 1 June 2010, the Department has issued 29 such e-mails to all local authorities, eight to small groups of schools for operational purposes and nine to all schools informing them of major policy issues.

Comparative figures for 2009/10 show that the Department issued 48 e-mails to all local authorities, 47 to small groups of schools for operational purposes and 33 to all schools informing them of major policy issues.

Schools: Benwell

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans his Department has to support schools in the Benwell and Scotswood area of Newcastle. [50705]

Mr Gibb: The Secretary of State has written to all local authorities, including Newcastle city council asking them to produce a school improvement plan for underperforming schools in their area by 15 April 2011.

4 Apr 2011 : Column 713W

Schools: Drugs

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on introducing pilot voluntary drug testing programmes in secondary schools; and if he will make a statement. [50058]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 31 March 2011]: There are no plans to introduce such a programme nationally. Headteachers are already entitled to develop voluntary approaches within their schools and departmental advice is set out in ‘Drugs: Guidance for Schools’ published in 2004 and available at:

www.education.gov.uk/publications

This document is currently being simplified and updated in line with our commitments to reduce bureaucracy in schools. However, the advice on drug testing is unlikely to change substantially based on currently available evidence.

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment his Department has made of the likely effects of the use of skunk cannabis on the academic performance of adolescents; and if he will make a statement. [50069]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 31 March 2011]: Early cannabis use is associated with increased risk of disengagement from school and, ultimately, poor academic performance. This effect is found in both international research papers and in the annual survey “Smoking Drinking and Drug Use Amongst Young People in England” (SDD) funded by the Department for Education, Home Office and NHS Information Centre.

The most recent SDD report found that pupils who had truanted or been excluded from school were far more likely to report regular drug use (14% compared with 1% of pupils who had not truanted or been excluded). Cannabis is the most common drug used among the SDD sample.

However, it is often not possible to identify a simple causal relationship between cannabis use and educational attainment. It is most likely that these behaviours are interrelated with drug use increasing the risk of exclusion or disengagement from school which in turn increases the risk of drug or alcohol misuse.

No specific assessment has been made of the impact of particular types of cannabis.

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on any potential link between academic underperformance and the use of drugs; and if he will make a statement. [50070]

Sarah Teather [holding answer 31 March 2011]: There are clear links between early drug use and poor educational outcomes. The Department for Education currently funds a proportion of the annual survey ‘Smoking Drinking and Drug Use Among Young People in England’ which provides detailed information on patterns of reported drug use among pupils aged 11 to 15.

Over the past year the Department has also commissioned an analysis of the relationships between different risk factors, including drug use, on educational

4 Apr 2011 : Column 714W

and social outcomes. The report, which is being completed by the National Centre for Social Research, will draw on data from the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England and will be published shortly.

A report ‘Specialist Drug and Alcohol Services for Young People—A Cost Benefit Analysis’ published in February 2011 looked at the costs associated with poor educational and employment outcomes due to young people’s drug and alcohol use.

The full report can be accessed at:

http://education.gov.uk/publications/standard/publicationDetail/Page1/DFE-RR087

As part of developing the national Drug Strategy published in December 2010, officials from the Department evaluated a broad range of research evidence on the effects of early drug use on educational and social outcomes and on the effectiveness of programmes designed to prevent drug use among young people.

School Sports

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what progress has been made in returning funding to school sport partnerships following the initial withdrawal of that funding in October 2010. [51002]

Tim Loughton: Funding of £47 million was paid to school sport partnerships in February this year. This will fund their work up to the end of the summer term 2011. This is in addition to £71 million paid to partnerships in October last year.

Ring-fenced funding for school sport partnerships will not continue beyond the summer term 2011. Instead, the Secretary of State is making available £65 million of new funding for schools to enable them to provide more opportunities for competitive sport. This funding will cover the school years 2011/12 and 2012/13 and will pay for one day a week of a secondary PE teacher's time to be spent out of the classroom, encouraging greater take-up of competitive sport in primary schools and securing a fixture network for schools to increase the amount of intra- and inter-school competition. Further details of this funding will be sent to schools soon.

In addition, at the Sports Colleges Conference in Telford in February, the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), announced outline plans for a network of School Games Organisers from September 2011. These organisers will be funded by the Department of Health and Sport England for three days a week to help schools sign up for the nationwide School Games. Further details on the funding for these organiser posts, their precise roles, and how schools can apply for them have been sent to schools.

Taken together, I believe this package of funding will enable schools to maximise the opportunities for competitive sport that they can provide for their pupils.

Schools: Standards

Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he expects to announce the allocation of the National Challenge programme funding for local authorities. [39937]

4 Apr 2011 : Column 715W

Mr Gibb [holding answer 11 February 2011]: The final National Challenge programme funding allocation will be paid to local authorities at the end of March 2011 as part of the Standards Fund grant. Local authorities have already been notified of their allocations for 2010-11.

Schools: Sun Protection

Mrs Siân C. James: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what information his Department holds on the number of schools with a sun protection policy; [48973]

(2) what guidance his Department issues to schools on reducing the exposure of children to harmful levels of sunlight; [48974]

(3) what consideration he has given to the merits of requiring mandatory use of sunblock in schools in order to prevent the development of malignant melanomas. [48976]

Mr Gibb: The Department for Education holds no information on the number of schools with a sun protection policy; has not issued departmental advice on reducing the exposure of children to harmful levels of sunlight; and has no plans to require, in law, the use of sun block in schools.

Cancer Research UK (CRUK) has a specific section on their website dedicated to schools:

http://www.sunsmart.org.uk/schools/

where teachers can download guidelines on developing sun protection policies, as well as advice on incorporating sun protection into the school curriculum and various SunSmart posters and other resources. There are also other sources of advice and guidance to the public on sun protection such as the Health Protection Agency webpage at:

http://www.hpa.org.uk/Topics/Radiation/Understanding Radiation/InformationSheets/info_SunsensePoster/

and a Directgov webpage specifically aimed at young people at:

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/YoungPeople/HealthAndRelationships/KeepingHealthy/DG_10036860

The Department expects head teachers to have a common sense approach, using the advice and guidance available, when dealing with sun protection in their schools.

Teachers: Training

Mr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has for the future of (a) teacher training and (b) the balance between academic and practical teacher training. [41381]

Mr Gibb: The Schools White Paper, The Importance of Teaching signalled our plans for the future of teacher training including raising standards for new entrants, for example by providing the funding to more than double the size of Teach First, and ensuring that appropriate and relevant training is available for both new graduates and career changers. We will publish for consultation our detailed proposals for the funding of initial teacher training later this year.

The White Paper reaffirms our commitment to ensure that more teacher training is on the job and practical. Universities will continue to play an important role in training teachers, in partnership with schools.

4 Apr 2011 : Column 716W

Third Sector

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps his Department has taken to support the big society initiative. [42641]

Sarah Teather: The big society is more than a collection of policies—it is an approach which is at the heart of the Government’s reforms across all policy areas with the aim of localising power and opening up public services and encouraging social action. Each Department has a range of specific programmes which will contribute to growing the big society. These policies are co-ordinated across Government through meetings at official and ministerial level, including the Informal Ministerial Group on the Big Society and Localism, which shares ideas and supports progress on cross-cutting issues relating to the big society.

The Department for Education has several programmes aimed at achieving the big society goals of catalysing social action, decentralising power and opening up public services. These include Free Schools, where we are working with local groups who have submitted proposals and are on track for the first Free Schools to be opened in September 2011, and the National Citizen Service where we are working closely with the Cabinet Office with the first pilots starting in summer 2011.

University Technical Colleges

Mr Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether it is his policy that all university technical colleges will (a) enrol children aged 11 to 18 years, (b) be established in partnership with a university and a further education or sixth form college and (c) offer a curriculum which consists of a maximum of 20 per cent. of vocational education. [49735]

Mr Gibb: The Department is committed to setting up technical academies, including at least 24 university technical colleges (UTCs).

The Department welcomes proposals across the age range for new technical academies. UTCs have a 14 to 19 age range and are sponsored by a local university. Further education colleges and other educational institutions may also work in partnership with UTCs.

In her report, Professor Alison Wolf recommended an academic core to the pre-16 curriculum. Where technical academies or UTCs cover pre-16 education, they will provide this academic core, alongside technical studies, through a longer day and year. The Department has not specified how technical academies or UTCs should split students' time between academic and vocational or technical studies.

Work Experience

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the potential effects of the transition from the Young People's Learning Agency to the Education Funding Agency on access by school pupils to work experience in Autumn 2011; and if he will make a statement. [40804]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 14 February 2011]: Subject to the successful passage of the Education Bill currently before Parliament, the new Education Funding Agency

4 Apr 2011 : Column 717W

will take over the Young People's Learning Agency's funding responsibilities from 1 April 2012. In these circumstances, the proposed transition will not impact on access by school pupils to work experience in autumn 2011.

International Development

Burma: Politics and Government

Paul Blomfield: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether his Department has assessed the humanitarian needs of ethnic Kachin people relocated to the Myitsone Aung Mye Thar model village in Kachin state, Burma. [50552]

Mr Duncan: We are aware of many cases in Burma where people have been displaced as a result of conflict or to make way for development projects. Humanitarian needs are vast right across the country. The Department for International Development (DFID) is expanding its programme of assistance to the Burmese people significantly over the next four years, focusing on health, education, livelihoods of rural families, civil society and people affected by conflict. Our aid is provided through the United Nations, non-governmental organisations and civil society rather than the Burmese central Government.

Departmental Travel

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development on what date (a) he and (b) each other Minister in his Department last used a ministerial car while travelling in an official capacity; and how many times (i) he and (ii) each other Minister in his Department has travelled to their constituency in a ministerial car since May 2010. [50197]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) does not hold a central record of all journeys undertaken by Ministers and the mode of transport used. All travel is undertaken in accordance with the ministerial code. The Secretary of State, Parliamentary Under-Secretary-of State and I last travelled in a ministerial car on 4 April 2011.

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development (1) on what date (a) he and (b) each other Minister in his Department last travelled by (i) London Underground and (ii) public bus services on Government business; how many times (A) he and (B) each other Minister in his Department has travelled by each such form of transport on government business since May 2010; and if he will make a statement; [50084]

(2) how many of his ministerial team have been issued with (a) an Oyster card and (b) a (i) monthly and (ii) annual travel card valid on London Transport and paid for by his Department for use while travelling on Government business. [50175]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) does not hold a central record of all journeys undertaken by Ministers and the mode of transport used. All travel is undertaken in accordance with the ministerial code. Ministers have not been issued with Oyster or other travel cards, but do walk or cycle when possible.

4 Apr 2011 : Column 718W

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much his Department has spent on ministerial travel by (a) ministerial car, (b) train, (c) bus, (d) commercial aircraft and (e) private aircraft since May 2010. [50206]

Mr Duncan: Details of overseas travel by Ministers between 13 May and 30 September 2010 are available on the Department for International Development's (DFID's) website. Details of overseas travel between 1 October and 30 December 2010 will be published on the website shortly. DFID is unable to provide details of ministerial travel in the UK without incurring disproportionate cost. All travel is undertaken in accordance with the Ministerial Code.

Ivory Coast: Overseas Aid

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what humanitarian aid his Department is providing to the people of the Ivory Coast. [50863]

Mr O'Brien: In response to the humanitarian crisis in Ivory Coast, the UK has swiftly responded to the growing needs of its people. The British Government announced last week an urgent emergency aid package totalling £8 million to help tens of thousands of people in Ivory Coast affected by fierce fighting and violence. In addition the British Government have announced a further £8 million to Liberia to help with the refugee influx from the Ivory Coast. The UK also committed £1 million to Liberia for Ivorian refugees back in February.

The new funds provided by Britain to Ivory Coast and Liberia is planned to provide food, shelter, water and sanitation, treatment for malnutrition and basic services for over 90,000 people.

Japan: Humanitarian Aid

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent estimate he has made of the level of humanitarian aid to Japan provided by his Department following the earthquake of March 2011; and if he will make a statement. [50247]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: Japan is well equipped to deal with disasters, but the scale of the devastation caused by the recent earthquake and tsunami was unprecedented. In response, 134 countries including the UK offered humanitarian assistance. However, the decision as to which offers of assistance to accept correctly sits with the Government of Japan, who are best placed to co-ordinate the relief effort in conjunction with local partners. They have been doing a tremendous job in very difficult circumstances.

As a highly developed country, the gaps in humanitarian need that cannot be met by Japan itself are very specific. In addition to the request for the UK to send a search and rescue team, Japan asked the Department for International Development to deliver 100 tonnes of bottled water to Ibariki prefecture so that it could be mixed with baby food. This is being used to protect infants from absorbing potentially damaging levels of radiation leaked into water supplies from the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

4 Apr 2011 : Column 719W

Mali: Development Aid

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent steps his Department has taken to support (a) diversified lending and investment, (b) debt relief and (c) the achievement of the millennium development goals in Mali. [50280]

Mr O'Brien: The Department for International Development (DFID) supports Mali to achieve the millennium development goals through our contributions to multilateral development organisations, including the UN, World Bank and European Commission. In 2008-09, the UK’s share of multilateral spending in Mali was £38.67 million. The Global Poverty Action Fund, launched in October 2010, is open to applications from civil society organisations to work in the bottom 50 countries on the Human Development Index, including Mali.

DFID was an early supporter of the heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC) Initiative. On reaching completion point in 2003 Mali received debt relief totalling $0.9 billion through HIPC and $2 billion through the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI). The UK provided an additional £2.09 million in debt relief to Mali in 2006-07. Although Mali’s risk of debt distress is low, we encourage the Government of Mali to maintain sound debt and fiscal policies and to promote growth and economic diversification in line with IMF guidance.

Mali: Food

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment his Department has made of changes in the adequacy of food supply in Mali since 2010. [50279]

Mr O'Brien: Following a good harvest in late 2010, food availability forecasts across Mali are positive, with the majority of poor households being food secure. However, as the lean season approaches, food availability in the east of the country is likely to deteriorate.

The Department for International Development (DFID) will closely monitor the situation as it develops.

Overseas Aid

Mr Meacher: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding the UK

4 Apr 2011 : Column 720W

committed to spend as a result of each international conference on

(a)

climate change and

(b)

poverty in the last 10 years; and how much such funding has been spent in each case. [50072]

Mr Duncan: This information can be provided only at disproportionate cost. The coalition Government are clear that the UK will no longer make international promises in monetary terms. What matters is not the amount of money spent but the results delivered for poor people. That is why the Deputy Prime Minister, my right hon. Friend the Member for Sheffield, Hallam (Mr Clegg) and the Secretary of State for International Development, my right hon. Friend the Member for Sutton Coldfield (Mr Mitchell) made commitments such as saving the lives of at least 50,000 women in pregnancy and childbirth, a quarter of a million newborn babies and enable 10 million couples to access modern methods of family planning, at the Millennium Development Goals summit in New York last September.

Palestinians: Overseas Aid

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much aid his Department has provided to Gaza in each of the last five years. [50895]

Mr Duncan: It is not possible to fully disaggregate UK aid to Gaza from our total support to the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPTs). For example, our financial assistance to the Palestinian Authority (PA), via a World Bank Trust Fund, helps pay for basic services and salaries of public sector workers in both Gaza and the West Bank. In addition, our support to the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) helps provide basic services, such as education, healthcare and social services, to Palestinian refugees across the OPTs and the middle east.

The UK does not provide any support, either directly or indirectly, to the de facto authorities in Gaza. Under European Union and British legislation it is illegal to provide financial assistance to Hamas.

The following table shows, for each of the last five financial years, how much aid the UK provided to the PA, UNRWA, OPTs-wide projects that included a Gaza component, and humanitarian aid and funding for early recovery work to Gaza.

UK aid intervention 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07

Financial assistance to the Palestinian Authority (benefitting both Gaza and the west bank)

£30 million through World Bank Trust Fund

£38.5 million through World Bank Trust Fund

£23.5 million through World Bank Trust Fund

£38.45 million (£3 million through Temporary International Mechanism; £15.45 million through PEGASE; £20 million through World Bank Trust Fund)

£11.875 million through Temporary International Mechanism

           

Financial assistance to UNRWA (unless otherwise stated, this is core funding spent across the OPTs Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan

£27 million core funding

£19.93 million core funding plus £5 million specifically for education in Gaza

£19 million core funding

£15.6 million core funding

£15 million core funding

           

4 Apr 2011 : Column 721W

4 Apr 2011 : Column 722W

Projects across the OPTs with Gaza component

£1.47 million

£1.07 million

£0.63 million

£51,000

           

Humanitarian aid and early recovery work (Gaza only)

£5.2 million

£11.9 million

£13.3 million

£3 million

£0.23 million

Treasury

Banks

Mr Umunna: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make a oral statement to the House after the Easter Recess on the interim findings of the Independent Commission on Banking. [50131]

Mr Hoban [holding answer 31 March 2011]: The Government have no plans for a debate on the interim report of the Independent Commission on Banking. The Government welcome the progress that the Commission has made and look forward to receiving its final recommendations in September 2011.

Banks: Corporate Hospitality

Mrs Main: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what discussions he has had with banking institutions in which the Government has a stake on planned expenditure on corporate hospitality in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012. [50853]

Mr Hoban: The Chancellor of the Exchequer meets chief executives of UK banking institutions on a range of issues. It is not the Government’s practice to provide details of all such meetings and discussions.

Banks: Incentives

Mr Bain: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) if he will estimate the number of individuals likely to benefit from the exemption whereby trusts established by firms for the payment of bonuses in the banking industry may defer paying tax on such bonuses for between three to five years in each of the next four financial years; [50020]

(2) what his policy is on continuing the ability of trusts established to pay bonuses by firms in the banking industry to defer paying tax on such bonuses for between three and five years; [50124]

(3) if he will estimate the cost to the Exchequer of the exemption whereby trusts established to pay bonuses by firms in the banking industry may defer paying tax on such bonuses for between three and five years. [50125]

Mr Hoban: As part of the Government’s commitment to tackle tax avoidance, Finance Bill 2011 includes legislation to target arrangements involving intermediary vehicles, including trusts, put in place by employers to disguise remuneration or avoid restrictions on pensions tax relief. The Government have consulted widely and have given very careful consideration to ensuring that the legislation does not impact on responsible and sustainable remuneration structures where there is no tax avoidance motive.

Legislation in the 2011 Finance Bill will not apply to genuine deferrals of remuneration, subject to a five year limit. Taking account of genuine deferral will ensure consistent treatment with existing rules applying to rewards that are paid directly to the employee by the employer, but with the additional safeguard of the five year time limit.

Arrangements which are motivated by tax avoidance will be charged immediately to the full rate of tax under the new law.

No such estimates are available in relation to the exemptions mentioned in the hon. Member’s questions.

Mr Umunna: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer with reference to paragraph 16 of Project Merlin - Banks' Statement, whether the chief executive of each banking institution will forfeit their right to (a) a bonus and (b) an annual increase in base salary if the relevant lending targets are not met. [50161]

Mr Hoban: The banks have stated a capacity and willingness to lend £190 billion of new credit to business in 2011, up from £179 billion actual lending in 2010. If demand exceeds this, the banks will lend more. £76 billion of this new lending capacity will be to small and medium-sized enterprises.

These lending commitments will be part of the performance metrics of each bank's chief executive. If a bank does not meet the commitment, its chief executive will not receive the maximum pay and bonus as a result.

Child Tax Credit

Mr Bain: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the savings to his Department from the reduction in sums payable under the childcare element of working tax credit in each of the next four financial years. [50127]

Justine Greening: The latest estimate of the savings to HMRC from the reduction in sums payable under the child care element of working tax credit was published in chapter 2 (p.44) of the Budget 2011 document, available at

http://cdn.hm-treasury.gov.uk/2011budget_chapter2.pdf

Mr Bain: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will assess the likely effect on annual incomes of households to which the childcare element of working tax credit is to be reduced of circumstances where one spouse or partner is required to reduce their hours of employment in order to provide additional childcare in person. [50135]

4 Apr 2011 : Column 723W

Justine Greening: The reduction of child care support to 70% from 80% is part of a range of reforms to the tax credits system announced at the spending review. There are interactions between the measures so estimating the impact of just one measure does not give a clear indication of the full impact on households.

The Government published estimates of the distributional impact of the whole package of announced tax and benefit measures which can be found at:

http://cdn.hm-treasury.gov.uk/sr2010_annexb.pdf

Departmental Contracts

Tessa Munt: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what contracts his Department and its associated public bodies signed with Lockheed Martin in each of the last 10 years; and for what purposes each such contract was let. [50702]

Justine Greening: HM Treasury Group (including HM Treasury, the UK Debt Management Office, and the Asset Protection Agency) has not held any contracts with Lockheed Martin since financial year 2002-03. As a result of change in the Department’s finance and accounting systems, information for previous years could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Meetings

Chris Bryant: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what recent (a) representations he has received from and (b) discussions he has had with the Central Europe Trust; [49781]

(2) on how many occasions he has met Lord Lawson of Blaby in the course of his official duties since his appointment. [49857]

Justine Greening [holding answers 29 March 2011]:A list of Treasury Ministers’ meetings with outside interest groups is published quarterly on the Treasury website:

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/ministerial_meetings.htm

Treasury Ministers and officials meet representatives from a wide range of organisations and individuals in the public and private sector as part of the process of policy development and implementation. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government’s practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Welsh Economy

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he plans to take to rebalance the Welsh economy. [50313]

Danny Alexander: The Government set out in the Budget and in their Plan for Growth the steps they intend to take to rebalance the UK economy, including the Welsh economy. Measures that will benefit Wales include reducing corporation tax and tax simplification; support for SMEs including increasing finance for new start-ups and business growth; support for investment including the Green Investment Bank, reforms to UKTI, and sectoral support; and a more educated workforce including additional work experience placements. In devolved areas of policy it is for the Welsh Assembly Government to determine its own policies and priorities.

4 Apr 2011 : Column 724W

Financial Services

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent assessment he has made of the level of exposure of companies regulated by the Financial Services Authority to defaults relating to (a) government debt within the euro-zone, (b) household lending, (c) commercial property, (d) US residential and commercial property and (e) emerging markets; and if he will make a statement. [50248]

Mr Hoban: The Treasury works closely with the Bank of England and the FSA to monitor and manage risks to financial stability, including those posed by exposure to specific default risks. The authorities consider a wide range of scenarios and make contingency plans accordingly. In addition, the FSA stress tests institutions regularly to ensure they have sufficient capital to withstand severe financial and economic shocks. More details on the FSA stress testing process are available on the FSA website:

http://www.fsa.gov.uk/pages/About/What/International/stress_testing/index.shtml

A description of the FSA stress scenarios is provided in the "Prudential Risk Outlook", published in March 2011 by the FSA.

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what measures are in place to assess whether the banks participating in Project Merlin meet their commitment on levels of new credit to be made available to business in 2011; and what steps he plans to take if these commitments are not met. [50312]

Mr Hoban: The Bank of England will publish quarterly data on the banks' total new lending to businesses under the Project Merlin definition. The Government will consider the banks' performance against the commitment in due course.

FirstBuy Programme

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what discussions he has had with (a) mortgage providers and (b) the Council for Mortgage Lenders on the FirstBuy programme; and if he will make a statement. [50120]

Grant Shapps: I have been asked to reply.

The Council of Mortgage Lenders has welcomed the FirstBuy programme announced by the Chancellor in the Budget. My Officials meet with the council and lenders on a regular basis.

FirstBuy will be delivered by the Homes and Communities Agency who have had initial discussions with over 50 retail lenders regarding the scheme and further meetings will follow.

Fuel Prices

Alun Cairns: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what reports he has received of petrol stations which have not reduced the price of fuel following his Budget Statement on 23 March 2011. [51008]

4 Apr 2011 : Column 725W

Justine Greening: Based on established practice the Government’s expectation is that retailers should pass on duty changes to their customers. The Government routinely monitor pump price data and are taking note of other evidence.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Mr Bain: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will assess the effects on economic growth of the adoption of the recommendation of the Committee on Climate Change that the UK should aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 60 per cent. of 1990 levels by 2030. [50605]

Justine Greening: The Government are currently considering the recommendations in Committee on Climate Change’s report on the level of the fourth carbon budget (2023-27). Government are required by the Climate Change Act to set the level of the fourth carbon budget by June, taking into account a range of issues including economic and fiscal impacts. The Committee on Climate Change assessed the cost of implementing their recommendations, and concluded they would be less than 1% of GDP in 2025. This is in line with previous assessments of the cost of tackling climate change.

Home Owners

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he has assessed the merits of bringing forward proposals to assist home owners who are unable to move house due to (a) the state of the property market and (b) difficulty in securing lending; and if he will make a statement. [50119]

Mr Hoban: The Government recognise the importance of a sustainable mortgage market to support a stable housing market.

The Government are determined that creditworthy borrowers looking to buy a home or move should have access to affordable mortgages. Our tough action on the deficit will help keep market interest rates low. The Government are also working with the Financial Services Authority (FSA), the Bank of England and international authorities to maintain stability in the financial system. This will help ensure banks and building societies have access to the funds they need to lend.

Budget 2011 included a number of measures to encourage investment in the housing market and to assist first-time buyers. The Government’s Plan for Growth also set out

4 Apr 2011 : Column 726W

a number of reforms to the planning regime to help ensure that we increase rates of house building. This will be crucial to improving housing affordability over the medium term.

Housing: Valuation

Mr Betts: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what research his Department has undertaken on measures to evaluate for the purposes of taxation the monetary value of domestic properties. [50819]

Mr Gauke: No such research has been undertaken.

Aggregate information on the value of domestic properties is available for England from tables published by the Department of Communities and Local Government.

Income Tax

Mr Raab: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what proportion of income tax revenue was derived from the (a) first, (b) second and (c) third quartile of earners in (i) 1997-98 and (ii) 1998-99. [43795]

Mr Gauke [holding answer 3 March 2011]: Estimated proportions of income tax liabilities accounted for by individuals in the first, second and third quartiles of taxpayers by total income in 1997-98 and 1998-99 are provided as follows:

Percentage
Taxpayer quartile by total income Share of income tax liabilities 1997-98 Share of income tax liabilities 1998-99

1

3.3

2.8

2

9.7

9.4

3

19.6

19.0

These figures are based on the 1997-98 and 1998-99 Survey of Personal Incomes.

Similar estimates for 1999-2000 to 2007-08, and projections to 2010-11 are available on the HMRC website:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/stats/income_tax/table2-4.pdf

An error has been identified in the written answer provided on 15 February 2011, Official Report, columns 691-92W, to a related question, providing the percentage of income tax derived from the (a) top 1%, (b) top 5%, (c) top 10%, (d) top 25%, (e) lowest 50%, (f) lowest 25%, and (g) lowest 10%, of earners in 1998-99.

A corrected version of the information requested is provided in the following table.

Table 2.4: Shares of total income (before and after tax) and income tax for percentile groups, 1999-2000 to 2010-11, Taxpayers only
Percentage
  Lowest Lower Higher Highest
Percentile Groups (ranged on total income before tax) 1% 5% 10% 25% 50% 50% 25% 10% 5% 1%

Share of total income

                   

Before tax

                   

1999-2000

0.2

1.3

2.8

8.9

23.8

76.2

53.4

32.9

23.3

11.0

2000-01

0.2

1.2

2.7

8.5

23.2

76.8

54.1

33.7

24.0

11.5

2001-02

0.2

1.2

2.7

8.6

23.4

76.6

53.9

33.4

23.7

11.1

2002-03

0.2

1.2

2.7

8.6

23.5

76.5

53.7

33.1

23.3

10.8

2003-04

0.2

1.2

2.7

8.5

23.3

76.7

53.9

33.3

23.6

11.0

2004-05

0.2

1.2

2.7

8.4

22.9

77.1

54.4

33.6

23.8

11.3

4 Apr 2011 : Column 727W

4 Apr 2011 : Column 728W

2005-06

0.2

1.2

2.6

8.3

22.4

77.6

55.3

34.8

25.1

12.2

2006-07

0.2

1.2

2.6

8.2

22.2

77.8

55.8

35.5

25.8

12.9

2007-08

0.2

1.1

2.5

8.1

22.1

77.9

56.1

36.0

26.4

13.4

2008-09(1)

0.2

1.2

2.7

8.6

22.8

77.2

55.4

35.6

26.1

13.3

2009-10(1)

0.2

1.3

2.8

8.8

23.1

76.9

55.1

35.2

25.8

13.1

2010-11(1)

0.2

1.3

2.8

8.8

23.1

76.9

54.8

34.8

25.2

12.4

                     

After tax

                   

1999-2000

0.3

1.5

3.4

10.2

26.4

73.6

50.0

29.3

19.9

8.8

2000-01

0.3

1.5

3.2

9.9

25.8

74.2

50.6

29.8

20.4

9.2

2001-02

0.3

1.5

3.2

9.9

26.0

74.0

50.3

29.5

20.0

8.9

2002-03

0.3

1.5

3.2

10.0

26.1

73.9

50.1

29.2

19.7

8.6

2003-04

0.3

1.4

3.2

9.8

25.9

74.1

50.4

29.5

20.1

8.9

2004-05

0.3

1.4

3.2

9.8

25.5

74.5

50.8

29.7

20.3

9.1

2005-05

0.3

1.4

3.1

9.6

25.1

74.9

51.7

30.8

21.3

9.9

2006-07

0.3

1.4

3.1

9.6

24.9

75.1

52.1

31.4

22.0

10.5

2007-08

0.2

1.4

3.1

9.5

24.8

75.2

52.4

31.8

22.5

10.9

2008-09(1)

03

1.5

3.2

9.9

25.3

74.7

51.9

31.4

22.1

10.7

2009-10(1)

0.3

1.5

3.3

10.1

25.6

74.4

51.5

31.2

21.9

10.5

2010-11(1)

0.3

1.5

3.3

10.2

25.8

74.2

50.9

30.1

20.7

9.2

                     

Share of total tax

                   

1999-2000

0.1

0.3

2.4

11.6

88.4

69.5

50.3

39.6

21.3

2000-01

0.1

0.3

2.2

11.3

88.7

70.3

51.5

40.7

22.2

2001-02

0.1

0.3

2.2

11.1

88.9

70.8

51.9

40.8

21.8

2002-03

0.1

0.3

2.2

11.1

88.9

70.5

51.5

40.2

21.0

2003-04

0.1

0.3

2.2

11.2

88.8

70.1

50.9

39.8

20.8

2004-05

0.1

0.3

2.1

10.8

89.2

70.7

51.4

40.3

21.4

2005-06

0.1

0.3

2.1

10.6

89.4

71.5

52.9

41.9

22.7

2006-07

0.1

0.3

2.1

10.5

89.5

71.8

53.5

42.6

23.5

2007-08

0.1

0.3

2.1

10.4

89.6

72.2

54.3

43.4

24.4

2008-09(1)

0.1

0.6

2.8

11.4

88.6

71.7

54.6

44.0

24.9

2009-10(1)

0.1

0.6

2.8

11.4

88.6

71.5

54.3

44.0

25.1

2010-11(1)

0.1

0.5

2.6

11.0

89.0

72.3

55.5

45.3

26.6

“—” = Negligible. (1) Projected estimates based upon the 2007-08 Survey of Personal Incomes using economic assumptions consistent with the OBR’s November 2010 economic and fiscal outlook. These projections fall outside the scope of National Statistics. Source: Survey of Personal Incomes