Classroom Assistants: Finance

Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he plans to announce the allocation of the (a) work force modernisation and (b) higher level teaching assistant grant for local authorities. [39949]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 11 February 2011]: The Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA) wrote to directors of children’s services on 30 June to notify them that:

the work force modernisation and developments grants would not be paid beyond November 2010 and

the support staff training and qualification grant (which included funding for the training of higher level teaching assistants) would not be paid during 2010-11.

This is consistent with the White Paper we published in November 2010 “The Importance of Teaching” which stated that head teachers were best placed to decide how to develop and deploy school support staff.

28 Feb 2011 : Column 257W

College of Social Work: Social Care Institute for Excellence

Julie Hilling: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will investigate the use of funds allocated by his Department to the Social Care Institute for Excellence and the Interim Board of the College of Social Work for the establishment of the College of Social Work. [36594]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 7 February 2011]: Following the publication of the Social Work Task Force report, the Department for Education committed to match £2.5 million of funding made available by the Department of Health to support the establishment of an independent, national college of social work. This Department’s funds have not yet been allocated and officials are in discussions regarding the appropriate time that further funds will need to be made available to meet the emerging business development plan. Both Departments have recently investigated concerns raised with us in relation to the college’s use of public funds and are reassured that there is no actual or proposed misuse.

Julie Hilling: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what role he plans the Social Care Institute for Excellence to have in the operation of the College of Social Work. [36596]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 7 February 2011]: The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) has been asked to facilitate the establishment of the College of Social Work, providing administrative support and expertise in a developmental phase of two years. Neither Government nor SCIE seek to influence the form or function of the emerging college. SCIE will have no role in the governance of the college that emerges.

College of Social Work: Unison

Andy Burnham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what discussions his Department had with other organisations before awarding Unison a contract for trade union services to the College of Social Work. [36268]

Tim Loughton: The Department does not seek to influence any partnership agreements the college might establish once it emerges from the current development stage and has not entered into any agreements or contracts with Unison or any other organisation on membership or trade union services.

The establishment process for the college was guided from January to September 2010 by a development group with representation from across the social work sector, including frontline practitioners, employer representatives, regulators, educators, work force organisations and the British Association of Social Workers, Unison and Aspect. Since September interim co-chairs and an interim board have been appointed who are taking forward this work and have maintained links with all parties.

28 Feb 2011 : Column 258W

Curriculum

Simon Hart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he expects his Department’s review of the national curriculum to be completed. [40309]

Mr Gibb: The review of the national curriculum for England is being conducted in two phases. We intend to publish new programmes of study for English, mathematics, science and physical education in autumn 2012, with the first teaching in maintained schools from September 2013. New programmes of study for all other subjects that are to form part of the new national curriculum will be published by September 2013, with teaching in maintained schools from September 2014.

Further details are in the remit for the review, a copy of which is in the House Libraries.

Departmental Allowances

Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how long on average he spends managing expenses and allowances claims; and if he will make a statement. [24520]

Tim Loughton: My ministerial colleagues and I follow the Department’s policy, rules and guidance on expenses and allowances in the course of our official duties. However, the information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Photographs

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much his Department has spent on photography since May 2010. [35828]

Tim Loughton: Since May 2010, the Department has spent £7,306.48 on photography.

Departmental Press Releases

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education on how many occasions his Department has provided embargoed media briefings prior to an oral statement to the House since 26 May 2010; in respect of how many such briefings his Department was informed that the embargo had been breached; what steps were taken as a result of each such breach; and on how many occasions his Department has provided media briefings without an embargo prior to an oral statement to the House since 26 May 2010. [31917]

Tim Loughton: The Department has not provided embargoed briefings during the requested period.

Departmental Redundancy

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many staff in his Department have been made redundant since May 2010; and how much it has spent on redundancy costs. [36151]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 25 January 2011]: The Department has made no compulsory redundancies since May 2010. The Department has, however, reduced

28 Feb 2011 : Column 259W

its headcount through voluntary early release and since May 2010 there have been 150 approved staff releases at a cost of £8.4 million.

Departmental Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what regulations his Department has removed since 6 May 2010. [37370]

28 Feb 2011 : Column 260W

Tim Loughton: In the period 6 May 2010 to 26 January 2011 the Department for Education has revoked a number of regulatory statutory instruments or significant parts of statutory instruments. These are detailed in the following table. However, as indicated by the third column of the table, in some cases the content of the revoked statutory instrument has been largely replaced.

Regulations revoked Revoking instrument Comments

The Children (Leaving Care) (England) Regulations 2001

The Care Leavers (England) Regulations 2010

Revoked but replaced. Coming into force 1 April 2011.

The Education (Independent School Standards) (England) Regulations 2003 (as amended)

The Education (Independent School Standards) (England) Regulations 2010

Revoked but replaced.

The Education (Prescribed Public Examinations) Regulations 1989

The Education (Prescribed Public Examinations) (England) Regulations 2010

Revoked so far as they applied to maintained schools in England, but replaced.

The National Care Standards Commission (Registration) Regulations 2001

The Care Standards Act 2000 (Registration) (England) Regulations 2010

Revoked but replaced.

The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 (Appropriate Officer and Schedule 7 Prescribed Persons) Regulations 2010

The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 (Appropriate Officer and Schedule 7 Prescribed Persons) (Revocation) Regulations 2010

 

The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 (Supervisory Authorities and Devolution Alignment) Order 2010

The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 (Supervisory Authorities and Devolution Alignment) (Amendment) Order 2010

The devolution alignment aspect of the Order was revoked.

The Education (School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions) Order 2009

The School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Order 2010

Revoked but replaced.

The Education (Pupil Referral Units) (Application of Enactments) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

The Education (Pupil Referral Units) (Application of Enactments) (England) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2010

 

The School Information (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

The School Information (England) (Amendment) (Revocation) Regulations 2010

 

The School Governance (Transition from an Interim Executive Board) (England) Regulations 2004

The School Governance (Transition from an Interim Executive Board) (England) Regulations 2010

Revoked but replaced.

The Children’s Trust Board (Children and Young People’s Plan) (England) Regulations 2010

The Children’s Trust Board (Children and Young People’s Plan) (England) (Revocation) Regulations 2010

 

The Education (Local Authority Performance Targets) (England) Regulations 2005 (along with four sets of Regulations which amended the 2005 Regulations)

The Education (Local Authority and School Performance Targets) (Revocation and Amendment) (England) Regulations 2010

Coming into force 30 January 2011.

Regulations 3 and 4 of the Education (School Attendance Targets) (England) Regulations 2007

The Education (School Attendance Targets) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

 

The Education (Provision of Information by Independent Schools) (England) Regulations 2003 (along with a set of Regulations which amended the 2003 Regulations)

The Education (Independent Educational Provision in England) (Provision of Information) Regulations 2010

Revoked but replaced.

Departmental Senior Civil Servants

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the (a) names and (b) salaries are of each senior civil servant who has (i) joined, (ii) moved posts within and (iii) left his Department since May 2010. [36498]

Tim Loughton [holding answer 27 January 2011]: The information for the Department is set out in the following tables:

Appointments (includes new appointees and promotions into senior civil service)
Name (1) (at director level and above only) Gross basic salary

Deputy director

£70,000-£74,999

 

£65,000-£69,999

 

£60,000-£64,999

   

Simon Parkes

£135,000-£139,999

Departures (including terminations, transfers to other Government Departments, outward secondments and loans out and others who can return to the Department, e.g. on career break)
Name (1) (at director level and above only) Gross basic salary

Deputy director

£70,000-£74,999

 

£80,000-£84,999

 

£60,000-£64,999

 

£90,000-£94,999

 

£75,000-£79,999

 

£65,000-£69,999

   

Michael Hearty

£90,000-£94,999

Ian Taylor

£125,00-£129,999

(1) Senior civil service naming and salary protocols are based on the latest published Transparency Agenda exercise criteria.

Departmental Travel

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much has been spent on travel by officials of his Department since May 2010. [35205]

28 Feb 2011 : Column 261W

Tim Loughton: The total amount spent on staff travel since May 2010 is £2,171,487 and includes all travel costs incurred between May 2010 and January 2011.

The corresponding staff travel figure for May 2009 to January 2010 is £4,023,795.

Departmental Written Questions

John Hemming: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 11 January 2011, Official Report, columns 292-3W, on social services: children, what audit work Ofsted performed after 23 November 2010 to provide an answer to the question tabled by the hon. Member for Birmingham, Yardley; how many staff at each grade were involved; how much staff time the audit took; and what errors were identified in the data originally prepared for the answer. [36175]

Tim Loughton: This is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 31 January 2011:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

An explanation of the context to the relevant data gathering may be helpful. Prior to receipt of PQ 025834, Ofsted was already carrying out an audit of all our serious childcare incident data dating back to 1 April 2007, The data requested in PQ 025634 covered very similar ground to this audit review, staff worked on the two processes together, and answering the PQ accurately was reliant on the audit being completed. As a result the work on PQ 025634 cannot be separated entirely from the wider ongoing audit. However, we have estimated the amount of time dedicated specifically to the PQ after 23 November 2010.

After 23 November 2010, Ofsted continued to audit data in respect of PQ 025634 dating back to April 2007, These data are stored in different formats and locations, and officials carefully and systematically cross-examined them to ensure there were no errors or duplication. This took one member of staff at Band A (grade 7) half a day, six staff at B1 (Senior Executive Officer) grade a total of eight and a half days and one member of staff at B2 (Higher Executive Officer) grade one day. The total staff time spent is therefore eight staff for a total of ten days.

Four errors were identified and corrected during the audit process. They all related to inaccurate recording or calculation of the ages of children.

I hope this is helpful and clarifies the work we have undertaken in this area. A copy of this reply has been sent to Tim Loughton MP, Minister for Children and Families, and will be placed in the library of both Houses.

Education Maintenance Allowance

Mr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what progress his Department is making in developing an alternative to the education maintenance allowance. [35617]

Mr Gibb: We are currently working with school, college and training organisation representatives and others, including the Sutton Trust, to develop the arrangements for a package of financial support which is more closely targeted on those young people who face the greatest financial barriers to participation.

Mr Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether he has made an assessment of the cost to the public purse of terminating the education

28 Feb 2011 : Column 262W

maintenance allowance (EMA), including

(a)

any penalty clause for the termination of the EMA element of his Department's learner support services contract with Capita and

(b)

any staff costs; and if he will make a statement. [38934]

Mr Gibb: We are working with the Young People’s Learning Agency, which administers the education maintenance allowance scheme on behalf of the Department for Education, to assess any costs that may arise from the reduction in value of Capita’s contract. Peter Lauener, the YPLA’s chief executive, has responded separately to the hon. Member on the question regarding penalty payments and staff costs, and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Peter Lauener, dated 11 February 2011:

I am writing in response to your Parliamentary Question PQ38934.

The contract with Capita currently supports a number of learner support schemes in addition to Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA) so the decision to end EMAs will not trigger termination of the contract and there will therefore be no consequent liability to pay a penalty.

This is however a significant change to the scale of the contract with Capita and we have begun commercial discussions with Capita as to the costs involved in reducing the scale of their operation. These costs are likely to involve staff redundancies in Capita as a result of the end of EMA. These negotiations will also cover the need for on-going delivery of the remaining schemes.

As you will appreciate, I cannot anticipate the outcome of these commercial negotiations, which are likely to take several months to complete.

Mr Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much funding has been allocated under each budget heading under his Department's Learner Support Services contract with Capita between 2009 and 2013; and what proportion of the contract is allocated to delivering education maintenance allowance. [38935]

Mr Gibb: This is a matter for the Young People's Learning Agency (YPLA) who operate the education maintenance allowance for the Department for Education. Peter Lauener, the YPLA's chief executive, has written to the hon. Member for Blaydon with the information requested and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Peter Lauener, dated 11 February 2011:

I am writing in response to your Parliamentary Question PQ38935 that asked:

“How much funding has been allocated under each budget heading under his Department's Learner Support Services contract with Capita between 2009 and 2013; and what proportion of the contract is allocated to delivering education maintenance allowance.”

The budgets for the administration of each scheme under the Learner Support contract with Capita for 2009-10 and 2010-11 are as follows;

£
Learner support schemes 2009-10 Budget 2010-11 Budget

EMA

35,000,000

25,000,000

Adult Learning Grant

4,500,000

3,300,000

Care to Learn

4,275,000

1,500,000

Dance and Drama Awards

100,000

200,000

Sixth Form College Childcare

335,000

100,000

28 Feb 2011 : Column 263W

Residential Support Scheme

335,000

120,000

Free Childcare for Training and Learning for Work

4,000,000

1,120,500

Professional and Career Development Loans

n/a

1,000,000

There are differing levels of administrative complexity across the schemes and this is reflected in the budget required for each scheme. 77.3% of the budget for the contract is attributed to EMA in 2010-11.

The amounts budgeted for 2011-12 (and 2012-13) are still to be determined and are dependent on the shape and size of the service for these periods.

Education: Worcestershire

Mr Robin Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what information his Department holds on the levels of (a) dedicated schools grant, (b) pupil premium funding and (c) funding for nursery provision in Worcestershire in 2010-11. [37491]

Mr Gibb: Worcestershire's dedicated schools grant is worth £297.478 million in 2010-11, based on a per pupil amount of £4,027.71.

The pupil premium will be introduced from April 2011 and will be worth:

£430 for each pupil known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM);

£430 for each looked after child; and

£200 for each service child.

No funding is available for the pupil premium in 2010-11. The January 2010 pupil count allows an estimate of the number of pupils known to be eligible for FSM to be made. Based on the January pupil count, Worcestershire would receive an estimated pupil premium of £3.8 million. However, the pupil premium for 2011-12 could be higher or lower depending on actual pupil numbers in January 2011.

Worcestershire have budgeted to spend £14 million on children on early years provision in 2010-11, as recorded on their 2010-11 Section 251 Budget Statement.

English Baccalaureate

Kwasi Kwarteng: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will assess the merits of increasing the range of subjects that would satisfy the humanities requirement of the English Baccalaureate to include religious studies alongside history and geography. [38191]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 7 February 2011]: For the purposes of the 2010 performance tables the humanities element of the English Baccalaureate measure was either history or geography. We have not included religious education (RE) as fulfilling the humanity requirement of the English Baccalaureate because it is already a compulsory subject. One of the intentions of the English Baccalaureate is to encourage wider take up of geography and history in addition to, rather than instead of, compulsory RE.

28 Feb 2011 : Column 264W

However we recognise, as many schools do, the benefits that religious education can bring to pupils. This is why the teaching of RE remains compulsory throughout a pupil’s schooling. Success in all subjects studied at GCSE will also continue to be recognised by other performance table measures, as it has in the past. We are open to arguments about how we can further improve the measures in the performance tables and will review the precise definition of the English Baccalaureate for the 2011 tables.

Free Schools

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which applications to become free schools have been (a) successful and (b) unsuccessful. [37039]

Mr Gibb: As at 29 January 2011, eight proposals to open a free school have been given approval to pre-opening stage, the final stage in the approval process. These schools are as follows:

ARK Conway, Hammersmith and Fulham

Discovery New School, West Sussex

Etz Chaim, Barnet

The Free School, Norwich

l-Foundation, Leicester City

St Luke’s Church of England Primary School, Camden

Stour Valley Community School in Suffolk

Woodpecker Hall, Enfield

A further 27 proposals have been given approval to proceed to the preceding business case and plan stage and their full plans will be considered in due course.

60 proposals have so far been unsuccessful.

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much he plans to allocate to each free school to develop projects. [40240]

Mr Gibb: Support for all free school projects is considered and approved on a case by case basis, based on the needs of each individual project.

Emma Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many proposals for free schools have been made in the Black Country. [39679]

Mr Gibb: As at 9 February 2011, we have received three proposals from groups and individuals within the four Black Country local authorities (Dudley, Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton).

Further Education: Absenteeism

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of students in further education were persistent absentees in each year since 2004. [39139]

Mr Gibb [holding answer 8 February 2011]:Information on pupils who were persistent absentees is not collected for further education establishments. The Department collects information on pupil absence for pupils aged 5 to 15 at the start of the school year from maintained primary, secondary, all special schools, city technology colleges and academies.

28 Feb 2011 : Column 265W

Information on absence can be found in Statistical First Release 07/2010 “Pupil Absence in Schools in England, Including Pupil Characteristics: 2008/09” at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000918/index.shtml

GCSE

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average number of GCSE entries was per student reaching the end of school year 11 in maintained schools in academic year (a) 1996-97 and (b) 2009-10. [27598]

Mr Gibb: In 1997, the average number of GCSE entries among pupils in maintained schools aged 15 at the start of the academic year was 8.33.

In 2010, the average number of GCSE entries among pupils in maintained schools at the end of key stage 4 was 7.69.

Short courses have been counted as half a GCSE entry and double courses as two entries.

Prior to 2005, statistics were based on pupils aged 15. In 2005, statistics based on pupils reaching the end of

28 Feb 2011 : Column 266W

key stage 4 were introduced, which aimed to take better account of the attainment of pupils learning at different rates. Since 2009, all figures have been based exclusively on pupils reaching the end of key stage 4.

Source:

School and College Performance Tables.

Mr Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which were the 100 lowest performing schools on the basis of proportion of students gaining five A* to C GCSEs including English and mathematics in the latest period for which figures are available; and in which local authority area each such school is located. [30671]

Mr Gibb: The following table shows the lowest performing schools, based on the percentage of pupils achieving five or more GCSEs at grades A* to C (or equivalent) including English and Mathematics GCSEs, by local authority. The table lists only those open maintained mainstream schools (including city technology colleges and academies, but excluding hospital schools and pupil referral units) with results published in the 2010 School and College Performance Tables with more than 10 pupils on roll at the end of Key Stage 4.

Local authority School Percentage of pupils achieving five or more GCSEs at grades A* to C (or equivalent) including English and Mathematics GCSEs

North East

   

Middlesbrough

Unity City Academy

28

Newcastle upon Tyne

All Saints College

21

Newcastle upon Tyne

Excelsior Academy

25

Northumberland

Bedlingtonshire Community High School

30

Northumberland

Northumberland CofE Academy

28

Redcar and Cleveland

Gillbrook College

23

Redcar and Cleveland

Redcar Community College A Specialist Visual and Performing Arts Centre

28

Sunderland

Academy 360

21

Sunderland

Red House Academy

30

     

North West

   

Blackburn with Darwen

Blakewater College

26

Blackpool

Beacon Hill High School Business and Enterprise College

28

Bury

Radcliffe Riverside School

29

Cumbria

Beacon Hill Community School

28

Knowsley

Huyton Arts and Sports Centre for Learning (Community)

30

Lancashire

Fulwood Academy

29

Lancashire

Shuttleworth College

23

Lancashire

Skerton Community High School

29

Liverpool

Parklands High School

23

Liverpool

Shorefields School

28

Manchester

Manchester Creative and Media Academy for Boys

28

Manchester

Manchester Enterprise Academy

27

St Helens

Newton-le-Willows Community High School

30

Wigan

PEMBEC High School

23

Wirral

Rock Ferry High School

29

     

Yorkshire and the Humber

   

Barnsley

Carlton Community College

27

Barnsley

Priory School and Sports College

30

Barnsley

The Dearne High—A Specialist Humanities College

30

Bradford

Aire Valley School

27

28 Feb 2011 : Column 267W

28 Feb 2011 : Column 268W

Bradford

Belle Vue Boys’ School

29

Bradford

Bradford Academy

24

Bradford

Dixons Allerton Academy

27

Calderdale

Park Lane Learning Trust

23

Calderdale

St Catherine’s Catholic High School

30

Doncaster

De Warenne Academy

30

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

David Lister School

26

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

Endeavour High School

30

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

Sir Henry Cooper School

21

Leeds

Primrose High School

25

Leeds

South Leeds Academy

29

Leeds

Swallow Hill Community College

24

Sheffield

Abbeydale Grange School

23

Sheffield

Chaucer Business and Enterprise College

30

Sheffield

Parkwood Academy

28

     

East Midlands

   

Derby

Sinfin Community School

26

Leicester

New College Leicester

28

Leicester

Riverside Business and Enterprise College

30

Lincolnshire

Gleed Boys' School

27

Lincolnshire

Haven High Technology College

28

Lincolnshire

Saint Bede’s Catholic Science College

20

Lincolnshire

The Mablethorpe Tennyson High

28

Northamptonshire

Weston Favell School

27

Nottingham

Hadden Park High School

27

Nottingham

Nottingham University Samworth Academy

21

Nottinghamshire

The Queen Elizabeth’s (1561) Endowed School

30

     

West Midlands

   

Coventry

Barr’s Hill School and Community College

29

Sandwell

St Michael’s CofE High School

30

Solihull

The Archbishop Grimshaw Catholic School

30

Staffordshire

Hagley Park Sports College

22

Stoke-on-Trent

James Brindley High School

30

Walsall

Blue Coat Church of England Comprehensive School A Performing Arts Specialist College

30

Walsall

Frank F Harrison Engineering College

24

Walsall

Sneyd Community School

27

Worcestershire

Tudor Grange Academy Worcester

28

     

East of England

   

Cambridgeshire

Coleridge Community College

29

Cambridgeshire

Thomas Clarkson Community College

27

Bedfordshire, Central

All Saints Academy Dunstable

29

Essex

Furtherwick Park School

29

Essex

St Peter’s Church of England and Specialist Arts College

19

Hertfordshire

The Bushey Academy

21

Norfolk

City Academy Norwich

26

Norfolk

The Hewett School

28

Peterborough

The Voyager School

24

Suffolk

Newmarket College

29

Thurrock

The Grays School Media Arts College

30

     

London

   

Haringey

Greig City Academy

30

Lewis ham

Prendergast—Ladywell Fields College

29

Newham

Eastlea Community School

29

Greenwich

The Eltham Foundation School

28

Hounslow

Hounslow Manor School

28

Merton

St Marks Church of England Academy

23

28 Feb 2011 : Column 269W

28 Feb 2011 : Column 270W

     

South East

   

Buckinghamshire

Aylesbury Vale Academy

26

Hampshire

Everest Community College

17

Hampshire

Oak Farm Community School

27

Kent

Angley School—A Sports College

28

Kent

Astor College for the Arts

30

Kent

Aylesford School—Sports College

27

Kent

Folkestone Academy

25

Kent

The Charles Dickens School

28

Kent

The Isle of Sheppey Academy

30

Kent

The Malling School

26

Kent

The Marlowe Academy

14

Medway

Strood Academy

29

Milton Keynes

Leon School and Sports College

25

Milton Keynes

The Milton Keynes Academy

19

Portsmouth

Charter Academy

24

Reading

John Madejski Academy

28

Southampton

Chamberlayne College for the Arts

30

Southampton

Oasis Academy Mayfield

29

Southampton

Woodlands Community College

30

West Sussex

The Regis School

30

     

South West

   

Bristol, City of

Merchants’ Academy

25

Bristol, City of

Oasis Academy Brightstowe

29

Bristol, City of

Oasis Academy Bristol

29

Plymouth

Sir John Hunt Community Sports College

28

Poole

Carter Community School

23

Source: 2010 School and College Performance Tables.

Mr Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of children have achieved five A* to C GCSEs, including English and mathematics, in (a) England and (b) each local authority area in each year from 1997 to 2010. [30672]

Mr Gibb: The information requested is given in the following table:

Percentage of 15-year-old pupils (1) achieving 5+ A*-C grades inc. English and Mathematics at GCSE and equivalent. Years: 1996/97 to 1999/2000 (2) (final)

1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/2000 (3)

(a) England (maintained sector)(4)

32.5

34.0

39.4

37.3

         

(b) Local authority/Government office region

       

North East

28.0

28.4

30.8

32.9

Darlington

28.1

28.1

32.7

37.3

Durham

27.4

27.8

29.7

31.8

Gateshead

31.5

32.1

34.0

35.1

Hartlepool

19.6

24.5

29.3

26.6

Middlesbrough

21.0

19.4

23.8

26.3

Newcastle upon Tyne

24.9

25.0

27.5

27.9

North Tyneside

31.0

30.7

32.7

34.6

Northumberland

34.2

36.5

37.3

40.8

Redcar and Cleveland

30.0

29.4

35.1

35.6

South Tyneside

27.3

30.8

32.4

33.0

Stockton-on-Tees

28.9

30.1

30.9

35.8

Sunderland

26.1

22.7

26.0

28.4

         

North West

32.2

32.9

35.1

36.7

Blackburn with Darwen

(5)

27.6

26.8

31.2

Blackpool

(5)

24.9

27.5

28.8

Bolton

30.3

30.6

33.3

32.6

28 Feb 2011 : Column 271W

28 Feb 2011 : Column 272W

Bury

37.3

39.5

44.4

45.0

Former Cheshire

37.5

(5)

(5)

(5)

Cheshire

(5)

42.4

43.7

46.6

Cumbria

33.4

33.6

37.0

38.9

Halton

(5)

24.7

28.9

29.7

Knowsley

14.6

14.4

17.4

16.6

Former Lancashire

34.6

(5)

(5)

(5)

Lancashire

(5)

38.2

39.8

41.3

Liverpool

23.8

24.5

26.6

28.3

Manchester

19.1

20.9

22.5

23.0

Oldham

27.4

27.5

30.7

31.8

Rochdale

25.3

26.1

29.7

29.4

Salford

22.1

24.1

25.0

25.0

Sefton

35.6

34.7

39.2

39.3

St. Helens

30.0

30.6

34.2

37.6

Stockport

40.8

40.3

41.0

43.0

Tameside

28.5

29.1

30.6

32.0

Trafford

44.3

45.5

47.1

50.0

Warrington

(5)

36.2

37.9

40.5

Wigan

34.6

33.3

34.7

36.5

Wirral

35.3

35.0

36.9

39.4

         

Yorkshire and the Humber

28.8

29.9

31.6

33.2

Barnsley

21.0

22.6

25.0

25.8

Bradford

20.8

22.8

24.6

25.2

Calderdale

29.4

31.7

33.4

34.6

Doncaster

24.8

24.7

27.9

28.2

East Riding of Yorkshire

34.2

36.4

39.4

40.1

Kingston upon Hull, City of

14.8

16.8

15.8

19.0

Kirklees

30.5

29.7

31.7

33.8

Leeds

28.5

29.7

31.3

33.0

North East Lincolnshire

22.8

24.1

27.6

27.0

North Lincolnshire

30.2

32.7

32.9

35.6

North Yorkshire

42.7

44.3

46.3

47.9

Rotherham

27.8

28.0

31.1

31.3

Sheffield

29.3

29.9

29.0

32.5

Wakefield

28.2

30.0

31.6

33.7

York

41.0

38.7

40.2

41.9

         

East Midlands

31.9

33.1

35.1

36.1

Derby

26.7

26.1

31.2

31.4

Derbyshire

33.6

35.6

39.0

40.6

Leicester

24.8

26.3

29.5

25.9

Leicestershire

34.8

35.1

37.3

38.8

Lincolnshire

39.3

39.4

40.8

42.7

Northamptonshire

31.3

33.8

35.2

36.5

Nottingham

(5)

18.5

18.9

19.4

Former Nottinghamshire

28.0

(5)

(5)

(5)

Nottinghamshire

(5)

32.9

32.9

34.2

Rutland

40.7

35.2

44.6

45.4

         

West Midlands

30.1

31.2

33.8

35.1

Birmingham

25.0

25.9

28.6

31.3

Coventry

27.1

28.2

30.3

31.7

Dudley

31.4

33.4

35.8

37.0

Hereford and Worcester

34.8

(5)

(5)

(5)

Herefordshire

(5)

37.8

41.7

43.1

Sandwell

17.7

18.7

21.3

21.4

Former Shropshire

37.0

(5)

(5)

(5)

Shropshire

(5)

43.3

44.4

45.4

Solihull

38.6

39.6

39.1

43.9

Staffordshire

34.5

34.3

37.8

38.1

Stoke-on-Trent

22.5

24.6

27.3

26.1

Telford and Wrekin

(5)

33.4

36.6

38.2

28 Feb 2011 : Column 273W

28 Feb 2011 : Column 274W

Walsall

25.4

25.8

28.9

29.3

Warwickshire

34.9

36.2

38.1

39.9

Wolverhampton

23.3

25.8

30.2

30.5

Worcestershire

(5)

35.6

38.1

39.2

         

East of England

35.4

38.0

39.5

40.4

Bedfordshire(4)

33.9

35.0

35.9

38.2

Former Cambridgeshire

34.9

(5)

(5)

(5)

Cambridgeshire

(5)

39.7

41.5

41.4

Former Essex

35.0

(5)

(5)

(5)

Essex

(5)

38.2

39.5

40.6

Hertfordshire

41.5

44.8

45.9

46.9

Luton

23.3

26.1

26.8

28.8

Norfolk

34.0

36.5

37.3

37.7

Peterborough

(5)

32.0

32.2

31.4

Southend-on-Sea

(5)

40.7

44.6

44.3

Suffolk

33.6

36.0

39.8

40.5

Thurrock

(5)

23.7

26.5

29.1

         

London

29.9

32.4

33.9

35.1

Inner London

21.4

22.8

24.3

25.5

Camden

35.1

34.6

35.0

38.6

Hackney

17.3

16.9

18.1

22.8

Hammersmith and Fulham

32.5

35.0

38.7

37.7

Haringey

17.9

19.9

22.0

21.8

Islington

16.5

15.6

20.2

17.5

Kensington and Chelsea

28.0

29.5

31.4

37.4

Lambeth

18.6

19.7

22.9

20.5

Lewisham

19.4

22.2

23.6

24.9

Newham

23.2

23.9

24.2

23.1

Southwark

17.1

18.2

19.9

21.6

Tower Hamlets

15.0

17.7

20.3

20.5

Wandsworth

23.2

26.3

25.8

31.2

Westminster

22.5

24.8

25.3

27.5

         

Outer London

33.8

37.0

38.3

39.6

Barking and Dagenham

22.0

22.5

24.1

26.5

Barnet

42.2

46.7

47.2

47.7

Bexley

35.6

37.7

39.2

40.8

Brent

30.1

34.9

33.4

38.2

Bromley

42.5

45.5

47.5

50.2

Croydon

28.4

30.2

32.0

32.2

Ealing

28.2

32.9

32.9

33.2

Enfield

31.4

33.4

36.5

35.0

Greenwich

19.9

23.3

22.8

22.9

Harrow

40.0

41.9

44.2

45.8

Havering

37.9

39.7

43.6

45.6

Hillingdon

30.1

33.9

35.4

36.6

Hounslow

31.3

36.1

36.3

36.4

Kingston upon Thames

44.7

48.7

46.5

52.3

Mellon

30.1

31.2

33.3

32.9

Redbridge

39.3

44.3

46.5

47.6

Richmond upon Thames

36.5

40.4

42.1

41.5

Sutton

47.3

51.2

52.8

56.2

Waltham Forest

25.0

27.6

28.3

30.0

         

South East

37.2

38.9

40.9

42.1

Berkshire

40.0

(5)

(5)

(5)

Bracknell Forest

(5)

37.7

38.1

38.6

Brighton and Hove

27.1

29.6

32.1

33.2

Buckinghamshire

50.4

51.0

53.5

53.5

East Sussex

33.3

35.6

37.0

40.2

Hampshire

37.6

40.1

42.3

44.1

Isle of Wight

32.0

28.5

34.8

33.9

28 Feb 2011 : Column 275W

28 Feb 2011 : Column 276W

Former Kent

37.5

(5)

(5)

(5)

Kent

(5)

40.5

42.0

42.7

Medway

36.4

37.8

36.6

Milton Keynes

21.9

22.0

23.3

25.9

Oxfordshire

36.7

36.1

37.9

40.4

Portsmouth

18.5

20.2

21.5

23.0

Reading

(5)

35.0

36.6

39.2

Slough

(5)

36.7

40.8

42.2

Southampton

29.4

29.9

30.7

30.3

Surrey

40.0

43.0

45.5

47.0

West Berkshire

(5)

42.6

44.9

45.7

West Sussex

38.3

38.9

41.5

42.0

Windsor and Maidenhead

(5)

46.5

47.2

48.0

Wokingham

(5)

48.2

50.4

52.2

         

South West

36.1

37.9

39.4

40.8

Isles of Scilly

27.8

57.1

45.2

53.8

Bath and North East Somerset

40.2

41.8

42.3

45.2

Bournemouth

40.5

41,7

41.0

40.2

Bristol, City of

22.6

21.0

22.0

23.2

Cornwall

36.0

38.1

40.1

41.2

Former Devon

33.8

(5)

(5)

(5)

Devon

(5)

37.0

37.3

38.6

Dorset

36.6

38.5

40.0

42.8

Gloucestershire

41.6

43.7

45.2

46.6

North Somerset

38.3

41.2

40.9

42.7

Plymouth

(5)

33.1

38.5

38.5

Poole

40.8

44.0

45.9

48.7

Somerset

37.6

39.6

41.2

42.4

South Gloucestershire

33.3

33.8

37.0

37.2

Swindon

34.9

34.2

35.9

35.5

Torbay

(5)

41.3

39.7

42.6

Wiltshire

39.0

40.1

41.5

44.4

(1) Age at the start of the academic year. (2) Including attempts and achievement in previous academic years. (3) In 1999/2000, local authority, Government office region and total figures do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas. (4) Maintained schools only, including maintained special schools and CTCs. Academies were not in existence during this time period. (5) Local authority not in existence at that time.

Mr Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools achieved five A* to C GCSEs, including English and mathematics, for (a) under 20 per cent., (b) 20 to 30 per cent., (c) 30 to 35 per cent., (d) 35 per cent. to 40 per cent., (e) 40 to 45 per cent. and (f) 45 to 50 per cent of pupils in the latest year for which figures are available. [30673]

Mr Gibb: The breakdown of the number of schools by the percentage of pupils that achieved five GCSEs at grades A* to C including English and mathematics is shown in the following table. The figures shown are for only those open maintained mainstream schools (including city technology colleges and academies, but excluding hospital schools and pupil referral units) with results published in the 2010 school and college performance tables with more than 10 pupils on roll at the end of Key Stage 4.

Percentage of pupils in the school who achieved 5 or more GCSEs at grades A* to C including English and mathematics Number of schools

Under 20%

4

Equal to 20% and less than 30%

78

Equal to 30% and less than 35%

143

Equal to 35% and less than 40%

215

Equal to 40% and less than 45%

311

Equal to 45% and less than 50%

353

Mr Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of students achieved five GCSE at grades A* to C or equivalent in each year from 1990 to 2010; and what proportion achieved these grades, excluding (a) non-GCSE qualifications, (b) non-GCSE qualifications and religious studies GCSEs and (c) non-GCSE qualifications, religious studies GCSEs and vocational GCSEs in each year. [32408]

28 Feb 2011 : Column 277W

Mr Gibb: The figures are presented in the following table: