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8 Nov 2010 : Column 146W—continued

Health Services: Third Sector

Penny Mordaunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the potential role of third sector organisations in providing expert guidance to GP consortia and other new commissioning bodies; and if he will make a statement. [21596]


8 Nov 2010 : Column 147W

Mr Simon Burns: Under the proposals set out in the White Paper 'Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS', we envisage that commissioning consortia will receive a maximum management allowance to reflect the costs of commissioning. General practitioner consortia will be able to decide which commissioning activities they undertake for themselves and for which activities they choose to buy in expertise and support from external organisations, including from third sector bodies.

Charities and voluntary organisations have a vital contribution to make to health and care, not only as the providers of services but also as advocates, partners in the co-design of services and involvers and engagers of local communities. The voluntary sector could, for instance, be well placed to support commissioners in developing needs assessments and commissioning guidelines.

We are committed to promoting continuous improvement in the quality of services for patients and greater opportunities for involvement of independent and voluntary providers in offering more responsive and personalised services.

Hereditary Diseases

Jim Fitzpatrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what data are collected (a) centrally and (b) by local health authorities on genetic conditions causing increased morbidity and mortality in children born to first cousin parents; and if he will make a statement. [21244]

Anne Milton: The Department does not routinely collect this information centrally. The Department continues to support the work of the national health service in providing information to all couples at risk of genetic conditions to enable them to make informed choices.

As part of the complementary work to the Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007, the Department has published the Implementation Plan for Reducing Health Inequalities in Infant Mortality: A Good Practice Guide. The document provides details on how genetic screening and counselling services play an important part in this area. Specifically, it highlights the work of two projects funded by the Department on how to provide appropriate genetic services and support to communities that practise cousin marriage.

Hospitals

Gordon Birtwistle: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department issues guidance on the maximum distance a person should travel to reach the nearest hospital accident and emergency department. [22561]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department has not issued guidance on the maximum distance a person should travel to reach the nearest hospital accident and emergency department.

It is a matter for the local national health service to ensure that there is appropriate provision of urgent and emergency services that are responsive to people's needs.

Gordon Birtwistle: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department issues guidance on the maximum size of population a general hospital outside London should serve. [22563]


8 Nov 2010 : Column 148W

Mr Simon Burns: The Department does not issue guidance on the maximum size of population that a general hospital outside London should serve. National health service organisations will decide locally what constitutes the best configuration for the delivery of healthcare services and facilities for their patients.

Hospitals: Children

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with specialist children's hospitals on (a) the additional costs incurred in treating children and (b) average expenditure per treatment of (i) a child and (ii) an adult; and if he will make a statement. [22506]

Mr Simon Burns: There is an ongoing dialogue between these hospitals and the Department.

As part of work in developing tariffs, my officials work with representatives from the specialist children's hospitals on understanding the costs related to providing children's services.

Officials are currently working closely with the specialist children's hospitals on checking the draft 2011-12 tariff. As part of this work, officials are discussing with the hospitals the potential impact of proposed changes to top-up payments for specialist services. These proposals, which include a reduction in the top-up payable for specialised services for children from 78% to 25% of the standard tariff, arise from a review of top-up arrangements that was initiated under the previous Administration.

Gordon Birtwistle: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidelines his Department issues to NHS trusts on the provision of and access to paediatric and children accident and emergency services in deprived areas. [22667]

Mr Simon Burns: No such guidance has been issued. However, in July 2010, the Secretary of State for Health laid down four tests for all proposals to reconfigure national health service services. Such proposals must show: a clear clinical evidence base underpinning any proposals, which focuses on improved outcomes for patients; clear support for proposals from general practitioners as the commissioners of local services; strengthened arrangements for public engagement; and support for patient choice.

Hospitals: Infectious Diseases

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many isolation beds are available in NHS wards for patients with highly infectious diseases. [21899]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not held centrally.

Mental Health

Jo Swinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the recommendations relevant to his Department's policy responsibilities contained in the Foresight report on Mental Capital and Wellbeing by the Government Office for Science; if he will ensure that his Department takes steps to promote
8 Nov 2010 : Column 149W
wellbeing; if he will ensure that his Department's policy development process takes account of psychological research into subjective wellbeing; and if he will make a statement. [22203]

Paul Burstow: The Government Office for Science's Foresight report on Mental Capital and Wellbeing has informed the cross-government Mental Health Strategy that we intend to publish this winter. The strategy will have the twin aims of promoting and sustaining good mental health and well-being in the wider population; and improving the quality of existing services for people across the full range of mental health problems.

Mental Health: Young People

David Mowat: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to increase levels of awareness of mental health issues in young people. [21796]

Paul Burstow: We announced our intention to produce a new mental health strategy in September. The strategy will take a cross-Government and life-course approach focusing on outcomes that are meaningful to patients and their families. We intend a wholesale shift in emphasis that puts mental health outcomes alongside physical health indicators in assessments of the quality of the national health service.

The Department of Health works closely with the Department for Education to increase awareness of mental health issues among young people.

NHS 111

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the annual savings to accrue from replacing NHS Direct with NHS 111. [21710]

Mr Simon Burns: NHS Direct is not being directly replaced by NHS 111. The Department conducted a partial impact assessment (pre-pilot) to assess the costs and benefits of introducing the NHS 111 service, which was published in December 2009.

This assessment will be updated to reflect evidence from the pilot sites and our final evidence-based conclusions will be published as part of the external evaluation of the NHS 111 pilots.

A copy of the partial impact assessment has been placed in the Library.

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when his Department plans to determine staffing levels for NHS 111; and if he will make a statement. [21723]

Mr Simon Burns: The most appropriate staff mix for NHS 111 call handling must be evidence-based and reflect the needs of commissioners, which is why we are piloting the service. We will collect and publish evaluation data from the pilots, which will be made available to commissioners. There will not be a centrally mandated approach to staffing NHS 111, and commissioners will be free to determine what is best for their patients.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 150W

NHS Direct

Frank Dobson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has for the future of NHS Direct. [21749]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department is piloting the new NHS 111 service in County Durham and Darlington, Nottingham City, Lincolnshire and Luton over the course of this year and NHS Direct is contributing to the delivery of these pilots. When NHS 111 is rolled out nationally, it will replace the NHS Direct 0845 4647 telephone number. Until then, NHS Direct will continue to provide its current service. While the telephone number will no longer exist in the long-term, NHS Direct is expected to play an ongoing role, alongside other providers, in delivering the NHS 111 service, in line with an any willing provider approach.

NHS: Finance

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimates he has made of the likely changes in the NHS budget consequent on (a) an increasingly elderly population and (b) rising drug prices in the next 10 years. [21827]

Mr Simon Burns: National health service funding for 2011-12 to 2014-15 is set out in the recent spending review settlement; funding is protected in real terms over the next four years.

Further, the Department is working with the NHS to prepare to deliver a quantum shift in NHS efficiency, delivering £15 billion to £20 billion over the next four years.

All of these savings will be reinvested in the NHS. Together with the guarantee to protect funding against inflation the increased efficiency will allow the NHS to continue to deliver high quality health care and keep pace with demographic pressures, medical advances and rising public expectations.

On the particular pressures identified in the question:

An increasingly elderly population: The Department anticipate a pressure of about 1% per year over the spending review period. This matches analysis of external commentators such as The King's Fund.

Branded drug prices are controlled by the Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme (PPRS)-a voluntary agreement between the Department and the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industries-which aims to achieve a balance between reasonable prices for the NHS and a fair return for the industry to enable it to research, develop and market new and improved medicines.

The 2009 agreement included a pricing package comprising price cuts of 3.9% in 2009, and a further 1.9% in 2010. The agreement also permits price increases of 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.2% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 respectively.

In 2014 we will introduce a system of value based pricing for medicines, where the price of a drug will be determined by its assessed value. The NHS faces great challenges and reforming the way we pay for new medicines is a key part of ensuring that patients get better access to drugs and the NHS and the taxpayer get better value for money.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 151W

Organs: Donors

Paul Uppal: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he plans to take to arrange for local co-ordination of organ donation under the proposals in the NHS White Paper; [21604]

(2) what progress has been made on implementation of the recommendations of the Organ Donation Taskforce's report on organs for transplants; how many likely organ donations after death there were in 2008; what estimate he has made of the number in 2013; and if he will make a statement. [21606]

Anne Milton: The implementation programme has been successful, with the vast majority of recommendations needing a central steer either being completed or nearing completion. Key progress includes:

Work to implement the recommendations in the Organ Donation Taskforce report has been ongoing since the report was first published in January 2008 and good progress has been made.

As part of the implementation programme, NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) have already been working to raise the profile of and improve the systems for organ donation within every hospital trust. In order to do this they have established a network of 220 Specialist Nurses for Organ Donation who are based at hospitals throughout the country. The role of these specialist nurses is to work with families, providing a constant link to support and guiding them throughout the donation process.

NHSBT have also worked with hospitals to ensure the appointment of 187 Clinical Leads for Organ Donation. Usually intensive care or emergency medicine consultants, the Clinical Leads are working with their colleagues to foster a culture where consideration of the potential for organ donation becomes a usual rather than unusual event.

In addition to this 160 Donation Committees have been set up within hospitals with the tools they need and an innovative Professional Development Programme to support organ donation.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 152W

There were 884 organ donations after death in 2008, when the implementation programme began. The implementation programme has led to the number of deceased organ donors and organ transplants reaching a record UK high last year, with the lives of more than 3,700 people being saved through the gift of life. This represents a 19% increase in deceased organ donation since the implementation programme began. This increase is significantly higher than the Programme Delivery Board anticipated at such an early stage of the implementation programme.

We are taking steps to ensure that the momentum gained over the last two years is sustained, to enable us to realise the taskforce's aspiration of a 50% increase in organ donation by 2013. This includes continuing to ensure that work is aligned with and utilises new levers, such as those included in the NHS White Paper.

Paul Uppal: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of people on (a) the transplant waiting list and (b) the NHS Organ Donor Register are from black and minority ethnic groups; what recent estimate he has made of the rate of deceased organ donation by people from black and minority ethnic groups; what steps he plans to take to increase that rate; and if he will make a statement. [21605]

Anne Milton: To raise the profile of organ donation and the benefits of transplantation, NHS Blood and Transplant work in partnerships with the national health service, commercial and third sector organisations to support local events around the country or national initiatives such as joining the Organ Donor Register when registering with a doctor, or applying for a driving license. As part of a recent media campaign there were activities targeted specifically at black and minority ethnic (BME) audiences including street plays, faith road shows and coverage in BME specific media outlets.

Information on the proportion of people from black and minority ethnic groups on the transplant waiting list; registered on the organ donor register and the ethnicity of deceased solid organ donors is given in the following tables.

Ethnicity of people on the current active transplant list, as at 1 November 2010
Ethnic origin Number Percentage

White

5,863

74.4

Asian

1,194

15.1

Black

613

7.8

Chinese

95

1.2

Mixed

20

0.3

Other

98

1.2

Not reported

1

<0.1

Unknown

2

<0.1

Total

7,886

100.0



8 Nov 2010 : Column 153W

8 Nov 2010 : Column 154W
Ethnicity of deceased solid organ donors in the UK, 1 April 2007-31 March 2010
2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage

Ethnicity

White

777

96.0

857

95.2

914

95.3

Asian

13

1.6

17

1.9

15

1.6

Black

11

1.4

13

1.4

13

1.4

Chinese

1

0.1

2

0.2

2

0.2

Other

7

0.9

11

1.2

15

1.6

Total

809

900

959


Ethnicity of registrants where given on the Organ Donor Register, as at 1 November 2010
Ethnic origin Number on the ODR Percentage on the ODR Percentage where ethnicity reported on the ODR

White

2,958,770

16.9

96.7

Asian

38,891

0.2

1.3

Black

12,168

0.1

0.4

Chinese

4,563

0.0

0.1

Mixed

34,321

0.2

1.1

Other

11,331

0.1

0.4

Total reported

3,060,044

17.5

-

Not reported

14,475,152

82.5

-

Total

17,535,196


Paul Uppal: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on increasing (a) the proportion of relatives who consent to organ donation by a deceased patient and (b) the number of donation after brain death donors. [21613]

Anne Milton: There is a range of ongoing activities to promote organ donation and increase donation rates. In autumn 2009, NHS Blood and Transplant launched a UK-wide public awareness campaign to encourage more people not just to join the Organ Donor Register (ODR), but also to discuss their wishes in relation to organ donation with family members.

NHS Blood and Transplant also work in partnership with the national health service, commercial and third sector organisations to support local promotional and awareness-raising activity around the country or national initiatives such as joining the ODR when registering with a doctor, or applying for a driving licence.

Steady improvement is being made. During 2009-10, organ donor rates increased to nearly 20% over the baseline year of 2007-08. We aim to see organ donor rates continue to rise this year, allowing many more people to benefit from a life saving or life enhancing transplant.

Our Life

Mark Menzies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how much his Department has spent on marketing and communications for the organisation Our Life in the financial year 2010-11 to date; [22444]

(2) whether his Department has given funding to the organisation Our Life in the last three financial years; and whether it plans to provide funding for the organisation in the next financial year. [22479]

Anne Milton: Our Life is an independent social enterprise established by NHS North West to focus on engaging the public and bring about a significant shift in well-being, attitudes and health behaviours. It is not directly funded by the Department. As a charitable community benefit society, Our Life is funded through a combination of membership fees, grants, donations, sponsorship and consultancy services. Further information on this can be obtained from Our Life direct.

Primary Care Trusts: Debts

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he has (a) taken or (b) plans to take steps to prevent primary care trusts from taking on debts prior to their abolition. [22752]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department is working with the strategic health authorities to address circumstances where primary care trusts (PCTs) owe money, with the expectation that any debt will be fully resolved by the end of 2012-13. The issue of PCT debt will be covered in further detail in the NHS Operating Framework for 2011-12.

Respiratory Diseases: Bexley

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of people in the London borough of Bexley newly diagnosed with a respiratory disease in each of the last five years. [21753]

Mr Simon Burns: This information is not collected centrally.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Kent

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many cases of each type of sexually transmitted infection were reported by (a) South East Coast Strategic Health Authority, (b) West Kent Primary Care Trust and (c) Medway Primary Care Trust, in each year since 2007. [21088]

Anne Milton: Before 2009 data are only available at the strategic health authority (SHA) of the clinic attended. The number of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in South East Coast SHA, West Kent Primary Care Trust (PCT) and Medway PCT diagnosed in genitourinary medicine clinics (GUM) by location of the GUM clinic attended between 2007 and 2009 are presented in Table 1.


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Since 2009, data have been collected by patient's area of residence. The number of STIs in 2009, in South East Coast SHA, West Kent PCT and Medway PCT diagnosed in GUM clinics by patient's area of residence are presented in Table 2.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 156W

The number of Chlamydia diagnoses made in community-based settings (non-GUM sites) in 15 to 24-year-olds resident in South East Coast SHA, West Kent PCT and Medway PCT are presented in Table 3.

Table 1: Number of STI diagnoses seen at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics by SHA and PCT of GUM clinic attended: 2007-09
By GUM clinic
South East Coast SHA 2009
Code group Diagnoses 2007 2008 2009 West Kent PCT Medway PCT

A1, A2

Primary and secondary infectious syphilis

110

111

101

13

*

A3

Early latent syphilis (first two years)

74

57

45

*

0

A4, A5, A6

Other acquired syphilis

84

102

77

8

6

A7

Congenital syphilis, aged under two

0

*

0

0

0

A8

Congenital syphilis, aged two or over

0

*

0

0

0

A9

Epidemiological treatment of suspected syphilis

48

50

45

0

*

B1, B2

Uncomplicated gonorrhoea

755

563

626

75

34

B3

Gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum

*

*

0

0

0

B4

Epidemiological treatment of suspected gonorrhoea

402

418

463

64

16

B5

Complicated gonococcal infection-including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and epididymitis

10

11

10

*

0

C1, C2, C3

Chancroid/Lymphogranuloma venerum/Donovanosis

13

23

15

*

*

C10A

Anogenital herpes simplex-first episode

1,700

1,978

2,136

230

141

C10B

Anogenital herpes simplex-recurrence

1,202

1,509

1,749

225

110

C11A

Anogenital warts-first episode

5,764

6,095

6,386

894

497

C11B

Anogenital warts-recurrence

3,541

3,557

1 3,660

508

365

C11C

Anogenital warts-re-registered cases

1,300

1,574

1,506

253

112

C12

Molluscum contagiosum

1,097

1,201

1,154

136

161

C4A, C4C

Uncomplicated genital chlamydial infection

6,393

6,934

6,371

686

566

C4B

Complicated genital chlamydial infection-including PID and epididymitis

145

158

187

11

*

C4D

Chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum

0

*

*

0

*

C4E

Epidemiological treatment of suspected genital chlamydial infection

3,549

3,958

3,753

558

351

C4H

Uncomplicated non-gonococcal/non-specific urethritis in males, or treatment of mucopurulent cervicitis in females

5,448

5,502

5,382

851

473

C4I

Epidemiological treatment of non-specific genital infection (NSGI)

1,852

1,699

1,824

191

252

C5

Complicated infection (non-chlamydial/non-gonococcal)-including PID and epididymitis

659

801

1,061

44

12

C6A

Trichomoniasis

142

116

148

37

19

C8, C9

Scabies/pediculosis pubis

107

100

141

5

11

E1A

New HIV diagnosis-asymptomatic

288

319

256

24

32

E1B, E2B

Subsequent HIV presentation (not AIDS)

5,131

5,503

6,974

635

266

E2A

New HIV diagnosis: symptomatic (not AIDS)

42

58

29

*

0

E3A1

AIDS: first presentation-new HIV diagnosis

18

28

23

*

0

E3A2

AIDS: first presentation-HIV diagnosed previously

*

12

*

0

0

E3B

AIDS-subsequent presentation

1,116

1,170

1,436

123

49

Total new STI diagnoses

22,765

24,055

24,071

3,016

1,953

Total other STI diagnoses

18,229

19,558

21,492

2,565

1,530

Total STI diagnoses

40,994

43,613

45,563

5,581

3,483



8 Nov 2010 : Column 157W

8 Nov 2010 : Column 158W
Table 2: Number of STI diagnoses seen at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics by patient area of residence: 2009
2009
Code group Diagnoses South East Coast SHA West Kent PCT Medway PCT

A1, A2

Primary and secondary infectious syphilis

114

15

*

A3

Early latent syphilis (first two years)

48

*

0

A4, A5, A6

Other acquired syphilis

81

*

*

A7

Congenital syphilis, aged under two

0

0

0

A8

Congenital syphilis, aged two or over

0

0

0

A9

Epidemiological treatment of suspected syphilis

59

*

*

B1, B2

Uncomplicated gonorrhoea

631

82

27

B3

Gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum

0

0

0

B4

Epidemiological treatment of suspected gonorrhoea

440

48

14

B5

Complicated gonococcal infection-including PID and epididymitis

12

*

0

C1, C2, C3

Chancroid/LGV/Donovanosis

17

*

*

C10A

Anogenital herpes simplex-first episode

2,018

226

121

C10B

Anogenital herpes simplex-recurrence

1,673

191

102

C11A

Anogenital warts-first episode

5,950

811

424

C11B

Anogenital warts-recurrence

3,392

454

317

C11C

Anogenital warts-re-registered cases

1,463

219

98

C12

Molluscum contagiosum

1,058

132

135

C4A, C4C

Uncomplicated genital chlamydial infection

6,000

663

486

C4B

Complicated genital chlamydial infection-including PID and epididymitis

204

15

*

C4D

Chlamydial ophthalmia neonatorum

(1)-

0

*

C4E

Epidemiological treatment of suspected genital chlamydial infection

3,543

506

285

C4H

Uncomplicated non-gonococcal/non-specific urethritis in males, or treatment of mucopurulent cervicitis in females

4,993

819

379

C4I

Epidemiological treatment of NSGI

1,713

208

208

C5

Complicated infection (non-chlamydial/non-gonococcal)-including PID and epididymitis

1,068

52

19

C6A

Trichomoniasis

148

39

13

C8, C9

Scabies/pediculosis pubis

131

*

10

E1A

New HIV diagnosis-asymptomatic

269

26

28

E1B, E2B

Subsequent HIV presentation (not AIDS)

6,651

558

214

E2A

New HIV diagnosis: symptomatic (not AIDS)

45

5

*

E3A1

AIDS: first presentation-new HIV diagnosis

31

*

*

E3A2

AIDS: first presentation-HIV diagnosed previously

7

0

0

E3B

AIDS-subsequent presentation

1,428

106

48

Total new STI diagnoses

22,735

2,893

1,650

Total other STI diagnoses

20,452

2,304

1,293

Total STI diagnoses

43,187

5,197

2,943

(1) Indicates brace.
Notes:
1. Cell size of 1 to 4 have been masked (masked with an asterisk,*) to protect deductive disclosure in accordance with ONS guidelines for SHA/PCT level data. Totals include the masked counts.
2. Counts for categories C4B and C4D have been combined to prevent disclosure of small numbers, in accordance with ONS guidelines.
3. The data available from the KC60 (2008 and earlier) and GUMCAD (2009 onwards) returns are for diagnoses made in genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics only. Diagnoses made in other clinical settings, such as General Practice, are not recorded in the GUMCAD dataset.
4. The data available from the KC60 and GUMCAD returns are the number of diagnoses made, not the number of patients diagnosed.
5. The difference between the total STI diagnoses in 2009 in Table 1 and 2 is due to patients attending GUM clinics in areas other than where they are resident.
6. The information provided is based on reported SHA data that has been adjusted for missing clinic data.
Date of Data:
25 August 2010
Source:
Health Protection Agency, KC60 and Genitourinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset (GUMCAD) returns.

Table 3: Number of Chlamydia diagnoses in 15 to 24-year-olds resident within the South East Coast SHA, West Kent PCT and Medway PCT made in community-based settings 2007-09

2007 2008 2009

South East Coast SHA

1,509

3,385

4,922

West Kent PCT

196

399

643

Medway PCT

144

361

546

Notes:
1. The NCSP has been phased in since 1 April 2003 with all 152 PCTs reporting data to the programme since March 2008. Therefore numbers of diagnoses have risen substantially as the proportion of sexually active under 25-year-olds who have been tested has increased.
2. Collection of non-NCSP, non-GUM data commenced from April 2008.
3. The data from the NCSP Core Dataset and the Non NCSP Non GUM are for positive Chlamydia diagnoses made outside of GUM clinics.
4. The data in Table 3 are the number of diagnoses made and not the number of patients diagnosed.
Date of Data:
NCSP Core Dataset: 25 October 2010; Non NCSP Non GUM Data: 5 August 2010.
Source:
Health Protection Agency, National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP), NCSP returns and Non NCSP Non GUM data

8 Nov 2010 : Column 159W

Smallpox: Vaccination

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS staff are vaccinated against smallpox for the purposes of first response in the event of a smallpox outbreak or biological attack. [21898]

Anne Milton: Vaccination of a cohort of front line health workers to deal with any initial suspected or confirmed case of smallpox if one were to occur was completed in 2005. The cohort comprised 516 vaccinated personnel of whom 147 were doctors, 164 were nurses, 100 were ambulance staff, 32 were scientists and 73 held other related health care occupations. All were carefully screened and monitored and none had adverse complications that required vaccinia immunoglobulin. There is no proposal to increase the numbers of people in the cohort.

Thrombolysis: Health Services

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to increase the number of NHS hospitals providing access to thrombolysis treatment 24 hours a day, seven days a week. [22126]

Mr Simon Burns: Thrombolysis is only suitable for a small proportion of people who have had an ischaemic stroke. We want to develop the system so that everyone who has a stroke, and can benefit from thrombolysis, is able to receive it safely. Pathways to achieve this will vary between local health economies. For example, some areas have developed a smaller number of hospitals providing a 24 hour, seven day a week service for a larger population, while others are developing telemedicine arrangements to access stroke specialist expertise remotely out of hours.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Stroke Quality Standard launched in June 2010 is a set of specific, concise statements that act as markers of high quality, cost-effective patient care covering treatment and prevention. Statement three in this stroke standard says "patients with suspected stroke are admitted directly to a specialist acute stroke unit and assessed for thrombolysis, receiving it if clinically indicated."

Business, Innovation and Skills

Daresbury Laboratory: Finance

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what funding his Department plans to allocate to Daresbury Laboratory in 2011-12 to 2013-14; and if he will make a statement. [21822]

Mr Willetts: In the recent spending review my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that the Government will spend £4.6 billion on science and research programmes in each of the next four years within a ring-fenced budget. Capital and administration spending on science and research have not yet been decided.

In the coming months, Ministers will make decisions on the balance of funding between the individual research councils, HEFCE's research and knowledge transfer activities, the national academies and other programmes.
8 Nov 2010 : Column 160W
Detailed decisions on specific projects, like the Daresbury Laboratory will be taken by research councils, in line with the Haldane Principle.

Debts: Advisory Services

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will provide funding to debt advisory organisations which have the objective of preventing home repossessions. [22123]

Mr Davey: Currently this Department is contributing £1 million per annum of grant funding to the National Debtline freephone service. This Department also administers the Financial Inclusion Fund's Face-to-Face Debt Advice Project (£27 million per annum), which assists clients with their money problems. Some of the people that use both of these services will also receive advice on their mortgage problems.

Dentistry: Higher Education

Stephen Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to page 25 of the Browne Review of Higher Education and Student Finance, if he will classify dentistry as a clinical and priority course. [22275]

Mr Willetts: Dentistry is currently classified as a clinical course. As a reflection of the importance of, and relative expense associated with delivering dentistry and other priority courses, direct public grant will continue to meet a proportion of the costs.

EU Grants and Loans

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether a cut-off date has been set for drawing down European Regional Development Fund funding to the UK in the event that matched funding is not made available. [22083]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 4 November 2010]: No cut- off date has been set for drawing down European Regional Development Fund funding to the UK. The Government expect that the UK's 2007-13 European Regional Development Fund programmes will continue to operate until their end date of 2015.

Fireworks: Sales

Mr Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on reducing the misuse of fireworks; [22291]

(2) what steps his Department takes to enforce regulations on the sale of fireworks to minors; [22292]

(3) what plans he has for the future regulation of the sale of fireworks. [22293]

Mr Davey: While my officials are in contact with the Department for Communities and Local Government, they talk more regularly with officials at Local Government Regulation, the body which advises trading standards departments, who are in turn responsible for enforcement of age-related sales. There are no plans to revise the legislation on the sale and use of fireworks.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 161W

Green Investment Bank

Mr Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what (a) governance mechanisms, (b) business model and (c) sources of funding he plans to put in place for the proposed Green Investment Bank. [22106]

Mr Prisk: Governance mechanisms and business model will depend on the final design of the Green Investment Bank (GIB). The GIB will make its investment decisions independent from political control and employ private sector skills and expertise.

Decisions on design will be subject to the Government's tests of effectiveness, affordability and transparency.

The GIB will be initially capitalised with £1 billion of funding allocated from departmental budgets together with additional significant proceeds from the sale of Government-owned assets.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether the Green Investment Bank will issue its own bonds. [22880]

Mr Prisk: The Green Investment Bank will be funded through £1 billion of departmental expenditure limit funding and additional significant proceeds from asset sales. Decisions on additional funding sources is subject to further design and market testing work. Decisions will be subject to the Government's tests of effectiveness, affordability and transparency.

Higher Education: Admissions

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment his Department has made of the effects of his Department's proposed reductions to the number of higher education places on the likely social mobility of students unable to gain a university place in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [22129]

Mr Willetts: There has not been a reduction in the number of higher education places. In 2009-10 the Government provided funding for 1,170,000 full time equivalent places. The coalition Government are funding 1,190,000 full time equivalent places in 2010-11, including the 10,000 places announced as part of the University Modernisation Fund. The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) will receive its annual grant letter for 2011-12 in due course. It will set out the number of funded places for that year. Going to university has always been a competitive process and not all those who apply will be accepted. The Government are working hard to ensure there are other equally valuable routes into a successful career and as part of the spending review this Government will be funding an additional 75,000 apprenticeships a year by 2014/15.

Higher Education: ICT

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent discussions he has had with representatives of universities on online education for students; and if he will make a statement. [21907]


8 Nov 2010 : Column 162W

Mr Willetts: I have regular discussions with university representatives about a wide range of issues, including online education.

I have also met Dame Lynne Brindley twice recently in her role as the chair of the independent Online Learning Task Force. The Task Force was established by HEFCE to make recommendations regarding the development of excellence in online learning, to support higher education (HE) in exploiting fully its pedagogical and commercial opportunities, with the aim of our HE sector sustaining its excellence and growing its market share. Although it was set up under the last Government, the Task Force has our full support for its objectives.

The appropriate use of digital technology in education has a very important role to play in both supporting and enhancing higher education. It can help universities to improve the quality of their provision, meet the expectations of today's digitally-aware students and fully engage disadvantaged students in HE-especially those with disabilities and caring responsibilities-as well as enabling them to deliver HE in more flexible ways.

I am therefore looking forward to seeing the Task Force's recommendations when they report in the near future and I anticipate saying more about the role of online education when we publish our Higher Education White Paper later this winter.

Higher Education: Student Loans

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the age at which student loans of (a) £7,000, (b) £10,000 and (c) £12,000 will be paid off by graduates in each income decile following implementation of the proposals in the Browne Review of higher education funding. [20746]

Mr Willetts: The Government have now set out their proposals for higher education and student finance in Parliament following the Browne Review of Higher Education and Student Finance. The Government have broadly accepted Lord Browne's proposals on repayment while adapting the system to make it more progressive.

We have estimated the number of years students are likely to be in repayment if the proposals in the Browne Review were to be implemented.

Graduates move into repayment from the April after they leave university. The following table gives the number of years that we estimate graduates will be in repayment, though in each year there will be many graduates who will be eligible to repay as they have left university while benefiting from the low income protection and not actually making any repayments.

Graduates who are still in repayment after 30 years have the balance of their loan cancelled and are considered to be in repayment for 30 years. Graduates who fully repay their loan on graduation are considered to be in repayment for 0 years. Graduates who have their loans cancelled for death or disability are considered to be in repayment for the number of years until their loan is cancelled.

This has been based on a student on a three-year course taking out a loan in each year.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 163W
Average number of years in repayment
Lifetime earnings decile £7,000/year £10,000/year £12,000/year

10

10

13

15

9

15

20

23

8

16

21

24

7

17

23

26

6

21

25

27

5

23

26

28

4

26

28

29

3

27

29

29

2

26

27

27

1

22

22

22


The figures are affected by the inclusion of graduates who have their loans written off for death or disability, particularly in the lowest decile as they are only in repayment until their loan is written off. As a result they are in repayment for a shorter period and they bring the average down.

Higher Education: Watford

Richard Harrington: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the proportion of young people resident in Watford who continued to higher education in each year since 2000. [22361]

Mr Willetts: Figures relating to the proportion of young people resident in Watford who continued to higher education (HE) are not available. As an alternative, the latest available information on the proportion of 15-years-old from maintained schools in Hertfordshire local authority who progressed to HE by age 19 is shown in the table. Figures for earlier years are not available.

Estimates of the proportion of 15-year-olds in 2001/02, 2002/03 and 2003/04 from maintained schools in Hertfordshire local authority who progressed to HE( 1) by age 19 in 2005/06, 2006/07 and 2007/08
Academic year Percentage who progressed to HE by age 19

2005/06

38

2006/07

39

2007/08

39

(1) Includes those who progress to higher education courses at English further education colleges.
Source:
Matched data from the National Pupil Database, the Higher Education Statistics Agency Student Record and the Individualised Learner Record.

Richard Harrington: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many people in Watford constituency applied to higher education institutions in the last 12 months; and what proportion of such people had their applications accepted. [22435]

Mr Willetts: The latest figures provided by UCAS show that, as at 13 October, 1,209 people resident in Watford constituency had applied to enter full-time undergraduate courses via UCAS during the 2010 application cycle, and 871 (or 72%) were accepted for entry. The 2010 application cycle runs from September 2009 to October 2010, and covers applicants applying to enter courses starting in autumn 2010, or, on the basis of deferred entry, 2011.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 164W

Higher Education: West Midlands

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many young people normally resident in (a) Coventry and (b) the West Midlands studied undergraduate courses at university in each year since 1997; and how much was paid to such students in non-refundable grants and bursaries. [22130]

Mr Willetts: The latest available information from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) on undergraduate enrolments from Coventry and the west midlands is shown in Table 1. Figures for the 2009/10 academic year will be available in January 2011. Figures for undergraduate enrolments to higher education (HE) level courses at further education (FE) colleges are not available by parliamentary constituency, and are therefore excluded.

Table 1: Undergraduate enrolments( 1 ) from Coventry local authority( 2) and West Midlands Government office region, UK higher education institutions( 3) , academic years 1997/98 to 2008/09
Number
Academic year Coventry West Midlands

1997/98

2,325

44,965

1998/99

2,505

47,510

1999/2000

2,650

48,965

2000/01

2,720

49,870

2001/02

2,790

50,400

2002/03

2,820

51,990

2003/04

2,855

53,860

2004/05

3,045

54,485

2005/06

3,145

56,420

2006/07

3,115

56,915

2007/08

3,075

57,835

2008/09

3,245

60,010

(1) Enrolments cover all years of study, not just first-year students. (2) Excludes those whose local authority could not be established due to missing or invalid postcode information. (3) Excludes the Open university due to inconsistencies in their coding across the time series. Note: Figures are based on a 1 December snapshot and have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

Tables 2 and 3 show information from the Student Loans Company (SLC) on applicants awarded grants for maintenance and the amounts awarded. These figures are on a different basis from the HESA figures in Table 1 which include part-time enrolments and should not be combined in calculations. SLC figures include postgraduate and part-time initial teacher training applicants who were awarded HE grants and maintenance grants. Other part-time support is not covered. Applicants awarded grants for HE courses in FE colleges are included. The HE grant was introduced in 2004/05; figures are shown from that year onwards. The maintenance grant was introduced for new students from 2006/07 and replaced the HE grant. The HE grant continued to be available to those who had entered higher education in 2004/05 and 2005/06.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 165W
Table 2: Grants for maintenance( 1) from Coventry local authority, academic years 2004/05 to 2008/09
Academic year Grant Applicants awarded (number) Amount awarded (£)

2004/05

HE grant

730

620,000

2005/06

HE grant

1,360

1,190,000

2006/07

HE grant

1,090

950,000

Maintenance grant(2)

1,140

2,280,000

2007/08

HE grant

670

610,000

Maintenance grant(2)

2,130

4,460,000

2008/09

HE grant

210

190,000

Maintenance grant(2)

3,330

7,200,000

(1) Applicant figures are rounded to nearest 10, amounts awarded to nearest £10,000. Includes awards to students who subsequently withdrew from their course or suspended study. (2) Maintenance grant figures include special support grant. Source: Student Loans Company.

Table 3: Grants for maintenance( 1) from West Midlands Government office region, academic years 2004/05 to 2008/09
Academic year Grant Applicants awarded (number) Amount awarded (£)

2004/05

HE grant

11,220

9,560,000

2005/06

HE grant

21,070

18,130,000

2006/07

HE grant

16,980

14,920,000

Maintenance grant(2)

18,810

36,680,000

2007/08

HE grant

10,420

9,210,000

Maintenance grant(2)

34,210

69,300,000

2008/09

HE Grant

3,330

2,930,000

Maintenance Grant(2)

51,620

108,860,000

(1) Applicant figures are rounded to nearest 10, amounts awarded to nearest £10,000. Includes awards to students who subsequently withdrew from their course or suspended study. (2 )Maintenance Grant figures include special support grant. Source: Student Loans Company.

The information requested on bursaries is not available centrally as they are the responsibility of HE institutions.

Innovation: Finance

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether innovation centres will be funded directly by his Department. [22308]

Mr Willetts: Funding for the technology and innovation centres will be allocated by the BIS-funded Technology Strategy Board to ensure that the areas of activity are prioritised and aligned to the national technology strategy.

The model for the centres will see this core public sector funding leverage significant contract funding from the private sector, alongside grant funding from the EU and national research programmes, which in turn leverage funding from the private sector.

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what factors he took into account in determining the level of funding by his Department for the new innovation centres. [22455]

Mr Willetts: The Department will provide over £200 million of funding for technology and innovation centres over the next four years. This level of funding was based on a number of factors including:


8 Nov 2010 : Column 166W

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether the £200 million allocation announced by the Prime Minister for innovation centres will be drawn from the £4.6 billion fund announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer as protected science spend. [22456]

Mr Willetts: No. The allocation of funding technology and innovation centres will be part of the Technology Strategy Board's settlement, which is part of my Department's budget supporting business innovation. This is complementary but distinct from the activity supported by the protected science budget.

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether he proposes that innovation centres attract external funding additional to the sum committed by his Department. [22498]

Mr Willetts: The centres will be based on the model proposed by Hermann Hauser and James Dyson, which sees core public sector funding leverage significant contract funding from the private sector, alongside grant funding from EU and national research programmes, which in turn leverage funding from the private sector.

Mandarin Chinese: Higher Education

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many UK-based students are studying on degree courses in Mandarin Chinese in universities in England in 2010-11; and how many he expects to take such courses in each of the next 10 years. [21947]

Mr Willetts: The latest available information from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) relates to the 2008/09 academic year. Figures for 2009/10 will be available in January 2011, and for 2010/11 in January 2012. Figures for Mandarin Chinese are not available, Chinese Studies/Chinese Language Studies has been provided as an alternative.

In the 2008/09 academic year, there were 590 UK domiciled first degree enrolments studying either Chinese Studies or Chinese Language Studies at English Higher Education Institutions.

We do not forecast the number of students we expect to be studying individual degree subjects.

Overseas Students: Palestinians

Mark Menzies: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what routes are available for students resident in the West Bank and Gaza to study at UK universities. [22447]


8 Nov 2010 : Column 167W

Mr Willetts: UK universities recruit students from all around the world including from the Palestinian Territories. In 2008/09, the latest year for which data are available, the Higher Education Statistics Agency recorded 75 students from the West Bank (including East Jerusalem) and Gaza studying at UK higher education institutions.

Policy on admissions rests with individual universities. Places for students outside the European Union are not publicly funded and nor are the numbers controlled centrally. This means that universities are free to set their own limits although they must satisfy themselves that applicants meet the necessary entry requirements for their courses.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is supporting the Higher Education Scholarships for Palestine Programme (HESPAL) which will see 10 academics a year from Palestinian universities complete a year's postgraduate study at a UK partner university. The programme is managed by the British Council and funded jointly by private sponsors, participating universities and the Government.

Overseas Trade: Iran

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent representations he has received on the signing of new contracts between UK-based companies and Iranian companies. [22405]

Mr Prisk: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has not received any representations on the signing of new contracts between UK-based and Iranian companies.

Redundancy

Ms Angela Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how much funding to meet staff redundancy costs was identified in his Department's settlement letter in respect of the comprehensive spending review. [21508]

Mr Davey: The administration budget of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) will reduce by an overall 40% in real terms over the spending review including savings that will come with the abolition of RDAs.

All pressures on Departments' budgets were taken into account as part of the spending review and settlements were allocated accordingly. The full cost of redundancies will be met from within this Department's spending review resource departmental expenditure limit-DEL-settlement.

Ms Angela Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the number of redundancies arising from the spending reductions proposed in the comprehensive spending review in respect of (a) his Department, (b) its non-departmental public bodies and (c) other public bodies which are dependent on his Department for funding. [21509]

Mr Davey: The administration budget of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) will reduce by an overall 40% in real terms over the spending review
8 Nov 2010 : Column 168W
including savings that will come with the abolition of regional development agencies.

The expected savings for BIS and its partner organisations (excluding RDAs) is equivalent to a 22% reduction (net of redundancies) over four years.

Determining optimal work force reforms in order to live within this Department's spending review resource DEL settlement will be an ongoing process. Detailed decisions regarding the number of redundancies that may be required have yet to be finalised.

Ms Angela Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the cost to his Department of staff redundancy in each of the next four years. [21510]

Mr Davey: The administration budget of the Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) will reduce by an overall 40% in real terms over the spending review including savings that will come with the abolition of RDAs.

The expected savings for BIS and its partner organisations (excluding RDAs) is equivalent to a 22% reduction (net of redundancies) over four years.

Determining optimal work force reforms in order to live within this Department's spending review resource DEL settlement will be an ongoing process. Detailed decisions regarding the number of redundancies that may be required have yet to be finalised.

Regional Development Agencies

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he plans to take to ensure that the disposal of the business and technology-related assets of regional development agencies will create maximum long-term value for the economy and their local areas. [22460]

Mr Prisk: Business and technology assets, like all other RDA assets, will be disposed of in line with a set of guiding principles which includes the requirement for decisions on disposal of assets to reflect the need to further the economic development and regeneration of the relevant area. It is also the case that some assets have national strategic importance and this will be taken into account when considering the future destination of such an asset.

Students: Fess and Charges

Mr Betts: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what estimate he has made of the proportion of students likely to pay off tuition fee debts (a) partially and (b) fully within 30 years of graduation following the implementation of his proposals regarding tuition fee levels; and if he will make a statement. [20216]

Mr Willetts: The Government have now set out their proposals for higher education and student finance in Parliament following the Browne review of higher education and student finance. The Government have broadly accepted Lord Browne's proposals on repayment while adapting the system to make it more progressive.


8 Nov 2010 : Column 169W

The estimated proportion of students who would repay a typical £30,000 of loans in full within 30 years is 50%, while 48-49% will partially repay and 1-2% will make no repayments either because their income does not surpass the repayment threshold or because they die or become permanently disabled.

Students: Finance

Sir Alan Beith: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the cost of the Student Loans Scheme was to (a) the body handling
8 Nov 2010 : Column 170W
the administration of such loans, (b) HM Revenue and Customs and (c) the Government Departments involved (i) in real terms and (ii) as a proportion of monies repaid by borrowers in each of the last five years. [21608]

Mr Willetts: Student loans form part of a broader package of financial support provided to students in Higher Education. The costs relating to individual elements of this package are not held separately. The available information is presented in the following table:

Department's contributions to the costs of the Student Loans Company Limited( 1) Department's contributions to the costs of HM Revenue and Customs on the student finance Total cost to the Department and its predecessors for activities related to Higher Education policy and delivery( 2)
Financial year Total student loans repayments collected (£ million) In real terms (£ million) As a proportion of repayments collected (percentage) In real terms (£ million) As a proportion of repayments collected (percentage) In real terms (£ million) As a proportion of repayments collected (percentage)

2005-06

481.6

49.9

10.4

4.9

1.0

8.2

1.7

2006-07

529.9

52.4

9.9

5.1

1.0

8.4

1.6

2007-08

633.5

48.4

7.6

4.9

0.8

8

1.3

2008-09

899.6

78.6

8.7

4.1

0.5

7.8

0.9

2009-10

1,009.7

79.8

7.9

6.2

0.6

7.5

0.7

(1) Costs provided relate to the assessment and payment of both loans and grants to English students, and the collection of repayment of loans from English students. Specific costs for the policy and delivery relating specifically to student loans are not held and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.
(2) Costs provided represent the total cost of providing Higher Education policy and delivery. Specific costs for the policy and delivery relating specifically to student loans are not held and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Work and Pensions

Atos Healthcare

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much his Department paid for the services provided by Atos Healthcare in 2009-10. [22688]

Chris Grayling: The Department has paid Atos Healthcare £107 million in 2009-10 for the services provided under the medical services agreement. This figure not only covers the total number of examinations undertaken across all benefits, but also costs relating to written and verbal medical advice, fixed overheads, administrative costs, investment in new technology and other service improvements.

Children: Maintenance

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent discussions he has had with the Child Support Agency on the difference between the amount of money collected from parents and the amount they have been assessed as being required to pay; and if he will make a statement. [22663]

Maria Miller: Although the CSA have improved their performance over the last few years, there is still much that needs to be done. There have been a number of meetings with the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission to ensure that an effective child maintenance system is available to families as part of the Government's commitment to supporting shared parenting and promoting parental responsibility.

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much the Child Support Agency has (a) assessed as being due and (b) collected in each of the last five years for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [22664] [Official Report, 13 December 2010, Vol. 520, c. 1MC.]

Maria Miller: The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to my hon. Friend with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Stephen Geraghty:


8 Nov 2010 : Column 171W

8 Nov 2010 : Column 172W
Table 1: Assessed amount due and collections
Quarter to : Cases with maintenance liability Average weekly assessment (£) Annual assessed amount (£ million) Total Child Maintenance collected or arranged (£ million)

September 2006

751,700

37

1,146

867

September 2007

825,100

35

1,502

942

September 2008

855,700

35

1,557

1,090

September 2009

834,000

34

1,475

1,131

September 2010

854,100

34

1,510

1,146

Notes:
1. Caseload figures rounded to nearest 100.
2. Arrears and collections figures rounded to nearest £1m.
3. Caseload figures include cases administered on both the CS2 and CSCS computer systems as well as cases administered off system with the exception of the September 2006 figure and represent a snapshot as of September each year.
4. Collections and arrangements are a true representation of the amount collected and arranged over the 12 months to September.
5. Weekly assessment figures include cases administered on the CS2 and CSCS computer systems only and exclude cases administered off system. Work is underway to more accurately calculate the value of assessments.

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he is taking to reduce the amount of time taken to make Child Support Agency assessments; and if he will make a statement. [22665]

Maria Miller: The Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is responsible for the child maintenance system. I have asked the Child Maintenance Commissioner to write to the hon. Member with the information requested and I have seen the response.

Letter from Stephen Geraghty:


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