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1 Jun 2009 : Column 242W

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many and what proportion of pupils attended mainstream secondary schools at which less than (a) 10 per cent., (b) 20 per cent. and (c) 30 per cent. of pupils obtained fewer than five A* to C grades in GCSE including English and mathematics in 2007-08; [271016]

(2) how many and what proportion of children in care with statements of special educational needs attended mainstream secondary schools at which fewer than (a) 10 per cent., (b) 20 per cent. and (c) 30 per cent. of pupils obtained fewer than five A* to C grades in GCSEs including English and mathematics in 2007-08; [260507]

(3) how many and what proportion of children in care attended mainstream secondary schools at which fewer than (a) 10 per cent., (b) 20 per cent. and (c) 30 per cent. of pupils obtained fewer than five A* to C grades in GCSEs including English and mathematics in 2007-08. [260509]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: Information on children in care is usually sourced from the Looked-After Children database but this is not currently matched to attainment data.

Data on pupils in care are also collected via the School Census. However, the School Census may undercount the number of looked-after children in secondary and special schools.

However, data on special educational needs, in care and attainment are currently not matched together in one data extract. Producing that could be done only at disproportionate cost.

The available data extract does, however, combine data on children in care with Achievement and Attainment Table data. In care data from that source is given in the table.

All pupils Pupils in care
Number of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 attending maintained mainstream schools at which fewer than: Number Percentage Number Percentage

10% of pupils achieve fewer than five GCSEs at grade A*-C including English and Maths

23,733

4.0

16

0.4

20% of pupils achieve fewer than five GCSEs at grade A*-C including English and Maths

34,305

5.9

52

1.3

30% of pupils achieve fewer than five GCSEs at grade A*-C including English and Maths

62,888

10.7

125

3.1


Only schools with results published in the Achievement and Attainment Tables have been included in this answer.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of pupils whose first language was not English achieved five grades A* to C at GCSE including English and mathematics in each year since 1997. [271473]

Jim Knight: This information available can be found in the following table:

Number and percentage of pupils( 1) whose first language is not English( 2) and are at the end of key stage 4 achieving five or more GCSE's at grade A*-C or equivalent including English and mathematics

Number Percentage

2004(3)

19,222

(4)37.3

2005

20,690

40.3

2006

22,714

41.7

2007

24,202

43.5

2008

26,328

45.1

(1) Only pupils in maintained schools have been counted.
(2) First language is either known or believed to be other than English.
(3) For 2004, figures are based on pupils ages 15 rather than at the end of key stage 4.
(4) Percentages of pupils at end of key stage 4 whose first language is not believed to be English.
Source:
National Pupil Database

Figures prior to 2004 cannot be given on a comparable basis as qualifications equivalent to a GCSE were not included in the calculation of the attainment results.

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of pupils of the relevant age did not gain a GCSE at (a) C grade or above, (b) D grade or above and (c) E grade or above in 2008. [259106]


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Jim Knight: The information is as follows:

In 2008:

The figures relate to all pupils in maintained schools; and include full GCSEs and vocational GCSEs.

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families in how many schools (a) 75 per cent. or more and (b) 50 per cent. or more of pupils eligible to receive free school meals did not achieve a single GCSE above grade D in 2008. [251048]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: The information requested is provided as follows:

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of pupils whose first language was not English and who had special educational needs achieved five grades A* to C at GCSE in each year since 1997. [265672]

Jim Knight: This information available can be found in the following table:

Number and percentage of pupils( 1) with special educational needs, whose first language is not English( 2) and are at the end of key stage 4 achieving five or more GCSE's at grade A*-C or equivalent

Number Percentage

2004(3)

1,350

(4)14.9

2005

1,815

19.5

2006

2,460

23.0

2007

3,333

27.9

2008

4,519

32.9

(1) Only pupils in maintained schools have been counted.
(2) First language is either known or believed to be other than English.
(3) For 2004, figures are based on pupils ages 15 rather than at the end of key stage 4.
(4) Percentages of pupils at end of key stage 4 with special educational needs and whose first language is not believed to be English.
Source:
National Pupil Database

Figures prior to 2004 cannot be given on a comparable basis as qualifications equivalent to a GCSE were not included in the calculation of the attainment results.


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Gifted Children

Mr. Milburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and what proportion of (a) primary and (b) secondary school pupils in (i) each region of England and (ii) Darlington are on gifted and talented programmes. [275751]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: The Department does not collect data on pupils participating in gifted and talented programmes. Through the School Census schools are asked to confirm the gifted and talented pupils they have identified. I have placed in the House Libraries a table showing the number and percentage of identified gifted and talented pupils in maintained primary and secondary schools at January 2008, broken down by local authority and region. This shows that the figures for Darlington are 3.7 per cent. (primary) and 13.6 per cent. (secondary), against national figures of 8.1 per cent. and 13.6 per cent. respectively.

Head Teachers

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools did not have a permanent head teacher for any period in each of the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement. [276511]

Jim Knight: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Literacy: Primary Education

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what funding his Department is providing to projects to improve literacy in primary schools in 2009-10. [275785]

Jim Knight: In 2009-10 we expect to spend in the region of £130 million projects to improve literacy in primary schools in 2009-10. This includes funding for schools and local authorities via the standards fund and central delivery costs of the national strategies (including provision of an education field force and free continuing professional development resources for teachers and practitioners), as follows:

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many children in England have received one-to-one tuition in reading through the Every Child A Reader programme since its national implementation; [275789]

(2) what funding has been allocated to the national implementation of the Every Child A Reader programme; [275787]

(3) what the estimated cost per child of the Every Child A Reader programme is; and if he will make a statement. [275788]


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Sarah McCarthy-Fry: By the end of this school year, just over 8,000 children will have received one-to-one tuition in reading through the Every Child a Reader programme since its national implementation in September 2008. This is at a cost to Government of approximately £17 million over the academic year 2008/09. The implementation of the Every Child a Reader programme is proving to be very successful, with children who access the intensive elements of these programmes making four to five times the normal rate of progress.

A report by KPMG’s Every Child a Chance Trust, published in January 2009, estimates the cost per child to be £2,609. This figure includes the costs incurred by local authorities as well as the national training and infrastructure co-ordinated through the University of London’s Institute of Education.

This Government are committed to ensuring every child learns to read. For most, this will mean good systematic phonics through the early years and beginning of primary school. For others, extra provision will be necessary—primarily through school-based interventions and our Every Child a Reader programme. We continue to fund local authorities and schools to strike the appropriate balance between whole class teaching and catch-up interventions for those children that need it. We remain committed to rolling out this highly effective programme to reach 30,000 children a year by 2010/11.

Members Correspondence: Learning and Skills Council

Mr. Winnick: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) when he plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Walsall, North of 7 April 2009 on Learning and Skills Council funding; [277482]

(2) when the Chief Executive of the Learning and Skills Council plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Walsall, North of 7 April 2009 on funding. [277483]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: A response to the letter to the Secretary of State, signed by the Minister for Schools and Learners, was sent to my hon. Friend on 27 May 2009.

The Learning and Skills Council has been focused on resolving allocations for schools, colleges and independent training providers. Letters with revised allocations for 2009/10, including the letter to my hon. Friend will be issued as soon as possible after the period of sensitivity around elections.

National Curriculum Tests

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will place in the Library a copy of all correspondence between the Secretary of State, the Minister of State for Schools and Learners and Mr. Ken Boston between January and December 2008. [271772]

Jim Knight: QCA has now placed correspondence between me and Ken Boston, in his role as chief executive of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), on their website at:

That web page also includes correspondence between QCA and other Government Ministers.


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Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what recent assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of standard assessment tests in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in raising standards of literacy and numeracy; [272951]

(2) what consideration he has given to the replacement of standard assessment tests with a system of assessment by teachers. [272952]

Jim Knight: Over the last 10 years, National Curriculum testing and assessment has played a vital role in ensuring that more than 100,000 more pupils leave primary school secure in English and maths. The Key Stage 2 tests provide a robust and objective measure of pupils' performance, and a recent survey confirmed that they are greatly valued by parents.

We announced last year that 14-year-olds would no longer be required to sit national Key Stage 3 tests, but would be assessed by ongoing teacher assessment throughout the key stage. At the same time, we established a new Expert Group on assessment to advise the Government on the future of testing and assessment and its role in school accountability. The group published its report on 7 May 2009. The group reported that the Key Stage 2 tests are valuable, vital for public accountability and a key part of giving parents objective information on their children's levels of attainment and progress. The group also made a number of recommendations for strengthening the quality of teacher assessment in primary and secondary schools.

The report and its recommendations, which the Government have agreed to in full, can be viewed on the DCSF website at:


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