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The Government are committed to rebuilding Apprenticeships. Since 1997 we have witnessed a renaissance in Apprenticeships from a low point of 65,000 to a record 225,000 apprenticeship starts in 2007/08. Completion rates are also at a record high with 64 per cent. successfully completing an apprenticeship—up from 37 per cent. in 2004/05.

Mr. Dai Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what events were (a) held and (b) visited by Ministers in his Department during Apprenticeship Week in February; and if he will post on his Department’s website a copy of the report on apprenticeships commissioned by his Department from Populus. [276303]

Mr. Simon: During Apprenticeship Week there were events across the length and breadth of the country, across sectors and industries, employers and providers,
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Sector Skills Councils and Learning and Skills Council (LSC) regions. The activity generated over 600 pieces of national, regional and trade coverage that conveyed the diversity and strength of apprenticeships.

The week received full cross party support from MPs and Ministers. Some examples of these events are:

Regions and stakeholders up and down the country ran events aimed at encouraging employers to take on more apprentices. These were supported by a large bank of spokespeople, local authorities, national employers and celebrities. There are too many to list but some examples are:

Colleges were also heavily involved with both independent events and activities such as Exeter College in the South West organised a parade of 50 Performing Arts Students through the town to raise awareness of apprenticeships.

Secretary of State John Denham attended two events during the week.

Lord Young also took an active role in the events of the week:


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David Lammy MP also participated in the week:

Sion Simon MP visited the opening of Sutton Coldfield/Matthew Boulton Learning Resource Centre during which he met a group of Apprentices at the business centre.

The Populus research referred to was not commissioned by the Department for Innovation Universities and Skills, but by a PR agency on behalf of the Learning and Skills Council. The research was published on 24 February in conjunction with a press notice released to support the activity during Apprenticeship Week. It is available on the National Apprenticeship Service website.

Apprentices: Greater London

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many public sector apprenticeships have been started in each London local authority area since 2005. [276213]

Mr. Simon: We do not hold centrally data on the number of apprentices there have been in the public sector by local authority. The Government are committed to developing and expanding apprenticeships in the public sector and earlier this year Cabinet colleagues announced plans for the expansion of the apprenticeships scheme across the public sector. We announced a £140 million package to deliver 35,000 extra places this year of which 21,000 would be in the public sector.

Apprentices: South Yorkshire

Jeff Ennis: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many people commenced level 2 apprenticeships in (a) Barnsley, (b) Doncaster and (c) South Yorkshire in each of the last five years. [275821]

Mr. Simon: The following table shows the number of people starting a Level 2 apprenticeship in the local authorities of Barnsley and Doncaster, and the metropolitan county of South Yorkshire for 2003/04 to 2007/08.

Level 2 Apprenticeship s tarts

2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08

Barnsley

1,100

1,000

1,000

1,100

1,500

Doncaster

1,700

1,700

1,800

1,600

2,000

South Yorkshire

4,900

4,600

4,300

4,200

5,300

Notes:
1. Area is based on home postcode of learner.
2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest 100.
3. South Yorkshire metropolitan county is made up of the local authorities of Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and the City of Sheffield.
Source:
WBL ILR

The Government are committed to rebuilding Apprenticeships. Since 1997 we have witnessed a renaissance in Apprenticeships from a low point of 65,000 to a record 225,000 apprenticeship starts in 2007/08. Completion rates are also at a record high with 64 per cent. successfully completing an apprenticeship—up from 37 per cent. in 2004/05.


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Basic Skills

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills which 10 skills courses are the most (a) over- and (b) under-subscribed. [274060]

Mr. Simon: Information on whether individual courses are over-subscribed or under-subscribed is not collected centrally. FE colleges and providers are independent institutions and are responsible for determining their own curriculum offer in order to respond to the demand locally from learners and employers. The curriculum offered by colleges will therefore change to respond to this demand rather than being a set offer that learners and employers apply for. Funding for these courses will also reflect demand and reward those colleges and providers that are most effective at meeting local demand. This will include moving funding from under performing colleges and providers in order to support those over performing.

FE colleges and providers are given indicative budgets based on the expected delivery of an overall volume of learning. However, the actual numbers and types of courses delivered by a college or provider will depend on demand. The Statistical First Release (SFR) “Post-16 Education: Learner Participation, Outcomes and Level of Highest Qualification Held” (March 2009) provides information on the number of LSC-funded learners.

Tables 1 and 2 show the 10 most/least popular Sector Subject Areas for learning aims in 2007/08, the subject area in which the course is based. It also shows the total number of learning aims undertaken in further education colleges.

Table 1: Learning aims in 2007/08 by Sector Subject Area (SSA)—10 most popular SSAs for courses undertaken in further education colleges
Sector Subject Area (tier 2) Number of learning aims

Foundations for Learning and Life

2,000,700

ICT for Users

338,400

Health and Social Care

335,900

Preparation for Life and Work

315,700

Science

180,700

Crafts, Creative Arts and Design

179,400

Sport, Leisure and Recreation

153,700

Business Management

131,700

Information and Communication Technology

128,700

Languages, Literature and Culture of the British Isles

126,400


Table 2: Learning aims in 2007/08 by Sector Subject Area (SSA)—10 least popular SSAs for courses undertaken in further education colleges
Sector Subject Area (tier 2) Number of learning aims

Social Sciences

5,600

Warehousing and Distribution

3,200

Marketing and Sales

2,400

Publishing and Information Services

2,400

Architecture

1,800

Archaeology and Archaeological Sciences

1,500

Medicine and Dentistry

600

Urban, Rural and Regional Planning

300

Anthropology

100

Linguistics

Notes:
1. A learner may be enrolled on more than one learning aim.
2. Includes LSC-funded learners only.
3. “—” indicates less than 50 aims.
Source:
FE and UfI Individualised Learner Records

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Leeds City College Keighley

Mrs. Cryer: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills if he will take steps to ensure that the building programme for Leeds City College Keighley campus is completed on schedule; and if he will make a statement. [276678]

Mr. Simon: Capital funding for Further Education colleges is administered by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC). As the information requested is with regard to an operational matter for the Council, I have asked Geoffrey Russell, the acting LSC chief executive, to write to my hon. Friend with the further information requested. A copy of his letter will be placed in the House Libraries.

Departmental Contracts

Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what services his Department has outsourced in each year since its creation; and if he will make a statement. [275634]

Mr. Simon: The Department was created in June 2007. Its corporate services were then provided by the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) and the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR). Changes and consolidations have been made to those arrangements, so that the list of corporate services now provided by DCSF is as follows:

The list of corporate services now provided by BERR is as follows:

In addition:

Many of the Department’s functions are devolved to the organisations that it funds. These are the principal areas in which functions have been transferred away from DIUS since its creation:


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