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This information will be placed in the House Libraries. It will also be made available on the Teachernet website within the next few days via the following link:

General Certificate of Secondary Education

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families with reference to the answer of 6 October 2008, Official Report, columns 489-90W, on General Certificate of Secondary Education, how many and what proportion of (a) all pupils and (b) pupils eligible to receive free school meals did not attain any GCSE grades higher than D in each year since 2002, broken down by local authority area. [243542]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: The information available will be placed in the House Libraries.

Figures for 2002 have not been provided as these are not available on a comparable basis.

Pupils: Diabetes

Mr. Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what steps his Department takes to encourage increased awareness of diabetes among teachers and head teachers; and if he will make a statement; [244166]

(2) what support is made available in schools for children (a) up to the age of 11 and (b) aged 11 to 16 years old who have diabetes; and if he will make a statement. [244167]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: “Managing Medicines in Schools and Early Years Settings”, issued jointly by my Department and the Department of Health in 2005, specifically addresses what schools can do to support pupils with medical needs such as diabetes. It encourages schools and local authorities to develop policies on the management of pupils’ medicines and on supporting pupils with medical needs, taking account of local resources and their various responsibilities. We produced sister guidance in the same year, entitled “Including me: managing complex health needs in schools and early years settings”.

We are taking a number of steps to ensure that pupils with long-term medical conditions have access to the help they need to enable them to attend school and participate in school activities.

Special Educational Needs

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many and what percentage of pupils with (a) a statement of special educational needs and (b) unstatemented special educational needs who attended maintained special schools achieved five A* to G grades at GCSE in each year since 2003; [253441]

(2) how many and what percentage of pupils with (a) a statement of special educational needs and (b) unstatemented special educational needs who attended maintained special schools achieved (i) five A* to C grades in all subjects, (ii) five A* to C grades including English and mathematics and (iii) five A* to G grades at GCSE in each year since 2003. [253442]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: Figures are available for the years 2006 to 2008 only, and are provided in the following table:


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Number and percentage of pupils who attend maintained special schools achieving GCSE and equivalents
2006 2007 2008

No. % No . % No. %

Children with a statement of special educational needs

5+ A* to C

39

0.4

47

0.5

52

0.5

5+ A* to C including English and maths

17

0.2

21

0.2

30

0.3

5+ A* to G

500

5.2

638

6.6

679

7.0

Children with special educational needs but without a statement

5+ A* to C

(1)

(1)

0

0

0

0

5+ A* to C including English and maths

(1)

(1)

0

0

0

0

5+ A* to G

7

11.1

7

11.5

11

14.7

(1) Less than 5.
Notes:
1. Children with SEN but without a statement can only go to special schools in prescribed circumstances, for example for the purposes of an assessment of their SEN. The numbers of such children are very small and so the data for their results should be treated with caution.
2. Pupils at the end of Key Stage 4.
3. Figures are based on final data in 2006-07 and revised data in 2008.

Home Department

Antisocial Behaviour

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will place in the Library a copy of each quarterly return on antisocial behaviour collected by crime and disorder partnerships; and if she will make a statement. [263349]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Crime and disorder reduction partnerships (CDRPs) provide information every quarter to the Home Office on which tools and powers they are deploying to tackle antisocial behaviour.

The Government want to ensure that members of the public can find out easily how their local agencies are tackling antisocial behaviour.

The latest information on the use of tools and powers will be published shortly.

Antisocial Behaviour: Elderly

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individuals aged over 65 years have been arrested for antisocial behaviour offences (a) while under the influence of alcohol, (b) while under the influence of drugs and (c) in total in each of the last 10 years. [264016]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The information requested on arrests is not collected centrally.

The arrests collection held by the Home Office covers arrests for recorded crime (notifiable offences) only, broken down at a main offence group level, covering categories such as violence against the person and robbery.

It is not possible to separately identify antisocial behaviour offences from the categories of arrests reported to the Home Office.

Antisocial Behaviour: Fixed Penalties

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what personal information is stored on the Police National Computer in relation to those who have received a penalty notice for disorder. [263807]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The standard information gathered for an arrest summons and stored on the police national computer (PNC) is:

If the disposal is undertaken in a police station custody suite then a DNA sample and fingerprints can be taken. While the PNC will state whether or not there is a record of DNA and fingerprints for the offender, the data are stored on the National DNA Database and IDENT1 (the National Fingerprint Database) respectively. If the penalty notice for disorder is issued in the street then fingerprints and DNA cannot be taken. In both cases an adjudication of ‘non-conviction’ goes on the record and a disposal of a fine can be recorded.

Cannabis: Young People

Margaret Moran: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people aged under 18 years have been identified in police raids on cannabis factories in the last 12 months. [263684]

Mr. Alan Campbell: Data provided by the Ministry of Justice, showing the number of persons aged 10 to 17 years proceeded against at magistrates courts for cultivating, or being involved in the production of a controlled drug—cannabis, are given in the following table for 2007 (latest available). Data for 2008 will be published in the autumn of 2009.

Identification data are not collected centrally by the police or Ministry of Justice; proceeded against information is provided in lieu.


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The court proceedings statistics provided relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

Number of persons aged 10 to 17 proceeded against at magistrates courts for offences of cultivating and production of a controlled drug—cannabis( 1) , England and Wales, 2007( 2,3)

Number

Cultivate cannabis plant

71

Permit, be concerned in, conspire to, or produce a controlled drug—cannabis

23

(1) Includes offences under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971:
s.4(2)(a)(b); s.6(2); s.8(a) and schedule 4.
(2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.
(3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
Evidence and Analysis Unit—Office for Criminal Justice Reform

Credit Card Fraud and Identity Theft

Mr. Gray: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps the Government are taking to combat (a) credit card fraud and (b) offences related to identity theft perpetrated over the internet. [264169]

Mr. Alan Campbell: The Government are determined to tackle the problem of fraud, whether the victim is a major organisation or a single individual.

Government have allocated £29 million over three years to implement the recommendations of the Fraud Review. This includes the creation of a National Fraud Strategic Authority, which became operational in October last year; a new national lead force role for the City of London Police; and a National Fraud Reporting Centre (NFRC), expected to go live in 2009, which will radically streamline the way that the public report fraud, including fraud committed over the internet, to the police. The NFRC will also equip law enforcement agencies with a powerful intelligence tool and help form the basis of better prevention advice and alerts to fraud threats for business and the public.

The Government are providing £3.5 million over three years to create the Police Central e-crime Unit (PCeU). This will provide support to the Police Service in developing a structured response to online crime, and its initial focus will be on the area of fraud-related electronic crime, working with the NFRC to develop a response to reports on such matters. The PCeU will act as the central unit for the police on promotion of standards for training, procedure and response to e-crime. It will bring together forces, the National Police Improvement Agency and other groups to develop training
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and to coordinate activity to build up the skill levels within policing. Outside of this, the Serious Organised Crime Agency will continue its on-going work to tackle the international and serious organised crime groups operating on the internet, supporting the NFRC and PCeU where appropriate.

Crimes of Violence: Crime Prevention

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much has been spent to date on the Tackling Gangs Action Programme in each of the four cities targeted under the plan, broken down by main category of expenditure. [263191]

Mr. Alan Campbell: More than £3 million has been invested in Birmingham, Liverpool, London and Manchester through the Tackling Gangs Action Programme (TGAP). TGAP saw a 51 per cent. reduction in firearms-related injuries (between October 2007 and February 2008). A breakdown of the funding allocated to each of the four participating cities are outlined in the following tables.

Investment in the Tackling Gangs Action Programme
Birmingham

Workstream £

2007-08

Enforcement, intelligence and prevention work. Including community reassurance and third sector delivery of support

304,037

2008-09

Improve risk management processes

200,000

Implement approaches set out in Tackling Gangs: A Practical Guide

200,000

Total allocation

704,037


Liverpool

Workstream £

2007-08

Enforcement, intelligence and prevention work. Including community reassurance and third sector delivery of support

313,855

2008-09

Improve risk management processes

200,000

Implement approaches set out in Tackling Gangs: A Practical Guide

200,000

Total allocation

713,855


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