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3 Feb 2009 : Column 1060W—continued



3 Feb 2009 : Column 1061W

3 Feb 2009 : Column 1062W
2007/08
Childminders Full day care Out of school day care( 2)
Number Rate Number Rate Number Rate

April to June

Opened

2,400

3.4

400

3.3

500

4.6

Closed

4,000

5.7

400

2.7

400

4.2

July to September

Opened

2,700

4.0

600

4.5

700

6.1

Closed

3,600

5.3

500

3.3

500

4.7

October to December

Opened

2,100

3.1

500

3.7

400

4.1

Closed

3,700

5.6

400

3.2

500

4.7

January to March

Opened

2,200

3.3

600

3.9

400

4.2

Closed

3,300

5.0

400

2.9

500

4.5

Total

Opened

9,300

14.5

2,100

15.0

2,000

19.0

Closed

14,600

22.6

1,700

11.8

1,900

18.1

(1) Figures are rounded to the nearest 10 if under 100, and to the nearest 100 if over 100.
(2) Out of school day care figures may not include services in extended schools as Ofsted data only include providers that have to register separately.
Source:
Ofsted

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the oral answer of 26 January 2009, Official Report, columns 10-11, on child abuse, what steps his Department is taking to encourage parents and others who provide childcare to use non-physical means of modifying a child's behaviour. [253615]

Beverley Hughes: Our approach is to provide parents with positive support and guidance to help them manage their children's behaviour more effectively. This includes making parenting classes more widely available to help give parents the confidence to use other, better means of disciplining their children than physical punishment. This approach works with parents and not against them. We are pleased that parents' attitudes towards smacking have been changing over time; this was the finding of the parental survey conducted in 2007 as part of the review of section 58 of the Children Act 2004.

Physical punishment is banned in schools and in registered childcare settings, including daycare and childminding. It is also banned in children's homes and local authority foster care.

Children: Internet

Mark Hunter: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what steps his Department has taken to encourage internet service providers to practise greater self-regulation in the area of pro-anorexia or pro-bulimia websites; [246090]

(2) what recent steps his Department has taken to promote awareness among parents of the dangers of pro-anorexia and pro-bulimia websites; [246091]

(3) what recent meetings his Department has had with internet service providers regarding websites which are pro-anorexia or pro-bulimia. [246092]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry [holding answer 12 January 2009]: We take the issue of safety on the internet very seriously. That is why we asked Dr. Tanya Byron to lead an independent review on potential risks online and in video games—and we have fully accepted all her recommendations, including those on the needs for vulnerable groups. These include:

The UK Council for Child Internet Safety, a multi stakeholder forum, was launched in September 2008 to implement the Byron recommendations. Its work will lead to the publication of a Child Internet Safety Strategy later this year that will contain specific measures to make the internet a safer place.

We are also working with the Department of Health to implement the recommendations of the report of the independent review of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, ‘Children and Young People in Mind’, published on 18 November. We have set up a National Advisory Council for children's mental health and psychological wellbeing to advise us on implementing the recommendations of the independent review of CAMHS final report and hold us to account on progress. Better access to specialist services for children, young people and families is a priority area for the implementation of the CAMHS review's recommendations.

In addition, the Department of Health announced in October 2008 a £170 million expansion of psychological therapies to provide better support for people with common mental health problems such as eating disorders.

Children's Centres

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment he has made of the viability of children’s centres in circumstances where local authorities comply with guidance issued by his Department that such centres become financially self-sustaining by 2011. [251043]

Beverley Hughes: There is no requirement that Sure Start Children’s Centres become self-sustaining by 2011. Integrated early learning and day care, which is a key part of the offer in children’s centres in the most
3 Feb 2009 : Column 1063W
disadvantaged areas and optional elsewhere, is the only service which is intended to become self-sustaining. The Department’s Phase 3 Sure Start Children’s Centres planning and delivery guidance states that this is to run on business lines once it is established. Local authorities are accountable, through their sufficiency duties, to ensure there is appropriate provision to meet local needs.

Education: Per Capita Costs

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average (a) primary and (b) secondary school per pupil funding is in each local authority area in 2008-09; and if he will make a statement. [249932]

Jim Knight: The per pupil revenue funding figures for each local authority for 2008-09 are shown in the following table. Since 2006-07, the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) is the main source of school funding. As the DSG is distributed through a single guaranteed unit of funding per pupil and is distributed from central government to local government, a primary/secondary split on a central to local government basis is not available. The following figures are for all funded pupils aged three-19 and are provided in cash terms:


3 Feb 2009 : Column 1064W

3 Feb 2009 : Column 1065W
2008-09 DSG plus grants per pupil
£

England

4,690

Barking and Dagenham

5,270

Barnet

5,200

Barnsley

4,480

Bath and North East Somerset

4,430

Bedfordshire

4,410

Bexley

4,730

Birmingham

5,240

Blackburn with Darwen

5,040

Blackpool

4,620

Bolton

4,600

Bournemouth

4,300

Bracknell Forest

4,500

Bradford

4,870

Brent

5,700

Brighton and Hove

4,660

Bristol, City of

5,050

Bromley

4,590

Buckinghamshire

4,510

Bury

4,430

Calderdale

4,570

Cambridgeshire

4,280

Camden

6,910

Cheshire

4,430

Cornwall

4,340

Coventry

4,790

Croydon

4,910

Cumbria

4,430

Darlington

4,550

Derby

4,660

Derbyshire

4,450

Devon

4,280

Doncaster

4,630

Dorset

4,350

Dudley

4,510

Durham

4,730

Ealing

5,620

East Riding of Yorkshire

4,270

East Sussex

4,560

Enfield

5,100

Essex

4,450

Gateshead

4,740

Gloucestershire

4,370

Greenwich

6,260

Hackney

7,250

Halton

4,960

Hammersmith and Fulham

6,490

Hampshire

4,320

Haringey

5,940

Harrow

5,170

Hartlepool

4,830

Havering

4,670

Herefordshire

4,320

Hertfordshire

4,500

Hillingdon

4,990

Hounslow

5,380

Isle of Wight

4,660

Islington

6,660

Kensington and Chelsea

6,530

Kent

4,520

Kingston Upon Hull, City of

4,870

Kingston upon Thames

4,850

Kirklees

4,650

Knowsley

5,080

Lambeth

6,780

Lancashire

4,520

Leeds

4,620

Leicester

4,860

Leicestershire

4,150

Lewisham

6,330

Lincolnshire

4,410

Liverpool

5,140

Luton

4,960

Manchester

5,440

Medway

4,600

Merton

5,010

Middlesbrough

4,960

Milton Keynes

4,710

Newcastle upon Tyne

4,840

Newham

5,970

Norfolk

4,410

North East Lincolnshire

4,850

North Lincolnshire

4,420

North Somerset

4,310

North Tyneside

4,520

North Yorkshire

4,440

Northamptonshire

4,360

Northumberland

4,400

Nottingham

5,330

Nottinghamshire

4,390

Oldham

4,820

Oxfordshire

4,410

Peterborough

4,790

Plymouth

4,540

Poole

4,250

Portsmouth

4,650

Reading

4,870

Redbridge

4,820

Redcar and Cleveland

4,750

Richmond upon Thames

4,750

Rochdale

4,900

Rotherham

4,730

Rutland

4,400

Salford

5,050

Sandwell

4,890

Sefton

4,590

Sheffield

4,650

Shropshire

4,240

Slough

5,130

Solihull

4,270

Somerset

4,350

South Gloucestershire

4,150

South Tyneside

4,910

Southampton

4,750

Southend-on-Sea

4,620

Southwark

6,650

St. Helens

4,640

Staffordshire

4,290

Stockport

4,410

Stockton-on-Tees

4,620

Stoke-on-Trent

4,800

Suffolk

4,320

Sunderland

4,680

Surrey

4,450

Sutton

4,810

Swindon

4,310

Tameside

4,560

Telford and Wrekin

4,510

Thurrock

4,700

Torbay

4,460

Tower Hamlets

7,350

Trafford

4,400

Wakefield

4,550

Walsall

4,700

Waltham Forest

5,330

Wandsworth

5,980

Warrington

4,320

Warwickshire

4,320

West Berkshire

4,570

West Sussex

4,370

Westminster

6,260

Wigan

4,510

Wiltshire

4,250

Windsor and Maidenhead

4,630

Wirral

4,630

Wokingham

4,360

Wolverhampton

4,940

Worcestershire

4,300

York

4,360

Notes:
1. Price base: Cash
2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest £10

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