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25 Nov 2008 : Column 1407W—continued

National Vocational Qualifications: Horse Riding

Mr. Steen: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills (1) how much funding the Government will allocate for horse riding and horse care national vocational qualifications in each of the next three years; and if he will make a statement; [238471]

(2) what public funds were made available for national vocational qualifications in horse riding and horse care in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2007-08 . [238472]


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Mr. Simon: As announced through the Government’s Grant Letter to the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) on 18 November, funding for adult learning will be £3.3 billion in 2009-10, an increase of 4.2 per cent. compared with 2008-09.

Colleges and providers are given indicative budgets based on the expected delivery of an overall volume of learning; the actual funding paid will depend on the choice of learning area made by employers and learners. As funding is not allocated at an individual course level, details of the amount made available to support these specific qualifications are not held centrally in the Department.

However, the LSC are able to provide a breakdown of funds directed towards specific qualifications in past years. I have asked Mark Haysom, chief executive of the LSC, to write out detailing how much was spent on NVQs in horse riding and horse care in 2006-07 and 2007-08. A copy of his reply will be placed in the House Library. It is not possible, however, for any estimate to be given of future funding, since investment from the LSC in specific qualifications comes only in response to demand from learners and employers.

All the sector skills councils (Lantra, for equine studies) are working to develop sector qualifications strategies. These identify the training and skills needs of their sector, and the qualifications that best meet these needs. Public funding for vocational qualifications will increasingly be focused on those qualifications that are deemed a priority for and by particular sectors.

Mr. Steen: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills whether he has plans further to develop the national vocational qualifications for horse riding and horse care. [238473]

Mr. Simon: Sector Skills Councils lead in identifying and driving the development, with awarding bodies, of vocational qualifications which are really needed by their sectors and will best meet the needs of employers and learners.

Performance Appraisal

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many staff in his Department did not achieve an acceptable assessment grade in their annual report in the latest reporting year for which figures are available. [235220]

Mr. Simon: The Department was created on 28 June 2007. The Department’s own performance process was introduced this year but will not trigger any reports, including those judged to be unacceptable, until March 2009. Analysis of performance markings using the legacy Department’s processes for 2008 is expected to be complete by January 2009.

Plain English

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many documents produced by his Department have been submitted to the Plain English Campaign for approval for Crystal Mark status since his Department's creation; in each year since 2005; and how many documents achieved such status in each year. [231120]


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Mr. Simon: DIUS was formed following machinery of government changes on 28 June 2007. DIUS publications are produced by many policy teams who use different suppliers and we do not have a central record of how many have sort approval for Crystal Mark status or how many achieved that status. The information requested can therefore be provided only at a disproportionate cost.

However, DIUS shares editorial services with the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) and therefore only uses editors on the DCSF framework. While there is no requirement in the shared services protocol for documents to be submitted to the Plain English Campaign, all editors on the DCSF framework are made aware of the importance of writing in plain English as stated in the role definition for editors:

The Department also uses the Central Office of Information (COI) who project manage key DIUS publications. COI has confirmed that

The Department also uses the Further Education Communications Gateway panel (FECG), which defines and promotes standards for producing good quality communications for the FE System. The FECG panel currently reviews proposals for and drafts of new DIUS, DCSF and LSC publications that are intended primarily for providers in the FE system and have through this work developed publishing guidelines.

Pre-school Education: Qualifications

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how much on average it cost (a) his Department to provide and (b) a student to complete an NVQ level 3 course in child care in the last 12 months; and what estimate he has made of the average cost to employers per employee taking such a course in that period. [233627]

Mr. Simon: All qualifications that receive public funding through the Learning and Skills Council (LSC), including NVQ level 3 qualifications, are funded at a national rate. This rate is based on the number of hours required to complete the course and a national fee assumption of the amount that either the learner or employer will contribute to the cost of the course, where full fee remission does not apply. For 2008-09, the national fee assumption is 42.5 per cent.

While the national fee assumption is taken into account in the calculation of funding rates, it is for colleges and providers to determine the actual level of fee charged. Where a learner is aged 19-25 and studying for their first full level 3 qualification, they will pay no fee where their qualification is delivered through the adult learner-responsive route or through Train to Gain.

The actual amount of funding that an individual college or provider receives to deliver an NVQ level 3 qualification may vary, due to the application of a provider factor. The provider factor takes account of,
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for example, costs arising from delivering to learners from disadvantaged areas, and the costs related to delivering specific types of course.

I have asked Mark Haysom, the chief executive of the LSC, to write detailing the cost of NVQ level 3 qualifications in child care for the 2008-09 academic year. A copy of his reply will be placed in the House Library.

Research: Finance

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills which international research facilities receive funding from the EU budget. [238878]

Mr. Simon: The following research facilities include non EU Members, and receive funding from the EU budget: CERN, the Institut Laue-Langevin and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The European Union does not provide recurrent funding for any of these facilities but has provided funding in response to competitive bids to the EC such as through the Euratom or framework programmes.

In addition, ITER (the International Tokomak Experimental Reactor) is in the process of being built at Cadarache in France. The European Union framework programme provides 36 per cent. of the funding for ITER.

Students: Income

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what estimate he has made of the average gross annual employment income of (a) full-time and (b) part-time undergraduate students who undertook paid work in the last academic year for which figures are available. [238877]

Mr. Lammy: The Student Income and Expenditure Survey (SIES) is a comprehensive study of students' income, expenditure, borrowing and debt The 2004-05 study showed that 56 per cent. of full-time and 83 per cent. of part-time undergraduate students undertook paid work at some time during the academic year—either during term time, during the short vacations or both. For those undertaking such work, their net earnings (after tax) were on average £3,250 for full-time and £10,390 part time students. Gross earnings are not available.

The 2007-08 Student Income and Expenditure Survey will be published in early 2009.

Train to Gain Programme

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many people living in the Vale of York have participated in Train to Gain in each of the last three years. [238069]

Mr. Simon: There were 190 people living in the parliamentary constituency of the Vale of York who started a Train to Gain programme in 2006-07.

Notes:

1. Train to Gain was created in April 2006. Standard reporting practice is to include the months of April to July 2006 in the 2006-07 academic year. The figure of 190 therefore covers Train to Gain starts over a 16 month period.

2. Fully audited figures are not yet available for 2007-08.


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Unemployment

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills pursuant to the answer of 9 June 2008, Official Report, columns 39-42W, on unemployment, if he will break down the information in each table by (a) socio-economic group and (b) ethnicity. [238792]

Mr. Simon: The estimates of numbers Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) and NEET rates for 16-24 year olds presented in the following tables are taken from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) for Quarter 4 1997 and Quarter 4 2007 as in the previous reply. In order to ensure that the estimates are reasonably robust the tables shown here are for all England given the nature of the breakdowns requested. Despite the condensed nature of the groups shown in the tables some of the estimates are based on small samples and should be treated with caution.

The "socio-economic group" or National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) of a respondent to the Labour Force Survey is based on their own current or past occupation. Consequently such a breakdown is not well suited to young people as it will merely reflect their own most recent occupation rather than their family background. Nevertheless information on two broad groupings of NS-SEC are shown below for Quarter 4 2007. Comparable information by NS-SEC is not available for 1997.

Table (a.1) Not in education, employment or training (NEET) in Quarter 4 2007 by age, gender and broad National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC)
Numbers 16-18( 1) 19-24( 1)
Male Female Total Male Female Total

Higher NS-SEC groups(2)

7,000

5,000

12,000

38,000

60,000

99,000

Lower NS-SEC groups(3)

104,000

76,000

180,000

188,000

304,000

492,000

England

111,000

81,000

192,000

226,000

364,000

590,000

Rates (per cent.)

Higher NS-SEC groups(2)

7

8

8

5

8

6

Lower NS-SEC groups(3)

11

9

10

16

25

21

England

11

9

10

11

18

15

(1) Analysis based on academic age; respondents age at preceding 31 August.
(2) For the purposes of this analysis Higher NS-SEC groups are those from higher managerial down to lower supervisory categories.
(3) For the purposes of this analysis Lower NS-SEC groups are those from the semi routine, routine and never worked, unemployed over a year, not elsewhere classified (NEC) categories. All full time students are defined to be in the NEC category and will therefore be counted in the denominator for the lower NS-SEC groups.
Source:
Labour Force Survey

In order to present reasonably robust estimates the only split by ethnicity here is between white and non-white. There was also a change in the definition of ethnicity between 1997 and 2007 which would make it difficult to present consistent data for a more detailed breakdown.


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Table (b1) Not in education, employment or training (NEET) in Quarter 4 1997 by age, gender and ethnicity
Numbers 16-18( 1) 19-24( 1)
Male Female Total Male Female Total

White

67,000

72,000

139,000

164,000

264,000

428,000

Non-White

7,000

11,000

18,000

26,000

54,000

80,000

England

74,000

83,000

157,000

190,000

318,000

507,000

Rates (per cent.)

White

8

9

9

11

17

14

Non-White

7

12

9

16

31

24

England

8

10

9

11

19

15

(1) Analysis based on academic age; respondents age at preceding 31 August
Source:
Labour Force Survey

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