Previous Section Index Home Page

11 Nov 2008 : Column 1078W—continued

Special Educational Needs

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his Department's policy is on informing parents of children with complex educational and specialist health needs of public and charitable provision that is available for such children nationally and locally. [232459]

Sarah McCarthy-Fry: Under section 12 of the Childcare Act 2006 local authorities (LAs) are required to deliver information, advice and guidance on child care and other local services for parents of children and young people up to age 20.

The information which must be prescribed by local authorities has been prescribed in the Childcare Act 2006 (Provision of Information to Parents) (England) Regulations 2007 (“the regulations”). These regulations require LAs to provide information about whether particular child care is suitable for disabled children, and about services, facilities and publication which may be of particular benefit to disabled children, young people or their parents.

Nationally, the Early Support Programme is the Government's recommended family-centred approach for delivering integrated services for young disabled children, which includes information resources for parents on how to work with local professionals to understand and secure the support their child needs. In addition, the Department funds Contact-a-Family directly and through the Parent Know How programme to provide information to parents of disabled children, including on the state and charitable provision available.

Specialised Diplomas: Business

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the procedures are for ensuring compliance with child protection requirements within businesses applying to participate in joint ventures offering diploma courses. [230058]

Beverley Hughes: Some staff of businesses which deliver parts of diploma courses, including work experience placements, may be required by schools or colleges attended by the learners concerned, or by education business brokers on their behalf, to have Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checks.

CRB checks happen in certain circumstances where it is judged by those responsible for organising the learning or placement that a young person might be at risk of
11 Nov 2008 : Column 1079W
experiencing inappropriate behaviours, for example where they are vulnerable, or are working with someone on a one-to-one basis or over an extended period of time. Guidance for schools, colleges and businesses can be found in ‘Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education’.

Specialised Diplomas: Vetting

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what estimate he has made of the number of (a) Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and (b) enhanced CRB checks which will be required on the members of staff of businesses offering part of a 14 to 19 diploma. [232329]

Beverley Hughes: CRB and Enhanced CRB checks required by members of staff of businesses offering part of a 14 to 19 diploma are expected to be small in number since the majority of diploma principal learning and additional specialist learning will take place in schools, colleges and training providers. Teachers, lecturers and trainers in these settings will have already been CRB checked.


11 Nov 2008 : Column 1080W

Teachers: Training

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what his Department’s targets for the number of people entering initial teacher training for each subject by (a) undergraduate, (b) post-graduate certificate of education and (c) other graduate teacher training routes were in each of the last five years. [233510]

Jim Knight: The following table shows the targets set for recruitment to mainstream Initial Teacher Training (ITT) for primary courses and secondary courses by subject for each academic year between 2004/05 and 2008/09. The Department does not set targets for each route into ITT.

Only the 2008/09 targets include Employment Based Routes Initial Teacher Training (EBITT) courses. Prior to 2008/09 the Department did not set targets for EBITT, although recruitment data for EBITT courses was still taken into account in projecting the future required numbers of recruits and successful completers on each type of programme and by subject to assist in determining the targets required for mainstream ITT targets.

Initial teacher training places( 1) , academic years: 2004/05 to 2008/09 , coverage: England

2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

Primary

16,300

15,800

15,300

14,800

17,460

Secondary(1)

19,500

18,500

17,500

16,500

19,385

O f which:

Art

880

800

700

600

670

Citizenship

250

240

230

220

265

Economics, Social Sciences, Classics. Other subjects

300

290

240

185

325

English (including Drama)

2,350

2,200

2,040

1,920

2,670

Geography

935

925

850

770

770

History

910

810

700

600

685

Mathematics

2,350

2,350

2,350

2,350

2,735

Modern foreign languages

2,050

1,900

1,790

1,670

1,670

Music

725

690

640

600

690

Physical Education

1,500

1,450

1,310

1,180

1,570

Religious Education

730

730

695

665

740

Science

3,225

3,225

3,225

3,225

3,615

Technology, of which:

2,895

2,890

2,730

2,515

2,980

Business Studies

760

730

680

600

590

Design and Technology

1,085

1,060

1,010

930

1,195

Information and communications technology

1,050

1,100

1,040

985

1,195

Vocational subjects(2)

400

Margin of flexibility/secondary reserve(3)

Primary and secondary

35,800

34,300

32,800

31,300

36,845

(1) Targets prior to 2008/09 include School Centred ITT but excludes Employment Based Routes ITT (EBITT). Targets for 2008/08 onwards include EBITT, but exclude Teach First.
(2) Places for vocational subjects in 2006/07 are included with the allocation for related academic subject:
Science includes places for applied science, design and technology includes both manufacturing and engineering, ICT includes applied ICT, business studies includes applied business, geography includes leisure and tourism, art includes applied art and other subjects includes health and social care and subjects relating to the new diploma subjects.
In 2004/05 places for vocational subjects were shown separately.
In 2003/04 the margin of flexibility included places for a vocational subjects pilot.
(3) The margin of flexibility/secondary reserve constituted places that the TDA could allocate to any secondary subject, to support providers whose baselines would otherwise be below economic levels: to ensure the appropriate denominational balance; and to help providers with a high proportion of places in shortage subjects and who therefore had particular uncertainty of income.
Source:
OGSF

11 Nov 2008 : Column 1081W

These data were published as part of the Statistical First Release: School Workforce in England (29/2007) and is available at:

Young Offenders: Education

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what educational provision is in force for young people under 18 years remanded in custody at young offender institutions prior to court disposal. [234142]

Beverley Hughes [holding answer 10 November 2008]: Education, training and personal development activities for all young people in custody are delivered as part of a package of placement services funded by the Youth Justice Board (YJB) and prescribed by a joint YJB/DCSF/MOJ/Learning and Skills Council specification “The Offender Learning Journey for Juveniles”. All young people in custody should receive full-time education and personal development activities, which are based on the national curriculum but with flexibilities to take account of prior learning and other needs such as substance misuse, and behaviour management needs etc which young people may have. The YJB sets requirements for education in Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) and require that 90 per cent. of young people receive 25 hours or more education, training and personal development activity per week.

Young People: Antisocial Behaviour

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what criteria his Department will use to assess the effectiveness of intensive intervention projects. [234730]

Beverley Hughes: The primary objective of intensive intervention projects is to improve outcomes for some of the most vulnerable and challenging young people in society—and to improve outcomes for the communities in which they live. We specifically expect the projects to:

Projects are expected to take referrals from across the whole local authority area. The criteria for referral to the project should draw on the local assessment of young people’s needs which underpins targeted youth support reforms. The target group should include those young people identified as being:

As a guide we would expect young people engaged with the project to also experience a range of the risk factors including:


11 Nov 2008 : Column 1082W

Next Section Index Home Page