Previous Section Index Home Page

8 July 2008 : Column 1482W—continued


8 July 2008 : Column 1483W

Jane Kennedy: Work force change teams in HM Revenue and Customs have worked and will continue to work closely with all business streams within the Department including the Large Business Service. Initial proposals reflect current business plans and future accommodation requirements both for space and facilities.

Nick Ainger: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer with reference to the publication of HM Revenue and Customs Workforce Change proposals on 11 June, how much spare capacity there will be in Ty Glees Carmarthen, following the transfer of staff from Ty Myoddin Carmarthen to Ty Glees. [216638]

Jane Kennedy: HMRC currently has two offices within the Carmarthen area, Crown Buildings, Picton Terrace and Ty Myrddin. The proposal published on 11 June is to retain Crown Buildings and vacate Ty Myrddin, but this is subject to consultation and detailed feasibility work and no decisions have yet been taken. Based on this proposal there would be no spare capacity in the building by 2012. If there was an increased business requirement it would be possible for more staff to work out of Crown Buildings through further optimisation of the existing space or by implementing desk sharing.

Nick Ainger: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer with reference to the publication of HM Revenue and Customs Workforce Change proposals on 11th June, how many staff will be transferred from Pembrokeshire offices to Ty Glees in Carmarthen. [216639]

Jane Kennedy: HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) currently has two offices in Carmarthen; Crown Buildings and Ty Myrddin. Proposals were published on 11 June 2008 which include the retention of Crown Buildings and vacation of Ty Myrddin. No decisions have been taken at this stage.

Nick Ainger: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what discussions HM Revenue and Customs officials have had with officials of the UK Border Agency on the co-location of their staff in Pembrokeshire. [216640]

Jane Kennedy: Estates teams in HM Revenue and Customs and the UK Border Agency are working closely together to identify the scope for mutually beneficial rationalisation of their respective estates across the whole of the UK. This co-operation was set up early in the life of the new shadow UKBA and will continue over many months in order to deal with the technical and legal issues that will need to be overcome to deliver practical estate solutions.

Tax Avoidance: British Overseas Territories

Dr. Pugh: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he is taking to prevent or inhibit the use of British Overseas Territories in tax avoidance by UK-based (i) companies and (ii) individuals. [216751]

Jane Kennedy: There are a range of measures that help to combat tax avoidance, through British Overseas Territories and more generally. These include the tax avoidance disclosure regime, under which tax avoidance
8 July 2008 : Column 1484W
schemes must be disclosed to HM Revenue and Customs, in accordance with strict rules that enable the users of schemes to be identified.

In addition, the UK is negotiating tax information exchange agreements with a number of Overseas Territories, which should increase transparency and ensure that HMRC is able to obtain information on the income of UK tax residents arising from accounts and activities in those territories. The UK is also encouraging the Overseas Territories to conclude similar agreements with other countries, within the framework of the OECD Harmful Tax Practices initiative.

The Caribbean Overseas Territories have all concluded savings tax agreements with EU member states within the framework of the Savings Directive, introduced in 2005. This is specifically concerned with tackling tax evasion and provides for the exchange of information, or the transfer of withholding tax, on the savings accounts of UK and other EU residents in those territories.

Taxation: Rebates

Matthew Taylor: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what budgetary provision his Department makes for the repayment of overpaid taxation; and by what means such provision is calculated. [216189]

Jane Kennedy: Where appropriate, the tax forecasts published in each Financial Statement and Budget Report and pre-Budget report are net of amounts that are expected to be repaid. However, HMRC make no budgetary provision for the repayment of overpaid taxes. When repayments to taxpayers become due, because they have overpaid, these amounts are netted off revenue collected by HMRC and the net amount collected is then paid over to the Consolidated Fund. Net revenue collected by tax and duty type is shown in the Department's Trust Statement.

Innovation, Universities and Skills

Adult Education: Hemsworth

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what funding has been allocated to adult education in Hemsworth constituency in each of the last five years. [215877]

Bill Rammell: Funding for adult participation through the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) will reach nearly £3.6 billion per year by 2010-11, an increase of 17 per cent. compared with 2007-08. This will support on average over three million funded adult learners per year over the next three years.

LSC funding is allocated to further education (FE) colleges and providers to offer education and skills training to adults in response to the needs of both learners and employers. As FE providers often operate cross constituency borders, the following table provides information on adult funding in respect of the two main FE providers serving the Wakefield area; Wakefield college and Wakefield district council.


8 July 2008 : Column 1485W

8 July 2008 : Column 1486W
Adult funding for the main further education providers in the Wakefield district

2003/04 (actuals) 2004/05 (actuals) 2005/06 (actuals) 2006/07 (actuals) 2007/08 (allocations)

Wakefield college(1)

3,520,098

4,043,563

3,683,988

3,981,982

4,200,475

Wakefield district council(2)

2,852,790

3,176,379

3,176,782

2,888,414

2,884,347

Total

6,372,888

7,219,942

6,860,770

6,870,396

7,084,822

(1) Total funding includes funding for 19+ further education provision, Train to Gain (which rolled out fully from 2006/07) and 19+ work-based learning. 2 Total funding includes funding for 19+ further education provision and adult safeguarded learning (includes adult and community learning, personal and community development learning among other provision). No Train to Gain funding information is available but the district council do deliver this provision as part of a consortium.

Other providers based in the Wakefield district deliver Train to Gain and Work-based Learning. The adult funding allocated to these providers has not been included on the basis that they will be delivering to learners across a much wider area—in some cases at a regional or national level. Including this information would not accurately represent the funding spent on adult education in the Wakefield/Hemsworth area.

Jon Trickett: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what the average cost of an adult education course is in (a) England, (b) Hemsworth constituency and (c) Wakefield District. [215878]

Bill Rammell: The Learning and Skills Council (LSC) use a national funding system comprising of national rates as the basis for determining the amount of public funding payable for courses funded through the Adult Learner and Employer Responsive funding models. The actual funding for an individual course is based on the number of hours required to complete the course. Those learners who do not qualify for full fee remission are expected to contribute to the cost of the course in line with the national fee assumption. For the 2007/08 academic year the national fee assumption is 37.5 per cent. of the national funding rate.

Adjustments are made to this value to take account of the higher costs of delivering certain subjects. The total public funding allocated to a college or provider will also take account of factors such as success rates and disadvantage (providing additional funding for learners from deprived areas). In light of the number of factors affecting the actual amount payable for each course it is not possible to provide an average level of funding for an adult education course.

Copyright

Adam Afriyie: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what progress the UK Intellectual Property Office has made in its consultation on copyright exceptions; and when he expects it to report the results of the consultation. [217146]

Ian Pearson: The consultation arising from the Gowers review of intellectual property, is taking place in two phases. The first phase was launched in January this year, and closed in April. Some 250 responses were received. Most of the respondents fell into two distinct categories: either seeking to maintain existing levels of protection for rights holders, or wanting far greater use of exceptions to permit freer access to copyrighted materials.

The UK Intellectual Property Office is currently working towards the second stage of the consultation, which is expected to be launched later this year. This second stage is intended to set out any legislative changes which will give effect to the Government's proposals. Final decisions on the way forward will be taken in the light of the outcome of the second phase.

European Space Agency: Contracts

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what estimate he has made of the value of the contracts awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises in the UK from involvement in European Space Agency projects. [216039]

Ian Pearson: ESA publishes quarterly figures on contracts placed, but does not publish information specifically on SMEs.

European Space Agency: Finance

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what estimate he has made of the value in sterling of industrial or governmental contributions to European Space Agency optional projects. [216040]

Ian Pearson: The estimated total value in sterling of governmental contributions to European Space Agency optional projects in 2008 is £124,827,000. The UK's participation in optional projects is carefully selected to address Government policy priorities such as climate change and technological innovation.

European Space Agency: Job Creation

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what estimate he has made of employment created in small and medium-sized businesses in the UK by European Space Agency projects. [216037]

Ian Pearson: There are no estimates available relating solely to small and medium-sized business employment on European Space Agency projects.

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what estimate he has made of employment created in the UK by European Space Agency projects. [216038]

Ian Pearson: There are no estimates relating solely to European Space Agency projects but in the ‘Size and Health of the UK Space Industry’ survey published by BNSC in 2006, analysis indicated that 16,200 people were already employed in the space sector and, taking indirect factors into account, the UK space sector contributes some £7 billion and 70,000 jobs to the economy.


8 July 2008 : Column 1487W

European Space Agency: UK Contributions

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how much the UK contributed to the European Space Agency in 2007. [216041]

Ian Pearson: UK subscriptions to European Space Agency (ESA) programmes are carefully chosen to address the UK's scientific and commercial priorities as well as to ensure that UK industrial capabilities are exploited to the full. The Government through the British National Space Centre works closely with ESA to ensure maximum possible returns to UK industry, including SMEs. The UK contributed a little over €259,456,000 to the European Space Agency in 2007.

Learndirect

Mr. Willetts: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many and what proportion of Learndirect centres are on the premises of (a) companies and (b) other private sector organisations. [216770]

Mr. Lammy: The following figures are based on information available at the end of June 2008. Learndirect is subcontracted to 324 providers and, through these providers, Learndirect operates in 728 centres in a wide range of settings. 56.5 per cent. (411) of Learndirect centres are based in the premises of private sector organisations, of which 0.4 per cent. (three) are based in the premises of a company.

In order to demonstrate how we reach 100 per cent. I have included a full breakdown:

Should you have any other questions about Ufi or LearnDirect please do not hesitate to contact us.

Lung Cancer: Research

Sir Peter Soulsby: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what funding the Medical Research Council has provided for research into lung cancer in each financial year since 1997-98; what research has been funded by such expenditure; and if he will make a statement. [216786]

Ian Pearson: The Medical Research Council's (MRC) direct expenditure on lung cancer research since 1997 was as follows:


8 July 2008 : Column 1488W

Expenditure on lung cancer research (£)

1997/98

93,000

1998/99

268,000

1999/2000

184,000

2000/01

581,000

2001/02

1.6 million

2002/03

1.8 million

2003/04

2.1 million

2004/05

1.5 million

2005/06

1.6 million

2006/07

2.1 million


Next Section Index Home Page