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1 Apr 2008 : Column 847W—continued


English domiciled students receiving means tested maintenance loans by entitlement category, year and loan rate( 1) , academic year 2006/07
Entitlement category—Living at: Full year or final year Students receiving loan at maximum rate Students receiving loan below maximum rate

Home

Full

69,800

1,400

Final

29,900

200

London

Full

36,100

600

Final

14,000

200

Elsewhere

Full

186,400

3,200

Final

76,200

500

(1) Table excludes students who move between entitlement categories during the year (e.g. Home and Elsewhere). Figures are rounded to the nearest 100. Source: Student Loans Company.

English domiciled students receiving maintenance loans including extra weeks allowances by entitlement category, year and loan rate( 1) , academic year 2006/07
Entitlement category— Living at: Full year or final year Students receiving loan above maximum rate (due to extra weeks) Students receiving loan at maximum rate Students receiving loan below maximum rate

Home

Full

45,000

24,900

27,000

Final

19,900

10,100

11,500

London

Full

25,600

10,600

19,400

Final

10,100

3,900

8,000

Elsewhere

Full

82,200

104,500

141,900

Final

36,300

40,000

58,300

(1) Table relates to total maintenance loans including non-means tested loans, means tested loans and extra weeks allowances. Excludes students who move between entitlement categories during the year (e.g. Home and Elsewhere). Figures are rounded to the nearest 100. Source: Student Loans Company.

1 Apr 2008 : Column 848W

Students: Low Incomes

Linda Gilroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of his Department's policies to encourage people from low income households to study at university. [172395]

Bill Rammell: This Government have instigated and supported a range of policies to encourage a wider range of people to be able and willing to participate in higher education (HE). We have done this because of economic need and to support social justice. Forecasts show that half of the 12 million jobs that should become vacant between 2004 and 2014 will be in occupations most likely to employ graduates. And higher education offers significant benefits to individuals—over their working life, the average graduate can expect to earn comfortably over £100,000 more than a similar person with just A levels, and graduates experience better health, are less likely to commit crime and are more likely to engage in civil society. It is right that these benefits should be available to all, regardless of their background, but the issues affecting HE participation patterns are varied and need to be addressed across the education system.

In recent years we have made good progress. There has been a steady increase in the number and proportion of entrants to HE who come from lower social class backgrounds. This is reflected in recent UCAS application data for 2008 entry—in England, the proportion of applicants coming from lower social class backgrounds is up from 28.2 per cent. in 2007 to 28.9 per cent. this year. The numbers and proportions of entrants to HE from lower social class backgrounds are at their highest ever levels, as are the numbers and proportions of entrants from state schools and low participation neighbourhoods. Similarly, the proportion of young people from lower social class backgrounds is at it highest level.

There is a range of interventions which contribute to this progress—the Aimhigher Programme, improvement in student financial support both from the Government and from higher education institution bursaries, institutions’ own outreach activity working directly with schools and the Government's broader efforts to raise attainment across the board and to narrow attainment gaps.

The Aimhigher Programme has been operating nationally since 2004 although similar, predecessor programmes began in 2001. The programme is designed to increase opportunities for people from under-represented groups to participate in HE. There have been various evaluations of the programme which show that it has had a positive impact on participants' attainment and their attitudes towards HE. In the programme's early years (2001 to 2002 when it was known as Aimhigher: Excellence Challenge (AH: EC)), and before it became a national programme, research showed that being part of AH: EC:


1 Apr 2008 : Column 849W

Additional research conducted by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) showed that over 70 per cent. of universities responding to its survey said that Aimhigher as a national programme added value to their widening participation policies and activities, that Aimhigher provided a positive and welcome boost to their own efforts to widen participation in HE and that this translated into increased applications.

Widening participation requires long-term address and we have announced the continuation of Aimhigher to 2011. We will continue to work with HEFCE to commission a national study to report before the end of 2011 on outcomes across the whole programme since 2004, when the unified, national Aimhigher was introduced. And at local level, Aimhigher Partnerships will determine the extent to which the Aimhigher programme has raised HE awareness, aspirations and attainment among participants and within participating institutions.

There is less accumulated evidence about the effectiveness of other interventions given that they were introduced relatively recently. But we do know that the Office for Fair Access, which agrees access agreements with HEIs, showing what they will do to attract students from lower-income backgrounds, reported that in the first operational year of access agreements, 2006-07:

We continue to support the work of universities and colleges through the Department's own communications activity and make efforts to raise awareness of bursaries alongside all other elements of the higher education student finance package.

Television

Mr. Maude: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many plasma television screens have been purchased by his Department, since its creation; and how many such screens have been purchased by its agencies in the last 24 months. [191079]

Mr. Lammy: The Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) was created by the Prime Minister on 28 June 2007.

DIUS has purchased eight plasma screens for use at its London and Sheffield offices.

The UK Intellectual Property Office (UK-IPO) has purchased three plasma screen TVs in the last 24 months. Other than purchases for the purpose of
1 Apr 2008 : Column 850W
testing under the RoHS regulations, the National Weights and Measures Laboratory (NWML) has not purchased any plasma TV screens in the last 24 months.

Training

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills how many adult and employer responsive training places will be available in the academic year 2010-11. [173171]

Bill Rammell: The Learning and Skills Council (LSC) Statement of Priorities published on 16 November set out the funding strategy for post-16 further education (FE) and skills for the comprehensive spending review (CSR) period (2008-09 to 2010-11). Total investment on post-16 FE and skills will increase from £11.2 billion in 2007-08 to £12.4 billion in 2010-11.

Annex C to the joint Grant Letter to the LSC from my Department and Department for Children, Schools and Families provides a breakdown of the number of funded places by programme. This is reproduced here and is also available at:

It shows that in 2010-11 a total of 2.5 million adult learner places will be funded through the adult learner and employer responsive models. In line with the national roll-out of level 3 provision delivered through Train to Gain set out in ‘Train to Gain: A Plan for Growth (November 2007)’, the number of funded adult learners on full level 3 provision significantly increases between 2009-10 and 2010-11 (from 144,000 to 356,000). This increase reflects the higher level skills challenge set out by Lord Leitch. It more than offsets the planned reductions in funded non-accredited and non-priority learning places in 2010-11 resulting in an overall increase in funded adult learner places compared with 2009-10.

Taking into account all adult learners funded by the LSC, not just those on provision funded through the adult learner and employer learner responsive models, on average over three million adult learners will be funded each year over the CSR period.


1 Apr 2008 : Column 851W
Planned outputs/volumes (academic year)
Academic years
Budget line 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
Learner numbers

Youth Participation

of which for planning purposes:

School Sixth Forms

376,000

370,000

364,000

16-19 FE

773,000

773,000

773,000

16-18 Apprenticeships

240,000

260,000

281,000

Entry to Employment

70,000

70,000

70,000

Total Youth Participation

1,460,000

1,473,000

1,488,000

Academies

16,000

22,000

28,000

Adult Learner Responsive

FE19+

1,372,000

1,127,000

1,154,000

Ufl/learndirect

204,000

179,000

152,000

Employability Learning

24,000

29,000

37,000

Adult Learner Responsive sub total

1,600,000

1,335,000

1,343,000

of which for planning purposes:

Foundation Learning Tier

368,000

372,000

374,000

Skills for Life

923,000

914,000

904,000

Full Level 2

133,000

143,000

161,000

Full Level 3

137,000

157,000

165,000

Developmental Learning

497,000

216,000

116,000

Employer Responsive

Employer based NVQs

185,000

196,000

216,000

Apprenticeships/Workbased Learning

114,000

124,000

126,000

Train to Gain

600,000

638,000

872,000

Employer Responsive sub total

899,000

958,000

1,214,000

of which for planning purposes:

Foundation Learning Tier

10,000

10,000

10,000

Skills for Life

304,000

313,000

323,000

Full Level 2 (Excluding Apprenticeships)

603,000

637,000

664,000

Full Level 3 (Excluding Apprenticeships)

136,000

144,000

356,000

Apprenticeships

113,000

123,000

125,000

Developmental Learning

11,000

3,000

0

Safeguarded Learning

630,000

605,000

585,000

Total Adult and Employer Responsive

2,499,000

2,293,000

2,557,000


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