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Schools: Finance

Mr. Burns: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much was allocated to schools in the West Chelmsford constituency for (a) books, (b) computers, (c) musical instruments and (d) sports equipment in (i) the latest period for which figures are available and (ii) 2001. [169764]

Jim Knight: The Department does not collect this information. It is a matter for each local authority and its schools to determine locally the level of funding for each of these areas.

Schools: Inspections

Julia Goldsworthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much Ofsted inspections cost in each of the last three years. [187328]

Jim Knight: This is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Christine Gilbert, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of her reply has been placed in the House Library.

Letter from Christine Gilbert, dated 20 February 2008:


3 Mar 2008 : Column 2163W
Table A: Relevant Costs of Inspectorates
£ million
Inspectorate 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08

Ofsted

223

211.6

236.6

ALI

30.3

25

CSCI

28.6

28.9

HMICA-CAFCASS

0.5

0.5

Total

282.4

266

236.6


Secondary Education

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the social class attainment gap at Key Stage 4 between the most deprived and least deprived quartile of children was in each year between 1997 and 2007 using the Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index. [187144]

Jim Knight: This type of information has only been available since 2002. We are unable to supply the information requested in the time allowed. The available information is set out in the following table:

GCSE( 1) attainment by IDACI( 2) decile of pupil residence, 2002 and 2007( 3)
5+ A*-C
IDACI decile 2002 2007

0-10 most deprived

26.6

42.3

10-20

32.0

45.2

20-30

37.6

49.1

30-40

43.3

53.9

40-50

49.4

58.8

50-60

54.4

63.0

60-70

59.1

67.1

70-80

63.4

70.3

80-90

67.1

73.7

90-100 least deprived

73.5

78.6

(1) The 2002 figures include GCSEs and GNVQ equivalent results for pupils aged 15. The 2007 figures include GCSE, GNVQ and a range of other approved qualifications for pupils at the end of Key Stage 4. As such the figures are not directly comparable.
(2) Based on the Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index 2004.
(3 )2007 data are provisional.
Source:
National Pupil Database

3 Mar 2008 : Column 2164W

Secondary Schools: Construction

Mr. Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many new secondary schools are planned to be built in the Milton Keynes and South Midlands Regional Strategy area in the next 10 years; and whether one is planned to be built in Wellingborough in that period. [183814]

Jim Knight: The Department does not maintain records of how many new secondary schools will be built within each local authority or region. This is because it relies on local authorities, using detailed local knowledge of demand and the capacity of existing schools, to determine priorities between improvement, expansion of existing schools, reorganisation, and new build. Capital resources for schools are higher than ever before, and allocations are planned to amount to £21.9 billion over the three year period 2008-09 to 2010-11.

Specialist Schools: West Midlands

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what steps the Government has taken to encourage more schools in the West Midlands to achieve specialist status. [189143]

Jim Knight [holding answer 28 February 200 8 ]: All maintained secondary schools who meet the criteria for the specialist schools programme are encouraged to apply for specialist status. This includes special schools with secondary aged pupils. We grant the Specialist Schools and Academies Trust and the Youth Sport Trust funding to support and advise all aspiring specialist schools.

There are currently 336 designated specialist schools in the West Midlands, which is around 93 per cent. of all eligible secondary schools in that region. There are also 26 special schools designated of which 15 have curriculum specialisms and 11 have special educational needs/inclusion specialisms.

Teachers: Foreigners

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teachers from overseas have been awarded qualified teacher status, broken down by country. [188374]

Jim Knight: The following table shows the number of teachers from the European economic area (EEA) who were awarded Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) between 1 September 2006 to 31 August 2007 based on mutual recognition within the European Union (EU).


3 Mar 2008 : Column 2165W
Number of teachers from the EEA awarded QTS in 2006/07
European economic area Number of teachers awarded QTS

Austria

14

Belgium

6

Cyprus

5

Czech Republic

31

Denmark

9

Estonia

8

Finland

6

France

27

Germany

38

Greece

15

Hungary

110

Iceland

1

Italy

15

Latvia

11

Lithuania

39

Malta

11

Netherlands

28

Norway

4

Poland

707

Portugal

49

Republic of Ireland

41

Slovakia

93

Slovenia

2

Spain

270

Sweden

13

Switzerland

9

EEA total

1,562

Notes:
1. These teachers have not undertaken any form of ITT in England.
2. All these teachers are exempt from the requirement to undertake an induction period in England and it is for employers to carry out background checks and assess their competency in English.
Source:
General Teaching Council for England (GTCE)

3 Mar 2008 : Column 2166W

Teachers from outside the EEA with prior qualifications in teaching can gain QTS through the Overseas Trained Teachers Programme (OTTP). In 2005/06 1,150 trainees gained QTS through the OTTP. The nationality of OTTP trainees is not collected centrally.

In addition trainees from overseas with no prior teaching qualifications can gain QTS through a mainstream ITT course or an Employment Based Route ITT (EBITT) course. The nationality of mainstream and EBITT trainees is not collected centrally.

Teachers: Labour Turnover

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time teachers entering the profession left the profession within (i) three years and (ii) five years in the latest period for which figures are available. [169136]

Jim Knight: The following table shows the number of teachers who left full and part-time service before March 2006 after entering service three and five years earlier. These teachers attained qualified teacher status in the calendar year before entering service.

N umber of teachers who had left full and part-time( 1) service before March 2006 after first entering service three and five years earlier
Number in service in March : Number in service in March :
2003 2006 Number who left the service by March 2006( 2) 2001 2006 Number who left the service by March 2006( 2)

Left service after three years (year qualified 2002)

Full-time(3)

20,790

16,260

4,530

n/a

n/a

n/a

Part-time(3)

760

1,310

-550

n/a

n/a

n/a

Total

21,550

17,580

3,980

n/a

n/a

n/a

Left service after five years (year qualified 2002)

Full-time(3)

n/a

n/a

n/a

16,780

11,540

5,240

Part-time(3)

n/a

n/a

n/a

600

1,470

-870

Total

n/a

n/a

n/a

17,380

13,000

4,380

n/a = Not applicable.
(1) The number of part-time teaches may have been underestimated by between 10 and 20 per cent. due to the under recording of these teachers.
(2) The figures for those leaving service includes teachers who have gone on to teaching service outside of the English maintained sector and those that have left teaching temporarily.
(3) Some teachers have moved from part-time to full-time within this period which results in a negative number for teachers who have left part-time service and vice versa.
Note:
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.
Source:
Database of Teacher Records.

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