Previous Section Index Home Page

4 Feb 2008 : Column 914W—continued


4 Feb 2008 : Column 915W

General Certificate of Secondary Education: Standards

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many pupils gained a single F grade at GCSE in 2007; [182754]

(2) how many pupils gained a single G grade at GCSE in 2007. [182755]

Jim Knight: The information is given as follows:

Number of pupils achieving a single grade in 2006/07

A*

494

A

264

B

317

C

593

D

1,014

E

1,930

F

2,944

G

3,993


The figures relate to pupils at the end of Key Stage 4.

Geography: GCE A-Level

Gregory Barker: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what assessment he has made of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's recommendation that A-level geography coursework be abolished; and if he will make a statement. [182826]

Jim Knight: It is the responsibility of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) to set criteria for A levels, including whether specifications may or may not include coursework. Coursework is only allowed under subject criteria where it is the most valid way of assessing subject specific skills, and where it can be robustly assessed.

The decision to remove coursework from A level geography was made following extensive consultation by QCA. The subject criteria continue to strongly recommend that fieldwork is included at AS level, and to require it at A2 level. However, this fieldwork must be externally assessed rather than assessed through coursework.

Higher Education

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what estimate he has made of the proportion of people from the poorest backgrounds who obtained degree level qualifications in each of the last 10 years; [179610]

(2) what estimate he has made of the proportion of people from the richest backgrounds who obtained degree level qualifications in each of the last 10 years. [179611]

Bill Rammell: I have been asked to reply.

This information is not held centrally.

Information is available on full-time young (aged 18-20) participation in higher education by socio-economic class. The table shows the following:


4 Feb 2008 : Column 916W
Full-time young participation by socio-economic class (FYPSEC)
Academic year 2002 2003 2004 2005

% from NS-SECs 1, 2 and 3

44.6

41.5

41.5

43.3

% from NS-SECs 4, 5, 6 and 7

17.6

17.9

17.7

19.9

Difference

27.0

23.6

23.8

23.4


The figures cover English-domiciled 18-20 year olds who are studying for the first time at higher education level at UK higher education institutions or English further education colleges, who remain on their courses for at least six months.

Due to a change from social class to socio-economic class in 2001, earlier comparable figures are not available. The 2006/07 figures will become available later this year.

The Government remain committed to widening participation in higher education it is an economic as; well as a social imperative that everyone who can benefit from higher education has the opportunity to do so. Widening participation is about spotting and nurturing talent, with schools, colleges and universities working together to ensure that all those with the potential and merit to benefit from higher education are able to do so.

Higher Education: Academies

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) which universities have agreed to sponsor academy schools; and which representatives from those universities Ministers in his Department have met in the past 12 months; [180342]

(2) in what ways his Department liaises with the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills on the sponsorship of academy schools by universities. [180398]

Jim Knight: There are currently 16 universities which have agreed to sponsor an Academy or at various stages of developing formal Academy proposals. These are listed as follows.

Universities developing formal proposals


4 Feb 2008 : Column 917W

Ministers from the Department for Children, Schools and Families have met or spoken with the Vice-Chancellors of the following Universities in the past 12 months about their involvement in the Academies programme:

Officials from the Department are in regular contact with DIUS on a range of matters, including university sponsorship of academies.

Higher Education: Admissions

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families which universities require a GCSE at grade C or above in a modern language as part of their general entry requirements. [177301]

Bill Rammell: I have been asked to reply.

That information is not collected centrally by the Department. As independent bodies, higher education institutions are free to set their own entry requirements for individual courses. However, a large number of institutions are now providing entry profiles for their courses, to enable potential applicants to clarify the entry criteria for any courses that they may be interested in. It is important that HE institutions publicise the availability of entry profiles and that careers advisers take them into account when advising young people on their options choices at age 13-14.

Literacy: Essex

Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many children in (a) Colchester constituency and (b) Essex county council area of school leaving age were functionally illiterate in each of the last 10 years. [180362]

Jim Knight: The Department does not currently report figures for functional literacy at age 16. We are piloting functional English qualifications at entry level, level 1 and level 2 to be available from 2010 which will provide young people and adults with the essential knowledge, skills and understanding that will enable them to operate confidently, effectively and independently in life and at work. The Government’s current Public Service Agreement target is for 60 per cent. of 16-year-olds to achieve five good GCSE grades (A*- C) or equivalent by 2008. Figures for 2007 published on 9 January show that this target has been met. But we are raising the bar and in future the target for the end of Key Stage 4 will be measured against the proportion of pupils achieving five grades A*-C or equivalent, including GCSE English and mathematics. The 2007 figure for England achieving this standard was 46.7 per cent. compared with 37.0 per cent. in 1998.


4 Feb 2008 : Column 918W

The following table shows the proportion of pupils in Colchester constituency and Essex achieving five or more GCSE grades A*-C or equivalent, including English and Mathematics for each year since 1998:

Percentage
Colchester Essex

1998

49.3

38.2

1999

45.3

39.5

2000

46.0

40.6

2001

49.2

41.3

2002

47.5

42.5

2003

47.4

41.6

2004

46.4

42.2

2005

45.5

42.9

2006

48.4

45.0

2007

49.5

46.9


In 2007 60.0 per cent. of pupils in England achieved at least Grade C in GCSE English compared with 53.2 per cent. in 1998. We do not publish disaggregated figures for GCSE subjects at local authority level.

Literacy: Staffordshire

Mr. Jenkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many 16-year-olds in (a) Tamworth constituency and (b) Staffordshire county council area were functionally illiterate in each of the last 10 years. [179501]

Jim Knight: The Department does not currently report figures for functional literacy at age 16. We are piloting functional English qualifications at entry level, level 1 and level 2 to be available from 2010 which will provide young people and adults with the essential knowledge, skills and understanding that will enable them to operate confidently, effectively and independently in life and at work. The Government’s current public service agreement target is for 60 per cent. of 16-year-olds to achieve 5 good GCSE grades (A*- C) or equivalent by 2008. Figures for 2007 published on 9 January show that this target has been met. But we are raising the bar and in future the target for the end of Key Stage 4 will be measured against the proportion of pupils achieving 5 grades A*-C or equivalent, including GCSE English and mathematics. The 2007 figure for England achieving this standard was 46.7 per cent. compared with 37.0 per cent. in 1998.

The table shows the proportion of pupils in Tamworth constituency and Staffordshire achieving 5 or more GCSE grades A*-C or equivalent, including English and mathematics for each year since 1998:

Tamworth Staffordshire

1998

26.0

34.3

1999

25.7

37.8

2000

30.2

38.1

2001

28.9

38.3

2002

28.0

40.2

2003

26.5

39.5

2004

30.7

38.8

2005

35.0

42.2

2006

32.6

42.7

2007

34.8

45.5


4 Feb 2008 : Column 919W

In 2007 60.0 per cent. of pupils in England achieved at least Grade C in GCSE English compared with 53.2 per cent. in 1998. We do not publish disaggregated figures for GCSE subjects at local authority level.


Next Section Index Home Page