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Schools: Fire Prevention

Susan Kramer: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families from what date all new primary and secondary schools are required to have fire sprinklers installed; and if he will publish the links to the websites containing (a) the risk analysis and (b) the cost-benefit analysis tools referred to in the answer of 17 July 2007, Official Report, column 308W, on schools: fire prevention. [162335]

Jim Knight: It was expected that from 1 March 2007 the designs of all new school buildings would include sprinklers unless it could be shown that there was a very low risk and therefore no benefit to install sprinklers.


14 Nov 2007 : Column 278W

The risk analysis and the cost-benefit analysis tools will be available for download from

on 9 November 2007.

Susan Kramer: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families with reference to the statement by the Minister for Schools and Learning, the hon. Member for South Dorset (Jim Knight) in the adjournment debate on 1 March 2007, Official Report, column 1180, on fire precautions (schools), what progress he has made in identifying the very low risk schools which do not need fire sprinklers installed; if he will detail the methodology he is using to determine risk; what very low risk schools he has already identified which do not need fire sprinklers installed; and if he will make a statement. [162337]

Jim Knight: The Department does not hold data on which schools do not have sprinklers installed. It is for local authorities to carry out the risk assessments. The risk assessment methodology is described in the risk assessment tools and in Building Bulletin 100.

Specialised Diplomas

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) if he will make a statement on the operation of the proposed academic diplomas; how many separate subjects will have to be taught for these in respect of each diploma for those pupils above Key Stage 4; and what financial provision he proposes to make for the diplomas; [163297]

(2) what diplomas he intends to have in place by the years (a) 2013 and (b) 2015; [163290]

(3) what subjects will be studied by students taking the new diplomas in (a) science, (b) languages and (c) humanities; and if he will make a statement; [163540]

(4) what subjects will be studied as part of the new diplomas in (a) construction and the built environment, (b) creative arts and media, (c) engineering, (d) information technology and (e) society, health and development; and if he will make a statement; [163533]

(5) what plans he has to introduce the formal teaching of modern languages at an earlier stage in the schools system. [163451]

Jim Knight: By 2013 we will have 17 14-19 diplomas in place. We currently expect to have the same number in place by 2015.

The policy statement attached to the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families’ written ministerial statement of 23 October, set out our intention to establish a Diploma Development Partnership (DDP) to specify the content for each of the new diplomas, consulting with a wide range of partners and stakeholders. This will start work in the new year. In order to specify the design structure and principles within which this DDP will work, we have created an expert advisory group to work with us over the next few months to develop the DDP terms of reference.

Students following any of the diploma programmes will have the opportunity to study a broad spectrum of topics relevant to their chosen sector, or area of study.
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The core of each diploma is the “Principal Learning” element. All students will also undertake a programme of generic learning which includes personal, learning and thinking skills and functional skills (in English, maths and information technology). diploma students will be able to personalise their learning by adding “Additional and Specialist Learning”, which can develop depth and breadth of study. The personalisation of each student’s learning programme is a key feature of the diploma structure.

Curriculum guidance has been published for the first five diplomas, ahead of first teaching in September 2008. The full specifications for each of the first five lines of learning , accredited by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, can be viewed on the National Database of Accredited Qualifications at:

Indicative levels of funding for 2008-11 for 14-19 learning, including diplomas, have been identified within the Government’s comprehensive spending review (CSR). The details of the additional funds to be allocated for diplomas are being finalised as part of firming up precise allocations within the indicative settlement. We expect to be able to announce levels of funding available by the new year, well before the end of the 2007-08 financial year.

Teachers: Pensions

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families whether the teachers' pension scheme is funded out of the budget for his Department; and if he will make a statement. [163292]

Jim Knight: The Teachers' Pensions Scheme (TPS) is an unfunded scheme. The budget for the associated costs is contained in the separate Teachers' Pension Scheme (England and Wales) Supply Estimate which is managed by this Department. The total income and expenditure are classed as Departmental Resource Annually Managed Expenditure (AME).

The budget in the Supply Estimate covers the following non-cash costs:

The expenditure is largely offset by income from employers and members, in the form of contributions.

The pension benefits paid to retired teachers and costs related to groups and individuals transferring out of the scheme are met from the pension liability provision on the balance sheet and do not score in a departmental expenditure limit.

Teachers: Working Hours

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average number of hours worked per week was for (a) primary and (b) secondary school teachers in each of the last five years. [163427]


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Jim Knight: The following table details the estimated average total hours worked per week by full-time teachers over the last five years. The fall in hours worked by secondary heads and deputy heads from 2006 to 2007 is statistically significant; no other categories of teacher saw a significant change in the hours they worked between 2006 and 2007.

Total hours worked per week
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Primary

Head teachers

55.5

55.6

52.9

53.5

54.2

Deputy heads

56.4

55.7

55.7

53.4

51.4

Classroom teachers

51.8

52.5

50.9

50.1

51.5

Secondary

Head teachers

60.9

60.8

62.6

65.1

57.6

Deputy head

56.5

54.1

58.1

61.0

53.6

Heads of faculty/department

52.7

51.6

51.2

51.5

50.2

Classroom teachers

50.8

49.9

49.3

49.1

48.7

Note:
The estimates are derived from the diary returns of about 2,000 randomly selected teachers in primary, secondary and special schools in England and Wales. In 2007, the diaries were completed during a single week in March; in previous years the survey ran in comparable weeks. Total hours worked include the time taken to complete the diary which on average took about an hour.

The changes in total hours that are statistically significant (at 95 per cent. level) are for:

The full report for the School Teachers’ Review Body on Teachers’ workloads diary survey, 2007 can be found at:

Truancy: Hampshire

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the level of truancy was by (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in local education authorities in (i) Hampshire, (ii) Southampton and (iii) Portsmouth in each year since 1997, broken down by sex; how many days were lost; and if he will make a statement. [162421]

Jim Knight: The Department does not maintain records of ‘truancy’. Unauthorised absence is absence without leave from a teacher or other authorised representative of the school. This includes all unexplained or unjustified absences, such as lateness, holidays during term time not authorised by the school, absence where reason is not yet established and truancy.


14 Nov 2007 : Column 281W

The available information is provided in the tables and relates to a selection of years between 1997/98 to 2005/06.

The first year for which absence rates by gender are available is 2005/06. The coverage of this information is secondary schools only. Absence rates by gender for 2006/07 will be available in February 2008, and the scope will extend to also include primary schools.

Maintained primary and secondary schools( 1) : Percentage of half days missed 1997/98,1999/2000, 2001/02, 2003/04, Hampshire, Portsmouth and Southampton local authority areas 2004/05
Primary schools Secondary schools
Percentage of half days missed: Percentage of half days missed:
Due to authorised absence Due to unauthorised absence Due to authorised absence Due to unauthorised absence

Hampshire local authority area

1997/98

4.9

0.3

6.9

0.8

1999/2000

4.5

0.3

6.6

0.8

2001/02

4.7

0.4

7.0

1.1

2003/04

4.5

0.3

6.4

1.1

2004/05

4.7

0.3

6.2

1.2

Southampton local authority area

1997/98

6.0

0.9

7.9

1.1

1999/2000

5.7

0.8

8.5

1.1

2001/02

6.3

0.8

8.7

1.3

2003/04

5.6

0.7

7.7

1.2

2004/05

5.7

0.8

7.4

1.9

Portsmouth local authority area

1997/98

6.6

0.8

9.5

1.9

1999/2000

5.4

0.8

8.4

1.8

2001/02

5.4

0.7

9.4

1.6

2003/04

5.1

0.8

8.2

1.9

2004/05

5.2

0.8

7.5

1.8

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed.
Source:
Survey of Absence in Schools

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