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17 Sep 2007 : Column 2202W—continued


Pupils: Per Capita Costs

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the average total amount of spending on each student throughout their school lives was for the 2007 GCSE cohort; and how many students from that cohort finished compulsory school with no GCSE qualifications or equivalent. [155081]

Jim Knight [holding answer 10 September 2007]: The information requested is provided as follows:

Number

Pupils at the end of Key Stage 4

645,931

Achieving no passes at GCSE or equivalent(1)

(2)14,346

(1 )Including entry level qualifications, which are below grade G at GCSE.
(2) 2.2 per cent. of the cohort
Note:
These figures are based on final 2006 data; provisional 2007 data will be published on 18 October 2007.

Schools: Capital Investment

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what the capital investment in schools in the City of York was in each year since 1996-97. [154938]

Jim Knight [holding answer 10 September 2007]: Records are not maintained centrally of local authority capital expenditure on schools, as this is decided in accordance with local asset management plans and will depend upon local authorities’ total sources of available funding. Capital allocations to York city council and schools in its area in each year since 1996-97 are set in the following table:

£ million

1996-97

0.8

1997-98

1.3

1998-99

1.8

1999-2000

4.5

2000-01

7.4

2001-02

4.8

2002-03

25.5

2003-04

9.7

2004-05

9.4

2005-06

8.7

2006-07

28.5

2007-08

6.4


The large allocations in 2002-03 and 2006-07 result, respectively, from a PFI allocation of £15.4 million and successful Targeted Capital Fund (TCP) bids of £22.2 million. TCP allocations were made throughout the period 2001-02 to 2006-07. Although no TCP allocation was made in 2007-08, there is building work in progress this year resulting from the earlier allocations.

Schools: Standards

Mr. Todd: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what proportion of (a) primary schools, (b) junior schools and (c) infant schools have been (i) placed in special measures and (ii) given notice to improve in 2006-07; and whether he has commissioned research on the frequency of these events in the three school types. [154860]

Jim Knight [holding answer 10 September 2007]: The following table gives the information requested.

Percentage
Ofsted category Primary schools placed into category during the 2006/07 academic year Infant schools placed into category during the 2006/07 academic year Junior schools placed into category during the 2006/07 academic year All( 1) primary schools placed into category during the 2006/07 academic year

Special Measures

0.8

0.2

1.4

0.7

Significant Improvement (Notice to Improve)

1.0

0.2

2.2

1.0

(1) Includes first schools and middle deemed primary schools.

The Department has not commissioned research in this area, but will discuss the matter with Ofsted.


17 Sep 2007 : Column 2203W

Teachers: Languages

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many teachers of modern foreign languages in secondary schools have degree level qualifications in (a) Mandarin and (b) Urdu. [155253]

Jim Knight [holding answer 12 September 2007]: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Teenage Pregnancy

David Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what progress has been made in reducing pregnancy rates among under 18-year-olds since 2005; and if he will make a statement. [155396]

Beverley Hughes: The latest annual under-18 conception data, published in February 2007, relate to conceptions that occurred in 2005. This data showed that the under-18 conception rate had fallen by 11.8 per cent. since 1998 (the baseline year for the Teenage Pregnancy Strategy), to its lowest level for over 20 years. The under-16 conception rate has also fallen—by 12.1 per cent. between 1998 and 2005.

First quarter 2006 data show an encouraging continued downward trend in both the under-18 and under-16 conception rates. While trends in quarterly conception rates should be interpreted with caution, first quarter 2006 rates are the lowest first quarter rates since 1993, when the statistical series started.

We have issued guidance to local authorities and primary care trusts on what we consider to be the key ingredients of local strategies, based on evidence from those local areas which have had most success in reducing teenage conception rates. All areas have been asked to use this guidance to accelerate progress to the levels of the best—if all areas had performed as well as the top quartile, the national reduction would be 26 per cent., more than twice the reduction actually achieved.

Truancy

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) when and for what reasons the decision to end nationally co-ordinated truancy sweeps was taken; [155176]

(2) what measures his Department has in place to monitor the effectiveness of truancy sweeps; and what his most recent assessment is of the effectiveness of such sweeps. [155278]

Jim Knight [holding answer 12 September 2007]: The Department began co-ordinating voluntary twice-yearly national truancy sweeps in May 2002. Each sweep focused local authority activity within the three-week period on which our data collections were based.

We took the decision in January 2007 to end this national co-ordination and data collection. Many local authorities had by then established local sweeps which
17 Sep 2007 : Column 2204W
were better aligned to local police service schedules, operating more frequently and effectively than within a centrally prescribed three-week period.

Having given local authorities the flexibility to make more effective local arrangements, we do not attempt to closely monitor these but instead gather and share their effective practice with others. Since April 2007, police community service officers have the power to remove absentee pupils from a public place. Later this month, we will publish updated guidance on effective practice in planning and undertaking truancy sweeps to reflect these powers.

Health

Ambulance Services: Death

Peter Bottomley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will list the conditions for which extended travel times on blue light emergency ambulance journeys are (a) material and (b) immaterial to mortality. [155522]

Mr. Bradshaw: The way the national health service responds to emergencies needs to focus not just on getting the patient to a location but also on taking care of the patient. This is why it is necessary to focus on a range of measures, including response times by the ambulance service, its ability to administer a wide range of treatment and provision of urgent and social care in the community.

The aim should always be to provide high quality care for patients close to home where this is clinically safe. Some patients may require more specialised care at centres with clinicians who have the right expertise and equipment.

Local health services need to decide the shape of local urgent and emergency care services so that they are responsive to the needs of the local population.

Ambulance Services: Personnel

Mr. Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of response staff in each ambulance NHS trust are (a) ambulance technicians, (b) paramedics and (c) emergency care practitioners. [155131]

Alan Johnson [holding answer 12 September 2007]: Data is available for ambulance staff breakdown, as at September 2006, through the Information Centre for health and social care 2006 Non-Medical Workforce Census. The following table sets out the proportion of ambulance technicians, paramedics and emergency care practitioners against the total number of employed staff for each ambulance trust. Response staff as a category is not collected and is therefore not available as part of the census return.

Ambulance trusts are currently producing individual five-year workforce outlook plans, providing more up-to-date information, which might show a different staffing position to the census.


17 Sep 2007 : Column 2205W

17 Sep 2007 : Column 2206W
H eadcount percentages
O f which:
Total staff Ambulance technician Ambulance paramedic Emergency care practitioner

Total Ambulance Trusts

100

21.4

25.4

1.3

East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

30.0

23.0

0.5

East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

19.1

21.6

3.5

Great Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

24.6

28.0

1.4

London Ambulance Service

100

31.7

23.9

1.0

North East Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

23.6

23.5

0.0

North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

12.4

26.6

0.9

South Central Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

19.5

21.6

1.2

South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

27.7

26.8

0.6

South Western Ambulance NHS Trust

100

4.1

37.5

1.0

Staffordshire Ambulance Service

100

31.2

39.1

0.0

West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

21.4

28.2

2.3

Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust

100

18.8

21.4

0.9

Note:
South Western Ambulance NHS Trust's Ambulance Technician figures are low in comparison to other Ambulance trusts. This is likely to be due to the re-coding of Ambulance staff in 2006. These figures have been clarified and signed off by the Trust.
Source:
The Information Centre for health and social care 2006 Non-Medical Workforce Census.

Dental Services

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what targets his Department set for access to NHS dentists under the new dental contract. [155557]

Ann Keen: The Department does not set targets for levels of access. Primary care trusts are responsible for assessing local needs and providing or commissioning dental services that reflect these needs.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of (a) adults and (b) children in each primary care trust have access to NHS dentistry. [155558]

Ann Keen: Information is collected centrally and published regularly on the number of adults and children who receive care or treatment from an national health service dentist in a given area over a 24 month period and the percentage of the adult and child population this represents.

Information on the percentage of adults and children who received care or treatment, by primary care trust, in the 24-month period ending 31 March 2007 is contained in table C2 of annex 3 of the “NHS Dental Statistics for England 2006-07” report. This is the most recent period for which data are available.

This report is available in the Library and is also available at:


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