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23 July 2007 : Column 862W—continued

Extended Schools

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what proportion of schools he expects to provide extended hours services in each year to 2011; and if he will make a statement. [149099]

Kevin Brennan: Our target is for all schools in England to be providing access to the extended schools full core offer of services by 2010 with half of all primary schools and a third of all secondary schools providing these services by September 2008. To help us meet our target we are aiming to have 6,000 schools delivering access to the full core offer of services by September 2007. With over 5,700 schools already providing these services, we are making excellent progress towards meeting our target.

The extended schools core offer of services includes primary schools providing access to child care from 8 am to 6 pm all year round in response to demand, all schools offering access to a range of study support activities beyond the school day, parenting support, swift and easy referral and opening up facilities to the wider community.

Family Courts

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will publish in full responses received to the Government's consultation on improving transparency and privacy in family courts; and what action he proposes to take as a result of the consultation. [150927]

Bridget Prentice: I have been asked to reply.


23 July 2007 : Column 863W

The Government published the consultation ‘Confidence and confidentiality: Improving transparency and privacy in family courts’ on 11 July 2006. The consultation paper and the response paper (published on 22 March 2007) can be found at:

Copies of the responses will be sent to the hon. Member shortly.

Having carefully considered the range of views expressed in the consultation, we concluded that a new approach was needed to improve confidence in the family courts. This would focus on information coming out of the courts rather than who could attend proceedings.

The Government published a further consultation paper on 20 June 2007, setting out what we intend to do and inviting views on a small number of additional proposals. This can be found at:

Copies will also be placed in the Libraries of the House.

Foster Care: Poole

Mr. Syms: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many foster parents are required in the Poole area to meet demand for placements. [151577]

Kevin Brennan: Data on the number of foster parents who are required in the Poole area to meet the current demand for placements are not collected centrally by the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF).

Foundation Schools

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many schools have taken up (a) foundation and (b) trust status. [150802]

Jim Knight: There are 927 foundation schools and 15 foundation special schools as of the 17 July 2007.

Trust Schools are foundation schools that have acquired a foundation established otherwise than under the School Standards and Framework Act 1998. Prior to the commencement of the relevant provisions of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 (25 May 2007), foundation schools did not have to follow a statutory process to acquire a foundation. The Department accordingly did not collect information on how many foundation schools acquired foundations before this date.

There are over 200 schools currently working towards acquiring Trust status—over 140 primary, secondary and specials schools, alongside 69 full pathfinder schools. As of the present time, no schools have implemented proposals to become foundation schools with foundations (Trust Schools) under the Education and Inspections Act 2006. However, the first of the pathfinder schools plan to become Trust schools from September 2007.


23 July 2007 : Column 864W

General Certificate of Secondary Education: Mathematics

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) what the mark required for an A grade in GCSE in mathematics was in each year since 1988-89; [149077]

(2) what average mark was required to achieve a grade (a) A, (b) B, (c) C and (d) E for GCSE (i) mathematics, (ii) English, (iii) physics and (iv) history in each year since 1990-91; and if he will make a statement. [149141]

Jim Knight: This information is not held centrally.

Head Teachers: Retirement

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what proportion of headteachers in England are within (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years, (d) five years and (e) 10 years of standard pension age; and if he will make a statement. [150805]

Jim Knight: The normal pension age (NPA) of teachers who entered service before 1 January 2007 is 60. Entrants to the profession from that date have a NPA of 65. NPA is the age at which members of the teachers’ pension scheme can retire without any actuarial reduction to their pension benefits.

The following table provides the percentage of full-time head teachers in service in the maintained schools sector in England within one year, two years, three years, five years and 10 years of the NPA 60, in March 2005, the latest information available.

Full-time head teachers in maintained sector schools in England, percentage in service by number of years before the normal pension age (age 60), March 2005 (provisional)
Years before NPA Percentage of head teachers( 1)

Less than:

1

2.1

2

6.2

3

11.3

5

23.9

10

57.7

(1) Percentages are cumulative
Source:
Database of Teacher Records.

Reforms of the teachers’ pension scheme that were introduced in January 2007—and which include a NPA of 65 for new entrants—included new provisions that are specifically aimed at encouraging teachers to extend their working lives. These new provisions will provide a real and attractive alternative to teachers’ traditional approach to retirement.

The National College for School Leadership is currently undergoing an extensive programme of work on succession planning.

Health Education: Alcoholic Drinks

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much he has allocated for the provision of alcohol awareness programmes in schools over the next three years; and how much was spent on such programmes in each of the last three years. [150414]


23 July 2007 : Column 865W

Kevin Brennan: The Government recently published the new Alcohol Strategy for England, which highlights young people as one of three priority groups. Alcohol education is delivered alongside education on drugs and volatile substances as part of Personal Social and Health Education, and is a vital element of the current approach.

DCSF does not provide ring-fenced funding for schools’ drug education lessons, which are funded from schools’ general budgets.

The Government provide ring-fenced funding to prevent substance misuse among young people. The Young People’s Substance Misuse Partnership Grant (YPSMPG) is made available to local authorities for the provision of universal, targeted and specialist responses commissioned and delivered at locally, based on their area’s needs and priorities. The grant funds a range of different projects across the country determined at local level, which are available for young people.

The grant brings together into a single pot funding from the Home Office, the Department of Health, the Youth Justice Board and the Department for Children, Schools and Families. The following table details the total YPSMPG expenditure for the past five years (note that the first year, 2003/04, was a pilot year in 27 local authority areas):

£ million

2003/04

(1)14.9

2004/05

58.8

2005/06

66.6

2006/07

64.1

2007/08

55.5

(1 )YPSMPG pilot in only 27 local authorities

The YPSMPG is used in addition to mainstream funding to provide a comprehensive range of services for young people up to 18 years:

In addition to supporting the work of local partnerships, The Government fund specific programmes targeting messages for young people about substances, including the FRANK campaign which has become a credible source of information and advice for young people and their parents. The cross departmental campaign was launched in 2003 funded by Home Office and Department of Health, with the Department for Children Schools and Families contributing from 2006/07.

£ million

2003/04

4.25

2004/05

4.30

2005/06

6.17

2006/07

9.05


The Government are committed to expanding and improving the quality of school drug education (Inc tobacco, alcohol, volatile substance), through encouraging the development of well structured high quality programmes of PSHE across all key stages.


23 July 2007 : Column 866W

The national health schools standard requires schools to demonstrate effective PSHE provision. The Government have also invested over £6 million on Blueprint, the largest research programme ever run in this country designed to test the effectiveness of a multi-component approach to drug education, involving an intensive set of school lessons for 11-13 year olds supported by work with parents, communities, health professionals and local media. The full results of the programme will be available over the next 12 months or so.

Health Education: Drugs

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how much has been spent on (a) drug awareness, (b) alcohol awareness and (c) volatile substance abuse programmes aimed at school age children in each of the last five years; and if he will list the projects funded. [150343]

Kevin Brennan: The Government are committed to reducing substance misuse related harm among young people, including harm arising from the misuse of drugs, alcohol and volatile substances. Education and awareness on these substances is a vital element of the current approach, and we have issued schools with guidance on drugs education. DCSF does not provide ring-fenced funding for schools’ drug education lessons, which are funded from schools’ general budgets.

The Government provide ring-fenced funding to prevent substance misuse among young people. The Young People’s Substance Misuse Partnership Grant (YPSMPG) is made available to local authorities for the provision of universal, targeted and specialist responses commissioned and delivered locally, based on their area's needs and priorities. The grant funds a range of different projects across the country determined at local level, which are available for young people.

The grant brings together into a single pot, funding from the Home Office, the Department of Health, the Youth Justice Board and the Department for Children, Schools and Families. The following table details the total YPSMPG expenditure for the past five years (note that the first year, 2003/04, was a pilot year in 27 local authority areas):

£ million

2003/04

(1)14.9

2004/05

58.8

2005/06

66.6

2006/07

64.1

2007/08

55.5

(1) Pilot year in only 27 local authorities

The YPSMPG is used in addition to mainstream funding to provide a comprehensive range of services for young people up to 18 years:


23 July 2007 : Column 867W

In addition to supporting the work of local partnerships, the Government fund specific programmes targeting messages for young people about substances, including the Frank campaign which has become a credible source of information and advice for young people and their parents. The cross departmental campaign was launched in 2003 funded by Home Office and Department of Health, with the Department for Children Schools and Families contributing from 2006/07.

£ million

2003/04

4.25

2004/05

4.30

2005/06

6.17

2006/07

9.05


The Government are committed to expanding and improving the quality of school drug education (inc. tobacco, alcohol, volatile substance), through encouraging the development of well structured high quality programmes of PSHE across all key stages. The National Health Schools Standard requires schools to demonstrate effective PSHE provision. The Government have also invested over £6 million on Blueprint, the largest research programme ever run in this country designed to test the effectiveness of a multi-component approach to drug education, involving an intensive set of school lessons for 11 to 13-year-olds supported by work with parents, communities, health professionals and local media. The full results of the programme will be available over the next 12 months or so.

The Department of Health lead on the Framework for Volatile Substance Abuse targeted at children and young people (launched on 20 July 2005). The document called “Out of Sight?...not out of mind” outlines a number of key recommendations that the Government intend to take forward in partnership with key stakeholders at local, regional and national level.

The stated aims of the VSA Framework are to:


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