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Rogue States

Llew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his definition of rogue states is; and which states fall within that definition. [93903]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: The term "Rogue State" was first used by the Clinton Administration in the US to describe states which were pursuing illicit programmes to develop weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and those which the US Administration considered posed a threat to the US. The term has become widely used by media and commentators to describe states of proliferation concern and those which provide succour and support for terrorism. The Government generally prefers to use the phrase "Countries of Concern" to describe such states, although "Rogue States" has also been used for this purpose.

We continue to be concerned by the proliferation of WMD and the means for their delivery in several regions including the Middle East, South Asia and the Korean Peninsula.

We are also concerned about state support for terrorist activity in a number of countries. In the light of the continuing campaign against terror, it is not possible at this time to specifically name publicly any of the countries about which we are concerned or to speculate on any action that might be taken to counter our concerns.

Service Delivery Agreement

Tony Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when his Department's service delivery agreement for 2003 to 2006 will be published. [94118]

Mr. Rammell: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office's Service Delivery Agreement for the period 2003–06 will be published within the next few weeks, once detailed planning and resource allocation for the delivery of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's Public Service Agreement targets has been completed. The Service Delivery Agreement will set out how the Public Service Agreement targets will be delivered.

Theft/Fraud

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his estimate is of the

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cost of theft and fraud to (a) his Department, (b) its agencies and (c) non-departmental public bodies in 2002. [89889]

Mr. Rammell: The information is as follows:

Cost of fraud and theft to FCO in 2002

£
Fraud and theft 61,613.99
Sum recovered 41,708.99

UNOMIG/HROAG

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions (a) he, (b) UK diplomatic staff at the United Nations and (c) UK diplomatic staff at the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe have had since 2001 about expanding the mandate and area of function of (i) UNOMIG and (ii) HROAG; and if he will make a statement. [95256]

Mr. Rammell: The mandate of UNOMIG (United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia) was unanimously extended by the Security Council on 30 January after consultations between member states.

Expanding the mandate and overall area of function of UNOMIG and HROAG (Human Rights Office in Abkhazia, Georgia) is not under active discussion.

Weapons Inspections (1998)

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether UNSCOM 243 entered Iraqi presidential palaces between March and April 1998. [94724]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: Yes.

Zimbabwe

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on plans to discuss sanctions against Zimbabwe at the EU education council meeting, scheduled for 6 February. [94705]

Mr. Rammell: There are no such plans.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what progress is being made with the compilation of the watch list of Zimbabwean nationals whose presence in the UK may not be conducive to the public good. [94728]

Mr. Rammell: The high commission in Harare and the FCO maintain a watch list of Zimbabwean nationals whose presence in the UK may not be conducive to the public good. This is regularly reviewed and up-dated. The list is being used on a discretionary basis to deny such people entry to the UK.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what UK sanctions are in place against Zimbabwe, independent of the EU sanctions. [94731]

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Mr. Rammell: The UK imposed an arms embargo on Zimbabwe in May 2000. This pre-dates and is independent of the EU arms embargo which formed part of the EU Common Position of 18 February 2002.

CABINET OFFICE

Licensing Bill

Mr. Mark Field : To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what research he undertook to seek to ensure that the Licensing Bill and related ministerial guidance (a) have broad public support, (b) are enforceable, (c) are easy to understand, (d) are balanced and avoid unintended consequences and (e) balance the risks, costs and practical benefits. [88907]

Dr. Howells: I have been asked to reply.

The reform of the licensing laws that the Licensing Bill will introduce were the subject of a White Paper consultation in 2000. The White Paper was published following a review of current licensing laws that involved all key stakeholders including the licensed trade, the police and local authorities. 1,215 individuals and organisations responded to the White Paper, including many members of the public. The majority of responses were in favour of the proposed reforms.

In addition to publishing Explanatory Notes with the Licensing Bill, the Government will be issuing guidance to licensing authorities and the police when the Bill receives Royal Assent. A draft version of the guidance will be made available before the Bill reaches Report Stage in the House of Lords. The guidance will explain in clear terms how the new licensing system will work and, like the Bill, is being prepared in consultation with other Government Departments, executive agencies and an Advisory Group comprising representatives of the following organisations:


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In drafting the Bill, the Explanatory Notes and the guidance the Government has, as far as possible, ensured that they are easy to understand, unambiguous, capable of enforcement and that they balance the risks, costs and practical benefits for all those who will be affected by the licensing reforms. The Regulatory Impact Assessment published along with the Bill considers these effects and quantifies the likely cost implications.

CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT

British Library (Visually Impaired People)

Mr. Brady: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what conditions her Department attaches to funding for the British Library to ensure that services are provided for visually impaired people. [95244]

Dr. Howells [holding answer 3 February 2003]: It is an objective of the British Library's Funding Agreement that the Library will enable ready access to its collection to all who need it. The Library is addressing the needs of visually impaired people through adjustments to its buildings and through reader services, such as image enhancers, hand-held magnifiers, audio books and through improvements to its website.

Civil Servants (Bonus)

Mr. Lyons: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many civil servants in her Department received bonuses having attained personal targets in the last financial year; and what the value was. [94581]

Dr. Howells: The number of civil servants who received bonuses, having attained personal targets in my Department in the last financial year, was 89. They received bonuses of between £750 and £3,500, with an overall value of £116,400.

Correspondence

Mr. Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport when she intends to reply to the letter to her dated 18 December from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton, with regard to Mr. Adrian Webb. [94692]

Tessa Jowell: I wrote to the right hon. Gentleman on 31 January 2003. I apologise for the delay in responding.

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