Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they will take to reduce the emergency response times of ambulance crews.[HL4043]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): National response time standards are in place to ensure an appropriate emergency response from ambulance service trusts. The national standards for ambulance services are:

A8—75% of category A (immediately life-threatening) calls should receive a response within 8 minutes; andA19—95% of category A patients requiring transport should receive this within 19 minutes of the request for transport being made.

In June 2012, category A8 was further split into red 1 (the most time-critical calls, eg cardiac arrest patients who are not breathing and do not have a pulse) and red 2 (serious but less immediately time critical, covering conditions such as stroke and fits). This was designed to reduce the inappropriate and/or multiple dispatch of resources by ambulance trusts and to allow a greater focus on the most serious incidents.

Category C calls are those which are neither life-threatening nor serious. The setting and monitoring of category C call performance is locally determined.

It is the responsibility of the National Health Service locally to ensure that ambulance trusts perform well. Performance on national response time standards is managed at strategic health authority level. Local commissioners must also hold ambulance trusts to account for local performance.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA42

Health: Asbestos-related Disease

Questions

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what information is required by coroners investigating asbestos-related deaths (1) in the hours following the death, (2) within seven days of the death, and (3) in the course of the inquest.[HL4342]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what (1) guidance, and (2) training, specific to asbestos-related disease is provided to police officers who fulfil the duties of coroner offices in visiting recently bereaved families to investigate asbestos-related deaths. [HL4343]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The Ministry of Justice has responsibility for coroner law and policy only. Coroners are solely responsible for the conduct of their investigations.

The Ministry of Justice provides training for coroners and their officers. The 2012/13 syllabus includes a session on exposure to asbestos but does not include specific training on visiting recently bereaved families to investigate asbestos-related deaths.

Health: Atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome

Question

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have received a recommendation from the Advisory Group for National Specialised Services regarding the commissioning of a national specialised service for atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS); and, if so, when they plan to make a decision based on that recommendation about whether or not a national specialised service for aHUS will be commissioned.[HL4248]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Ministers have received a recommendation from the Advisory Group for National Specialised Services about the commissioning of a national specialised service for the treatment of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and expect to make an announcement early in the new year.

Health: Birth Defects

Questions

Asked by Lord Rooker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the latest information they have regarding the high risk groups suffering neural tube defects at birth. [HL4211]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how the take-up of advice given on NHS websites in respect of prevention of spina bifida is currently monitored. [HL4212]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA43

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many births classed as spina bifida caused by neural tube defects there have been in each of the past five years.[HL4213]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have any plans to propose new advice or actions regarding women thought to be in the high risk groups with respect to potential neural tube birth defects.[HL4214]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The department currently recommends that all women who are planning a pregnancy or who could become pregnant should take a daily supplement containing 400 micrograms of folic acid (the synthetic form of the vitamin folate) before conception and until the 12th week of pregnancy, as well as to increase their consumption of folate-rich foods, to reduce the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) such as spina bifida.

The department recommends that women with an increased risk of having an NTD-affected pregnancy take a higher dose of folic acid (five milligrams/day), which can be prescribed by their general practitioner. Women at high risk of having an NTD-affected pregnancy include those who have previously had a baby with an NTD, those who have (or whose partner has) an NTD, those who are taking an anti-epileptic medication and those who have diabetes.

The national Infant Feeding Survey, carried out every five years on behalf of United Kingdom health departments, collects information about dietary supplementation practices during pregnancy. Data from the most recent Infant Feeding Survey (2010) show that 94% of mothers reported taking folic acid either before or during their pregnancy. Before they were pregnant, 37% said they took folic acid, increasing to 79% who reported taking it during the first three months of pregnancy, while 23% took it later on in pregnancy.

Data on the number of births classed as spina bifida are collected and published by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers (BINOCAR). The information provided in the following table gives the numbers of live-born babies with spina bifida in the English registers for the years 2006 to 2010. These are the most recent years BINOCAR has complete data for. BINOCAR does not cover all of England and Wales; the registers included in the data cover approximately 35% of the births in England and Wales.

YearNumber of cases of spina bifida* (live births)

2006

31

2007

28

2008

41

2009

41

2010

54

Note: Spina bifida is only one form of NTD; if other congenital anomalies of the central nervous system (such as hydrocephalus or anencephaly) are included, these figures will be higher.

The department provides women with information on health and nutrition pre-conception and during pregnancy, including the importance of taking folic

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA44

acid supplements to reduce the risk of NTDs such as spina bifida, via all its relevant communications. This includes the pregnancy and baby guide on the NHS Choices website, materials produced as part of the Start4Life campaign, and the NHS Information Service for Parents, a new digital service for parents-to-be and new parents launched in May 2012. The Information Service for Parents sends parents regular free e-mails, videos and SMS messages with advice and information about pregnancy and the first few months with a baby. The service includes advice on folic acid and vitamin supplements, with a video for parents covering “Should I take supplements during my pregnancy?”. To date over 89,000 parents-to-be and new parents have signed up to the service.

The department was advised by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) and the Food Standards Agency Board in 2007 on fortification options as a measure to reduce the risk of pregnancies being affected by neural tube defects (NTDs). Fortification of foodstuffs with folic acid is a complicated issue, with a balance of benefits as well as potential risks. Additional advice on folic acid and cancer risk was requested by the then Chief Medical Officer and provided by SACN in 2009. The papers underpinning the advice from SACN have not yet all been peer-reviewed and published in a scientific journal. Ministers need to very carefully consider this complicated issue and would like to see all information in the public domain before making any decision.

Asked by Lord Rooker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what current Government-sponsored research is under way in respect of neural tube birth defects.[HL4215]

Earl Howe: The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) biomedical research centre at Great Ormond Street Hospital and University College London Institute of Child Health is studying whether combined treatment with folic acid and inositol is more effective at preventing neural tube defects than folic acid alone. The researchers are leading a clinical trial of this treatment supported by the NIHR Clinical Research Network.

The neural tube defect spina bifida may be associated with hydrocephalus in childhood. Hydrocephalus is commonly treated through insertion of a shunt to drain off the excess fluid, and new devices have been introduced to try to reduce shunt infection. The NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme is funding a £2 million trial comparing these new shunts to standard shunts.

The NIHR is also funding a clinical lectureship focused on neurogenic bowel dysfunction associated with spina bifida and other neurological conditions.

Health: Bounty

Questions

Asked by Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what payments have been made to Bounty by any department or vice versa in each of the past five years.[HL4162]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA45

The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury (Lord Sassoon): The table below sets out the payments made by HM Revenue and Customs to Bounty.

YearAmount paid to Bounty £Number of Child Benefit claim forms distributed

2007-08

112,487.00

706,843

2008-09

125,671.75

774,604

2009-10

143,167.00

852,592

2010-11

126,906.79

888,180

2011-12

90,805.00

901,298

Information on payments that may have been made by other government departments is not held centrally.

Asked by Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what payments have been made to Bounty by the Department of Health or vice versa in each of the past five years; and what agreements were in place between Bounty and the Department of Health regarding the contents of, or distribution of, Bounty packs to expectant or new mothers, for each of the past five years. [HL4161]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what information they hold regarding payments to NHS Hospital Trusts, primary care trusts or strategic health authorities by Bounty for the distribution of their packs to expectant or new mothers.[HL4164]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what conditions, restrictions or safety precautions apply to representatives of commercial companies entering maternity units for the purposes of data collection or providing commercial services such as photography to parents.[HL4166]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Neither the department nor the National Health Service centrally has any contracts with Bounty. The distribution of Bounty packs is negotiated locally by Bounty with individual NHS and foundation trusts, and individual trusts are able to influence the contents of the packs delivered to their maternity services users. The department does not have information about the contracts that exist between Bounty and the NHS locally, as this is the responsibility of individual NHS authorities and is not collated centrally.

Bounty occasionally promotes departmental public health messages free of charge, including messages on seasonal flu, encouraging pregnant women to have the flu jab, and encouraging women to sign up to the NHS Information Service for Parents. The department’s messages are promoted on Bounty’s website, in its membership area and in its “Thank you for registering with Bounty” e-mails sent to newly registered pregnant women. The NHS Information Service for Parents wallet cards with sign-up details are placed in Bounty’s pregnancy and information pack for pregnant women free of charge.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA46

Levels of security provision are for NHS bodies to establish on a local basis, according to an assessment of the particular security risks they face. Each NHS body is responsible for providing the necessary resources to manage security.

NHS Protect has national responsibility for leading work to protect NHS staff and resources from crime and provides support, guidance and advice to NHS bodies on assessing security risks and taking effective action.

For areas such as maternity units where there are specific security risks, it is for each NHS body to determine who has access to these areas and to have protocols in place for supervising contractors and/or individuals while on their premises.

Asked by Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether NHS trusts are placed under any restrictions regarding the distribution of materials from commercial companies or charities other than Bounty; and what approval has been given by any department for any such contracts.[HL4207]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will place in the Library of the House copies of any (1) agreements, (2) correspondence and (3) details of meeting dates, between Bounty and the Department of Health since June 2010.[HL4208]

Earl Howe: The distribution of materials from commercial companies and charities is negotiated locally with individual National Health Service and/or foundation trusts, and as such the department is not involved in the approval process for any relevant contracts.

The department does not have any written agreements with Bounty.

There were 10 items of correspondence received from Bounty since 1 June 2010. Copies of the correspondence, together with department’s replies, have been placed in the Library.

Since June 2010 departmental officials have met with Bounty on five occasions; a further meeting is planned in 2013. The then Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (Anne Milton) also met with Bounty in June 2011. The meetings covered a range of issues including Start4life, public health messages surrounding drinking, giving up smoking in pregnancy and opportunities to promote seasonal flu messages. Officials have also attended one of Bounty’s health networks to brief it on Start4Life, the NHS Information Service for Parents and the Start4Life smoke-free midwives pack.

Health: Cardiology

Question

Asked by The Lord Bishop of Ripon and Leeds

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they expect the Independent Reconfiguration Panel to publish the findings of its review of the Safe and Sustainable proposals on children’s congenital heart services; whether they issued any instructions about consulting Members of Parliament when requesting

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA47

that review; and whether they plan to issue further instructions to ensure that interested Members of the House of Lords are able to contribute.[HL4020]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Following referrals from three local Overview and Scrutiny Committees, and subsequent initial assessments of those referrals, the Independent Reconfiguration Panel (IRP) is currently undertaking a full review of the proposals concerning Safe and Sustainable.

The panel is now due to submit its advice to the Secretary of State no later than 28 March 2013. As is routine, the panel will publish its advice at the same time as the Secretary of State makes his decision public.

No instructions were issued to the panel about consulting Members of Parliament and no further instructions will be issued. As an independent body, it is up to the panel to determine how to carry out its review.

However, we are clear that anyone, including honourable Members and other elected or non-elected representatives can make their own representations and views known to the IRP on this important issue.

This can be done by contacting the panel at [email protected] and in writing to IRP, 6th floor, 157-197 Buckingham Palace Road, London SW1W 9SP.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA48

Health: Consultancy Services

Question

Asked by Lord Mawhinney

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much hospital trusts spent on outside consultants, by strategic health authority area, (1) in each of the past 12 months, and (2) in each of the past five years, for which figures are available.[HL4233]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Information regarding expenditure on consultancy services by National Health Service trusts within strategic health authority (SHA) regions for the years 2007-08 to 2010-11 is in the following table.

SHA spend in respect of the last 12 months in 2012-2013 will be available once the department’s annual report and accounts are laid before Parliament in October 2013.

NHS Direct NHS Trust does not fall under a specific SHA region; as such, figures for the organisation have been listed separately.

NHS Trust consultancy spend by SHA region2007-08 £000s2008-09 £000s2009-10 £000s2010-11 £000s2011-12 £000s

NHS Direct NHS Trust

3,627

7,279

4,955

1,308

2,730

North East SHA

2,972

2,165

1,230

656

561

North West SHA

13,301

12,862

7,460

8,443

14,079

Yorkshire and the Humber SHA

5,570

6,604

5,720

5,566

7,844

East Midlands SHA

8,349

8,256

12,960

10,822

13,772

West Midlands SHA

17,088

17,631

15,658

12,818

17,005

East of England SHA

10,003

9,403

9,822

7,781

7,325

London SHA

37,588

49,204

52,179

44,871

55,548

South East Coast SHA

13,884

16,355

13,193

10,064

12,411

South Central SHA

13,407

11,716

11,826

9,099

8,811

South West SHA

8,285

7,378

7,865

7,566

6,673

Source: 2007-08 to 2011-12 NHS Trusts Audited Summarisation Schedules

The data are taken from the audited summarisation schedules of NHS trusts which are used to prepare the NHS elements of the department’s annual report and accounts.

Health: Finance-related Ill-health

Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the link between financial anxiety over debt and health problems; and what steps they are taking to improve debt advice services.[HL4359]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The links between worklessness and mental ill-health are well established. The Foresight Report Mental Capital and Wellbeing, published by the Government Office of Science, highlighted the link between mental ill-health and social factors, particularly debt. A copy of the report is available at the following link: www.bis.gov.uk/foresight/our-work/projects/published-projects/mental-capital-and-wellbeing/reports-and-publications.

Through provisions in the Financial Services Act, the Government have clarified the role of the Money Advice Service so that it is required to work with other organisations which provide debt services, with a view to improving the availability, quality and consistency in the services available, in the way in which they are provided and in the advice given.

Health: Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

Questions

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to increase investment in innovation in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. [HL4266]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA49

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme is funding a systematic review of evidence on the benefits, harms and costs of treatments for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The review began in May 2012 and is expected to report in mid-2014. In addition, the NIHR is funding two one-year biomedical research fellowships studying IPF.

In addition, the department has asked the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to produce a clinical guideline on the diagnosis and management of IPF. The draft guideline is due to be published for consultation from 11 January 2013 to 22 February 2013, with a view to final publication in June 2013.

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the introduction of the value-based pricing system for treatments for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.[HL4267]

Earl Howe: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is developing technology appraisal guidance on the use of pirfenidone (Esbriet) for the treatment of patients with mild to moderate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. NICE issued initial draft guidance for consultation on 29 November 2012 which does not recommend the drug and currently expects to issue final guidance in April 2013.

The Government have set out their intention to introduce a system of value-based pricing (VBP) for branded medicines from January 2014. VBP will focus primarily on new medicines and it is not our intention to reassess under VBP the vast majority of treatments already appraised by NICE. Under our current plans, we intend to maintain the funding direction for NICE-recommended treatments and replicate its effect for medicines with a value-based price.

Health: Infection Control

Questions

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans are in place to appoint a new inspector of microbiology and infection control to advise the Government within the new NHS structures.[HL4196]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The department plans to discuss with the NHS Commissioning Board and Public Health England how to cover the inspector of microbiology and infection control’s functions in future.

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans are in place to ensure that variations in the redeployment of specialist infection prevention and control commissioning nurses and teams will not pose risks to management of infection prevention and control.[HL4197]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA50

Earl Howe: It is a matter for local determination to ensure that appropriate specialist infection prevention and control commissioning nurses and teams are in place to prevent and control infections.

Health: Miscarriage

Question

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of reports of women losing their babies due to mistaken diagnosis of miscarriage, and the subsequent advice to doctors from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. [HL4173]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): It is important that women receive accurate diagnosis of miscarriage to enable them to make informed decisions about their pregnancy.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has considered the available evidence on diagnosis and initial management in early pregnancy of ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage and published clinical guidelines on 12 December 2012: www.nice.org. uk/nicemedia/live/14000/61854/61854.pdf.

Health professionals will wish to follow the NICE recommendation that women be informed that the diagnosis of miscarriage using one ultrasound scan cannot be guaranteed to be 100% accurate and there is a small chance that the diagnosis may be incorrect, particularly at very early gestational ages.

Health: Neurology

Questions

Asked by Baroness Gale

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how the commissioning data set for neurology will be developed; and who will be responsible for collecting the data and ensuring that it is accurate.[HL4281]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when the commissioning data set for neurology will be complete.[HL4282]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people with long-term neurological conditions in the United Kingdom have a care plan.[HL4284]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The department does collect information on the number of people with a long-term neurological condition who have a care plan. Data on care planning was previously collected by the GP Practice Survey, which assesses patients’ experiences of local National Health Services. The most recent data collected, which cover the period April 2010 to March 2011, showed that of nearly 2 million respondents with a long-term condition, 83% reported they had a care planning discussion, and 96% reported an improvement in their care as a result of the care planning process. Of those respondents reporting having a care planning discussion, 70% did not want a written plan summarising the discussion.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA51

The Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention work stream on long-term conditions is looking at reducing the variations in the care planning that people receive. Evidence emerging from this work suggests that people want and value a care planning discussion rather than the need for a written care plan.

Arrangements for the development and operation of the neurology dataset will be matters for the NHS Commissioning Board to determine as it moves towards taking on its full responsibilities from April 2013. The board has committed to working with the service to increase the amount of data flowing within the NHS to support clinical commissioners in driving continuous improvements in quality in both secondary and primary care.

Asked by Baroness Gale

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what indicators in the Commissioning Outcomes Framework pertain specifically to neurological conditions.[HL4283]

Earl Howe: The NHS Commissioning Board published the Clinical Commissioning Group Outcomes Indicator Set (formerly the Commissioning Outcomes Framework) for 2013-14 on 18 December. The set contains indicators from the NHS Outcomes Framework that specifically include patients with neurological conditions. These are as follows (with the NHS Outcomes Framework number in brackets):

potential years of life lost from causes amenable to healthcare (1a); health-related quality of life for people with long- term conditions (2);unplanned hospitalisation for chronic ambulatory care sensitive conditions (adults) (2.3.i); andunplanned hospitalisation for asthma, diabetes and epilepsy in under 19s (2.3.ii).

Health: Obesity

Question

Asked by Lord Jones of Cheltenham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the risks to patients of using products containing orlistat in treatments (1) prescribed by the NHS, and (2) sold over the counter.[HL4190]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Orlistat is authorised for weight loss in adults who are overweight and should be taken in conjunction with a mildly hypocaloric, lower-fat diet. Orlistat works by preventing the absorption of ingested fat. Orlistat is available as both a prescription-only medicine (Xenical) and a non-prescription over-the-counter medicine that is available under the supervision of a pharmacist (Alli).

Orlistat is authorised throughout the European Union and a full assessment of its safety and efficacy was conducted at the time of authorisation. Public assessment reports have been published by the European Medicines Agency.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA52

The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency keeps the safety of all licensed medicines, including orlistat-containing products, under close review using a wide range of data sources. These include suspected adverse drug reactions spontaneously reported by health professionals and patients through the Yellow Card scheme.

Up-to-date information on the side effects of orlistat is provided in the product information for prescribers and the patient information leaflets, which accompany both the prescription-only and the over-the-counter medicines.

Health: Parkinson's Disease

Questions

Asked by Baroness Gale

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when the quality standard for Parkinson’s disease will be developed.[HL4279]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): We have asked the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to develop a quality standard on Parkinson’s disease as part of a library of approximately 180 National Health Service quality standards. NICE has not yet published a timescale for the development of this quality standard.

The NHS Commissioning Board, which will be responsible for the strategic direction of NHS quality standards from April 2013, has begun discussions with NICE to determine the most appropriate sequencing for NHS quality standards to assist the board in improving patient outcomes across the five domains of the NHS Outcomes Framework.

Asked by Baroness Gale

To ask Her Majesty’s Government when the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidance on Parkinson’s disease will next be updated. [HL4280]

Earl Howe: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published a clinical guideline on the diagnosis and management of Parkinson’s disease in primary and secondary care in June 2006.

NICE carried out a routine review of the need to update the clinical guideline in 2011 and concluded that the guideline should be further considered for an update once the outcomes of recent clinical research in this area have been published.

Higher Education: Modern Languages

Question

Asked by Baroness Coussins

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many (1) modern languages departments, and (2) degree courses in or including one or more modern language, have been closed in United Kingdom universities in each of the last five years.[HL4345]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA53

Baroness Garden of Frognal: The Government do not hold the specific data requested. Higher education institutions (HEI) are autonomous and responsible for how they structure themselves and what courses they offer. As a result of our funding reforms, from 2012-13 HEI funding increasingly flows from the fees paid by students, so institutions are making decisions about which courses to offer to respond to student demand.

We have asked the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) to protect subjects that are strategically important and vulnerable (SIVS), including modern foreign languages, to avoid undesirable reductions in the scale of provision.

HEFCE is working with institutions to explore how modern foreign language (MFL) provision could best

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA54

be sustained across the sector, taking into account the new landscape for student fees and finance in HE. HEFCE continues to provide funding for student demand-raising activity in MFL at a national level: for 2012-13 this funding is worth £1 million and between 2013 and 2016 HEFCE has committed to invest a further £3 million in a new programme of demand-raising work. Given the need to sustain the supply of MFL provision, HEFCE protected student numbers in these subjects in the redistribution of student numbers for 2012-13.

The table below shows the total number of students studying modern foreign languages over the past five years. It demonstrates that there has been little change in the overall number of FTE students taking modern foreign languages at undergraduate level.

Table 1: Undergraduate FTE in modern foreign languages drawn from HESA data*
Academic year
2006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11% change 2006-07 to 2010-11

Undergraduate FTE in modern foreign languages

27,967

26,883

27,441

27,185

28,021

0%

* Includes all students across all modes of study (full-time and part-time), from all domiciles (home, EU and international), and in all years of study. Excludes Open University.

Higher Education: Online Courses

Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the impact on the provision of university education of the publication by leading United Kingdom universities of degree resources online. [HL4232]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: The UK must be at the forefront of developments in educational technology. Open online courses present an opportunity for us to widen access to, and meet the global demand for, higher education. Recent initiatives by the Open University and others will make high-quality UK-produced academic content freely available to anyone who wishes to study it. We congratulate the Open University and its partners on this.

House of Lords: Appointments

Question

Asked by Lord Tebbit

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Strathclyde on 19 November (WA 320), when they expect to start on the process of achieving the objective of creating a second Chamber that is reflective of the share of the vote secured by the political parties in the last general election.[HL4052]

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (Lord Strathclyde): It remains the Government’s continued intention that Lords appointments will be made with the objective of creating a second Chamber that is reflective of the share of the vote secured by the political parties in the last general election, and this commitment is taken into account by the Prime Minister when making appointments.

House of Lords: Catering

Question

Asked by Lord Kennedy of Southwark

To ask the Chairman of Committees whether he will ensure that foie gras is removed from the menu of all catering establishments in the House of Lords. [HL4301]

The Chairman of Committees (Lord Sewel): The only outlets where foie gras had been on the menu were the Barry Room and the Peers’ Dining Room, during December 2012. Foie gras has now been removed from the menu in both outlets.

Foie gras has also been an option for menus for banqueting events, but will be removed from future banqueting menus.

House of Lords: Members

Question

Asked by Lord Ashcroft

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord McNally on 10 December (WA 196), what steps they take to ensure that all Members of the House of Lords retain the correct citizenship status to be a Member of the House. [HL4192]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA55

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): Since it was established in May 2000, the House of Lords Appointments Commission has asked non-party-political nominees to confirm their nationality and hereditary Peers elected in a by-election are required to confirm they are not disqualified for membership of the House of Lords, but Members’ nationality is not actively monitored thereafter.

House of Lords: Private Members’ Bills

Question

Asked by Lord Laird

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assistance in the preparation of Private Members’ Bills was provided by the Department of Energy and Climate Change in (1) the 2010–12 Session, and (2) this Session.[HL4118]

Lord Gardiner of Kimble: No direct assistance in the preparation of Private Members’ Bills has been provided by the department during the previous and current Sessions. This is because no Private Members’ Bills were tabled which fitted in with agreed policy of the department. The department does, however, endeavour to support Members whenever it can if their proposed Private Members’ Bills fit in with departmental policy.

Housing

Questions

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to make family housing more accessible.[HL4042]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): The Government believe that local communities should determine the right mix of new housing for their area. In June 2010 we removed the national minimum density target from Planning Policy Statement 3 (Housing) to give local authorities the flexibility to set density ranges that suit the local needs in their areas—particularly for family houses. The National Planning Policy Framework makes clear that councils should plan to meet the objectively assessed needs for market and affordable housing in the housing market area. As part of this, they should plan for a mix of housing based on current and future demographic trends, market trends and the needs of different groups in the community, such as families with children.

The Homes and Communities Agency is expecting that delivery of larger family homes through the new Affordable Homes Programme is broadly in line with the proportion delivered through the earlier National Affordable Homes Programme. Around 29% of the homes will be family-sized homes (3+ bedrooms).

The Government are also committed to helping people access all types of housing, including family housing, by providing help with mortgage finance. Over £900 million is being invested by government and housebuilders through FirstBuy to help up to 27,000 first-time buyers into home ownership by March 2014. FirstBuy offers an equity loan of up to 20% of

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA56

the property value which can be used towards the cost of purchasing a home. 45.7% of FirstBuy sales to the end of September 2012 were properties of three or more bedrooms. The NewBuy Guarantee scheme helps buyers realise their aspirations for home ownership with a 5% deposit. The Government provide the necessary guarantee to support lenders to offer 95% loan-to-value new-build mortgages.

Asked by Baroness Whitaker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what measures they are taking to improve the design quality of new-build housing.[HL4238]

Baroness Hanham: Our housing strategy, Laying the Foundations: A Housing Strategy for England, was published in November 2011. It emphasises that getting the quality, sustainability and design of housing right is crucial if communities are going to support new homes.

In line with this, the National Planning Policy Framework published in March 2012 makes clear that good design is a key aspect of sustainable development, is indivisible from good planning and should contribute positively to making places better for people. Specifically it sets out that: permission should be refused for development of poor design; great weight should be given to outstanding or innovative designs; proposals that have evolved to take account of the views of the community should be looked on more favourably; and local planning authorities should have local design review arrangements in place.

In addition, we are currently funding the Design Council CABE to provide design review services. This enables developers and local authorities to get potential schemes reviewed by an independent panel of experts, who provide advice on how the scheme design could be improved.

We have also supported the development of the Building for Life design checklist. This is promoted by the Home Builders Federation and the Design Council as a reference tool that can be used at the pre-application stage to help frame local discussions about the design of a new housing scheme.

Asked by Baroness Whitaker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they plan to introduce minimum space and storage standards for new homes as part of their review of housing standards.[HL4239]

Baroness Hanham: No decisions have been made about standards for space and storage in the review of local housing standards. Ministers will receive recommendations for their consideration in due course.

Asked by Baroness Whitaker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the current minimum space standards applicable to new affordable housing developments.[HL4240]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA57

Baroness Hanham: Information on the design and sustainability standards used by the Homes and Communities Agency can be found online at: www. homesandcommunities.co.uk/ourwork/design-and-sustainability-standards.

Information on how the quality of housing schemes is measured is at: www.homesandcommunities.co.uk/hqi.

Asked by Baroness Whitaker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the cost implications of (1) the Lifetime Homes Standards, (2) the Code for Sustainable Homes, and (3) minimum space standards for public housing for new developments in England.[HL4241]

Baroness Hanham: The Department for Communities and Local Government commissioned analysis of the cost implications of Lifetime Homes Standards by Building Cost Information Service in 2009, which estimated costs ranging between £199 and £2,500 per unit for different home types and designs.

The cost of the Code for Sustainable Homes has been regularly assessed, and the last report was published in 2011. This indicated that extra over costs can range between £230 and £40,000 per unit, depending on different code level, home type and design, and location. The latest cost report is available at this link: https:// www.gov.uk/government/publications/cost-of-building-housing-to-the-code-for-sustainable-homes-standard-updated-cost-review.

The Department for Communities and Local Government has not made any estimate of the cost implications of space standards.

Asked by Baroness Whitaker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the regulations relating to information required for the marketing of new homes and what consideration they have given to the proposals made by the Royal Institute of British Architects for an industry-wide voluntary agreement regarding the quality and nature of information provided in marketing information for the sale of homes.[HL4242]

Baroness Hanham: Striking the right balance in the regulatory system is very important. We need to protect consumers while eliminating the avoidable burdens of regulation and bureaucracy to promote growth, innovation and social action.

To protect consumers, the marketing of new homes is covered by general marketing and consumer protection laws. There is also a requirement that an energy performance certificate must be made available to prospective home purchasers.

To remove unnecessary red tape, we abolished the previous Government’s home information packs because they significantly increased the cost of moving home for sellers and resulted in duplicated costs as buyers did not trust the information. We have also recently announced our intention to repeal the Property Misdescriptions Act 1991 as the Consumer Protection

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA58

from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 provide adequate similar protections against false or misleading commercial practices in this sector, as in other sectors.

We would welcome further industry initiatives in response to the proposal from the Royal Institute of British Architects and Future Homes Commission. This could build on the consumer code for house-builders, which is an example of an existing voluntary industry-wide initiative to make the home-buying process fairer and more transparent for purchasers.

Asked by Baroness Whitaker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what conditions or expectations are set out in agreements with developers for the disposal of public land for the purpose of new housing development as to the design quality of the homes that will be built. [HL4262]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what requirements are set out for developers taking part in the Build Now Pay Later scheme in respect of the design quality of homes built on surplus public sector land.[HL4263]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what measures they are taking to ensure that new homes built on surplus public sector land are of a good design quality.[HL4264]

Baroness Hanham: As part of the Government’s public land programme, departments are freeing up their surplus, formerly used land, with development potential, particularly for housing. Each landowning department is responsible for the disposal of its land and the contracts it uses, including Build Now Pay Later terms, and these will be tailored on a site-by-site basis.

The National Planning Policy Framework sets out the Government’s planning policies on design, making it clear that good design is a key aspect of sustainable development. Matters of design quality for homes on public land and all sites are for local decision, as they importantly need to respect the local character and environment of the area. I refer my noble friend to the answer given to my honourable friend the Member for South Staffordshire on 7 January (Official Report, col. 127W), which provides more detail about the steps being taken by the Government to encourage good design.

Immigration: Detention

Questions

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of detainees without authorisation to be in the United Kingdom have been incarcerated for (1) one year, and (2) over two years.[HL4127]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, of the detainees without authorisation to be present in the United Kingdom who have been incarcerated for over two years, how many were (1) released, (2) forcibly released, and (3) kept in detention, during the last five years.[HL4128]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA59

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): The number of persons detained under Immigration Act powers at 30 September 2012, the latest date for which published information is available, was 3,091; 149 were detained for one year or more and, of these, 27 were detained for two years or more.

I have assumed that by “forcibly released” you refer to individuals whose release has been ordered by the courts. We have provided information relating to those released on bail, but do not hold information centrally on whether temporary admission or release is given as the result of a court order or following the UK Border Agency’s review of detention. Information on the number of individuals leaving detention, including the reasons and length of detention, is only available from 2010.

Of those detained for two years or more:

77 persons left detention in 2010. Of these, 26 were removed and 15 were granted temporary admission or release. A further 31 were granted bail.

118 persons left detention in 2011. Of these, 29 were removed and 23 were granted temporary admission or release. A further 61 were granted bail.

55 persons left detention in 2012 up to 30 September 2012, the latest date for which published information is available. Of these, 19 were removed and 13 were granted temporary admission or release. A further 22 were granted bail.

Detailed information on people in detention, by length of detention, is released quarterly in table dt.9.q, and people leaving detention in tables dt.05.q and dt.06.q of Immigration Statistics, which is available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office’s Science, Research and Statistics website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-tabs-q3-2012/detention-q3-2012-tabs?view=Binary

Detention is a necessary part of the process to remove some individuals with no right to be in the UK. We always seek to remove those with no right to be here as quickly as possible but if detainees give false or incomplete information or submit spurious last-minute appeals, then in such cases, it can delay their return and extend their detention.

Asked by Lord Roberts of Llandudno

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will establish an independent panel to review the cases of detainees without authorisation to be present in the United Kingdom who are held for lengthy periods.[HL4129]

Lord Taylor of Holbeach: The establishment of such a panel is not considered to be necessary or appropriate. Exercise of immigration detention powers is a matter for the Secretary of State. Decisions to maintain detention are kept under regular review at successively higher levels in the UK Border Agency, with cases involving particularly lengthy detention being reviewed at director level. The legality of detention can be challenged in the courts, as well as the individual having the right to apply for bail at any time.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA60

Immigration: Handcuffs

Question

Asked by Baroness Stern

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many times (1) handcuffs, and (2) escort chains, were used on children by escort providers escorting children to or from (a) immigration reception centres, (b) the pre-departure accommodation, The Cedars, and (c) immigration detention centres, during the latest 12-month period for which figures are available, and during the three preceding 12-month periods. [HL3533]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Taylor of Holbeach): Handcuffs are only ever used on children as a last resort where it is strictly necessary to prevent self-harm or escape, or to protect others and property. Escorting officers do not use chains.

The detention and escorting contract transferred to Reliance Secure Task Management on 1 May 2011. From May 2011 to the present date, there have not been any instances of officers using handcuffs on children when escorting them to or from the pre-departure accommodation or immigration removal centres. There are no facilities called immigration reception centres.

Data from the previous escorting provider are not available.

The information is taken from data normally used for management information only. It has not been subject to the detailed checks that apply for National Statistics publications and is provisional and subject to change.

Israel

Question

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have had with the Government of Israel concerning any long-term ceasefire they were negotiating with Hamas before the recent hostilities started.[HL4187]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): We are aware of media reports about a possible full ceasefire proposal before the recent violence in Gaza and southern Israel. However, we have not discussed this issue with the Israeli Government.

Following the Egyptian-brokered ceasefire on 21 November, the priority now must be to address the underlying causes of the conflict, including more open access to and from Gaza for people and goods, and an end to the smuggling of weapons. It is important that momentum towards finding a solution to the problems of Gaza is maintained.

Israel and Palestine

Questions

Asked by Baroness Uddin

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the reported raids by Israeli forces on the offices of Palestinian human

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA61

rights organisations, including the offices of the Union of Palestinian Women Committees and the Palestinian NGO Network.[HL4146]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): We are deeply concerned by the incursion by Israeli security forces into Ramallah on 11 December to raid the offices of three non-governmental organisations (NGOs) with which the EU has implemented co-operation projects—Addameer, the Union of Palestinian Women Committees (UPWC) and the Palestinian NGO Network (PNGO).

Incursions by Israeli forces into Palestinian cities where the Palestinian Authority under the Oslo accords assumes the powers and responsibilities for internal security and public order put in jeopardy the internationally recognised success of Palestinian institution-building efforts.

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent discussions they have had with the Government of Israel concerning the recommendation of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office report Children in Military Custody that military law and public administration should deal with Palestinian children on an equal footing with Israeli children.[HL4184]

Baroness Warsi: Our ambassador to Tel Aviv has discussed the report’s findings with the Israeli Attorney-General and Deputy Attorney-General and with the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs. We will continue dialogue with the Israeli authorities on this issue.

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my honourable friend the Member for North East Bedfordshire (Mr Burt), has also written to the Israeli ambassador on this subject and has met Baroness Scotland, as one of the authors, to discuss follow-up to the report.

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent representations they have made to the Government of Israel concerning Palestinian farmers in Jayyous and elsewhere who are unable to access their land because of the security barrier.[HL4188]

Baroness Warsi: Through our embassy in Tel Aviv, we have lobbied the appropriate authorities on the issue of movement and access. We continue to work closely with the quartet and EU partners, and to call on Israel to ease restrictions on access.

The UK position on the separation barrier is clear: if Israel wished to build the barrier, it should have been built on the 1967 border—and where it is constructed on the Palestinian side of that border, it is illegal under international law.

According to the UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs there are now 522 obstacles which restrict Palestinian access, compared to 503 at the end of 2010. This is a clear increase and it is clear

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA62

that more needs to be done, particularly in the Jordan Valley and Palestinian land on the Israeli side of the separation barrier.

We will continue to argue for a just outcome for all the people affected by illegal settlement construction and the confiscation of land due to the separation barrier. This includes funding from the Department for International Development for the Norwegian Refugee Council to provide legal support to communities affected by the occupation.

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what has been the total cost of Mr Tony Blair and his supporting staff in his role as Quartet Envoy to the Middle East; and what is the United Kingdom share of that cost.[HL4326]

Baroness Warsi: The Government do not provide any financial contribution to the Office of the Quartet Representative. However, we do currently second two civil servants to the Office of the Quartet Representative in London, and one to the Office of the Quartet Representative in Jerusalem, to support the work of the quartet in reinforcing the prospects of a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

The Government do not hold information on the total cost of Tony Blair’s role as Quartet Envoy.

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will make representations to the Government of Israel about access to the Old City of Jerusalem for pilgrims and students coming from the West Bank, Jordan and Israel, in line with United Nations resolutions on the matter.[HL4365]

Baroness Warsi: We remain deeply concerned about restrictions on freedom of movement between the West Bank and East Jerusalem, and elsewhere in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Through our embassy in Tel Aviv, we have lobbied the appropriate authorities on the issue of movement and access. We continue to work closely with the quartet and EU partners, and to call on Israel to ease restrictions on access.

Israel and Palestine: West Bank

Question

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have had with the Government of Israel concerning the break-in and removal of all computer hard disks from the human rights offices of Addameer and other community organisations in Ramallah. [HL4185]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): We are deeply concerned by the incursion by Israeli security forces into Ramallah on 11 December, to raid the offices of three non-governmental

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA63

organisations, including Addameer, the Union of Palestinian Women Committees and the Palestinian Non-Governmental Organisation Network.

Incursions by Israeli forces into Palestinian cities where the Palestinian Authority under the Oslo Accords assumes the powers and responsibilities for internal security and public order put in jeopardy the internationally recognized success of Palestinian institution building efforts.

Officials at our embassy in Tel Aviv are actively seeking an opportunity to raise this raid with the Israeli authorities.

Justice: Confiscation Orders

Questions

Asked by Lord Thomas of Gresford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many prisoners are currently serving a term of imprisonment for default in the payment of confiscation orders. [HL4222]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): The National Offender Management Service and the Ministry of Justice Analytical Services are unable to obtain information from their data systems in relation to how many offenders are currently serving a confiscation default sentence for non-payment of confiscation orders. In addition, if the court has invoked the default sentence and if the offender is still serving their substantive prison sentence they will not be classed as serving their default sentence until after they have served their main sentence.

Asked by Lord Thomas of Gresford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much was recovered from confiscation orders in 2011. [HL4223]

Lord McNally: A record amount of £120.8 million was recovered from confiscation orders in England and Wales during the financial year of 2011-12.

Asked by Lord Thomas of Gresford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many confiscation orders resulted in default sentences being activated in 2011.[HL4224]

Lord McNally: HMCTS has eight regional confiscation units and the breakdown of the number of default prison sentences activated for non-payment of confiscation orders during 2011-12 is recorded in the table below.

HMCTS Regional Confiscation UnitNumber of default sentences activated during 2011-12

London

66

Midlands (east)

27

Midlands (west)

41

North East

37

North West

67

South East

48

South West

35

Wales

6

Total

327

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA64

Asked by Lord Thomas of Gresford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what range of default sentences were set by the Crown Courts for non-payment of confiscation orders in 2011. [HL4225]

Lord McNally: The minimum prison default sentence for non-payment is seven days for outstanding amounts up to £200, while the maximum additional sentence is 10 years for outstanding amounts over £1 million.

The table below records the sliding scale of default prison sentences against the amount left outstanding, all of which were allocated during 2011-12.

AmountDefault Period

Not exceeding £200

7 days

Exceeding £200 but less than £500

14 days

Exceeding £500 but less than £1,000

28 days

Exceeding £1,000 but less than £2,500

45 days

Exceeding £2,500 but less than £5,000

3 months

Exceeding £5,000 but less than £10,000

6 months

Exceeding £10,000 but less than £20,000

12 months

Exceeding £20,000 but less than £50,000

18 months

Exceeding £50,000 but less than £100,000

2 years

Exceeding £100,000 but less than £250,000

3 years

Exceeding £250,000 but less than £1,000,000

5 years

Exceeding £ 1,000,000

10 years

Asked by Lord Thomas of Gresford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what types of offence resulted in confiscation orders being made in 2011.[HL4226]

Lord McNally: During the 2011-12 financial year, 20 of the 21 offence categories were used for grant confiscation orders. No confiscation orders were granted under terrorism during 2011-12.

The table below records the volume and value of confiscation orders granted during 2011-12, under each offence category.

OffenceVolume of Orders GrantedValue of Orders Granted

Arms Trafficking

7

£1,766,873.33

Bribery and Corruption

11

£1,716,429.75

Burglary/Theft

512

£5,697,593.23

Counterfeiting/Intellectual Property/Forgery

135

£8,814,064.66

Drug Trafficking

3,333

£45,428,479.24

Excise Duty Fraud

46

£2,917,292.68

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA65

Handling Stolen Goods

63

£868,691.02

Intellectual Property Crime

13

£186,313.94

Money-laundering - Drugs

257

£12,407,865.56

Money-laundering - Other

333

£32,106,071.95

Other Crime

127

£8,556,117.70

Other Fraud/Embezzlement/Deception/Crimes of dishonesty

904

£36,014,747.14

People Trafficking

32

£2,179,856.14

Pimps and Brothels/Prostitution/Pornography

51

£3,372,369.73

Robbery

103

£513,453.21

Tax and Benefit Fraud

300

£14,215,450.13

Terrorism

0

0.00

Trading Standards Offences

3

£473,820.00

Unknown

12

£150,134.32

VAT Fraud

25

£10,165,274.51

Vehicle Offences

3

£111,772.35

Grand Total

6,270

£187,662,670.59

Asked by Lord Thomas of Gresford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their estimate of the cost of confiscation proceedings in 2010 and 2011 arising out of court hearings, the use of expert witnesses, enforcement and default prison sentences.[HL4227]

Lord McNally: HM Courts and Tribunals Service systems do not identify the cost of confiscation proceedings, including court hearings, the use of expert witnesses, enforcement and default prison sentences. To provide an estimate would require liaising with many government departments and would incur disproportionate costs. Furthermore it is difficult to set an average cost, as some confiscation cases are straightforward while others such as fraud are very complex and would be lengthy and include many specialists.

Kenya

Questions

Asked by Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what consideration they have given to the issue of an apology to Kenyan victims of torture during the 1950s Kenyan Emergency.[HL4103]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): We understand the pain and grievance felt by all those involved in the divisive and bloody events of the emergency period in Kenya. We acknowledge that the claimants in the related case currently before the High Court may have suffered

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA66

torture and ill treatment. However, in light of the ongoing legal proceedings it would not be appropriate to comment further.

Asked by Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will meet the Kenyan Human Rights Commission to discuss the setting up of a welfare fund for Kenyan victims of torture and violence and degrading treatment by the British colonial authorities during the 1950s Kenyan Emergency.[HL4104]

Baroness Warsi: It would not be appropriate to comment on the possibility of a welfare fund while there is an ongoing legal case in the High Court.

Liver Bird

Question

Asked by Lord Storey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations they have made to (1) Liverpool Football Club, (2) Liverpool City Council, (3) the UK Intellectual Property Office, and (4) the European Union Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market, regarding the rights associated with the use of the Liver Bird; and, if they have not made representations, whether they will do so.[HL4275]

Baroness Stowell of Beeston: There has been no recent contact between the UK Intellectual Property Office (IPO) and either Liverpool Football Club or Liverpool City Council regarding use of the Liver Bird in their logos. In April 2009, an official from IPO held a discussion with representatives of both Liverpool Football Club and Liverpool City Council to offer advice in relation to their continued and joint use of the Liver Bird.

IPO has not discussed this matter with, nor made any representations to, the Office for the Harmonisation of the Internal Market, and is not aware of any discussions between that office and Liverpool Football Club or Liverpool City Council.

Localism Act 2011

Question

Asked by Baroness Whitaker

To ask Her Majesty’s Government to what extent the duty to co-operate introduced in the Localism Act 2011 applies to co-operation between public bodies for individual development sites; and whether they will consider measures to require co-operation between public bodies and private companies on individual sites.[HL4243]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Communities and Local Government (Baroness Hanham): The duty to co-operate applies to the preparation of local and marine plans where local planning authorities, county councils and prescribed bodies are planning for strategic cross-boundary matters. Local planning authorities report to their communities on their actions under the duty in their authority monitoring report at least annually. The duty is intended to support the joint working necessary for good plan-making and this may include work with private partners where appropriate. Public

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA67

bodies subject to the duty are required to have regard to the activities of local enterprise partnerships when preparing local plans, bringing together public and private sector organisations. The duty does not apply to the development management process but there is a similar expectation around effective joint working.

London Underground: Line Extensions

Question

Asked by Lord Berkeley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their estimate of the cost of extending the Northern Line to Battersea Power station; and what contribution the developer of that site will make.[HL4289]

Earl Attlee: The costs of the extension are not expected to exceed £1 billion in outturn prices. Further design works will be required to provide a more accurate forecast of the capital costs, which will also be dependent on the timing of construction.

Transport for London is currently working with the London boroughs of Wandsworth and Lambeth, the Greater London Authority and private developers to finalise the project’s funding and financing solution. The developer of the Battersea Power Station site is committed to providing £211.6 million (this figure will be subject to indexation) of funding towards infrastructure works, as set out in its Section 106 agreement. At least 72% of this will be used to fund the Northern Line extension.

Muslim Brotherhood

Question

Asked by Lord Patten

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of whether the Muslim Brotherhood presents any terrorist threat globally.[HL4160]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): The Muslim Brotherhood is a diverse movement that has its own political parties in a number of countries. We will engage with political parties where they respect the democratic process and have a commitment to human rights, the rule of law and non-violence. We do not consider the Muslim Brotherhood to be a terrorist organisation.

NHS: Contracts

Question

Asked by Lord Beecham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many NHS contracts are currently placed with organisations owned by private equity companies.[HL4255]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): Contracts to provide goods and services to National Health Service bodies are generally let by the NHS bodies themselves. As a consequence the department does not hold information on the corporate structure of suppliers awarded these contracts.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA68

NHS: Data

Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what applications they have (1) received, and (2) granted, from organisations which collect data from NHS users in NHS hospital maternity units regarding the permission of onward sale of that data to other organisations and individuals.[HL4206]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) is the central body responsible for undertaking national collections of data from health and care organisations, including data on maternity services. The HSCIC routinely publishes and shares the data it collects so that they can be used to support the delivery of healthcare services but—crucially—only in ways that do not identify individuals. Identifiable data are released by the HSCIC only where consent has been obtained or where there is another basis in law to release it.

The HSCIC receives applications for specific extracts of the data it holds to be provided for particular purposes as part of a bespoke data extract service. All applications for such data extracts are assessed by the centre to ensure there is a valid and appropriate purpose for the intended use of the data. If they include identifiable data, the applicant must have the appropriate legal approval to see the data. In addition, a customer of the service can only hold the data having signed a data reuse agreement which contains strict conditions about how the data are to be used.

The HSCIC operates this service on a cost recovery basis. That means that any charges made by HSCIC cover only the resource cost of providing the data. No charge is made for the data itself.

The HSCIC records requests for bespoke data extracts according to the customer rather than the subject matter of the data. As a result, this information is not stored in a way that allows any requests which may have included maternity data to be identified without examining every extract request manually.

Dame Fiona Caldicott is currently leading an independent review, commissioned by the Government, to examine and report on how we can strike the right balance between appropriately safeguarding people’s health and care data while ensuring we are able to harness the enormous power information has to transform people’s experience of care. That review is expected to report early in 2013.

NHS: Funding

Questions

Asked by Baroness Pitkeathley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the cost to the National Health Service in the period 2007-2012, as captured by the National Programme Budgeting Database, of funding continuing healthcare packages for patients’ ongoing health and social care needs, broken down by medical speciality. [HL4133]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA69

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the cost to the National Health Service in the period 2007-2012 of funding continuing healthcare packages for patients’ ongoing health and social care needs arising from problems of vision, broken down by primary care trust.[HL4134]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the cost to the National Health Service in the period 2007-2012 of funding continuing healthcare packages for patients’ ongoing health and social care needs arising from neurological problems, broken down by primary care trust.[HL4135]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The cost of funding National Health Service continuing healthcare packages is not captured specifically by National Programme Budgeting. Since 2009, the department has collected information on the total cost of NHS continuing healthcare packages through a financial information management system1. The annual costs are as follows:

2009-10 - £2,030,071,000;2010-11 - £2,186,171,000; and2011-12 - £2,324,655,000.

This information is not available broken down by medical specialty.

Note:

1This is management information and is not audited for departmental records

NHS: General Practitioners

Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to minimise patient services being cut by general practitioners.[HL4361]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The proposed changes to the general practitioners’ (GP) contract for 2013-14 are designed to improve the range and quality of services provided by GP practices.

The Government’s evidence to the Review Body on Doctors’ and Dentists’ Remuneration proposes that GP practices should also receive an uplift in funding for 2013-14 to allow up to a 1% increase in pay for GPs and practice staff and additional funding to reflect increases in non-staff expenses.

NHS: Liverpool Care Pathway

Questions

Asked by Lord Patten

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether all patients who are intended to be placed on the Liverpool Care Pathway, and their legal carers, (1) must be informed by hospital staff of that intention, and (2) have the absolute right to decline this form of care.[HL4071]

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA70

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe): The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is an option for clinicians to help manage the care of people in their last days or hours of life, complementing the skill and expertise of the practitioner using it. It requires senior doctors and nurses involved in a patient’s care to agree that death is very likely to be imminent, and that being placed on the LCP would reduce a patient’s distress, discomfort and pain. That decision involves the clinician choosing the best approach to care for an individual patient, whether curative treatment, palliative care, or a mixture of both. The LCP documentation is very clear that the decision should involve the patient and family members wherever possible. The LCP is not a treatment but a framework for managing treatments. Consent is therefore not required for the LCP itself, but normal consent rules apply to treatments while someone is on the LCP. If, as part of the discussions between the patient, family and healthcare team, it becomes clear that someone did not wish LCP to be used to help manage their care, then the healthcare team should respect that choice.

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government who has been appointed to chair their inquiry into the operation of the Liverpool Care Pathway; with whom the chair will be working to conduct that inquiry; and what mandate the inquiry will have.[HL4257]

Earl Howe: We expect to announce the chair of the independent inquiry very shortly. Once the chair is in place, further details, including the terms of reference for the inquiry, will be published.

North Korea

Questions

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the answer by Baroness Warsi on 12 December (Official Report, col. 1064) and following the decision by the Government of North Korea to test its ballistic missile technology, what message was conveyed to the ambassador from North Korea during the meeting to which he was invited at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on 12 December; what was his response; and what contact the Foreign Secretary has had with the Government of China in preparation for the meeting of the United Nations Security Council which will consider this matter.[HL4177]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): The North Korean ambassador was summoned to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) by the Permanent Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my honourable friend the Member for North East Bedfordshire (Mr Burt), on 12 December. Alistair Burt condemned North Korea’s satellite launch, made clear that it was a violation of UN Security Council Resolution 1874 and

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA71

emphasised the importance of North Korea adhering to its international obligations. He also pointed out that North Korea should prioritise its resources on feeding its people, avoid further provocative action and take urgent steps to re-engage constructively with the international community.

The ambassador’s response was consistent with public statements by the North Koreans.

The Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right honourable friend the Member for East Devon (Mr Swire), met the North Korean ambassador on 19 December. He repeated the UK’s strong condemnation of the satellite launch and explained that under international law North Korea must adhere to the obligations placed on it by the UN Security Council. He reiterated the Government’s call for North Korea to focus its resources on improving the lives of the North Korean people.

The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right honourable friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague), did not have any contact himself with the Chinese Government before the UN Security Council meeting on 12 December. However, in advance of the satellite launch, he instructed our embassy in Beijing to speak to the Chinese Government to explain our position. Officials from the FCO in London also spoke to the Chinese embassy and our ambassador to North Korea met the Chinese ambassador in Pyongyang to reiterate these messages.

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions have taken place in the United Nations Security Council following the launch of a ballistic missile by North Korea; what bilateral discussions they have had with China; and what measures are being taken in response by the international community. [HL4258]

Baroness Warsi: The UN Security Council held urgent consultations following the launch on 12 December of North Korea’s Eunha 3 rocket. In that meeting, members of the Security Council condemned the launch as a clear violation of Security Council resolutions 1718 and 1874. They recalled that in April 2012 the council demanded that North Korea not proceed with any further launches using ballistic missile technology. Consultations on the exact nature of the Security Council’s response are ongoing between council members.

Officials at the UK Mission to the UN have also discussed the satellite launch with officials at the Chinese Mission to the UN as part of wider efforts to secure a strong UN response. Our embassy in Beijing has also spoken to the Chinese Foreign Ministry and set out our position in an attempt to secure Chinese support for an appropriate Security Council response.

We and other like-minded partners remain focused on seeing the Security Council agree an appropriate response to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s launch. EU member states will then consider their own response, in light of decisions taken by the Security Council. At the same time, other international partners such as South Korea and Japan are also considering bilateral responses to the satellite launch.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA72

Ofsted

Question

Asked by Baroness Sharp of Guildford

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Hill of Oareford on 24 September (WA 326) regarding complaints to Ofsted, whether details of complaints are made public, and if so where; and what was the outcome of the two complaints against further education colleges which were not concluded at the time the Question was answered.[HL4144]

Baroness Garden of Frognal: This question is a matter for Ofsted. The Deputy Chief Inspector, Education, Children’s Services and Skills, John Goldup, has written to the noble Baroness, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from John Goldup, Deputy Chief Inspector, Education, Childrens Services and Skills, Ofsted, to Baroness Sharp of Guildford, dated 13 December 2012.

Your recent Parliamentary Question has been passed to Ofsted for response. Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector is away, and I am replying on his behalf.

I can confirm that we do not currently make public details of complaints about Ofsted’s work. However, the annual report of the Independent Complaints Adjudication Service for Ofsted (ICASO) evaluates how complaints have been handled when complainants remain dissatisfied following our internal investigations into their concerns. The ICASO annual report is available on its website at: http://www.ofstedadjudicationservice.co.uk/

In terms of the two complaints by further education colleges where investigations had not been completed at the time the previous Parliamentary Question was answered, one related to the inspection judgments awarded, and one related to aspects of inspector conduct, administrative issues and the inspection judgments. None of these concerns was upheld following complaint investigations.

A copy of this reply has been sent to Lord Hill of Oareford, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Schools, and will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Older People

Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Warsi on 14 December (Official Report, col. 1328) that “the mark of a good society is how it treats its old people”, what plans they have to encourage people in the United Kingdom to value older people.[HL4228]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): As the debate on 14 December highlighted, the contribution of older people to our society is considerable and wide-ranging. The people who benefit from that contribution—whatever form it takes—already hold them with great value.

8 Jan 2013 : Column WA73

Government do recognise the importance of the issues facing people in later life and the contribution they make to society, but do not assume that they know all the answers. The Age Action Alliance was created in recognition of the need for a radical shift in approach. The alliance’s vision is informed and driven by older people themselves, sharing a vision of improving older people’s lives and creating neighbourhoods where all older people are secure, valued and able to make a contribution to their local communities and wider society.

UK Older People’s Day is held on 1 October and celebrates the contribution older people make to our society. The purpose of the day is to be a national celebration of the achievements and contributions that older people make to our society and to the economy. Supported by the Department for Work and Pensions, Older People’s Day is a means through which we can progressively address negative attitudes and outdated stereotypes.

Community events such as the Big Lunch have also shown themselves to be good vehicles for bringing the generations together. In 2012 8.5 million people took part, with events often involving an intergenerational aspect. In rural Cleveland, targeted support made possible by this department gave an isolated community a big boost with teenagers helping older residents to take part in the Big Lunch.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Question

Asked by Lord Myners

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Sassoon on 6 December (WA 203–4), whether the voluntary contribution of €150,000 to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development “to support rapid progress on its work to tackle the profit shifting and the erosion of the corporate tax base at the global level” is directly linked to a specific deliverable and agreed timetable.[HL4322]

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Lord Newby: The Organisation for the Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) work is important to help promote a better way of dealing with profit shifting and the erosion of the corporate tax base at the global level. The OECD will report to the G20 Finance Ministers on progress in February 2013. The timetable and direction for further work by the OECD will be set following consideration of the February report.

Given the complex issues involved and the need to gather evidence, the voluntary contributions to this work will help make progress in achieving concrete results.

Overseas Aid

Question

Asked by The Earl of Sandwich

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much funding the Department for International Development has allocated in the last two financial years for (1) agriculture, (2) forestry, (3) fisheries, and (4) livestock, broken down by country.[HL4137]

Baroness Northover: DfID uses input sector codes to collect information on sectoral spend across its bilateral programme. Information on how much is spent by sector is published annually through its Statistics on International Development publication and at more detailed sectoral level through a set of additional tables. This information can be found at the following link: http://www.dfid.gov.uk/About-us/How-we-measure-progress/Aid-Statistics/Statistics-on-International-Development-2012/.

The tables below provide details of bilateral spending in agriculture, forestry, fisheries and livestock broken down by country and regional programme in financial years 2010-11 and 2011-12. The department also provides finance for these sectors through core contributions to multilateral organisations. For example, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) received £32 million in 2010-11, with elements of this funding being used for agricultural purposes.

Bilateral sector spending, by country, 2010-11
£ thousand
CountryAgricultureFisheriesForestryLivestockGrand Total

Afghanistan

5,088

-

-

6

5,094

Africa Regional

11,984

2,813

1,515

1

16,314

Asia Regional

-

-

13

-

13

Brazil

-

-

24

-

24

Burma

2.706

-

-

375

3,081

Cambodia

455

280

253

-

988

Cameroon

-

-

257

-

257

China

884

-

-

-

884

Ethiopia

15,838

-

-

-

15,838

Ghana

70

-

607

-

677

India

6,888

-

-

-

6,888

Indonesia

-

-

753

-

753

Kenya

17

-

-

-

17

Liberia

-

-

146

-

146

Malawi

4,097

-

-

-

4,097

Mozambique

192

-

-

-

192

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Nepal

1,602

-

3,200

-

4,802

Nicaragua

113

-

-

-

113

Nigeria

294

-

-

694

988

Pakistan

2,192

-

-

-

2,192

Rwanda

4,283

-

-

-

4,283

South Africa, Republic of 1

-319

-

-

-

-319

South of Sahara Regional

36

-

-

-

36

St Helena

-

169

-

-

169

Sudan

1,214

-

-

-

1,214

Tajikistan, Republic of

11

-

-

-

11

Tanzania

467

-

-

-

467

Uganda

334

-

-

334

Yemen

1,021

-

-

-

1,021

Zimbabwe

4,281

-

-

-

4,281

Non-specific Country

5,050

48

52,872

1,205

59,174

Grand Total

68,799

3,310

59,640

2,281

134,030

1 Reimbursement of funds to programme.

2 Spending on agriculture based on Input Sector Codes 31110, 31120, 31130 and 31191.

3 Spending on fisheries based on Input Sector Codes 31310 and 31320.

4 Spending on forestry based on Input Sector Codes 31210 and 31220.

5 Spending on livestock based on Input Sector Codes 31163.

- represents zero expenditure