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Camelids

Baroness Byford asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Whitty): Camelid keeping in the UK is a niche market and most are kept as pets or hobby animals. The Government see no need at present to require these animals to be formally identified or registered given their relatively small numbers. Movement controls only become necessary during a disease outbreak and the Government have the necessary powers to implement identification and movement controls at such times. In addition, the high value of camelids means that their owners tend to keep their own very good records relating to each animal.

Scenes of Crime: Roads and Railways

Lord Berkeley asked Her Majesty's Government:

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Lord Davies of Oldham: The Highways Agency does not keep detailed records of all the incidents that occur on its roads. The police handle any accident scene in accordance with their road death investigation manual. This does not require a declaration of a scene of crime, but requires that incidents be treated as such until the cause of the accident is determined. This ensures that the scene is kept sterile and preserves it in order to capture and record evidence.

On the railways, the British Transport Police are required to establish if any incident may have occured through a criminal act and protect and preserve the evidence. This standard approach is applied to all incidents they deal with.

Lord Berkeley asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Which police force declared that the slow speed derailment of a train at Kings Cross Station on 16th September was a "scene of crime"; and for how many hours this remained in force; and[HL4604]

    How the declaration of a "scene of crime" at Kings Cross Station on 16th September following a slow speed derailment contributed to re-establishing normal rail services in the shortest possible time.[HL4605]

Lord Davies of Oldham: No "scene of crime" was declared for this incident. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) was the first organisation to attend the incident and it was decided by all the agencies involved that the HSE would have primacy in this investigation. The British Transport Police provided assistance to HSE through their crime scene investigators to preserve and examine the scene and gather evidence. This assistance was provided to facilitate the HSE operation and ensure the site was returned to Network Rail at the earliest opportunity.

Railways: Cumbria

Lord Inglewood asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether the Strategic Rail Authority's threat to reduce funding to "rural lines" will not include the Cumbrian coast line.[HL4703]

Lord Davies of Oldham: The Strategic Rail Authority's Specification of Network Outputs strategy proposes that, in order to achieve better value for money, maintenance and renewal should be commensurate with the requirements of differently used lines. The strategy views the network in terms of two high-level groups, with the first prioritised for expenditure. The two groups are: (i) primary/London and south-east commuter/main secondary; and (ii) other secondary/rural/freight only. The Cumbrian coast line is classed as an "other secondary" route. The SRA, the Rail Regulator and Network Rail will be taking forward the implementation of the strategy in the next few months.

The Strategic Rail Authority wants to improve the performance of rural lines and secure their future on a sustainable basis. The authority has recently

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appointed an executive director of community rail development to work to this end.

Lord Inglewood asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether the approximate 40 minutes extra journey time included in the recently published autumn and winter timetable for the West Coast Main Line journey from Cumbria to London is not principally intended to reduce the scale of financial liability for late arrival.[HL4704]

Lord Davies of Oldham: The increased journey time is due to engineering works to improve the West Coast Main Line between Crewe and Stafford. Passengers will benefit from these works once they are completed. Under the proposed winter 2004 timetable the Oxenholme to London journey time will be reduced to just over three hours.

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Goods Vehicles

Earl Attlee asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many foreign registered goods vehicles were stopped in the United Kingdom for vehicle checks in each of the past five years.[HL4763]

Lord Davies of Oldham:

YearRoadworthiness ChecksTraffic Enforcement Checks
2002–033,01811,421
2001–023,21313,122
2000–013,95112,204
1999–20003,68413,790
1998–993,49813,288

Earl Attlee asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many foreign registered goods vehicles stopped in the United Kingdom for vehicle checks in each of the past five years received immediate prohibitions.[HL4764]

Lord Davies of Oldham:

A. Traffic Enforcement

YearNumber Examined (inc the number weighed)Prohibited for drivers hours, tachographs & recordsProhibition rateNumber weighedProhibited for overloadingProhibition rate
2002–0311,4211,46012.8%5,54070112.6%
2001–0213,1221,61812.3%5,43069112.7%
2000–0112,2048657.1%5,4265159.5%
1999–200013,7908536.2%5,8005048.9%
1998–9913,2888416.3%4,84258912.2%


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B. Roadworthiness

YearNumber examinedImmediate prohibitions issuedProhibition rate
2002–033,01848516.1%
2001–023,21342213.1%
2000–013,9513919.9%
1999–20003,6843148.5%
1998–993,4983018.6%

Earl Attlee asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many foreign goods vehicle operators have been reported to their own licensing authorities regarding vehicle prohibitions acquired in the United Kingdom in the past five years.[HL4765]

Lord Davies of Oldham: The details of all traffic enforcement prohibitions issued to foreign vehicles/drivers are reported to the licensing authority in the operator's home member state, hence the figures are

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the same as those given in the "prohibited" columns of table A provided for the response to question HL 4764.

For roadworthiness prohibitions, there was no requirement for the UK to notify licensing authorities in other member states prior to the introduction of European Directive 2000/30/EC. Since the Vehicle Operator and Services Agency began reporting in February 2003, a total of 144 reports have been sent.

Earl Attlee asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many goods vehicle prohibitions acquired in the last convenient 12-month period were not reported to either (a) a United Kingdom vehicle operator's licensing authority; or (b) a foreign vehicle operator's licensing authority.[HL4766]

Lord Davies of Oldham: (a) Nil: details of all prohibitions issued to UK operators and/or drivers of HGVs were reported to Traffic Commissioners.

(b) Nil: details of all prohibitions issued to foreign operators and/or drivers of HGVs were reported to vehicle operator's licensing authority in the countries of origin of the offenders.



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