Previous Section Back to Table of Contents Lords Hansard Home Page


Fallen Stock Disposal

Lord Mancroft asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord Whitty): My right honourable friend the Minister of State for Rural Affairs is aware of the role played by the hunts as a casualty service for the wild red deer. The European Union's Animal By-products Regulation will ban routine on-farm burial and burning of animal carcasses from 30 April 2003. This will mean that the existing fallen stock service provided by a number of hunts could only continue with considerable investment in new equipment. So the future of the hunts' service is in doubt irrespective of the Bill. The Government have been holding discussion with the livestock and disposal industry with the aim of developing a national fallen stock scheme.

Common Fisheries Policy

Lord Swinfen asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Whitty: No member state or acceding country has opted out of the common fisheries policy.

Unlawful Deer and Hare Coursing

Lord Hardy of Wath asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Whitty: It is a matter for the chief constables to determine the policing priorities within his or her area

13 Jan 2003 : Column WA23

and to ensure the enforcement of the relevant legislation.

The Hunting Bill will have dedicated provisions in regard to unlawful hare coursing, giving the police the power of arrest, a fine of up to £5,000 and a power of confiscation of animals and equipment.

Lawful Hare Coursing

Lord Hardy of Wath asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they expect the hare population in England to rise or to fall, should current lawful coursing be banned[HL902]

Lord Whitty: The conclusion of the Report of the Committee of Inquiry into Hunting with Dogs in England and Wales (Burns Report) was that hare coursing has a relatively small direct impact on hare numbers. A ban would have little effect in practice on the hare population but would eliminate one form of cruelty (Burns paragraph 5.94).

Nuclear Power Stations

Lord Gray of Contin asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What plans they have to replace existing nuclear power stations with new nuclear power stations; and[HL850]

    What plans they have to replace the power generation provided by the existing nuclear power stations after their closure; and[HL851]

    How they propose to meet their Kyoto commitments if nuclear power stations are not replaced by new nuclear power stations.[HL852]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Trade and Industry (Lord Sainsbury of Turville): The Government are currently carrying out a review of future energy policy with a view to issuing a White Paper shortly. The review includes consideration of the future role of nuclear power.

Male Teachers

Lord Stoddart of Swindon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is the proportion of teachers in state primary and secondary schools in the United Kingdom who are men.[HL822]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Education and Skills (Baroness Ashton of Upholland): In March 2001 (the most recent date for which provisional data are available) 14 per cent of the

13 Jan 2003 : Column WA24

teachers in regular full or part-time service in maintained nursery and primary schools and 42 per cent of the teachers in regular full or part-time service in maintained secondary schools in England and Wales were male.

Some 10 to 20 per cent of part-timers are not recorded on the Teachers' Pension Scheme, from which the data are obtained.

The devolved administrations are responsible for the supply of teachers in their countries.

Language Teaching

Lord Lester of Herne Hill asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What are their priorities for the allocation of public funds to improve the teaching, learning and study of particular foreign languages, as distinct from foreign languages generally, in accordance with the National Languages Strategy, referred to in Languages for All: Languages for Life: A Strategy for England; and[HL918]

    What are their priorities for the allocation of public funds to improve the teaching, learning and study of French, German, Spanish, Russian and Chinese languages respectively in primary and secondary schools in accordance with the National Languages Strategy, referred to in Languages for All: Languages for Life: A Strategy for England.[HL919]

Baroness Ashton of Upholland: Our main priority, as set out in our strategy, is to provide high quality teaching and learning opportunities for young people regardless of the language taught. While our recently published strategy highlights the development and enhancement of joint programmes with France, Germany, Spain, Russia and China, we are also in discussion with other countries about the possibilities of similar joint programmes. Our strategy makes clear that primary schools will be expected to offer an EU language as part of the language entitlement, and to support that expectation we are funding initial teacher training primary places in French, Spanish and German.

However, we also want to promote diversification in language learning. Around 20 languages are offered by the 157 specialist language colleges currently in operation. The expansion of the specialist schools programme, with their role as hubs of excellence, will provide enhanced opportunities for primary schools to access language expertise.

Finally, new training opportunities for teaching a foreign language will be developed for people with language skills, including commuity languages, to give them additional teaching skills and recognition to work with teachers in classrooms. Our recognition system will also provide accreditation in a wide range of languages, including community languages.



   Back to Table of Contents Lords Hansard Home Page