Previous Section Back to Table of Contents Lords Hansard Home Page


The Economy: Predicted Cycle

Lord Shore of Stepney asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: The expected cyclical path for the economy was set out in Chart A3 on p.125 of the recent Pre-Budget Report, and in Box A3, p.132 of the March Budget document.

13 Dec 1999 : Column WA14

Immigration and Nationality Directorate

Lord Lester of Herne Hill asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the Written Answer by the Lord Bassam of Brighton on 30 November (WA 35), in what respects did Financial Times Management Services Ltd conclude that the Immigration and Nationality Directorate does not yet meet the Investors in People Standard.[HL194]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office (Lord Bassam of Brighton): The report from Financial Times Management Services Ltd concluded that most indicators are partially but not fully met by the Immigration and Nationality Directorate (IND) at the present time. The main areas for improvement are: the communication of clear vision and direction to

13 Dec 1999 : Column WA15

staff; clearer business objectives and strategies to achieve them, including a properly resourced training and development plan; and an evaluation system to measure the contribution of the investment in training and development to the achievement of IND objectives. Plans have been prepared to address the areas identified by the report and action is being taken.

European Committee for the Prevention of Torture: UK Visit

Lord Avebury asked Her Majesty's Government:

    On what date in 1997 the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture visited the United Kingdom; when they propose to publish the report of that visit; why it has not already been published; and when the Government's reply will be published.[HL93]

Lord Bassam of Brighton: The committee visited the United Kingdom in September 1997. We received the Committee's report in April 1998 and forwarded a response in October 1998. Publication of the report is a matter for the committee.

International Criminal Court

Lord Avebury asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether, in view of their commitment to legislation enabling the United Kingdom to ratify the statute of the International Criminal Court, they still consider that extra-territorial jurisdiction should not go beyond the limits proposed by the Home Office Steering Committee Report Review of Extra-Territorial Jurisdiction of July 1996.[HL223]

Lord Bassam of Brighton: Jurisdiction will be taken as appropriate to enable the United Kingdom to ratify the Statute of the International Criminal Court. Government policy on extra-territorial jurisdiction more generally continues to be guided by the 1996 Home Office Steering Committee Report.

Youth Offending Teams

Baroness David asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will clarify the links between youth offending teams and local authority secure units.[HL230]

Lord Bassam of Brighton: Youth offending teams are being established under the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 to work with young offenders and those at risk of offending. The teams are responsible for providing or co-ordinating the provision of a range of youth justice services. These include the placement of children and young people remanded to local

13 Dec 1999 : Column WA16

authority secure accommodation and the throughcare and post-release supervision of young offenders sentenced to custody, some of whom may serve their sentence in such accommodation. These functions will require youth offending teams to develop and maintain close links with staff working in local authority secure units.

Young Offenders

Baroness David asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What offending behaviour programmes are available to:


    (a) 12 to 14 year-olds placed in secure training centres;


    (b) 12 to 14 year-olds and 15 to 16 year-olds placed on remand in local authority secure accommodation; and


    (c) 15 to 16 year-olds and 17 year-olds placed in Prison Service establishments.[HL231]

Lord Bassam of Brighton: 12 to 14 year-olds serving a secure training order in a secure training centre receive formal education and vocational training and spend at least one hour a day following a crime avoidance programme. The programme is tailored to the individual trainee, but it also covers the risk factors associated with criminal behaviour; the consequences of offending for the trainee and their victims; and ways of avoiding a return to offending after release.

Because 12 to 16 year-olds on remand to local authority secure accommodation are not convicted offenders, they do not take part in programmes designed to address offending behaviour. However, they do take part in formal education and in programmes addressing behavioural problems, such as drug misuse and mental health problems.

As well as providing educational programmes to 15 to 17 year-olds in prison custody, the Prison Service offers specific programmes designed to address offending behaviour. A programme called "Reasoning and Rehabilitation" consists of 35 sessions and is on offer in four young offender institutions. A second programme, "Enhanced Thinking Skills", is on offer in 16 young offender institutions. There are also special programmes designed to tackle sex offending behaviour.

Baroness David asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What are the most recent statistics available for the number of 12 to 14 year-olds placed in custody:


    (a) in secure training centres;


    (b) on remand in local authority secure accommodation; and


    (c) as section 53 cases;


    and whether they can supply the available information on reoffending rates.[HL232]

13 Dec 1999 : Column WA17

Lord Bassam of Brighton: The most recent statistics for the number of 12 to 14 year-olds placed in custody are:


    (a) Secure Training Centres--95 as at 7 December 1999;


    (b) On remand in local authority secure accommodation--44 as at 31 October 1999; and


    (c) Section 53 cases--42 as at 9 December 1999.

No information is currently available on reoffending rates.

Baroness David asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether the institutions which come within the juvenile secure estate which comes into being in April 2000 will adopt the general welfare principle of the Children Act 1989.[HL234]

Lord Bassam of Brighton: The Government are planning to reflect the principles of the Children Act 1989 in the regime standards in place from April 2000 in relation to all forms of secure accommodation for children and young people on remand and under sentence.

WTO: UK Representation

Lord Shore of Stepney asked Her Majesty's Government:

    With reference to the World Trade Organisation and the opening of the Millennium Round in Seattle this week, whether the European Commissioner, Mr Lamy, or the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, speaks for the United Kingdom.[HL196]

The Minister for Science, Department of Trade and Industry (Lord Sainsbury of Turville): My right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry speaks for the United Kingdom in the formation of European Union policy, which Commissioner Lamy then represents in the World Trade Organisation.

The European Social Model

Lord Tebbit asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the statement by the Prime Minister in his speech to the Confederation of British Industry Conference on 12 November that "the special European Council in Lisbon next spring would provide a fundamental reform of the European social model so that the European Union as a whole will be able to compete and thrive in a fast-moving economy", whether they will set out the reform programme to which he referred[HL140]

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: The Portuguese announced that they will host a Special "European Council on employment, economic reform and social cohesion (towards a Europe of innovation and knowledge)" in March under their Presidency. As my right honourable friend the Secretary of State for

13 Dec 1999 : Column WA18

Trade and Industry said in his speech to the CBI on 1 November 1999, we are determined to take this opportunity to work with our European partners to reform the European social model as part of our initiatives aimed at making Europe the most competitive, socially-inclusive knowledge-based economy in the world.

WTO Meeting: Delegate Numbers

The Earl of Sandwich asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How many delegates are attending the World Trade Organisation's meeting in Seattle from (a) the United States, (b) the United Kingdom, (c) South Africa, (d) India, and (e) Bangladesh; and what is their ratio to the population of those countries.[HL137]

Lord Sainsbury of Turville:


    United States, 181 delegates: ratio of 1 delegate to 1,506,292 people;


    United Kingdom, 42 delegates: ratio of 1 delegate to 1,407,463 people;


    South Africa, 41 delegates: ratio of 1 delegate to 1,059,180 people;


    India, 41 delegates: ratio of 1 delegate to 24,390,243 people;


    Bangladesh, 21 delegates: ratio of 1 delegate to 6,053,190 people.


Next Section Back to Table of Contents Lords Hansard Home Page