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Lord Inglewood asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord McIntosh of Haringey: The information requested for 1998, the most recent year for which comparative data are currently available, is contained in the OECD publication Taxing Wages: Taxes and Wages and Salaries, Social Security Contributions for Employees and their Employers, Child Benefits, and is as follows:

Top Income Tax RateTop Income Tax Threshold (,=s)(1)Top Income Tax Threshold (Euros)(1)
Austria50%30,65550,869
Belgium55%(2)36,15359,992
Denmark28.5%(3)20,27633,646
Finland38%(4)31,01551,466
France54%26,97344,759
Germany53%36,98761,376
Greece45%15,00424,898
Ireland46%7,65212,697
Italy45.5%42,30470,200
Luxembourg46%39,43965,446
Netherlands60%28,37847,090
Portugal40%18,88531,337
Spain47.6%38,02963,105
Sweden25%(5)15,08725,035
UK40%27,10044,970

(1) Using currency exchange rates as at 28 September 2000.

(2) Belgium: Government levies a crisis surcharge of 3 per cent, plus municipalities levy a local income tax by way of a surcharge on national tax, maximum of 10 per cent (of the national tax). Average rate is around 7 per cent.

(3) Denmark: In addition, municipal income tax is levied at flat rates ranging from 24 per cent to 33 per cent. Average 31.7 per cent. This is a proviso that maximum combined rate of municipal and national rate cannot exceed 59 per cent.

(4) Finland: In addition, municipal income tax is levied at flat rates ranging from 15 per cent to 19.5 per cent.

(5) Sweden: In addition, local income tax is levied. Rates determined by municipality; average 31 per cent.




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