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South London Murders: Classification

Lord Tebbit asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Bassam of Brighton: I understand from the Commissioner that none of these incidents was classified as a racist crime.

Rural Policing

Baroness Lockwood asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Bassam of Brighton: My right honourable friend the Home Secretary is announcing today that £15 million of the £91 million for police modernisation will be used to meet the special needs of rural policing. We are discussing with the police service how this money is to be allocated to improve

15 Jun 2000 : Column WA212

performance. In particular, we shall be discussing a national standard response time for emergency calls in rural areas. Additional funding for future years will be considered as part of the Spending Review 2000 process.

Metropolitan Police: Performance Assessment

Baroness Gould of Potternewton asked Her Majesty's Government:

    When they expect the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis to publish full-year data for the performance of the Metropolitan Police in relation to its policing plan for 1999–2000.[HL2911]

Lord Bassam of Brighton: The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis included performance data for the first 11 months of the last financial year, and projected performance in its final month, in his Policing and Performance Place for 2000–01, which he published on 31 March, on the Metropolitan Police Webside http://www.met.police.uk.

The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis tells my right honourable friend, the Home Secretary, that he expects to publish a hard copy version of the Plan on 21 June. This will include full-year performance data for 1999–2000. These data confirm, I understand, the provisional out-turns included in the version of the plan published on 31 March.

I am, therefore, today placing proof copies of the plan in the Printed Paper Office, and in the Library.

Robbery

Lord Peston asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they intend to provide additional support to the Police Service for reducing robbery.[HL2912]

Lord Bassam of Brighton: I am announcing today the allocation of £20 million additional resources for tackling robbery in the five metropolitan areas in which 70 per cent of all robberies take place, and for which challenging targets have been set for the police forces concerned by their respective police authorities. The £20 million forms part of the £91 million which my right honourable friend the Chancellor of the Exechequer allocated in the Budget for additional measures to support the delivery of crime reduction.

The specific amounts being made available are:

£ million
Metropolitan Police9.1
West Midlands3.3
Greater Manchester3.2
West Yorkshire2.6
Merseyside1.8

The five forces will now be drawing up plans to achieve early reductions in robbery levels.


15 Jun 2000 : Column WA213

Airport Runways: Increased Capacity

Lord Berkeley asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will publish the terms of reference to the consultation in respect of additional airport runway capacity in the South East; and which bodies they have invited to respond.[HL2756]

The Minister of State, Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (Lord Macdonald of Tradeston): Terms of reference for the South East and East of England Regional Air Services (SERAS) study were published, after public consultation, on 9 February. Copies are available from the House Libraries.

The commissioning of the SERAS study, and the consultation on the proposed appraisal framework to be used in that study, has resulted in a wide range of organisations making representations.

We are currently in the early stages of assessing options, at both existing airports and possible new sites. We will proceed through successive sifts to narrow down options to a final shortlist, on which there will be a full public consultation before Ministers come to decisions.

Lord Berkeley asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they support British Airways' proposals for a third runway at Heathrow submitted in response to a two-year government consultation programme.[HL2757]

Lord Macdonald of Tradeston: As the then Minister for Transport announced on 11 March 1999, the South East and East of England Regional Air Services (SERAS) study will examine a wide range of options and has started from the position that nothing is ruled in and nothing is ruled out.

Options will be appraised through a process of successive sifts. A very large number of options will be considered during the sifting process, which is designed to reduce the options to a manageable number, so that those can be appraised in sufficient detail to support a meaningful public consultation at the end of the study.

Until then, it would be premature to comment on the status of any option.

Lord Berkeley asked Her Majesty's Government:

    How a consultation programme for additional runway capacity in the South East will be undertaken alongside the inquiry into Terminal 5 at Heathrow.[HL2758]

Lord Macdonald of Tradeston: It is expected that the South East and East of England Regional Air Services study will be completed by spring or summer 2001. This will be followed by a public consultation on the options arising from it.

15 Jun 2000 : Column WA214

The results will feed into an Air Transport White Paper, which will also take account of the Government's decisions in response to the Inspector's report on the Heathrow Terminal 5 inquiry.

Grammar School: Definition

Lord Patten asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is their definition of (a) a grammar school, and (b) "a pretty standard grammar school" in the phrase attributed to the Lord Privy Seal.[HL2707]

The Minister of State, Department for Education and Employment (Baroness Blackstone): The School Standards and Framework Act 1998 defines a grammar school as one whose "admission arrangements make provision for all (or substantially all) of its pupils to be selected by reference to general ability, with a view to admitting only pupils with high ability". Between the late 1940s and late 1970s schools such as that attended by the Lord Privy Seal were known as direct grant grammar schools.

GCSE Point Scores

Baroness Blatch asked Her Majesty's Government:

    In addition to the data given in the Written Answers by Lord Bach on 6 April (WA 151–152) and the Baroness Blackstone on 11 May (WA 232–233), whether they will publish data for the average GCSE point score per 15 year-old pupil for each decile of the distribution for:


    (a) all 15 year-old pupils in comprehensive schools;


    (b) all 15 year-old pupils in grammar schools; and


    (c) all 15 year-old pupils in secondary modern schools. [HL2706]

Baroness Blackstone: The average GCSE point score per 15 year-old pupil for each decile of the distribution is shown in the following table.

(a)(b)(c)
ComprehensiveSelectiveModern
Decile 13.137.42.5
Decile 215.349.413.4
Decile 323.953.620.7
Decile 430.557.026.2
Decile 536.259.931.0
Decile 641.362.835.3
Decile 746.165.839.5
Decile 851.268.843.7
Decile 957.372.748.7
Decile 1068.279.558.0

In the comprehensive sector there are about 48,000 pupils in each group quoted above compared with approximately 2,000 in the selective and modern ones.




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